Managing China is NATO’s biggest challenge yet

China has emerged as the most formidable challenge that has ever faced NATO. That is true as well for the North American and European economies upon which NATO rests, which account for roughly half of global GDP. Most media focused on the theatrics of this week’s 70th anniversary summit of NATO’s now-29 members. The biggest news – though woefully underreported – was that NATO, history’s most enduring and successful alliance, for the first-time defined China as a strategic challenge. However, alt


China has emerged as the most formidable challenge that has ever faced NATO.
That is true as well for the North American and European economies upon which NATO rests, which account for roughly half of global GDP.
Most media focused on the theatrics of this week’s 70th anniversary summit of NATO’s now-29 members.
The biggest news – though woefully underreported – was that NATO, history’s most enduring and successful alliance, for the first-time defined China as a strategic challenge.
However, alt
Managing China is NATO’s biggest challenge yet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, biggest, european, huaweis, summit, weeks, nato, trump, chinas, managing, united, china, natos, leader


Managing China is NATO's biggest challenge yet

China has emerged as the most formidable challenge that has ever faced NATO. That is true as well for the North American and European economies upon which NATO rests, which account for roughly half of global GDP.

Most media focused on the theatrics of this week’s 70th anniversary summit of NATO’s now-29 members. The biggest news – though woefully underreported – was that NATO, history’s most enduring and successful alliance, for the first-time defined China as a strategic challenge.

That news was drowned out by French leader Emmanuel Macron, who came into town having declared NATO brain dead; by Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who responded that it instead was the French leader’s brain that was lifeless; by Canadian leader Justin Trudeau, who was caught mocking President Trump during allied cocktail hour; and by President Trump, who shrugged in response that the Canadian was two-faced.

As entertaining as all that was, more significant was that NATO allies have belatedly focused on the most significant challenge to world democracies and their market-driven economies in our new era of major power competition. However, although the closing NATO summit statement required unanimity, even more revealing is the ambiguity of its language, reflecting disagreement over whether Beijing is more of an economic opportunity than fundamental challenge.

“We recognize that China’s growing influence and international policies present both opportunities and challenges that we need to address together as an alliance,” it said.

That’s soft stuff considering that this authoritarian, state capitalist country has already become a global center of gravity – the world’s largest by population, ranking second only to the United States in military spending and, depending on what measure you like, is already or will soon be the largest economy on Earth.

The language was also muted compared to new outrage and legislative action in the United States and elsewhere regarding the reported repression of China’s Uighur Muslim minority, following weeks of Hong Kong protests and local elections supporting their cause, and in the face of continued concerns regarding Huawei’s 5G telecom dominance.

One also didn’t have to look far in the news this week to see new evidence of China’s growing partnerships with Russia, NATO’s primary focus for many years, ranging from a new 1,800 mile-long gas pipeline connecting both countries, to Huawei’s expanded relations with at least eight top Russian universities and research institutes.

Writing for Defense One, the Atlantic Council’s Barry Pavel and Ian Brzezinski have usefully called upon NATO to create a NATO-China Council that would collectively engage China on areas of concern. It would be a structural mechanism for dialogue with Russia to raise concerns, avoid misunderstandings and, where possible, foster cooperation.

The list of matters it would deal with is already a lengthy one, write the authors: Huawei’s targeting of European and North American digital infrastructure; increasing ownership of major European seaports critical to NATO; joint exercises with the Russian military, including in the Nordic-Baltic region; and cyber espionage and intellectual property theft.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, biggest, european, huaweis, summit, weeks, nato, trump, chinas, managing, united, china, natos, leader


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During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending

Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England. Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford. In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture o


Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England.
Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford.
In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture o
During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, nato, focus, public, trillion, goods, services, net, spending, european, summit, trade, needs, defense, union


During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending

Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England.

Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford.

Here is what we have now.

By the end of this year, the U.S. is expected to run a quasi-unstoppable gross public debt of $23.2 trillion, with its public sector budget deficits remaining at about 7% of the country’s economy.

On external accounts, the U.S. is showing a trade deficit on goods and services currently running at an annual rate of $529 billion, and a net foreign debt of $10.6 trillion at the end of last June.

In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture of wealth and macroeconomic stability.

At the end of this year’s second quarter, the EU’s gross public debt stood at $14 trillion, with a budget deficit of only 0.9% of the group’s GDP.

Apart from that, the EU is a large net beneficiary on international trade accounts. Its surplus on goods and services trade in the first half of this year ran at an annual rate of $194.3 billion, in large part as a result of its strong net exports to the United States.

So, there it is: A deeply indebted U.S. continues to carry most of the financial burden of a defense alliance – NATO, The North Atlantic Treaty Organization – that guarantees the security of a rich and prosperous European Union.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, nato, focus, public, trillion, goods, services, net, spending, european, summit, trade, needs, defense, union


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Trump abruptly cancels NATO press conference after summit turns sour

Hours before the press conference was set to start, video emerged of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau caught on a hot mic mocking Trump . The presser was scheduled to come after a series of bilateral meetings with NATO members, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte. “We won’t be doing a press conference at the close of NATO because we did so many over the past two days. President Donald Trump on Wednesday abruptly canceled a press conference th


Hours before the press conference was set to start, video emerged of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau caught on a hot mic mocking Trump .
The presser was scheduled to come after a series of bilateral meetings with NATO members, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte.
“We won’t be doing a press conference at the close of NATO because we did so many over the past two days.
President Donald Trump on Wednesday abruptly canceled a press conference th
Trump abruptly cancels NATO press conference after summit turns sour Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, trump, cancels, nato, president, abruptly, conference, press, minister, video, trudeau, turns, summit, sour


Trump abruptly cancels NATO press conference after summit turns sour

US President Donald Trump (L) and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (R) pose for the family photo at the NATO summit at the Grove hotel in Watford, northeast of London on December 4, 2019.

Hours before the press conference was set to start, video emerged of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau caught on a hot mic mocking Trump .

The presser was scheduled to come after a series of bilateral meetings with NATO members, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte.

“We won’t be doing a press conference at the close of NATO because we did so many over the past two days. Safe travels to all!” Trump said.

“When today’s meetings are over, I will be heading back to Washington,” Trump said in a series of tweets.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday abruptly canceled a press conference that was scheduled to cap a contentious trip to England for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s 70th anniversary meeting.

Trump offered a blunt retort when asked Wednesday about Trudeau’s comments.

“He’s two-faced,” Trump said, before adding, “I find him to be a very nice guy but the truth is I called him out on the fact that he’s not paying 2% and I guess he’s not very happy about it.” Trump has long griped about NATO members paying less than their “fair share” toward the alliance, and brought up the issue repeatedly over the two-day anniversary meeting this week.

Trudeau, speaking with French President Emmanuel Macron, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, said that Trump “was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference off the top.”

“You just watched his team’s jaws drop to the floor,” Trudeau said at another point in the video, raising his eyebrows and motioning with his hand for effect.

None of the politicians in the hot-mic video, which emerged on social media Tuesday evening, mentioned Trump by name. But Trudeau reportedly said later Wednesday that it was Trump’s surprise announcement of the location for next year’s Group of Seven summit that made “his team’s jaws drop to the floor.”

Trump revealed Tuesday that the 2020 G-7 summit will be held at Camp David in Maryland, weeks after he retreated from a plan to host it at his own Miami golf resort.

The hot-mic gossip was the latest point of tension at the meeting, but it was far from the only dispute between leaders on display.

Macron defended his recent claim that NATO was suffering from “brain death” from critics including Trump, who had called that comment “very nasty.”

The French leader also called out Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan for his threat to oppose NATO’s plan for defense of Baltic countries if it does not recognize groups the country deems as terrorists. The White House announced Wednesday morning that Trump had met with Erdogan during the NATO event.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, trump, cancels, nato, president, abruptly, conference, press, minister, video, trudeau, turns, summit, sour


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Erdogan, Trump have ‘very productive’ meeting at NATO summit: Turkish official

President Donald Trump and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan leave the stage after family photo during the annual NATO heads of government summit at the Grove Hotel in Watford, Britain December 4, 2019. Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan and U.S. President Donald Trump had a “very productive” meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit in Britain on Wednesday, Turkey’s communications director said. Fahrettin Altun made the comment on Twitter and his office said the meeting lasted half an hou


President Donald Trump and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan leave the stage after family photo during the annual NATO heads of government summit at the Grove Hotel in Watford, Britain December 4, 2019.
Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan and U.S. President Donald Trump had a “very productive” meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit in Britain on Wednesday, Turkey’s communications director said.
Fahrettin Altun made the comment on Twitter and his office said the meeting lasted half an hou
Erdogan, Trump have ‘very productive’ meeting at NATO summit: Turkish official Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turkish, trump, nato, meeting, president, britain, turkeys, tayyip, donald, summit, productive, erdogan, official


Erdogan, Trump have 'very productive' meeting at NATO summit: Turkish official

President Donald Trump and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan leave the stage after family photo during the annual NATO heads of government summit at the Grove Hotel in Watford, Britain December 4, 2019.

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan and U.S. President Donald Trump had a “very productive” meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit in Britain on Wednesday, Turkey’s communications director said.

Fahrettin Altun made the comment on Twitter and his office said the meeting lasted half an hour. NATO leaders were meeting near London at a summit aiming to tackle sharp disagreements over spending, future threats including China and Turkey’s role in the alliance.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turkish, trump, nato, meeting, president, britain, turkeys, tayyip, donald, summit, productive, erdogan, official


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Macron: ‘When we speak about NATO, it’s not just about money’

Macron: ‘When we speak about NATO, it’s not just about money’President Trump and France’s President Macron hold a press conference at the NATO summit in London.


Macron: ‘When we speak about NATO, it’s not just about money’President Trump and France’s President Macron hold a press conference at the NATO summit in London.
Macron: ‘When we speak about NATO, it’s not just about money’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, press, summit, speak, moneypresident, trump, nato, president, money, macron, hold, london


Macron: 'When we speak about NATO, it's not just about money'

Macron: ‘When we speak about NATO, it’s not just about money’

President Trump and France’s President Macron hold a press conference at the NATO summit in London.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, press, summit, speak, moneypresident, trump, nato, president, money, macron, hold, london


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Trump: NATO is becoming stronger because people are now fulfilling commitments

Trump: NATO is becoming stronger because people are now fulfilling commitmentsPresident Trump and France’s President Macron hold a press conference at the NATO summit in London.


Trump: NATO is becoming stronger because people are now fulfilling commitmentsPresident Trump and France’s President Macron hold a press conference at the NATO summit in London.
Trump: NATO is becoming stronger because people are now fulfilling commitments Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, press, summit, fulfilling, stronger, trump, nato, commitments, president, macron, hold, london


Trump: NATO is becoming stronger because people are now fulfilling commitments

Trump: NATO is becoming stronger because people are now fulfilling commitments

President Trump and France’s President Macron hold a press conference at the NATO summit in London.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, press, summit, fulfilling, stronger, trump, nato, commitments, president, macron, hold, london


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Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with

US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018. Defense spending, againSpending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading. Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again. The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S. In September


US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018.
Defense spending, againSpending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading.
Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again.
The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S.
In September
Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, russia, summit, natos, trump, issue, defense, deal, pressing, alliance, spending, nato, military


Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with

US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018. NurPhoto | NurPhoto | Getty Images

As heads of state and government meet in the U.K. this week for the 70th anniversary of the military alliance NATO, discussions are likely to focus on shifting geopolitical relations and military threats, that thorny issue of defense spending and, crucially, the alliance’s future. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said earlier this year that the summit on Dec. 3 and 4 will give members the opportunity to address “current and emerging security challenges and how NATO continues to invest and adapt to ensure it will remain a pillar of stability in the years ahead.” The summit on the outskirts of London comes at a tricky time for NATO with unsettled relationships countering older insecurities like its relations with Russia. Furthermore, the commitment of its most powerful member, the U.S., to the alliance is now more uncertain than ever. “Rarely has NATO not been under verbal siege over these past few months,” Judy Dempsey, a non-resident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe, said in an editorial piece on Tuesday last week. “The fact that that this meeting will not be called a summit shows how NATO’s seventieth birthday is not being celebrated with great fanfare but instead with a degree of self-doubt, if not anxiety.” That anxiety comes after a tough few years for the alliance, especially when it comes to the issue of who pays the most. NATO agreed at a summit in Wales in 2014 to reverse the trend of declining defense budgets and to raise them over the coming decade, a move that was designed to “further strengthen the transatlantic bond.” Then, members agreed to spend a minimum of 2% of their GDP (gross domestic product) on defense. At last year’s summit in Brussels, President Donald Trump chided other members of the group for not meeting spending targets agreed at the NATO summit in 2014. Experts note that discussions at this NATO “Leaders Meeting,” as it’s being called, will be informed as much by issues not on the formal agenda as those that are. “Member states will be keen to bring their political differences back behind closed doors, whilst emphasizing the military coherence and credibility of their alliance,” Sarah Raine, consulting senior fellow for geopolitics and strategy at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), told CNBC. “The degree to which Europe should do more not just for itself, but also by itself, remains highly contentious. Assessment of the scope of NATO’s engagement on China’s challenge, including the U.S. push to include the issue of 5G within these discussions, risk further highlighting these sensitivities,” she said.

Defense spending, again

Spending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading. NATO estimates for 2019, released in June, show that only the U.S., U.K., Greece, Estonia, Romania, Poland and Latvia have met or surpassed that target. The highest defense spend was made by the U.S., at 3.4% of its GDP, while the lowest spend was by Luxembourg which only spent 0.55%. Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again. Germany has been singled out for especially harsh treatment because of its budget surplus. The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S.

US commitment to NATO

Defense spending, or the lack thereof, has created so much ire in Trump that there are reports that he frequently discussed pulling the U.S. out of the alliance, even with Congressional support. In July, he also likened countries not meeting the defense spend target, like Germany, to delinquents. “We’re the schmucks that are paying for the whole thing,” Trump said at a rally in July. “Frankly, many countries owe us a tremendous amount of money for many years back, where they’re delinquent, as far as I’m concerned, because the United States has had to pay for them,” singling out Germany as “the number one” culprit.

Perhaps the only thing Trump has in common with his predecessor Barack Obama was their shared dismay at the perception that the U.S. bears the brunt of NATO spending. Obama called out “free riders” in NATO that benefit from U.S. military support without contributing enough to defense themselves.

Europe’s commitment to NATO

Ironically, questions over members’ commitment to NATO could come from closer to home (it’s headquartered in Brussels) with increasing talk in Europe about strengthening the EU’s cooperation and coordination on defense. French President Emmanuel Macron has caused a stir ahead of this week’s NATO meeting after he said in early November that “what we are currently experiencing is the brain death of Nato.” Speaking to The Economist magazine, Macron cited the U.S. failure to consult NATO before pulling out of Syria as a reason for his comment, and also questioned NATO’s validity. He argued that Europe should focus on its own defense alliance, although German Chancellor Angela Merkel believes the continent is too weak “for now” to defend itself. Speaking to lawmakers last week, Merkel said that “we rely on this trans-Atlantic alliance, and that is why it is right for us to work for this alliance and take on more responsibility.” IISS’s Raine told CNBC that the short-term priority for the alliance “must be to get NATO’s public messaging back on track.” “That includes the presentation of an alliance that is militarily more capable than ever before, and that is adapting to the evolving security threats its members face, not at the expense of its traditional focus but in addition to it,” she said. The NATO secretary general will be hoping for summit headlines that focus attention away from the state of NATO’s brain, Raine said, “and towards admiration for NATO’s muscles, by highlighting the range and depth of NATO’s operational commitments and capabilities.”

The ‘R’-word

NATO was set up in 1949 as a military alliance between 10 European countries, the U.S. and Canada “to promote cooperation among its members and to guard their freedom,” the alliance says, “within the context of countering the threat posed at the time by the Soviet Union.” Seventy years on, and after several decades of relatively good relations and cooperation, NATO’s relations with Russia are tense. This comes after Moscow’s 2014 annexation of Crimea and its role in a pro-Russian uprising in eastern Ukraine. NATO says that the channels of communication remain open with Russia but that “Russia’s destabilizing actions and policies go beyond Ukraine” citing its “provocative military activities near NATO’s borders stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea.” It has also cited its “irresponsible and aggressive nuclear rhetoric,” its support for the regime in Syria as well as the U.K. nerve agent attack which it said was “a clear breach of international norms.” NATO has said it supported the U.S.’ decision to withdraw from the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty in response to “Russia’s material breach.” On Russia’s part, perhaps the most controversial NATO decision has been the decision to deploy NATO missile defense systems in Romania and Poland (although completion of this Aegis Ashore — a land-based missile defense system — site is delayed to 2020). Along with the deployment of thousands of NATO troops to the Baltic nations and Poland in the last few years, these developments appear to have served only to exacerbate tensions with Russia. Russia has widely criticized the deployment of missile defense shields in its former backyard. The prospect of Ukraine and Georgia, both of which used to be part of the former USSR, joining NATO (and even potentially the European Union) is also an unsavory prospect for Moscow. In September 2019, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said that “NATO approaching our borders is a threat to Russia.” That view was echoed by Russian President Vladimir Putin this month, when he told Russia’s Security Council that he was “seriously concerned about the NATO infrastructure approaching our borders, as well as the attempts to militarize outer space.”

The future?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, russia, summit, natos, trump, issue, defense, deal, pressing, alliance, spending, nato, military


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COP25 climate summit starts as UN chief says the planet faces a ‘point of no-return’

The COP25 climate summit got underway Monday, with the UN secretary general warning that “the point of no-return is no longer over the horizon.” The summit, which will end on December 13, is taking place in Madrid, Spain. While Guterres stressed the importance of unity and collaboration, ensuring that all countries are on the same page is a huge challenge. As COP25 begins, the shadow of COP21, which took place in Paris in 2015, looms large. “Per the terms of the Agreement, the United States subm


The COP25 climate summit got underway Monday, with the UN secretary general warning that “the point of no-return is no longer over the horizon.”
The summit, which will end on December 13, is taking place in Madrid, Spain.
While Guterres stressed the importance of unity and collaboration, ensuring that all countries are on the same page is a huge challenge.
As COP25 begins, the shadow of COP21, which took place in Paris in 2015, looms large.
“Per the terms of the Agreement, the United States subm
COP25 climate summit starts as UN chief says the planet faces a ‘point of no-return’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: anmar frangoul
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COP25 climate summit starts as UN chief says the planet faces a 'point of no-return'

The COP25 climate summit got underway Monday, with the UN secretary general warning that “the point of no-return is no longer over the horizon.”

The summit, which will end on December 13, is taking place in Madrid, Spain. It was originally due to be held in Santiago, Chile, but was moved to Europe after civil unrest in the South American country.

In remarks delivered Sunday, Antonio Guterres emphasized that his message was “one of hope, not of despair” but sought to highlight the urgency of the problems faced by the planet.

“We simply have to stop digging and drilling and take advantage of the vast possibilities offered by renewable energy and nature-based solutions,” he said.

“In the crucial 12 months ahead, it is essential that we secure more ambitious national commitments — particularly from the main emitters — to immediately start reducing greenhouse gas emissions at a pace consistent to reaching carbon neutrality by 2050,” he went on to state.

While Guterres stressed the importance of unity and collaboration, ensuring that all countries are on the same page is a huge challenge.

China, for instance, is constructing more coal-fired power plants and approving new mines, according to Reuters. The country has built 42.9 gigawatts of new coal-fired power capacity since the beginning of 2018, Reuters said, compared with 35 GW in 2017.

As COP25 begins, the shadow of COP21, which took place in Paris in 2015, looms large.

As well as a commitment to make sure global warming stayed “well below” 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, world leaders at Paris also agreed to “pursue efforts” to limit the temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

The Paris Agreement suffered a setback on November 4 when the U.S. Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, officially announced in a statement that the country had started the process to withdraw.

“Per the terms of the Agreement, the United States submitted formal notification of its withdrawal to the United Nations,” he said. “The withdrawal will take effect one year from delivery of the notification.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: anmar frangoul
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Turkey’s multibillion-dollar arms deal with Russia casts a shadow over NATO summit

WASHINGTON — Clouding the NATO leaders meeting in London this week is Turkey’s decision to buy and begin testing of a Russian missile system — a move that is believed to pose a risk to the world’s strongest military alliance. Ankara faces blowback from NATO members as well as U.S. sanctions for completing its messy multibillion-dollar arms deal with the Kremlin. Yet Turkey’s government has shrugged off the potential sanctions since accepting delivery of the Russian S-400 missile system, and Pres


WASHINGTON — Clouding the NATO leaders meeting in London this week is Turkey’s decision to buy and begin testing of a Russian missile system — a move that is believed to pose a risk to the world’s strongest military alliance.
Ankara faces blowback from NATO members as well as U.S. sanctions for completing its messy multibillion-dollar arms deal with the Kremlin.
Yet Turkey’s government has shrugged off the potential sanctions since accepting delivery of the Russian S-400 missile system, and Pres
Turkey’s multibillion-dollar arms deal with Russia casts a shadow over NATO summit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, multibilliondollar, s400, russia, casts, arms, shadow, sanctions, nato, trump, turkeys, patriot, missile, system, turkey, president, deal, summit, russian


Turkey's multibillion-dollar arms deal with Russia casts a shadow over NATO summit

WASHINGTON — Clouding the NATO leaders meeting in London this week is Turkey’s decision to buy and begin testing of a Russian missile system — a move that is believed to pose a risk to the world’s strongest military alliance.

Ankara faces blowback from NATO members as well as U.S. sanctions for completing its messy multibillion-dollar arms deal with the Kremlin.

Yet Turkey’s government has shrugged off the potential sanctions since accepting delivery of the Russian S-400 missile system, and President Donald Trump himself has been sympathetic to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s decision.

Last month, the two leaders met in Washington with seemingly no breakthrough on the S-400 issue.

Earlier this year, Trump said he could not blame Turkey for buying the S-400, a move that resulted in dropping the NATO ally’s participation in the F-35 program.

“I don’t blame Turkey because there are a lot of circumstances and a lot of … problems that occurred during the Obama administration,” Trump said in July. “This dates back to the Obama administration, which was a disaster.”

Read more: Turkey proceeds with deal for Russian missile system despite US and NATO warnings

Trump then did not elaborate on whether he would impose sanctions on Turkey for doing business with the Kremlin. Under the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, or CAATSA, which the president signed in August 2017, Turkey could face economic sanctions for buying the Russian-made missile system.

“It’s a tough situation. They’re getting the S-400 and our statues and everything else — as you do that, you just can’t order this equipment,” Trump said. “And generally speaking, you can’t order equipment period.”

In efforts to deter Turkey from buying the S-400, the State Department offered in 2013 and 2017 to sell the country Raytheon’s Patriot missile system. Ankara passed on Patriot both times because the U.S. declined to provide a transfer of the system’s sensitive missile technology. Turkey can still get the Patriot, but only after meeting certain conditions.

“There is room for Turkey to come back to the table. They know that to make this work they need to either destroy, return, or somehow get rid of the S-400. At the same time, we certainly have not closed the door on their ability to acquire the Patriot battery, which does address their air defense needs,” explained a senior State Department official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

The official also said that the timeline for imposing CAATSA sanctions “is not prescribed or absolute.”

“There is still plenty of scope that could be applied as to where sanctions and the breadth and depth of sanctions could be imposed upon Turkey,” the official added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, multibilliondollar, s400, russia, casts, arms, shadow, sanctions, nato, trump, turkeys, patriot, missile, system, turkey, president, deal, summit, russian


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Levi Strauss CEO: ‘Sizes will go out the window 10 years from now’

“I personally believe that the best innovation happens when you’ve got constraints,” Levi Strauss CEO Chip Bergh said on CNBC’s “Mad Money” the night before an appearance at the CNBC Evolve summit in Los Angeles on Tuesday. “Sizes will go out the window 10 years from now,” Bergh said at CNBC Evolve. When Bergh took over Levi Strauss in 2011, one of the things he was surprised to discover was the location of its innovation center: Turkey. The CNBC Evolve Summit returns to LA on June 9, 2020. In 2


“I personally believe that the best innovation happens when you’ve got constraints,” Levi Strauss CEO Chip Bergh said on CNBC’s “Mad Money” the night before an appearance at the CNBC Evolve summit in Los Angeles on Tuesday.
“Sizes will go out the window 10 years from now,” Bergh said at CNBC Evolve.
When Bergh took over Levi Strauss in 2011, one of the things he was surprised to discover was the location of its innovation center: Turkey.
The CNBC Evolve Summit returns to LA on June 9, 2020.
In 2
Levi Strauss CEO: ‘Sizes will go out the window 10 years from now’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: eric rosenbaum
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sizes, evolve, valley, summit, strauss, levi, silicon, innovation, bergh, window, ceo, store


Levi Strauss CEO: 'Sizes will go out the window 10 years from now'

“I personally believe that the best innovation happens when you’ve got constraints,” Levi Strauss CEO Chip Bergh said on CNBC’s “Mad Money” the night before an appearance at the CNBC Evolve summit in Los Angeles on Tuesday. “Completely unconstrained, an innovation organization can just get lost in the weeds.”

One physical constraint that the CEO of the 166-year-old denim brand thinks has a major innovation in store is body size.

“Sizes will go out the window 10 years from now,” Bergh said at CNBC Evolve. “Everyone can do their own body scan on a camera.”

When Bergh took over Levi Strauss in 2011, one of the things he was surprised to discover was the location of its innovation center: Turkey.

“I used to say, ‘We’re at the northern tip of Silicon Valley. How do we attract all the Silicon Valley talent and innovation to work with Levi’s?'” Bergh told CNBC’s Jim Cramer. “They’re not going to do it if they have to go all the way to Turkey.”

The CNBC Evolve Summit returns to LA on June 9, 2020. Registration for this event is now open.

In 2013, Levi Strauss opened its Eureka Innovation Lab located near its San Francisco headquarters. Bergh sees innovation as one of the three big business shifts he brought to the company, including a move to direct e-commerce and branded store sales, as well as a renewed focus on women’s clothing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: eric rosenbaum
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sizes, evolve, valley, summit, strauss, levi, silicon, innovation, bergh, window, ceo, store


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