Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp suffer hours-long outage in US, Europe

Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp were down Sunday. All three social media platforms, including Facebook Messenger, were not loading as of early Sunday morning. Downdetector.com, a site that monitors site outages, shows Facebook was down since 6:30 a.m. EST in much of the world, with thousands of reported outages concentrated in northeastern U.S., Europe and the Philippines. An email requesting comment about the outage was sent to Facebook and Instagram. There are more than 1.52 billion daily act


Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp were down Sunday. All three social media platforms, including Facebook Messenger, were not loading as of early Sunday morning. Downdetector.com, a site that monitors site outages, shows Facebook was down since 6:30 a.m. EST in much of the world, with thousands of reported outages concentrated in northeastern U.S., Europe and the Philippines. An email requesting comment about the outage was sent to Facebook and Instagram. There are more than 1.52 billion daily act
Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp suffer hours-long outage in US, Europe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, site, hourslong, platforms, europe, social, media, suffer, outage, whatsapp, instagram, facebook, users, outages


Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp suffer hours-long outage in US, Europe

Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp were down Sunday.

All three social media platforms, including Facebook Messenger, were not loading as of early Sunday morning.

Downdetector.com, a site that monitors site outages, shows Facebook was down since 6:30 a.m. EST in much of the world, with thousands of reported outages concentrated in northeastern U.S., Europe and the Philippines.

Facebook appeared to be back up and running for most users by 9 a.m. EST.

It was not immediately clear what caused the outage or how long the platforms would be down.

An email requesting comment about the outage was sent to Facebook and Instagram.

#FacebookDown, #instagramdown and #whatsappdown were all trending on Twitter globally.

Facebook acquired Instagram in 2012 and WhatsApp in 2014.

There are more than 1.52 billion daily active Facebook users, according to the social media network’s website.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, site, hourslong, platforms, europe, social, media, suffer, outage, whatsapp, instagram, facebook, users, outages


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London house prices suffer their biggest drop in 10 years as Brexit fears bite

House prices in London are falling at the fastest rate in a decade. According to the Nationwide House Price index, prices over the first three months of 2019 in London dropped 3.8 percent in value, compared to the same period in 2018. The average house price in London during the first quarter of 2019 was £455,594 ($593,500), according to one of Britain’s biggest mortgage lenders. The capital’s decline is the seventh consecutive quarter in which prices have fallen and Nationwide’s chief economist


House prices in London are falling at the fastest rate in a decade. According to the Nationwide House Price index, prices over the first three months of 2019 in London dropped 3.8 percent in value, compared to the same period in 2018. The average house price in London during the first quarter of 2019 was £455,594 ($593,500), according to one of Britain’s biggest mortgage lenders. The capital’s decline is the seventh consecutive quarter in which prices have fallen and Nationwide’s chief economist
London house prices suffer their biggest drop in 10 years as Brexit fears bite Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: david reid, tony baggett, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fall, fears, bite, brexit, price, rubinsohn, house, london, uk, prices, drop, rics, quarter, market, suffer, biggest


London house prices suffer their biggest drop in 10 years as Brexit fears bite

House prices in London are falling at the fastest rate in a decade.

According to the Nationwide House Price index, prices over the first three months of 2019 in London dropped 3.8 percent in value, compared to the same period in 2018. The biggest drop since 2009.

The average house price in London during the first quarter of 2019 was £455,594 ($593,500), according to one of Britain’s biggest mortgage lenders.

The capital’s decline is the seventh consecutive quarter in which prices have fallen and Nationwide’s chief economist, Robert Gardner, blamed high prices and changes to buy-to-let rules.

Gardner said in a statement Friday that housing market activity across the United Kingdom was broadly stable but new buyer enquiries were continuing to fall, hitting “their lowest level since 2008.”

England recorded its first annual price fall since 2012, with prices down 0.7 percent when compared to the first quarter of last year. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland all enjoyed price gains.

A recent survey of U.K. residential property from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) concluded that Brexit is currently the main obstacle for market activity.

More than the three quarters of estate agents that were asked, said uncertainty over how the U.K. leaves the European Union was holding back both buyers and sellers of property.

Speaking to CNBC last week, RICS Chief Economist Simon Rubinsohn said that there was evidence that if Brexit could be resolved then the market would be reasonably well set.

“That doesn’t mean that prices will spike up, but it is visible in the responses that the degree of pessimism is measured,” said Rubinsohn.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: david reid, tony baggett, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fall, fears, bite, brexit, price, rubinsohn, house, london, uk, prices, drop, rics, quarter, market, suffer, biggest


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European rather than UK stocks would suffer more in a no-deal Brexit, fund manager says

The shares of European firms outside of Britain would suffer more in the event of a poorly executed Brexit, a strategist told CNBC Tuesday. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe,” Ralph Jainz, a fund manager at Centricus Asset Management, said a negative Brexit outcome had “for sure” been underpriced by investors. “European markets are back to where they were in September and October,” he said. “We’ve seen a dramatic deterioration of the macro data since, and Europe as the (U.K.’s) largest tradi


The shares of European firms outside of Britain would suffer more in the event of a poorly executed Brexit, a strategist told CNBC Tuesday. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe,” Ralph Jainz, a fund manager at Centricus Asset Management, said a negative Brexit outcome had “for sure” been underpriced by investors. “European markets are back to where they were in September and October,” he said. “We’ve seen a dramatic deterioration of the macro data since, and Europe as the (U.K.’s) largest tradi
European rather than UK stocks would suffer more in a no-deal Brexit, fund manager says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: chloe taylor, alex kraus, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uks, underpriced, uk, sure, markets, undoubtedly, trading, stocks, europe, brexit, manager, european, nodeal, tuesdayspeaking, weve, fund, suffer


European rather than UK stocks would suffer more in a no-deal Brexit, fund manager says

The shares of European firms outside of Britain would suffer more in the event of a poorly executed Brexit, a strategist told CNBC Tuesday.

Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe,” Ralph Jainz, a fund manager at Centricus Asset Management, said a negative Brexit outcome had “for sure” been underpriced by investors.

“European markets are back to where they were in September and October,” he said. “We’ve seen a dramatic deterioration of the macro data since, and Europe as the (U.K.’s) largest trading partner will undoubtedly be negatively impacted (by a bad Brexit) — and after what has been a sensational start to the year for equity markets everywhere, for sure that risk is underpriced.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: chloe taylor, alex kraus, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uks, underpriced, uk, sure, markets, undoubtedly, trading, stocks, europe, brexit, manager, european, nodeal, tuesdayspeaking, weve, fund, suffer


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China’s industrial profits suffer first drop in 3 years

Earnings growth at China’s industrial firms in November fell for the first time in nearly three years in the face of slackening domestic and external demand, highlighting rising risks to the world’s second-largest economy. Industrial profits fell 1.8 percent in November from a year earlier to 594.8 billion yuan ($86.33 billion), the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said on its website on Thursday. For the first eleven months, profits at industrial firms rose 11.8 percent from the same period


Earnings growth at China’s industrial firms in November fell for the first time in nearly three years in the face of slackening domestic and external demand, highlighting rising risks to the world’s second-largest economy. Industrial profits fell 1.8 percent in November from a year earlier to 594.8 billion yuan ($86.33 billion), the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said on its website on Thursday. For the first eleven months, profits at industrial firms rose 11.8 percent from the same period
China’s industrial profits suffer first drop in 3 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-27  Authors: feng li, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drop, industrial, growth, chinas, yuan, profits, rising, statistics, firms, slowing, demand, suffer


China's industrial profits suffer first drop in 3 years

Earnings growth at China’s industrial firms in November fell for the first time in nearly three years in the face of slackening domestic and external demand, highlighting rising risks to the world’s second-largest economy.

The gloomy data points to a further loss of economic momentum as a trade dispute with the United States piles pressure on China’s vast manufacturing sector and as firms, bracing for a tough year ahead, shelve their investment plans, executives say.

Industrial profits fell 1.8 percent in November from a year earlier to 594.8 billion yuan ($86.33 billion), the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said on its website on Thursday. It marked the first decline since December 2015. For the first eleven months, profits at industrial firms rose 11.8 percent from the same period a year earlier to 6.1 trillion yuan, slowing from a 13.6 percent increase in January-October.

The decline in profits largely reflected slowing growth in sales and producer prices as well as rising costs, He Ping of the statistics bureau said in a statement accompanying the data. Economists expect earnings to continue to worsen next year, weighed down by smaller gains in industrial prices in the face of cooling demand, with some even warning of the risk of deflation.

In November, China’s factory price growth slowed to the weakest pace in two years as domestic demand lost further momentum.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-27  Authors: feng li, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drop, industrial, growth, chinas, yuan, profits, rising, statistics, firms, slowing, demand, suffer


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Facebook needs to show the world that it can be trusted: Professor

Facebook needs to show the world that it can be trusted: Professor10 Hours AgoArun Sundararajan of NYU Stern School of Business says companies could suffer “long-term damage” if they push back too hard against regulatory action.


Facebook needs to show the world that it can be trusted: Professor10 Hours AgoArun Sundararajan of NYU Stern School of Business says companies could suffer “long-term damage” if they push back too hard against regulatory action.
Facebook needs to show the world that it can be trusted: Professor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trusted, school, stern, facebook, sundararajan, regulatory, suffer, push, nyu, world, professor10, professor, needs


Facebook needs to show the world that it can be trusted: Professor

Facebook needs to show the world that it can be trusted: Professor

10 Hours Ago

Arun Sundararajan of NYU Stern School of Business says companies could suffer “long-term damage” if they push back too hard against regulatory action.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trusted, school, stern, facebook, sundararajan, regulatory, suffer, push, nyu, world, professor10, professor, needs


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Hedge funds suffer worst month in nearly three years in October and are now down for the year

October saw hedge funds notch their worst collective monthly performance since January 2016, according to Preqin a research firm on the industry. Hedge funds lost 2.35 percent on average in October, according to Preqin’s index, while investors withdrew $4.6 billion of hedge fund capital in the third quarter of this year. The hedge fund industry’s performance turned negative for the year in October, down 0.8 percent. “Hedge fund performance was severely impacted by the sell-off resulting from the


October saw hedge funds notch their worst collective monthly performance since January 2016, according to Preqin a research firm on the industry. Hedge funds lost 2.35 percent on average in October, according to Preqin’s index, while investors withdrew $4.6 billion of hedge fund capital in the third quarter of this year. The hedge fund industry’s performance turned negative for the year in October, down 0.8 percent. “Hedge fund performance was severely impacted by the sell-off resulting from the
Hedge funds suffer worst month in nearly three years in October and are now down for the year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-21  Authors: michael sheetz, yellow dog productions, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, withdrew, performance, nearly, fund, according, uncertainties, hedge, suffer, worst, month, worse, funds, preqins


Hedge funds suffer worst month in nearly three years in October and are now down for the year

October saw hedge funds notch their worst collective monthly performance since January 2016, according to Preqin a research firm on the industry.

Hedge funds lost 2.35 percent on average in October, according to Preqin’s index, while investors withdrew $4.6 billion of hedge fund capital in the third quarter of this year. The hedge fund industry’s performance turned negative for the year in October, down 0.8 percent.

“Hedge fund performance was severely impacted by the sell-off resulting from the escalation of trade, political and monetary policy uncertainties,” Preqin’s head of hedge funds Amy Bensted said in a statement.

Hedge funds specializing in equity strategies were the worse performing, losing 3.3 percent, according to the report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-21  Authors: michael sheetz, yellow dog productions, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, withdrew, performance, nearly, fund, according, uncertainties, hedge, suffer, worst, month, worse, funds, preqins


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Chip stocks suffer their biggest drop in nearly 10 years

It’s been a tough week for semiconductor-related stocks. Major components of the SMH have been trading firmly in a bear market amid the U.S.-China trade war, and concerns around China’s economic growth. The White House implemented 10 percent taxes on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports in September. Those tariffs are set to rise to 25 percent by January 1 and could affect products manufactured with semiconductors. The tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite fell 4.4 percent to 7,108.40— entering correctio


It’s been a tough week for semiconductor-related stocks. Major components of the SMH have been trading firmly in a bear market amid the U.S.-China trade war, and concerns around China’s economic growth. The White House implemented 10 percent taxes on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports in September. Those tariffs are set to rise to 25 percent by January 1 and could affect products manufactured with semiconductors. The tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite fell 4.4 percent to 7,108.40— entering correctio
Chip stocks suffer their biggest drop in nearly 10 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: kate rooney, michaela rehle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nearly, trade, concerns, suffer, biggest, trading, stocks, white, worst, chip, week, wednesdaythe, wars, worth, drop, fell


Chip stocks suffer their biggest drop in nearly 10 years

It’s been a tough week for semiconductor-related stocks. Shares of chipmaker Advanced Micro Devices, or AMD, fell as much as 18 percent in extended trading Wednesday after the company reported third quarter revenue that missed Wall Street estimates. Also on Wednesday, Texas Instruments tumbled after disappointing quarterly earnings and lowered outlook.

Major components of the SMH have been trading firmly in a bear market amid the U.S.-China trade war, and concerns around China’s economic growth. The White House implemented 10 percent taxes on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports in September. Those tariffs are set to rise to 25 percent by January 1 and could affect products manufactured with semiconductors.

“What concerns us is most of the companies in the index are trading at super-high valuations, you may see demand slowing, and the perception is such that with these trade and tariff wars, with everything going on in China and across the U.S., that people are concerned with how this settles out,” Matt Maley, equity strategist at Miller Tabak told CNBC’s Trading Nation Wednesday.

The tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite fell 4.4 percent to 7,108.40— entering correction territory — with its worst day since 2011 on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: kate rooney, michaela rehle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nearly, trade, concerns, suffer, biggest, trading, stocks, white, worst, chip, week, wednesdaythe, wars, worth, drop, fell


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Browder says if murder is proven, Khashoggi assassins must suffer ‘most grave’ sanctions

Bill Browder says Magnitsky Act could be used in Khashoggi case 3 Hours Ago | 03:05Anyone found responsible for the killing of missing journalist, Jamal Khashoggi, should be targeted by sanctions, investor Bill Browder told CNBC Wednesday. Browder said that according to reports he has read, Khashoggi was murdered and dismembered by up to 15 assassins sent from Saudi Arabia. He said authorities should impose “Magnitksy Act” sanctions on anyone deemed guilty of involvement in an extra-judicial kil


Bill Browder says Magnitsky Act could be used in Khashoggi case 3 Hours Ago | 03:05Anyone found responsible for the killing of missing journalist, Jamal Khashoggi, should be targeted by sanctions, investor Bill Browder told CNBC Wednesday. Browder said that according to reports he has read, Khashoggi was murdered and dismembered by up to 15 assassins sent from Saudi Arabia. He said authorities should impose “Magnitksy Act” sanctions on anyone deemed guilty of involvement in an extra-judicial kil
Browder says if murder is proven, Khashoggi assassins must suffer ‘most grave’ sanctions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-17  Authors: david reid, sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sanctions, murder, khashoggi, suffer, browder, saudi, proven, assassins, act, turkish, grave, magnitsky, journalist, investment, true


Browder says if murder is proven, Khashoggi assassins must suffer 'most grave' sanctions

Bill Browder says Magnitsky Act could be used in Khashoggi case 3 Hours Ago | 03:05

Anyone found responsible for the killing of missing journalist, Jamal Khashoggi, should be targeted by sanctions, investor Bill Browder told CNBC Wednesday.

Khashoggi, a journalist for the Washington Post and critic of Saudi Arabian leaders, has been missing since entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. Turkish officials have said they believe the journalist was murdered and his body removed. The Saudis have strongly denied the allegation.

Browder said that according to reports he has read, Khashoggi was murdered and dismembered by up to 15 assassins sent from Saudi Arabia. He said authorities should impose “Magnitksy Act” sanctions on anyone deemed guilty of involvement in an extra-judicial killing.

Browder’s lawyer, Sergei Magnitsky, died in a Russian prison in 2009 after exposing corruption in the government.

Since then, Browder has led an anti-corruption campaign against Russian officials. In 2012, U.S. Congress passed the “Magnitsky Act,” which sanctions Russians and others for alleged human rights abuses.

“If this is true, and again it hasn’t been proven yet, but if this is true it is exactly what the Magnitsky Act is for. It should be for these people and those who order, going as high as it needs to go,” he said to CNBC’s Street Signs.

The American-born Browder, author of the 2015 book “Red Notice,” worked in Russia for more than a decade — becoming the biggest foreign money manager in the country before leaving in 2005.

Now based in London, the investor told CNBC that any reluctance by authorities to properly investigate the Khashoggi case would fail to appease public outcry.

“I don’t think President Trump, the Saudi regime, or the Turkish regime control the story,” he said before adding “this is the most horrifying story I’ve ever heard and if there are not the most grave sanctions then everybody involved will lose credibility.”

The investment and financial community has expressed displeasure at the possible slaying of Khashoggi with many corporate, media, and political organizations pulling out of an October investment conference organized by Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund, the Public Investment Fund.

Browder said investors needed to go further and withdraw capital from the country but that could only happen with legal intervention.

“Investors basically are governed by greed and fear. If the penalties for doing business with bad guys are high enough, that will create the fear not to do business with them.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-17  Authors: david reid, sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sanctions, murder, khashoggi, suffer, browder, saudi, proven, assassins, act, turkish, grave, magnitsky, journalist, investment, true


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Cryptocurrencies suffer $18 billion drop in value over three days

Digital currencies are tanking — Here’s where eight experts think bitcoin and cryptocurrencies go next 3:33 PM ET Thu, 11 Oct 2018 | 05:02This was a tough week for cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin finally began to stabilize Friday, but not before the total cryptocurrency market lost $18 billion of its already waning value in the course of a few days. Ether, the second-largest cryptocurrency by market capitalization, has dropped 12 percent in a week while the third largest XRP is down 18 percent in seve


Digital currencies are tanking — Here’s where eight experts think bitcoin and cryptocurrencies go next 3:33 PM ET Thu, 11 Oct 2018 | 05:02This was a tough week for cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin finally began to stabilize Friday, but not before the total cryptocurrency market lost $18 billion of its already waning value in the course of a few days. Ether, the second-largest cryptocurrency by market capitalization, has dropped 12 percent in a week while the third largest XRP is down 18 percent in seve
Cryptocurrencies suffer $18 billion drop in value over three days Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: kate rooney, yu chun christopher wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cryptocurrencies, value, 18, market, cryptocurrency, capitalization, suffer, week, bitcoin, largest, digital, billion, drop, total, days


Cryptocurrencies suffer $18 billion drop in value over three days

Digital currencies are tanking — Here’s where eight experts think bitcoin and cryptocurrencies go next 3:33 PM ET Thu, 11 Oct 2018 | 05:02

This was a tough week for cryptocurrencies.

Bitcoin finally began to stabilize Friday, but not before the total cryptocurrency market lost $18 billion of its already waning value in the course of a few days.

The world’s largest and most widely owned digital asset began its slide Wednesday evening and fell below $6,200 for the first time in a month, according to data from CoinDesk. Bitcoin was mostly stable in the $6,200 range as of Friday afternoon but had kicked this week off well above $6,500, ending the week about 5 percent lower.

Other cryptocurrencies, known as “alt coins,” fared much worse. Ether, the second-largest cryptocurrency by market capitalization, has dropped 12 percent in a week while the third largest XRP is down 18 percent in seven days. Bitcoin Cash is down 14 percent, while EOS has fallen 10 percent, according to CoinMarketCap.com.

The total market capitalization for cryptocurrencies was $201 billion on Friday, down from $219 billion on Tuesday. The market has struggled to recover to anywhere near crypto’s $820 billion peak in January.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: kate rooney, yu chun christopher wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cryptocurrencies, value, 18, market, cryptocurrency, capitalization, suffer, week, bitcoin, largest, digital, billion, drop, total, days


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If Trump abandons globalism, American interests will suffer ‘irreparable harm’

President Donald Trump, speaking on the world’s biggest stage, this week laid for the United Nations his case for patriotism and against globalism. Thus, President Trump should have instead remade himself as a “patriotic globalist.” Yet to achieve lasting progress on any of these fronts, President Trump will need to do better at galvanizing friends and allies and navigating multilateral organizations. His UN speech betrays a misunderstanding of how U.S. international engagement since World War I


President Donald Trump, speaking on the world’s biggest stage, this week laid for the United Nations his case for patriotism and against globalism. Thus, President Trump should have instead remade himself as a “patriotic globalist.” Yet to achieve lasting progress on any of these fronts, President Trump will need to do better at galvanizing friends and allies and navigating multilateral organizations. His UN speech betrays a misunderstanding of how U.S. international engagement since World War I
If Trump abandons globalism, American interests will suffer ‘irreparable harm’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-28  Authors: fred kempe, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images, jim watson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, suffer, trump, institutions, week, globalism, president, interests, abandons, irreparable, american, international, engagement, world, war, harm


If Trump abandons globalism, American interests will suffer 'irreparable harm'

President Donald Trump, speaking on the world’s biggest stage, this week laid for the United Nations his case for patriotism and against globalism. He then doubled down on his determination to push back on China.

If he’s determined to do the first, however, he will fail at the second.

Put another way: If he wants to dramatically reduce U.S. engagement through multilateral institutions, he will lack the leverage to either counter China or shape its behavior.

Thus, President Trump should have instead remade himself as a “patriotic globalist.” After all, it was patriotism at its best that prompted U.S. decision makers after the Second World War to establish an America-led system of alliances and institutions that ended the destructive cycle of zero-sum relations in Europe and Asia.

They did so not out of abstract benevolence or Utopian naivete, but because global engagement ensured American interests. And history has proven them right. Through establishing international norms for free trade and a U.S. military presence around the world to enforce them, U.S. leaders enabled U.S. businesses to securely trade globally, thus creating unprecedented profits and jobs.

Whatever you think of Trump’s style, what appeals to his supporters is that he frequently puts his finger on real problems that other politicians have swept under rugs.

It’s true that U.S. allies haven’t paid enough for their own defense, that China engages in unfair trade and investment practices, that the Obama administration failed to address Iran’s regional misconduct and Syria’s use of chemical weapons, and that conventional approaches to North Korea did nothing to alter its nuclear weapons’ trajectory.

He gets too little credit for identifying and acting upon issues that more conventional politicians had allowed to fester. Yet to achieve lasting progress on any of these fronts, President Trump will need to do better at galvanizing friends and allies and navigating multilateral organizations.

His UN speech betrays a misunderstanding of how U.S. international engagement since World War II has served American interests. Cold War victory over Soviet-style communism and its global influence efforts, without a shot being fired by the principals, came about only due to consistent U.S. leadership of allies and friends, working through acronymic institutions such as NATO, the OSCE, the EU and the IMF.

Hardly a week passes when the U.S.-established order doesn’t face strains, many exacerbated by the Trump administration itself.

On Sunday, Macedonia will vote on whether to join NATO as its 30th member. The likely positive outcome underscores the alliance’s continued attractiveness as stability provider.

Next week will also do much to determine the shape of the British exit from the European Union, given the British Conservative Party congress starting on Sunday. The costs of a “no deal” Brexit would be huge for the British, but any form of Brexit would be a blow for U.S. interests in Europe and the strength of post-war European institutions.

Finally, it remains uncertain whether Canada will join the recent U.S.-Mexico trade agreement and thus strengthen NAFTA, or whether the trilateral trade pact will come undone and lead to even greater trade tensions with America’s nearest neighbor and ally.

These short-term developments are not disconnected strands but rather all relate to maintaining U.S. international interest though existing international institutions and agreements.

The stakes for the international system, however, are highest in the contest between the United States and China over who will have the most influence in shaping the coming century.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-28  Authors: fred kempe, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images, jim watson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, suffer, trump, institutions, week, globalism, president, interests, abandons, irreparable, american, international, engagement, world, war, harm


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