American Airlines cancels all 737 Max flights through August 19

American Airlines is extending cancellations for the Boeing 737 Max aircraft through August 19, a key summer travel period, as the jets remain grounded. The cancellations amount to about 115 flights per day, roughly 1.5% of American’s total flying per day in the summer, the airline said. Boeing has slowed production and stopped deliveries as it works on a software fix. United has canceled Max flights through June 5. As major airlines continue to extend cancellations, Boeing said Thursday that it


American Airlines is extending cancellations for the Boeing 737 Max aircraft through August 19, a key summer travel period, as the jets remain grounded. The cancellations amount to about 115 flights per day, roughly 1.5% of American’s total flying per day in the summer, the airline said. Boeing has slowed production and stopped deliveries as it works on a software fix. United has canceled Max flights through June 5. As major airlines continue to extend cancellations, Boeing said Thursday that it
American Airlines cancels all 737 Max flights through August 19 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: emma newburger, shannon stapleton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cancels, max, american, remain, boeing, 19, software, cancellations, travel, fix, summer, flights, 737, airlines


American Airlines cancels all 737 Max flights through August 19

American Airlines is extending cancellations for the Boeing 737 Max aircraft through August 19, a key summer travel period, as the jets remain grounded.

The cancellations amount to about 115 flights per day, roughly 1.5% of American’s total flying per day in the summer, the airline said. They come after the Max’s anti-stall software was implicated in an Ethiopian crash in March that killed 157 people.

It’s unclear when the Max, which has been grounded since mid-March, will return. Boeing has slowed production and stopped deliveries as it works on a software fix.

On Friday, Southwest Airlines removed the Max jet from its schedule through Aug. 5. United has canceled Max flights through June 5.

“We remain confident that the impending software updates, along with the new training elements Boeing is developing for the MAX, will lead to recertification of the aircraft soon,” American CEO Doug Parker and President Robert Isom wrote in a letter to employees Sunday.

Parker also said canceling the flights now will help the airline plan for its busiest travel season of the year.

As major airlines continue to extend cancellations, Boeing said Thursday that it’s completed 96 flights with the new Max software fix. The planemaker will likely submit the fix to Federal Aviation Administration regulators within the next couple weeks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: emma newburger, shannon stapleton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cancels, max, american, remain, boeing, 19, software, cancellations, travel, fix, summer, flights, 737, airlines


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Prepare for $80 oil this summer as ‘wounded bulls’ rise, RBC warns

International oil prices will average $75 a barrel in 2019, and consumers may find themselves contending with bouts of $80 crude this summer, RBC Capital Markets said. The global investment bank revised its oil price forecast higher Thursday, pointing to a cocktail of market conditions. The bank also boosted its outlook for U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude from $61.30 per barrel to $67 for 2019. The long-to-short ratio reached 13 times “at the peak of the oil price euphoria last fall” and aver


International oil prices will average $75 a barrel in 2019, and consumers may find themselves contending with bouts of $80 crude this summer, RBC Capital Markets said. The global investment bank revised its oil price forecast higher Thursday, pointing to a cocktail of market conditions. The bank also boosted its outlook for U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude from $61.30 per barrel to $67 for 2019. The long-to-short ratio reached 13 times “at the peak of the oil price euphoria last fall” and aver
Prepare for $80 oil this summer as ‘wounded bulls’ rise, RBC warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: tom dichristopher, juan pelegrin, moment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wti, 80, oil, times, price, prepare, crude, wounded, bank, warns, bulls, rbc, rise, prices, barrel, west, summer


Prepare for $80 oil this summer as 'wounded bulls' rise, RBC warns

International oil prices will average $75 a barrel in 2019, and consumers may find themselves contending with bouts of $80 crude this summer, RBC Capital Markets said.

The global investment bank revised its oil price forecast higher Thursday, pointing to a cocktail of market conditions. Those include steep OPEC supply cuts, robust demand, geopolitical risk and investor positioning that leaves crude futures with plenty of room to run.

RBC’s $75 call for international Brent crude is up from a previous 2019 forecast of $69.50 per barrel. The bank also boosted its outlook for U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude from $61.30 per barrel to $67 for 2019.

“We see price risk asymmetrically skewed to the upside spurred by geopolitically infused rallies that could shoot prices toward or even beyond our high-end, bull-case scenario and test the $80/bbl mark for intermittent periods this summer,” RBC strategists Michael Tran, Helima Croft and Christopher Louney said in a research note.

Brent hit $71.78 and WTI rose to $64.79 this week, the highest levels since early November.

While Brent and WTI have rallied 32% and 40.5%, respectively, this year, the oil trade is not as crowded as it was last year. There are currently about 4.5 times as many long positions in crude futures — bets that oil will rise — as there are short positions, or wagers that the commodity price will fall.

The long-to-short ratio reached 13 times “at the peak of the oil price euphoria last fall” and averaged 8.5 times in 2018, RBC notes.

“In short, there is room to run to the upside given that geopolitical hotspots are still a clear and present danger for the market, but many wounded bulls remain following the Q4’18 washout,” the analysts said, referring to the collapse in oil prices at the end of last year.

RBC expects the 14-nation OPEC producer group to extend its deal to cap output and boost oil prices, keeping the cost of crude near the $75-$80 range many nations need to balance their budgets.

The bank sees signs of strong demand in the Atlantic Basin, where bellwether barrels from the North Sea and West Africa are finding buyers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: tom dichristopher, juan pelegrin, moment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wti, 80, oil, times, price, prepare, crude, wounded, bank, warns, bulls, rbc, rise, prices, barrel, west, summer


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The semis are sending an important signal to the bond market: JP Morgan

The yield curve between the 3-month and 10-year note also inverted, a market signal often considered a recession precursor. He told CNBC’s “Futures Now” on Thursday that strength in semiconductors signaled a recovery in global manufacturing data. “Look back at summer 2016. It took until mid-year for global PMI to show signs of a pickup. Its price moves have also outperformed the market – the SOXX ETF has surged 28% in 2019, nearly double the S&P 500.


The yield curve between the 3-month and 10-year note also inverted, a market signal often considered a recession precursor. He told CNBC’s “Futures Now” on Thursday that strength in semiconductors signaled a recovery in global manufacturing data. “Look back at summer 2016. It took until mid-year for global PMI to show signs of a pickup. Its price moves have also outperformed the market – the SOXX ETF has surged 28% in 2019, nearly double the S&P 500.
The semis are sending an important signal to the bond market: JP Morgan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-06  Authors: keris lahiff, krisztian bocsi, bloomberg, getty images, michael nagle, anthony wallace, afp, brendan mcdermid, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, semis, morgan, signal, sending, yields, important, hunter, data, jp, market, global, yield, soxx, summer, bond, 2016, pmi


The semis are sending an important signal to the bond market: JP Morgan

Semis could be pointing to a spike in yields, JPMorgan technician says 2:59 PM ET Fri, 5 April 2019 | 02:28

Yields have tumbled over the past month as a dovish Federal Reserve and weak global data kept demand for bonds alive.

The 10-year yield, which moves inversely to the note’s price, ended Friday at 2.5% after hitting a low of 2.34% a week earlier. That late-March level was its lowest in 14 months. The yield curve between the 3-month and 10-year note also inverted, a market signal often considered a recession precursor.

Jason Hunter, head of global fixed income and U.S. equity technical strategy at J.P. Morgan, expects yields to make a comeback into the summer and is finding proof in an unexpected corner of the market.

He told CNBC’s “Futures Now” on Thursday that strength in semiconductors signaled a recovery in global manufacturing data. Then, when data improves, global rates will move higher.

“Semiconductors 12-month performance leads PMI and they stay very correlated, not just in this cycle but if you go back to the late 1990s. That relationship has been around for a long while,” said Hunter. “Look back at summer 2016. What you see is the semiconductors year-over-year growth bottoms out early on in the year and then PMIs bottom out a quarter later so basically lagging.”

The SOXX semiconductor ETF’s rate of change, a momentum indicator, bottomed out in February 2016. It took until mid-year for global PMI to show signs of a pickup.

This year, the SOXX ETF’s rate of change found a bottom in January before the trend turned upward. Its price moves have also outperformed the market – the SOXX ETF has surged 28% in 2019, nearly double the S&P 500.

Like in 2016, Hunter expects the global PMI data to begin to pick up steam a quarter or two after the semis show improvement and only then will some of the lagging corners of the market begin to turn higher, too.

“There’s a class of markets that doesn’t really re-price until the data validates. We’ll put global rates in there. And in equities, we focused on financials, energy and materials. Their relative performance strengths tend to track PMI and not the leading markets,” said Hunter. “We’re still bullish on the S&P, but we’d rather buy those laggard groups making the bet that we see convergence into the summer.”

On the 5-year note, Hunter anticipates its yield moving to 2.35% to 2.4% in the near term, up from 2.31% on Friday. Yields should spike to 2.6% by the middle of the year, he says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-06  Authors: keris lahiff, krisztian bocsi, bloomberg, getty images, michael nagle, anthony wallace, afp, brendan mcdermid, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, semis, morgan, signal, sending, yields, important, hunter, data, jp, market, global, yield, soxx, summer, bond, 2016, pmi


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Flights to Europe are cheaper than they’ve been in years—here’s where to go to get the best deals

Now is the time to make those daydreams of traveling to Europe a reality. That’s because flights to Europe are the cheapest they’ve been in three years, according to travel app Hopper. Prices on flights from the U.S. are currently averaging $637 roundtrip, which is down 15 percent from this time last year. Across Europe, if you travel in March, April or May, fares are 20 percent cheaper on average, compared to the summer months of June, July and August. Traveling in late spring will not only sav


Now is the time to make those daydreams of traveling to Europe a reality. That’s because flights to Europe are the cheapest they’ve been in three years, according to travel app Hopper. Prices on flights from the U.S. are currently averaging $637 roundtrip, which is down 15 percent from this time last year. Across Europe, if you travel in March, April or May, fares are 20 percent cheaper on average, compared to the summer months of June, July and August. Traveling in late spring will not only sav
Flights to Europe are cheaper than they’ve been in years—here’s where to go to get the best deals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: megan leonhardt, nick dolding, digitalvision, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spring, youll, high, theyve, deals, wide, season, flights, travel, europe, cheaper, best, yearsheres, summer, corwin


Flights to Europe are cheaper than they've been in years—here's where to go to get the best deals

Dreaming of strolling along the wide avenues in Paris or eating pastas in Rome? Now is the time to make those daydreams of traveling to Europe a reality.

That’s because flights to Europe are the cheapest they’ve been in three years, according to travel app Hopper.

Prices on flights from the U.S. are currently averaging $637 roundtrip, which is down 15 percent from this time last year. Across Europe, if you travel in March, April or May, fares are 20 percent cheaper on average, compared to the summer months of June, July and August.

Traveling in late spring will not only save you money on flights, but on lodging and other travel costs as well. In fact, May is the best time of year to go if you want to spend less on your trip than you would during the summer high season, Liana Corwin, Hopper’s consumer travel expert, tells CNBC Make It.

“Early May is still considered ‘low season’ in many destinations, which means you’ll also be able to scoop up hotel rooms and attractions at a fraction of the high season cost through most of the spring,” Corwin says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: megan leonhardt, nick dolding, digitalvision, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spring, youll, high, theyve, deals, wide, season, flights, travel, europe, cheaper, best, yearsheres, summer, corwin


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Here’s when and why daylight saving time started in the US

Benjamin Franklin first introduced the idea of daylight saving time in a 1784 essay titled “An Economical Project.” Now, according to the Department of Transportation, daylight saving time reduces crime, conserves energy and even saves lives. American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands also don’t observe daylight saving time. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, meanwhile, is introducing a bill to shift the entire country onto daylight saving time for good. Don’t miss: Here’s why daylight savi


Benjamin Franklin first introduced the idea of daylight saving time in a 1784 essay titled “An Economical Project.” Now, according to the Department of Transportation, daylight saving time reduces crime, conserves energy and even saves lives. American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands also don’t observe daylight saving time. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, meanwhile, is introducing a bill to shift the entire country onto daylight saving time for good. Don’t miss: Here’s why daylight savi
Here’s when and why daylight saving time started in the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, sleep, sunshine, started, law, idea, war, hour, heres, daylight, saving, workers


Here's when and why daylight saving time started in the US

On Sunday March 10 at 2 a.m., most Americans will set our clocks forward one hour. That means losing an hour of sleep but seeming to gain some precious sunshine.

Benjamin Franklin first introduced the idea of daylight saving time in a 1784 essay titled “An Economical Project.” But the modern concept is credited to George Hudson, an entomologist from New Zealand, who in 1895 “proposed a two-hour time shift so he’d have more after-work hours of sunshine to go bug hunting in the summer,” the National Geographic reports.

The concept resurfaced during WWI as a way to save energy. The idea was that people would spend more time outside and less time inside with the lights on at night and, therefore, conserve electricity.

“But it was only done during the summer,” Vox reports. “Otherwise, farmers would have to wake up and begin farming in the dark to be on the same schedule as everyone else.”

The law “to save daylight” was passed by Congress in 1918. After the war, however, state governments were left to decide whether they wanted to continue with the time change.

The law resurfaced during WWII but again, after the war, the time change decision was left to each state. Some states kept it and others abandoned it. Daylight saving time didn’t officially become a law until 1966, under the Uniform Time Act. Now, according to the Department of Transportation, daylight saving time reduces crime, conserves energy and even saves lives.

Still, not everyone is a fan. After all, “springing forward” and losing an hour of sleep can hurt workers’ productivity. Studies have shown that even one night of not getting proper sleep can have ripple effects: It can make you feel hungrier than usual, it puts you at greater risks for accidents while driving and at work, it can decrease your focus and it can makes you susceptible to catching a cold.

States can opt out of daylight saving time. Hawaii and most of Arizona already have. Another handful of states have considered or experimented with it. American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands also don’t observe daylight saving time.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, meanwhile, is introducing a bill to shift the entire country onto daylight saving time for good. “Studies have shown many benefits of a year-round Daylight Saving Time, which is why Florida’s legislature overwhelmingly voted to make it permanent last year,” Rubio said.

The idea of the Sunshine Protection Act has its adherents: Given that our current system of having to change clocks is “irritating” and potentially “perilous,” as one writer at Slate puts it, Florida’s version of the law is “the only good piece of legislation to emerge from Tallahassee so far this century.”

Don’t miss: Here’s why daylight saving time hurts workers’ productivity

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, sleep, sunshine, started, law, idea, war, hour, heres, daylight, saving, workers


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Boeing is said to aim to speed 737 jet production in early summer

Boeing Co is pushing to speed up assembly of its best-selling 737 jetliner in early summer, two people familiar with the plan said on Monday, as it tries to keep up with soaring global demand and its European rival. Boeing aims to begin assembling 57 single-aisle jets per month starting on June 3, up from the current rate of 52, said one of the people. The more planes Boeing makes a month, the less it usually pays suppliers for the parts. Boeing has said it would increase production later this y


Boeing Co is pushing to speed up assembly of its best-selling 737 jetliner in early summer, two people familiar with the plan said on Monday, as it tries to keep up with soaring global demand and its European rival. Boeing aims to begin assembling 57 single-aisle jets per month starting on June 3, up from the current rate of 52, said one of the people. The more planes Boeing makes a month, the less it usually pays suppliers for the parts. Boeing has said it would increase production later this y
Boeing is said to aim to speed 737 jet production in early summer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: oli scarff, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speed, higher, rate, muilenburg, jet, 737, summer, boeing, month, aim, production, early, delays, 57, planes


Boeing is said to aim to speed 737 jet production in early summer

Boeing Co is pushing to speed up assembly of its best-selling 737 jetliner in early summer, two people familiar with the plan said on Monday, as it tries to keep up with soaring global demand and its European rival.

Boeing aims to begin assembling 57 single-aisle jets per month starting on June 3, up from the current rate of 52, said one of the people.

The goal is contingent on the world’s largest planemaker overcoming persistent supplier delays on engines and other issues that have hobbled the 737 factory to varying degrees since last summer, though Boeing says it is making progress.

The extra five planes a month is key to Boeing’s effort to raise profit margins on its top-selling jetliner, the company’s largest source of profit. The more planes Boeing makes a month, the less it usually pays suppliers for the parts.

It may take some time for new jetliners, which carry a list price of $100 million, to work their way through final testing and delivery, when an airline hands over the bulk of the money for a plane it ordered.

Boeing has said it would increase production later this year but has not released specifics. A spokesman declined to provide more details.

European rival Airbus SE is on the brink of producing 60 aircraft per month of its best-selling single-aisle A320-family, a rate roughly comparable to Boeing’s given the long European summer holiday.

Last week, Boeing Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg said the company was still battling delays on engines supplied by U.S.-France venture CFM International but had moved some parts of its supply chain to the higher rate.

CFM contributed to a major bottleneck at the Seattle-area 737 factory last year.

“We’re not going to make that full transition to 57 a month until we’re very confident that we’re ready,” Muilenburg said last week.

Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc, which makes about 70 percent of the 737’s structure and was also cited by Boeing as a cause of delays last year, said on Friday it has been conducting practice runs to support the higher rate of 57 planes per month.

Boeing is also working to hit a higher rate of 14 787 Dreamliners per month in the second quarter, the company said on Wednesday, confirming an earlier Reuters report.

The 787 transition to 14 per month will be completed by the second quarter, Muilenburg said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: oli scarff, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speed, higher, rate, muilenburg, jet, 737, summer, boeing, month, aim, production, early, delays, 57, planes


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Amazon has explored getting into consumer health diagnostics — testing for disease at home

Two people say the company was in discussions this year to buy a venture-backed diagnostics start-up called Confer Health, but those talks did not result in a deal. The person said that Confer would have fit into a medical diagnostics project that was being actively explored over the summer. Within its diagnostics unit, the company was interested in fertility and geriatric tests for seniors, this person said. It could bring Amazon into competition with testing giants Quest and LabCorp, as well a


Two people say the company was in discussions this year to buy a venture-backed diagnostics start-up called Confer Health, but those talks did not result in a deal. The person said that Confer would have fit into a medical diagnostics project that was being actively explored over the summer. Within its diagnostics unit, the company was interested in fertility and geriatric tests for seniors, this person said. It could bring Amazon into competition with testing giants Quest and LabCorp, as well a
Amazon has explored getting into consumer health diagnostics — testing for disease at home Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: christina farr, eugene kim, leonard ortiz, digital first media, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consumer, diagnostics, health, testing, project, summer, tests, explored, amazon, getting, person, disease, company, talks, confer


Amazon has explored getting into consumer health diagnostics — testing for disease at home

Amazon’s secretive special projects group has considered products for consumers to conduct medical tests in the home, which could take the company into the health diagnostics space, according to a person familiar with the company’s plans.

Two people say the company was in discussions this year to buy a venture-backed diagnostics start-up called Confer Health, but those talks did not result in a deal. Via its web site, Confer develops hardware for at-home tests starting with fertility and infections like strep throat. Their tests are designed to provide clinical grade results at home without visiting the doctor’s office.

The person said that Confer would have fit into a medical diagnostics project that was being actively explored over the summer. That project was led by a team under Babak Parviz, who joined Amazon from Google in 2014 to create a special projects lab focused partly on health. Within its diagnostics unit, the company was interested in fertility and geriatric tests for seniors, this person said. A different person who met with Parviz around the same time also said that he expressed strong interest in home health testing.

It is not known whether Amazon has decided to move forward with the project. One person said that Confer deal talks fell apart in the summer, around the time that Amazon made the decision to acquire the Internet pharmacy company PillPack.

But a move into the home health-testing space would be a signal of Amazon’s ambitions to remake the entire health care supply chain. It could bring Amazon into competition with testing giants Quest and LabCorp, as well as retail health centers where the bulk of tests are performed today. If successful, it could save people trips to the doctor’s office for simple things like checking to see whether they have the flu, and reduce the spread of communicable disease.

Confer has raised just shy of $10 million in venture capital and is advised by Chamath Palihapitiya, a former Facebook executive who has been notoriously bullish on Amazon. Amazon and Palihapitiya did not return requests for comment. Confer Health declined to comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: christina farr, eugene kim, leonard ortiz, digital first media, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consumer, diagnostics, health, testing, project, summer, tests, explored, amazon, getting, person, disease, company, talks, confer


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Elon Musk says Tesla would consider buying idled GM plants

Tesla would consider buying the factories that General Motors intends to idle, CEO Elon Musk said in an interview that aired on CBS’ “60 Minutes.” But the system would have failed if I was truly erratic,” Musk said. The SEC forced Musk to step down as chairman of the board for three years. “I want to be clear: I do not respect the SEC,” Musk said. WATCH: How taxpayers have helped Elon Musk and Tesla


Tesla would consider buying the factories that General Motors intends to idle, CEO Elon Musk said in an interview that aired on CBS’ “60 Minutes.” But the system would have failed if I was truly erratic,” Musk said. The SEC forced Musk to step down as chairman of the board for three years. “I want to be clear: I do not respect the SEC,” Musk said. WATCH: How taxpayers have helped Elon Musk and Tesla
Elon Musk says Tesla would consider buying idled GM plants Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: robert ferris, bobyip
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, musk, think, assembly, consider, company, sec, shareholder, buying, elon, tesla, plants, gm, respect, idled, erratic


Elon Musk says Tesla would consider buying idled GM plants

Tesla would consider buying the factories that General Motors intends to idle, CEO Elon Musk said in an interview that aired on CBS’ “60 Minutes.”

“It’s possible that we would be interested. If they were going to sell a plant or not use it that we would take it over,” he said.

In a wide-ranging interview with Lesley Stahl, Musk made no apologies for his erratic behavior over the summer and reiterated his lack of respect for the Securities and Exchange Commission, which sued him in September for allegedly defrauding investors after tweeting that he wanted to take the company public at $420 a share and had “funding secured.” He didn’t and pulled back on those plans a few weeks later.

“Nobody’s perfect,” he said.

Musk acknowledged that he was “somewhat impulsive,” adding that he “didn’t really want to try to adhere to some CEO template.” He stoked controversy all summer with his erratic behavior, taunting the SEC, calling a diver in the Thai cave rescue a “pedo” and capping the summer by appearing to smoke pot on the Joe Rogan podcast.

“I’m just being me. I mean, I was certainly under insane stress and crazy, crazy hours. But the system would have failed if I was truly erratic,” Musk said.

The SEC forced Musk to step down as chairman of the board for three years. The company named Robyn Denholm, who was already on the board, as chairwoman.

“I want to be clear: I do not respect the SEC,” Musk said. “I do not respect them.” But he said he was adhering to the agreement because he respects the U.S. justice system.

He scoffed at the idea that Denholm was put in place to keep him in line. “Yeah. It, it’s not realistic in the sense that I am the largest shareholder in the company. And I can just call for a shareholder vote and get anything done that I want,” Musk said.

He said he does not want to return to the role of chairman. “I actually just prefer to have no titles at all.”

Tesla has struggled to ramp up production of its much hyped Model 3 midsize sedan. The company resorted to building a second assembly line inside a tent-like structure next to its main assembly plant in Fremont, California. The decision, like many Tesla has made, was ridiculed by some in the industry.

The last-minute push increased production by 50 percent, Musk told CBS.

“Those betting against the company were right by all conventional standards that we would fail,” he said, “but they just did not count on this unconventional situation of creating a second assembly in the parking lot in a tent.”

Musk said the long-awaited $35,000 version of the Model 3 will “probably” be available in five to six months. That is the price of the vehicle Tesla originally promised would be an electric sedan for the masses when it was first unveiled in March 2016. Since then, however, Tesla has only made higher-priced versions of the car.

Musk admitted he is notorious for missing deadlines.

“Well, I mean punctuality’s not my strong suit. I think, uh well, why would people think that if I’ve been late on all the other models, that’d I’d be suddenly on time with this one,” he said.

WATCH: How taxpayers have helped Elon Musk and Tesla


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: robert ferris, bobyip
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, musk, think, assembly, consider, company, sec, shareholder, buying, elon, tesla, plants, gm, respect, idled, erratic


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Pfizer to raise prices on 41 prescription drugs next year despite pressure from Trump

Pfizer will raise prices on 41 of its prescription drugs in January after initially putting off those plans this summer amid pressure from President Trump. Most of the increases will be 5 percent, though Pfizer will raise three drugs’ list prices by 3 percent and one drug’s by 9 percent. The news was first reported by the Wall Street Journal. Trump criticized Pfizer this summer when the company said it would raise prices on about 40 drugs. He tweeted that Pfizer and other drugmakers “should be a


Pfizer will raise prices on 41 of its prescription drugs in January after initially putting off those plans this summer amid pressure from President Trump. Most of the increases will be 5 percent, though Pfizer will raise three drugs’ list prices by 3 percent and one drug’s by 9 percent. The news was first reported by the Wall Street Journal. Trump criticized Pfizer this summer when the company said it would raise prices on about 40 drugs. He tweeted that Pfizer and other drugmakers “should be a
Pfizer to raise prices on 41 prescription drugs next year despite pressure from Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: angelica lavito, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drugs, despite, street, pfizer, prices, raise, prescription, pressure, 41, wall, price, summer, increases, trump, drug


Pfizer to raise prices on 41 prescription drugs next year despite pressure from Trump

Pfizer will raise prices on 41 of its prescription drugs in January after initially putting off those plans this summer amid pressure from President Trump.

The drug giant will increase the list price of about 10 percent of its drugs Jan. 15, the company announced Friday. Most of the increases will be 5 percent, though Pfizer will raise three drugs’ list prices by 3 percent and one drug’s by 9 percent.

List prices are the advertised price of a drug, not necessarily the price insurers pay after discounts, known as rebates.

The news was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

“We believe the best means to address affordability of medicines is to reduce the growing out-of-pocket costs that consumers are facing due to high deductibles and co-insurance, and ensure that patients receive the benefit of rebates at the pharmacy counter,” Pfizer’s outgoing CEO Ian Read said in a statement.

Trump criticized Pfizer this summer when the company said it would raise prices on about 40 drugs. He tweeted that Pfizer and other drugmakers “should be ashamed” for increasing drug prices.

Pfizer reversed course and said it would hold off on making these increases until the end of the year or until Trump’s blueprint to lower drug prices went into effect. On an earnings call with Wall Street analysts last month, Read said by the end of the year, the company’s strategy on price increases would be back to “business as normal.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: angelica lavito, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drugs, despite, street, pfizer, prices, raise, prescription, pressure, 41, wall, price, summer, increases, trump, drug


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Couple who quit in their 30s share the best part of early retirement

“So it’s a big shift from the normal vacation of one or two weeks for most working people.” The freedom of not working makes it easier to jump on good airline deals and keep travel costs low, Kaisorn adds. The hardest part about settling down early might be adjusting to less structure and more alone time. Overall, retiring early “was pretty great five years ago and it’s still really great now,” says Justin. Don’t miss: This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their be


“So it’s a big shift from the normal vacation of one or two weeks for most working people.” The freedom of not working makes it easier to jump on good airline deals and keep travel costs low, Kaisorn adds. The hardest part about settling down early might be adjusting to less structure and more alone time. Overall, retiring early “was pretty great five years ago and it’s still really great now,” says Justin. Don’t miss: This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their be
Couple who quit in their 30s share the best part of early retirement Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, source, mccurry family
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weeks, working, summer, justin, travel, best, couple, going, early, retirement, vacation, work, share, 30s, quit, think


Couple who quit in their 30s share the best part of early retirement

The McCurrys, who have three kids, also have more time to travel. “Every summer we take usually a month or two to go on vacation somewhere internationally, like the Bahamas, Mexico, Europe — this coming summer we’re going to Southeast Asia for eight weeks,” says Justin. “So it’s a big shift from the normal vacation of one or two weeks for most working people.”

The freedom of not working makes it easier to jump on good airline deals and keep travel costs low, Kaisorn adds.

The hardest part about settling down early might be adjusting to less structure and more alone time. “Work keeps you busy, so you’re not sitting around at home thinking, How do I fill my days?” Justin says. You may no longer have as much regular contact with your peers, and that can be an adjustment, too: “I think the social aspect is an area that people sort of overlook when they’re going into regular retirement or early retirement. How are they going to get out and meet people? How are they going to stay busy and stay active?”

Still, he and Kaisorn are very glad they made the choice they did. “In terms of the constraints on lifestyle and requirements to show up every day at 8 a.m. and do things and be on a schedule and have deadlines, I definitely don’t miss it at all,” he says.

Overall, retiring early “was pretty great five years ago and it’s still really great now,” says Justin. “We’re sitting on the couch or outside walking around or going shopping in the middle of the day on a Tuesday. I still get a smile on my face when I sit back and think, Oh, this is our hard work — we put this together and now it’s really working out for us.”

Don’t miss: This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their best lives

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, source, mccurry family
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weeks, working, summer, justin, travel, best, couple, going, early, retirement, vacation, work, share, 30s, quit, think


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