Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer as US-Iran tensions simmer — CNBC survey

U.S.-Iran tensions are an important factor for the market, but just 14% saw geopolitics as the biggest driver of oil prices. CNBC Oil SurveyU.S. oil production is expected to continue to rise, with production averaging 12.5 million barrels a day at the end of the year. Just one participant said the U.S. would produce less than 12 million barrels, while 13.5% expect the U.S. to produce 13 million barrels a day or more. Last week, the U.S. produced 12.1 million barrels a day, but production has hi


U.S.-Iran tensions are an important factor for the market, but just 14% saw geopolitics as the biggest driver of oil prices. CNBC Oil SurveyU.S. oil production is expected to continue to rise, with production averaging 12.5 million barrels a day at the end of the year. Just one participant said the U.S. would produce less than 12 million barrels, while 13.5% expect the U.S. to produce 13 million barrels a day or more. Last week, the U.S. produced 12.1 million barrels a day, but production has hi
Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer as US-Iran tensions simmer — CNBC survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: patti domm
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Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer as US-Iran tensions simmer — CNBC survey

Oil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect the U.S. to have any meaningful discussions with Iran until at least six months, and more than half see either no direct military confrontation or just minor skirmishes.

Fifty-nine per cent of the 22 respondents said they expect it could take six months or longer before the U.S. and Iran enter discussions, while 23% see negotiations starting within three to six months. President Donald Trump said earlier this week that the U.S. would be willing to negotiate with Iran, with no preconditions, just days after he called off a retaliatory strike on Iran following the downing of a U.S. military drone.

About 36% of the respondents do not expect a military confrontation between the U.S. and Iran, and 18% expect minor skirmishes on the water, but with no injuries. Another 23% expect limited missile strikes. Just 9% expect extended missile strikes or major conflicts on the water.

The participants, polled between last Friday and Wednesday, mostly see oil prices trading in the current range or higher, at the end of the summer, and 95% expect OPEC and Russia to agree to extend an agreement to cut production by 1.2 million barrels a day when they meet next week.

“U.S. shale remains the overhang. When oil barely budges when tankers are literally exploding in the Persian Gulf, then the market clearly thinks we are amply supplied,” wrote Dan Pickering of Tudor, Pickering, Holt.

U.S.-Iran tensions are an important factor for the market, but just 14% saw geopolitics as the biggest driver of oil prices. Instead demand issues were the factor for 41%, while 18% cited trade disputes, seen by many in the market as a reason for weak demand.

CNBC Oil Survey

“We believe the weak demand outlook, primarily due to escalating trade tensions, warrants continued production restraint from the Declaration of Cooperation members to keep the oil markets balanced in the second half,” wrote Amarpreet Singh, energy analyst at Barclays.

Many participants see oil trading somewhat higher or in a current range by the end of August. They expect to see a bigger rise in U.S. oil prices this summer, with 50 percent expecting West Texas Intermediate to trade at $60 to $70 per barrel at the end of August. That’s above the current price of WTI futures of just under $60. But 41% said WTI could stay in the current $50 to $60 range.

Fifty-two percent expect the international benchmark Brent crude to trade at $60 to $70 per barrel. Brent was in the middle of that range, at $65.43 per barrel, on Thursday. Another 38% see prices rising above $70 but trading below $80 per barrel by the end of August.

CNBC Oil Survey

U.S. oil production is expected to continue to rise, with production averaging 12.5 million barrels a day at the end of the year. About 37% expect the U.S. to be producing 12.3 million to 12.5 million barrels a day by the end of the year. Just one participant said the U.S. would produce less than 12 million barrels, while 13.5% expect the U.S. to produce 13 million barrels a day or more. Last week, the U.S. produced 12.1 million barrels a day, but production has hit 12.3 million barrels a day recently.

Nearly two-thirds expect Russia to comply with the joint production agreement with OPEC, and the same amount expect Russia and OPEC to move toward a more formal agreement. Another 18% believe Russia will end its agreement with OPEC within the year.

OPEC was viewed by 73% of the respondents as “very important” to oil prices, but 59% said OPEC will be less relevant in five years.

About 68% of participants expect fuel prices to rise toward the end of the year as the shipping industry transitions to a new lower-sulfur fuel.

The required transition to lower-sulfur marine fuel for the shipping industry at the start of next year is expected to drive fuel prices higher, according to 68%. About 41% expect the gains in fuel to be between 5% and 10%, but another 18% expected gains between 10% and 15%.

“The narrative in oil has changed. Last fall, all anyone wanted to talk about was the supply-side of the equation, especially as it applied to the looming reinstatement of sanctions on Iran, along with sanctions on Venezuela and civil unrest in Libya,” said Stephen Schork of the Schork Report. “Today it is all about the demand side, such as the deleterious impact on the Chinese and U.S. economies from the extant trade war and the inversion in the U.S. yield curve.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, production, summer, trade, end, simmer, oil, barrels, higher, current, day, tensions, million, usiran, prices, iran, survey, range, expect


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Goldman upgrades Procter & Gamble, predicting a ‘double-digit’ return

Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer — CNBC surveyOil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect any talks between the U.S. and Iran for at least six months, and more than a third see no military confrontation. Market Insiderread more


Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer — CNBC surveyOil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect any talks between the U.S. and Iran for at least six months, and more than a third see no military confrontation. Market Insiderread more
Goldman upgrades Procter & Gamble, predicting a ‘double-digit’ return Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: michael bloom, megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goldman, gamble, upgrades, trade, surveyoil, predicting, summer, oil, military, talks, months, surveyed, range, doubledigit, procter, return


Goldman upgrades Procter & Gamble, predicting a 'double-digit' return

Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer — CNBC survey

Oil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect any talks between the U.S. and Iran for at least six months, and more than a third see no military confrontation.

Market Insider

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: michael bloom, megan graham
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Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Apple, Nike, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs and more

Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer — CNBC surveyOil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect any talks between the U.S. and Iran for at least six months, and more than a third see no military confrontation. Market Insiderread more


Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer — CNBC surveyOil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect any talks between the U.S. and Iran for at least six months, and more than a third see no military confrontation. Market Insiderread more
Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Apple, Nike, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: jesse pound, kif leswing
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Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Apple, Nike, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs and more

Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer — CNBC survey

Oil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect any talks between the U.S. and Iran for at least six months, and more than a third see no military confrontation.

Market Insider

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: jesse pound, kif leswing
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Raymond James sees growth opportunity in Planet Fitness’ ‘judgment free’ gyms

Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer — CNBC surveyOil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect any talks between the U.S. and Iran for at least six months, and more than a third see no military confrontation. Market Insiderread more


Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer — CNBC surveyOil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect any talks between the U.S. and Iran for at least six months, and more than a third see no military confrontation. Market Insiderread more
Raymond James sees growth opportunity in Planet Fitness’ ‘judgment free’ gyms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
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Raymond James sees growth opportunity in Planet Fitness' 'judgment free' gyms

Oil to trade in current range or higher this summer — CNBC survey

Oil experts surveyed by CNBC do not expect any talks between the U.S. and Iran for at least six months, and more than a third see no military confrontation.

Market Insider

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
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The average parent expects to pay almost $1,000 for child care this summer

During the school year, parents in Bankrate’s survey say they spend about $11,619 on average for child care for each child. It’s not uncommon, she adds, for child care to be a family’s largest household expense — more than rent or a mortgage. Why child care costs so muchSpending almost $1,000 per kid seems like a lot until you realize that parents regularly underestimate the final bill. One of the biggest reasons child care is so expensive is that caring for young kids is a labor-intensive busin


During the school year, parents in Bankrate’s survey say they spend about $11,619 on average for child care for each child. It’s not uncommon, she adds, for child care to be a family’s largest household expense — more than rent or a mortgage. Why child care costs so muchSpending almost $1,000 per kid seems like a lot until you realize that parents regularly underestimate the final bill. One of the biggest reasons child care is so expensive is that caring for young kids is a labor-intensive busin
The average parent expects to pay almost $1,000 for child care this summer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: megan leonhardt
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The average parent expects to pay almost $1,000 for child care this summer

It’s going to be a long and expensive summer for working parents, as they spend the next couple of months trying to cobble together child-care options. For many that consists of stringing together a patchwork schedule of camps, babysitters, grandparent care, and family vacations thrown in for good measure. It’s not only complicated, it’s expensive. Parents say they expect to spend an average of $998 per child, according to an online poll of almost 3,900 U.S. adults with kids conducted by Bankrate.com. Nearly one in five parents say they plan on spending over $2,000 per child for summertime child-care services, and that includes summer camps, classes, as well as daily babysitters or nannies. During the school year, parents in Bankrate’s survey say they spend about $11,619 on average for child care for each child. That means, including summer expenses, families are spending just over $1,000 a month year-round on child-care services. “Child care in general is expensive, no matter what time of year it is,” Cristina Novoa, a policy analyst for Early Childhood Policy at the Center for American Progress, tells CNBC Make It. It’s not uncommon, she adds, for child care to be a family’s largest household expense — more than rent or a mortgage.

Why child care costs so much

Spending almost $1,000 per kid seems like a lot until you realize that parents regularly underestimate the final bill. The Center for American Progress, using data from the Afterschool Alliance’s America After 3PM survey, found last year that parents with two children actually ended up paying closer to $3,000 for summer programs. That’s about 20% of a typical family’s income. That’s not surprising when you break down the rates of care. The average weekly rate for day camp ranges from $199 to $800, while overnight camps will set parents back between $680 and $2,000 a week, according to the American Camp Association. And while those figures are from 2018, Novoa says there’s no real reason to believe that things will be cheaper this year. Additionally, that $3,000 budget doesn’t include the family vacation and care from grandparents that 44% of parents depend on to fill any gaps in the schedule, according to a 2018 online survey of parents conducted by the D.C.-based policy organization New America. These stopgap solutions can also fuel additional spending. One of the biggest reasons child care is so expensive is that caring for young kids is a labor-intensive business, Novoa says. One you can’t really automate. “You’ll always need an adult in the classroom who will ensure that kids are safe, healthy and happy, and who will provide the kinds of sensitive, one-on-one interactions kids need,” Novoa says. And that comes at a price. Another issue is a lack of options: 51% of Americans live in neighborhoods classified as child-care deserts by the Center for American Progress. These are areas with an insufficient supply of licensed child-care providers, according to a comprehensive study the organization undertook last year.

Where to find cheaper summer child-care options


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: megan leonhardt
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‘Dark Phoenix’ and ‘Godzilla’ box office numbers are a bad sign for summer blockbusters

It’s beginning to look like a cruel summer at the box office for blockbuster franchises. “Godzilla: King of the Monsters” was the highest-grossing movie of the weekend when it opened on May 31, but its $48 million take is subpar by summer blockbuster standards. The latest entry in the “X-Men” franchise, “Dark Phoenix,” debuted at number two with a take of $33 million, the worst box office performance in “X-Men” history. “There seems to be a bit of fatigue, especially for the ‘X-Men’ franchise,”


It’s beginning to look like a cruel summer at the box office for blockbuster franchises. “Godzilla: King of the Monsters” was the highest-grossing movie of the weekend when it opened on May 31, but its $48 million take is subpar by summer blockbuster standards. The latest entry in the “X-Men” franchise, “Dark Phoenix,” debuted at number two with a take of $33 million, the worst box office performance in “X-Men” history. “There seems to be a bit of fatigue, especially for the ‘X-Men’ franchise,”
‘Dark Phoenix’ and ‘Godzilla’ box office numbers are a bad sign for summer blockbusters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-15  Authors: daniel bukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, xmen, franchises, dark, office, million, numbers, sequels, summer, phoenix, blockbusters, box, franchise, blockbuster, bad, godzilla, weekend, sign


'Dark Phoenix' and 'Godzilla' box office numbers are a bad sign for summer blockbusters

It’s beginning to look like a cruel summer at the box office for blockbuster franchises. It started off strong with “Avengers: Endgame,” which has earned $2.7 billion worldwide, but 2019’s other would-be blockbusters have been met with a collective shrug by moviegoers.

“Godzilla: King of the Monsters” was the highest-grossing movie of the weekend when it opened on May 31, but its $48 million take is subpar by summer blockbuster standards. It dropped to fourth place the following weekend and took in only $15 million, a 68% drop from just one week earlier.

The movies that pushed it from the top spot didn’t fare any better. The latest entry in the “X-Men” franchise, “Dark Phoenix,” debuted at number two with a take of $33 million, the worst box office performance in “X-Men” history. It was denied the top spot by “The Secret Life of Pets 2,” which earned $47 million, less than half of the $104 million that the 2016 original made during its opening weekend.

“[A]s the last few weeks have shown us, the market has been saturated with franchise films as of late, and many have been under-performing,” said the revenue tracking website Box Office Mojo.

That being the case, it’s worth wondering if audiences are growing weary of cinematic universes, prequels, sequels, spinoffs and reboots in general. And if that’s the case, it could be bad news for the blockbuster sequels slated to open later this summer, such as “Toy Story 4” and “Spiderman: Far From Home.”

“There were similar problems back in summer 2016 and 2017, whereby a large amount of the sequels and franchises released those years flopped or missed expectations for opening weekend box office sales,” said Mark Pacitti, managing director and founder of the Woozle research firm in London. “Take, for example ‘Independence Day,’ ‘Ice Age,’ the ‘Huntsman’ films in 2016. In 2017, we had the same trend with ‘Pirates of the Caribbean.’ Same goes for the ‘Transformers’ franchise, which is seeing a commercial decline.”

Daniel Green, director of the Master of Entertainment Industry Management Program at Carnegie Mellon University, said that while it’s true that many moviegoers are staying away from some franchises, that’s not the primary cause of box office disappointment. Sometimes, the competition is just too hard to overcome.

“There seems to be a bit of fatigue, especially for the ‘X-Men’ franchise,” he said. “Audiences, especially fans, have already been impressed with ‘Avengers: Endgame,’ and since the reviews were not pushing people into the theater, ‘Dark Phoenix’ wasn’t imperative to see.”

Author, actor and entertainment reporter Christopher Lucas said that studio politics and advertising strategies are much more significant factors in box office performance than many may realize.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-15  Authors: daniel bukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, xmen, franchises, dark, office, million, numbers, sequels, summer, phoenix, blockbusters, box, franchise, blockbuster, bad, godzilla, weekend, sign


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Reynolds Wrap will pay someone $10,000 to eat barbecue across America this summer

One lucky person will travel across America testing barbecue this summer — and get paid $10,000 to do it. Reynolds Wrap is looking for a “chief grilling officer” to help find the best barbecue in America. Not only will the winning applicant be paid five figures, they can bring a friend, and Reynolds Wrap is also picking up the tab for the travel, accommodations and food, for an additional $10,000 value, according to the company. During the trip, the winner will share tips, grilling techniques an


One lucky person will travel across America testing barbecue this summer — and get paid $10,000 to do it. Reynolds Wrap is looking for a “chief grilling officer” to help find the best barbecue in America. Not only will the winning applicant be paid five figures, they can bring a friend, and Reynolds Wrap is also picking up the tab for the travel, accommodations and food, for an additional $10,000 value, according to the company. During the trip, the winner will share tips, grilling techniques an
Reynolds Wrap will pay someone $10,000 to eat barbecue across America this summer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: jimmy im
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winning, eat, travel, paid, america, wrap, grilling, 10000, summer, barbecue, reynolds, winner, pay


Reynolds Wrap will pay someone $10,000 to eat barbecue across America this summer

One lucky person will travel across America testing barbecue this summer — and get paid $10,000 to do it.

Reynolds Wrap is looking for a “chief grilling officer” to help find the best barbecue in America. Not only will the winning applicant be paid five figures, they can bring a friend, and Reynolds Wrap is also picking up the tab for the travel, accommodations and food, for an additional $10,000 value, according to the company.

During the trip, the winner will share tips, grilling techniques and photos on the Reynolds Kitchen website and social channels.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: jimmy im
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winning, eat, travel, paid, america, wrap, grilling, 10000, summer, barbecue, reynolds, winner, pay


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Here’s where Americans are vacationing this summer — and what they’re spending

Going on a summer vacation this year? Almost 100 million Americans, or 4 in 10 U.S. adults, will take a family trip in 2019, according to AAA. Meanwhile, financial website Bankrate.com found in a March 2019 survey of 2,577 adults that 52% are planning a summer holiday this year. For the most part, somewhere we can drive to, according to findings from both AAA and vacation rental management company Vacasa. That basically jibes with AAA findings, which indicate road trips are among Americans’ top


Going on a summer vacation this year? Almost 100 million Americans, or 4 in 10 U.S. adults, will take a family trip in 2019, according to AAA. Meanwhile, financial website Bankrate.com found in a March 2019 survey of 2,577 adults that 52% are planning a summer holiday this year. For the most part, somewhere we can drive to, according to findings from both AAA and vacation rental management company Vacasa. That basically jibes with AAA findings, which indicate road trips are among Americans’ top
Here’s where Americans are vacationing this summer — and what they’re spending Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oregon, spending, vacationing, road, vacasa, heres, summer, americans, aaa, according, age, portland, theyre, vacation


Here's where Americans are vacationing this summer -- and what they're spending

Going on a summer vacation this year? You’re in good company.

Almost 100 million Americans, or 4 in 10 U.S. adults, will take a family trip in 2019, according to AAA. That’s up slightly from last year. Meanwhile, financial website Bankrate.com found in a March 2019 survey of 2,577 adults that 52% are planning a summer holiday this year.

So just about half of us, more or less, are hitting the road — literally or figuratively — in the next three months. Where are we headed and how will we get there? For the most part, somewhere we can drive to, according to findings from both AAA and vacation rental management company Vacasa.

The recent Summer Travel Trends report from Portland, Oregon-based Vacasa found that most travelers surveyed are vacationing within the U.S., with 33% traveling cross-country, 28% exploring their own region and 22% staying within the borders of their home state. (Vacasa, which operates in 30 U.S. states and 16 countries, teamed with public relations firm Allison+Partners in April 2019 to survey 1,017 Americans over age 18.)

More from Personal Finance:

The top 10 ‘hidden gems’ for summer vacation travel

Why travelers end up blowing their vacation budgets

Travel industry extremely resilient: Expedia CEO

To that point, 64% overall will drive on their summer vacation, including 53% of Gen Z vacationers (about age 22 and younger) and 76% of people age 74 and older, Vacasa found. That basically jibes with AAA findings, which indicate road trips are among Americans’ top plans (53%) for summer getaways.

The top five routes this year for summertime road trips are, according to AAA member routing data: Las Vegas to national parks in Nevada, Arizona and Utah; the northern California and southern Oregon coasts; northern New England; North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Parkway; and the Black Hills region of South Dakota.

And 6 of the top 10 most popular destinations among Vacasa customers — Kissimmee, Florida; Miami; New Orleans; Portland, Oregon; San Diego; and Seattle — are also located in the driveable “lower 48” contiguous U.S. states. (Honolulu — a flight or two away for most — joined by Playa del Carmen, Mexico, and Milan and Rome in Italy, rounded out the list.)

Vacasa also crafted a list of 10 comparable and (often) nearby alternative “hidden gems” that may be less crowded and more affordable. Examples include Bend, Oregon, instead of Portland; Davenport, Florida, in place of Kissimmee; and Savannah, Georgia, as an alternative to New Orleans.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
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The top 10 ‘hidden gems’ for summer vacation home rentals

Noel Hendrickson | DigitalVision | Getty ImagesWhat are the top hot spots American vacationers are booking in home rentals this summer? “These hidden gems allow travelers to escape flocks of tourists, endless lines and crowded restaurants,” Vacasa says. Here’s a look at the company’s Top 10 “hidden gems,” for your vacation consideration. Davenport, Florida … instead of KissimmeeLake in Davenport, Florida. Daytona Beach, Florida … instead of MiamiDaytona Beach, Florida.


Noel Hendrickson | DigitalVision | Getty ImagesWhat are the top hot spots American vacationers are booking in home rentals this summer? “These hidden gems allow travelers to escape flocks of tourists, endless lines and crowded restaurants,” Vacasa says. Here’s a look at the company’s Top 10 “hidden gems,” for your vacation consideration. Davenport, Florida … instead of KissimmeeLake in Davenport, Florida. Daytona Beach, Florida … instead of MiamiDaytona Beach, Florida.
The top 10 ‘hidden gems’ for summer vacation home rentals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, city, hidden, travelers, vacation, gems, vacasa, getty, san, rentals, instead, beach, list, florida, summer


The top 10 'hidden gems' for summer vacation home rentals

Noel Hendrickson | DigitalVision | Getty Images

What are the top hot spots American vacationers are booking in home rentals this summer? The lists are as numerous as the destinations themselves. Vacation rental management company Vacasa has compiled its own Top 10 list by “combing through a comprehensive set of Vacasa and partner data” (including combined occupancy during June, July and August from 2017 through June 2019) to determine the most popular destinations being booked in the markets it serves. (Vacasa operates in 30 U.S. states and 16 countries in Europe, South Africa and the Americas.) The Top 10, in increasing order of popularity, are: Portland, Oregon; Kissimmee, Florida; Playa del Carmen, Mexico; New Orleans; Miami; Honolulu; Seattle; Milan, Italy; San Diego; and — topping the list — Rome, Italy. Nice list — but the Portland, Oregon-based firm has gone one better: Aware that popularity necessarily means crowds, the firm also identified nearby “undiscovered towns and smaller cities,” with a similar look and feel to the Top 10. “These hidden gems allow travelers to escape flocks of tourists, endless lines and crowded restaurants,” Vacasa says. “Plus, they can score some deals.” Here’s a look at the company’s Top 10 “hidden gems,” for your vacation consideration. Source: Vacasa

10. Bend, Oregon … instead of Portland

The Old Mill District In Bend, Oregon. Jeffrey Murray | Aurora Open | Getty Images

Citing Portland, Oregon’s famed breweries and “eco-friendly culture,” Vacasa call the Pacific Northwest city “an outdoor playground for travelers.” It may rain half the year, the firm notes, but Portland is “beautiful during the summer, making it hard to beat.” However, Bend, Oregon, just 150 miles to the southeast, is a viable — and potentially more cost-effective — alternative summer vacation destination, reports Vacasa. The company notes that, while both cities offers a similar focus on art, music and craft beer, Bend is less busy and “perhaps even more outdoorsy” than its larger sibling.

9. Davenport, Florida … instead of Kissimmee

Lake in Davenport, Florida. rustycanuck | iStock | Getty Images

Beloved by Walt Disney World-bound vacationers, family fun hub Kissimmee, Florida, comes in at No. 9, but travelers might also consider nearby Davenport. Located about 20 miles to Kissimmee’s southwest and 10 miles from Disney, the hidden gem of Davenport has “plenty of accommodation options and it’s often more affordable” than Kissimmee or Orlando, according to Vacasa.

8. Tulum, Mexico … instead of Playa del Carmen

Seaside Mayan ruins in Tulum, Mexico. Kelly Chang Travel Photography | Getty Images

Popular Mexican beach resort town Playa del Carmen is an escape from the hustle and bustle of busier Cancun to the north, but its increased popularity has travelers-in-the-know looking even farther afield. Some have discovered Tulum, just an hour from Playa del Carmen. It’s not only “much less commercialized,” according to Vacasa, but boasts “more authentic restaurants and stores,” along with a set of world-famous seaside Mayan temple ruins.

7. Savannah, Georgia … instead of New Orleans

Savannah, Georgia Daniela Duncan | Moment | Getty Images

Few U.S. cities are as unique and iconic as the Big Easy, landing it the No. 7 spot on Vacasa’s list of top summer destinations. But let’s face it: New Orleans’ myriad charms — from Mardi Gras, voodoo lore and Bourbon Street bars to air boat swamp tours, alligators and Cajun-Creole cuisine — mean big crowds and hefty tabs. Why not try just as charming but less crowded Savannah, Georgia, three states west on the Atlantic Ocean? Vacasa notes that, “like NOLA, Savannah is known for its historic district and antebellum charm.” The company suggests a sunny horse-drawn carriage ride through the city’s cobblestone streets as a must on any visit.

6. Daytona Beach, Florida … instead of Miami

Daytona Beach, Florida. Karen Hartman / EyeEm | EyeEm | Getty Images

The sunny Greater Miami area — from South Beach to Coral Gables to Little Havana — is the sixth-most-popular destination with Vacasa customers, but consider less crowded and just as lovely Daytona Beach, a four-hour drive to the north. Lively Daytona “has tons of rides, arcades, concerts and clubs,” says the home rental company.

5. Princeville, Kauai, Hawaii … instead of Honolulu

Resort in Princeville, Kauai, Hawaii. M.M. Sweet | Moment | Getty Images

No. 5 Honolulu is beloved for its “stunning beaches, volcanic Diamond Head crater and many hotels,” according to Vacasa. Not so loved: The Hawaiian capital’s high prices and crowds. Scenic Princeville and other hidden gems on Kauai may not be much cheaper, but they’re a lot less populated. Known for its “wild beauty and cliffside views overlooking the sea,” Princeville is, says Vacasa, the perfect Hawaii alternative for sun and sand seekers.

4. Boise, Idaho … instead of Seattle

Ann Morrison Park and Boise, Idaho, skyline in fall colors. Steve Bly | Photographer’s Choice | Getty Images

“Surrounded by water and lush forests,” Seattle is “perfect for outdoorsy foodies who have a passion for pop culture.” Here’s the thing: It’s not No. 4 on this list for nothing. Since the Emerald City is a must on many regular travelers’ bucket lists, it’s hard to claim bragging rights after a visit. Many have been there, done that before you. Virgin territory awaits, however, 500 miles to the southeast in Boise, Idaho. This “up and coming” Pacific Northwest city is home to “an active arts community” and boasts a “lively downtown filled with shops, restaurants and nightlife,” says Vacasa.

3. Lake Como, Italy … instead of Milan

Lake Como in northern Italy’s Lombardy region. Westend61 | Westend61 | Getty Images

Coming in at No. 3 is the Italian city of Milan. Popular with travelers thanks to its food, fashion and retail scenes, cosmopolitan Milan flaunts a New York-style vibe and pace. Looking for quieter but just as upscale escape? How about a visit to what locals in Italy’s Lombard region claim is “the most beautiful lake in the world?” Scenic Lake Como, nestled at the foot of the Alps, lies an easy day trip from the metropolitan mania back in Milan.

2. San Clemente, California … instead of San Diego

California coastal town of San Clemente, just north of San Diego County. Art Wager | E+ | Getty Images

San Diego, the No. 2 most popular destination booked by Vacasa clients, is often cited by visitors as one of the most beautiful U.S. cities they’ve visited. In addition to the seaside views, vacationers are keen on the town’s famous boardwalk, Mexican restaurants, surfing opportunities and city zoo — not to mention a lively party scene. While it may not be as busy, equally attractive if smaller San Clemente — an hour’s drive north of San Deigo — is known as the “Spanish Village by the Sea,” says Vacasa. What’s the appeal? How does “unbeatable ocean views” and sunshine “300 days out the year” sound?

1. Senigallia, Italy … instead of Rome

The Rocca Roveresca fortification in Senigallia, in Italy’s Marche region. Marco Maccarini | Photolibrary | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, city, hidden, travelers, vacation, gems, vacasa, getty, san, rentals, instead, beach, list, florida, summer


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Ex-Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz sticks with strategist Steve Schmidt despite taking summer off from politics

Howard Schultz, the billionaire former CEO of Starbucks who is considering an independent run for president, is taking the summer off from political activities and has laid off several staffers – but he is sticking with veteran strategist Steve Schmidt. “Steve has advised Howard for quite a while and will continue to do so,” said a senior Schultz aide who declined to be named. Schultz, the aide added, “is realigning his team as he moves into the next phase of an exploration.” His last public rem


Howard Schultz, the billionaire former CEO of Starbucks who is considering an independent run for president, is taking the summer off from political activities and has laid off several staffers – but he is sticking with veteran strategist Steve Schmidt. “Steve has advised Howard for quite a while and will continue to do so,” said a senior Schultz aide who declined to be named. Schultz, the aide added, “is realigning his team as he moves into the next phase of an exploration.” His last public rem
Ex-Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz sticks with strategist Steve Schmidt despite taking summer off from politics Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, average, team, schultz, howard, exstarbucks, president, democratic, politics, steve, biden, came, taking, schmidt, aide, trump, summer, sticks, strategist


Ex-Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz sticks with strategist Steve Schmidt despite taking summer off from politics

Howard Schultz, the billionaire former CEO of Starbucks who is considering an independent run for president, is taking the summer off from political activities and has laid off several staffers – but he is sticking with veteran strategist Steve Schmidt.

“Steve has advised Howard for quite a while and will continue to do so,” said a senior Schultz aide who declined to be named. Schultz, the aide added, “is realigning his team as he moves into the next phase of an exploration.”

Schmidt was a senior campaign strategist on Sen. John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign and was, until earlier this year, a frequent and vocal media critic of President Donald Trump’s.

Schultz has dramatically scaled back his political activities since he announced in January that he would consider a centrist bid for the presidency, targeting both Trump and what he has called an increasingly liberal Democratic Party.

On Wednesday, Schultz released a statement saying that he was recovering from three back surgeries. He said he would be “back in touch after Labor Day” but did not say whether his next announcement will about a potential presidential run.

Schultz’s last speaking engagement came in April in Arizona. He canceled events in Utah, San Francisco and Dallas.

While Schultz is out of the spotlight, Schmidt and his team will continue to help the former Starbucks boss “assess the landscape and the viability of running for president as an independent,” said another aide, who declined to be named.

Schmidt himself has gone dark. His last public remarks came in February, when he stormed off his own podcast after co-hosts grilled him about backing Schultz. During the interview, he said he was going to open a 501c4 dedicated to building a third party movement that would be funded by Schultz. So far, none of that has come to fruition.

Schmidt, who quit the Republican Party in 2018, has even scaled back his presence on social media, where he would routinely hammer Trump. His last tweet came Jan. 24, when he hit the House GOP for voting against a bill that barred Trump from deciding to exit the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

Schmidt did not return repeated requests for comment.

Schultz’s break comes as former Vice President Joe Biden continues to enjoy strong support in polls. Biden is considered a centrist Democrat and is perceived as a candidate who would capture the kind of moderate voters Schultz would seek.

People close to Schultz said that the strength of Biden’s appeal will be a deciding factor for whether the coffee tycoon officially launches a run for president.

Biden consistently leads the expansive Democratic field in state and national polls, According to a Real Clear Politics polling average, Biden is ahead of his 22 rivals with a 32% average. Self-described democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders is second with a 16% average.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, average, team, schultz, howard, exstarbucks, president, democratic, politics, steve, biden, came, taking, schmidt, aide, trump, summer, sticks, strategist


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