LGBTQ YouTubers file discrimination lawsuit, say leaders just paying ‘lip service’ to concerns

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Several LGBTQ YouTube creators are criticizing executives’ promises and apologies “lip service” in a new class action complaint. The complaint, which accuses YouTube of discrimination and fraud, includes eight plaintiffs who have their own channels about the LGBTQ community and have thousands of subscribers. CEO Susan Wojci


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Several LGBTQ YouTube creators are criticizing executives’ promises and apologies “lip service” in a new class action complaint. The complaint, which accuses YouTube of discrimination and fraud, includes eight plaintiffs who have their own channels about the LGBTQ community and have thousands of subscribers. CEO Susan Wojci
LGBTQ YouTubers file discrimination lawsuit, say leaders just paying ‘lip service’ to concerns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lgbtq, community, lawsuit, file, youtubers, paying, service, lip, wojcicki, susan, popular, crowder, company, plaintiffs, say, youtube, leaders, discrimination, 2017


LGBTQ YouTubers file discrimination lawsuit, say leaders just paying 'lip service' to concerns

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California.

Several LGBTQ YouTube creators are criticizing executives’ promises and apologies “lip service” in a new class action complaint.

“Whatever promises, apologies, and misunderstanding explanations Google/YouTube has given to the LGBTQ+, they were and continue to be ‘lip service’ as described by one LGBTQ+ YouTuber following his meeting with YouTube’s management in 2017,” the suit states. “Instead of fixing the problems, Defendants Google/YouTube have doubled down on their anti-LGBTQ+ animus and discrimination that now pervades the platform.”

The complaint, which accuses YouTube of discrimination and fraud, includes eight plaintiffs who have their own channels about the LGBTQ community and have thousands of subscribers. They are seeking unspecified restitution and damages.

YouTube did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

It’s part of an ongoing chain of criticism directed at YouTube, which most analysts believe contributes at least $15 billion a year to Google’s revenues. Over the last year, YouTube has faced backlash for its vague policies, including when it suspended the monetization of a popular conservative creator Steven Crowder hours after defending him. Crowder harassed people of minority groups including gay journalist Carlos Maza.

CEO Susan Wojcicki apologized to the LGBTQ community at a tech conference but stood by her decision to host homophobic slurs. That motivated Google and YouTube employees to organize a protest march against the company in the annual Gay Pride Parade.

In an interview last week, Wojcicki again tried assuring creators she and company leaders cared about the LGBTQ community by speaking with YouTuber Alfie Deyes who appeared skeptical of the company’s decision-making process. That same week, The Washington Post reported that the company made exceptions to its policies for popular conservative creators.

In the complaint, plaintiffs allege YouTube favors popular right-wing YouTube stars and pointed to a Brazil-based YouTube star who, like Crowder, reportedly made a profit from videos that contained homophobic slurs and conspiracy theories. The plaintiffs on the case include Chase Ross, whose videos like “How to come out” and “Trans 101” have drawn in 164,235 subscribers.

WATCH: YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki faces tough questions at Code Con


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lgbtq, community, lawsuit, file, youtubers, paying, service, lip, wojcicki, susan, popular, crowder, company, plaintiffs, say, youtube, leaders, discrimination, 2017


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YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater
YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


YouTube CEO says 'sorry,' but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California.

SCOTTSDALE, Arizona — YouTube’s chief executive apologized on Monday for the hurt she said is caused by videos with anti-gay slurs, but said the company was right to let the videos remain on its service.

CEO Susan Wojcicki, in an on-stage interview at the tech-focused Code Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, spoke publicly for the first time since YouTube last week imposed a stricter ban on hate speech, including videos that promote ideas of racial superiority.

But rather than being lauded for tackling Nazism, Wojcicki was met with a barrage of questions about videos she has decided to leave up. The questions were prompted by journalist Carlos Maza launching a campaign last month to bring attention to homophobic abuse and harassment he says he received from a conservative YouTube personality.

Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. Several activists are lobbying to ban YouTube’s parent company, Google, from the San Francisco Pride march this month over what they see as the service’s inaction.

“I know the decision we made was very hurtful to the LGBTQ community,” Wojcicki said. “That was not our intention at all. We’re really sorry about that.”

But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.”

“I do agree this was the right decision,” she said.

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Wojcicki, a high-profile Silicon Valley executive, faced a skeptical crowd at the annual conference for tech and media professionals. When Ina Fried, a journalist from Axios, suggested during a question-and-answer period that Wojcicki wasn’t actually sorry, the audience greeted the question with applause.

YouTube, like Facebook and other online services that rely on users for content, is facing growing scrutiny over material that shows violence, promotes hatred or is objectionable in other ways. The service’s rulebook bans harassment, for example, but only when it is “malicious.”

Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious material, and that the service faced a challenge in being consistent. She said the same rules needed to apply across the board, including to late-night comedy shows or rap music videos.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


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Bill Gates: A key to Warren Buffett’s success is ‘something anyone could do’

Warren Buffett is anything but average: The legendary investor has an approximate net worth of $82 billion, making him the third richest person in the world. A key to Buffett’s extraordinary success, though, is a refreshingly simple habit and “something anyone can do,” his longtime friend Bill Gates pointed out in a recent blog post: He reads every day. Buffett, who spends between five and six hours a day paging through books and newspapers, finds it “enjoyable to think about business and invest


Warren Buffett is anything but average: The legendary investor has an approximate net worth of $82 billion, making him the third richest person in the world. A key to Buffett’s extraordinary success, though, is a refreshingly simple habit and “something anyone can do,” his longtime friend Bill Gates pointed out in a recent blog post: He reads every day. Buffett, who spends between five and six hours a day paging through books and newspapers, finds it “enjoyable to think about business and invest
Bill Gates: A key to Warren Buffett’s success is ‘something anyone could do’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: kathleen elkins, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images, gp images, getty image
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buffetts, susan, loves, warren, simple, everybody, gates, buffett, business, worth, competitive, success, bill, read, key


Bill Gates: A key to Warren Buffett's success is 'something anyone could do'

Warren Buffett is anything but average: The legendary investor has an approximate net worth of $82 billion, making him the third richest person in the world. At 88, he still runs Berkshire Hathaway, his holding company that owns businesses like Geico, Dairy Queen and See’s Candies.

A key to Buffett’s extraordinary success, though, is a refreshingly simple habit and “something anyone can do,” his longtime friend Bill Gates pointed out in a recent blog post: He reads every day.

Buffett, who spends between five and six hours a day paging through books and newspapers, finds it “enjoyable to think about business and investment problems,” he says in HBO’s documentary “Becoming Warren Buffett.”

Plus, staying up to date on business news and current events is a relatively simple way to gain a competitive advantage. “Everybody can read what I read. It is a level playing field,” Buffett used to tell his late wife, Susan Buffett, according to the HBO documentary.

“And he loves that because he is competitive,” Susan said of Buffett. “He’s sitting there all by himself in his office, reading these things that everybody else can read, but he loves the idea that he is going to win.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: kathleen elkins, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images, gp images, getty image
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buffetts, susan, loves, warren, simple, everybody, gates, buffett, business, worth, competitive, success, bill, read, key


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YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks at Lesbians Who Tech conference

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki will speak at the Lesbians Who Tech conference in San Francisco on Friday around 1:45 p.m. ET, one day after her company decided to disable comments on most videos featuring minors in an effort to curb predatory behavior. The Google-owned company faced backlash from advertisers who halted spending on the platform within the past couple weeks following reports that pedophiles used coded comments to alert each other to instances of suggestive images featuring children in


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki will speak at the Lesbians Who Tech conference in San Francisco on Friday around 1:45 p.m. ET, one day after her company decided to disable comments on most videos featuring minors in an effort to curb predatory behavior. The Google-owned company faced backlash from advertisers who halted spending on the platform within the past couple weeks following reports that pedophiles used coded comments to alert each other to instances of suggestive images featuring children in
YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks at Lesbians Who Tech conference Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesbians, featuring, conference, youtube, speaks, susan, videos, weeks, used, ceo, comments, company, tech, wojcicki


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks at Lesbians Who Tech conference

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki will speak at the Lesbians Who Tech conference in San Francisco on Friday around 1:45 p.m. ET, one day after her company decided to disable comments on most videos featuring minors in an effort to curb predatory behavior.

The Google-owned company faced backlash from advertisers who halted spending on the platform within the past couple weeks following reports that pedophiles used coded comments to alert each other to instances of suggestive images featuring children in seemingly innocent videos. AT&T, Hasbro, Disney, Mattel and Nestle were among the companies that pulled their ads from the platform.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesbians, featuring, conference, youtube, speaks, susan, videos, weeks, used, ceo, comments, company, tech, wojcicki


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Susan Collins and Joe Manchin will vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to Supreme Court

Republican Sen. Susan Collins on Friday said she would vote to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, ending months of speculation from the crucial swing senator. “Mr. President, I will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh,” Collins said at the very end of a nearly 45-minute-long speech on the Senate floor. Minutes after Collins’ speech concluded, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said that he, too, would vote for Kavanaugh. Collins voted to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination in the 51-49 vote, which sa


Republican Sen. Susan Collins on Friday said she would vote to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, ending months of speculation from the crucial swing senator. “Mr. President, I will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh,” Collins said at the very end of a nearly 45-minute-long speech on the Senate floor. Minutes after Collins’ speech concluded, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said that he, too, would vote for Kavanaugh. Collins voted to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination in the 51-49 vote, which sa
Susan Collins and Joe Manchin will vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to Supreme Court Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brett, susan, collins, protesters, manchin, senate, speech, republican, supreme, voted, sen, joe, court, kavanaugh, vote, confirm


Susan Collins and Joe Manchin will vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to Supreme Court

Republican Sen. Susan Collins on Friday said she would vote to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, ending months of speculation from the crucial swing senator.

“Mr. President, I will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh,” Collins said at the very end of a nearly 45-minute-long speech on the Senate floor.

Minutes after Collins’ speech concluded, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said that he, too, would vote for Kavanaugh.

“Based on all of the information I have available to me, including the recently completed FBI report, I have found Judge Kavanaugh to be a qualified jurist who will follow the Constitution and determine cases based on the legal findings before him,” Manchin said in a statement.

“I had to deal with the facts I had in front of me,” Manchin told reporters over shouts of “Shame!” from protesters in the hallway.

Collins revealed her decision Friday afternoon, hours after a key procedural vote in the confirmation process.

Collins voted to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination in the 51-49 vote, which saw divisions largely along party lines. The only exceptions were Alaska Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski, who voted no, and Manchin, who voted yes.

“I believe he is a good man,” Murkowski said afterward. “It just may be that, in my view, he’s not the right man for the court at this time.”

Collins’ remarks on the Senate floor Friday afternoon, scheduled for 3:05 p.m. ET, were initially delayed after protesters began shouting in the Senate gallery, chanting “Vote No! Show up for Maine women!”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brett, susan, collins, protesters, manchin, senate, speech, republican, supreme, voted, sen, joe, court, kavanaugh, vote, confirm


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Susan Collins, announcing her support for Kavanaugh, suggests allegations could be a case of mistaken identity

Ford told lawmakers last month that she was “100 percent” sure that Kavanaugh was the person who assaulted her. But Collins said that the confirmation process had raised questions about Ford’s account. For instance, she said that it was still not clear who drove Ford to the party at which she claims Kavanaugh assaulted her. In announcing her support for Kavanaugh, Collins effectively ensured that he would be confirmed to the Supreme Court. The final confirmation vote is expected to come as early


Ford told lawmakers last month that she was “100 percent” sure that Kavanaugh was the person who assaulted her. But Collins said that the confirmation process had raised questions about Ford’s account. For instance, she said that it was still not clear who drove Ford to the party at which she claims Kavanaugh assaulted her. In announcing her support for Kavanaugh, Collins effectively ensured that he would be confirmed to the Supreme Court. The final confirmation vote is expected to come as early
Susan Collins, announcing her support for Kavanaugh, suggests allegations could be a case of mistaken identity Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: tucker higgins, win mcnamee, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, susan, announcing, testimony, collins, process, suggests, allegations, sexual, ford, case, mistaken, identity, support, confirmation, court, kavanaugh, vote, assaulted


Susan Collins, announcing her support for Kavanaugh, suggests allegations could be a case of mistaken identity

The lone remaining Republican swing vote in the battle over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh announced her support for the judge on Friday, saying she believed one of his accusers but that the allegations of sexual assault against him did not meet the “more-likely-than-not” threshold she required to sink his confirmation.

In doing so, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, seemed to refer to a theory first broached by a Washington Post columnist and later promoted by conservative pundits and Kavanaugh himself: Perhaps the accusations against the judge were a case of mistaken identity.

In a carefully choreographed, nearly hour-long address, Collins described the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford, who told lawmakers last month that Kavanaugh assaulted her in the early 1980s, as “sincere, painful and compelling.”

“I believe that she is a survivor of a sexual assault, and that this trauma has upended her life,” Collins said in the speech.

But Collins stopped short of saying she believed Ford’s testimony entirely. Ford told lawmakers last month that she was “100 percent” sure that Kavanaugh was the person who assaulted her.

Collins raised doubts about that part of Ford’s testimony, noting that Kavanaugh “forcefully” denied the allegation, and that a number of alleged witnesses could not corroborate that the incident occurred.

“The facts presented do not mean that professor Ford was not sexually assaulted that night or at some other time,” Collins said. “But they do lead me to conclude that the allegations fail to meet the more-likely-than-not standard.”

In his own opening statement to lawmakers last month, Kavanaugh also raised the possibility of mistaken identity. He said he was not “questioning that Dr. Ford may have been sexually assaulted by some person in some place at some time.” But, he said, he never sexually assaulted anybody.

Lawmakers have been caught in the midst of the #MeToo movement, which has spread a spotlight on sexual abuse. The movement has also led to tension in cases where the evidence is uncertain, as Americans weigh the movement’s emphasis on believing those who say they are victims of sexual abuse against the rights of the accused to a presumption of innocence.

Collins noted that the Senate confirmation process was not a criminal trial but said that “certain fundamental legal principles about due process, the presumption of innocence and fairness do bear on my thinking.”

While she blasted the confirmation process as a “caricature of a gutter-level political campaign,” she said that if any good had come out of the process it is that more attention would be paid to the problem of sexual violence.

“Every person, man or woman, who makes a charge of sexual assault deserves to be heard and treated with respect,” Collins said. “The #MeToo movement is real. It matters. It is needed and long overdue.”

But Collins said that the confirmation process had raised questions about Ford’s account. For instance, she said that it was still not clear who drove Ford to the party at which she claims Kavanaugh assaulted her. She also said it was odd that none of her friends called her the next day.

“Even though she left that small gathering of six or so people abruptly, and without saying goodbye, and distraught, none of them called her the next day or ever to ask why she left, is she okay,” Collins said. “Not even her closest friend, Ms. Keyser.”

In announcing her support for Kavanaugh, Collins effectively ensured that he would be confirmed to the Supreme Court. The final confirmation vote is expected to come as early as Saturday.

Trump appointed Kavanaugh to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy in July. Kennedy had long served as the court’s swing vote, particularly in civil rights cases. Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the court would solidify a conservative majority on the court for the foreseeable future.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: tucker higgins, win mcnamee, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, susan, announcing, testimony, collins, process, suggests, allegations, sexual, ford, case, mistaken, identity, support, confirmation, court, kavanaugh, vote, assaulted


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Sen. Susan Collins: If SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh lied, ‘that would be disqualifying’

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, told reporters on Monday that if Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh lied in denying that he sexually assaulted a woman at a high school party in the early 1980s that it would “obviously” disqualify him from a seat on the nation’s highest court. “Obviously if Judge Kavanaugh has lied about what happened that would be disqualifying,” Collins said during a brief gaggle with the press outside her office. Kavanaugh gave the same account to Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, a H


Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, told reporters on Monday that if Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh lied in denying that he sexually assaulted a woman at a high school party in the early 1980s that it would “obviously” disqualify him from a seat on the nation’s highest court. “Obviously if Judge Kavanaugh has lied about what happened that would be disqualifying,” Collins said during a brief gaggle with the press outside her office. Kavanaugh gave the same account to Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, a H
Sen. Susan Collins: If SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh lied, ‘that would be disqualifying’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: tucker higgins, joshua roberts, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, collins, disqualifying, party, committee, senate, scotus, brett, lied, told, kavanaugh, nominee, susan, ford, vote, democrats, sen


Sen. Susan Collins: If SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh lied, 'that would be disqualifying'

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, told reporters on Monday that if Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh lied in denying that he sexually assaulted a woman at a high school party in the early 1980s that it would “obviously” disqualify him from a seat on the nation’s highest court.

“Obviously if Judge Kavanaugh has lied about what happened that would be disqualifying,” Collins said during a brief gaggle with the press outside her office.

Kavanaugh has vigorously denied that the alleged incident ever took place, and a White House official told NBC News Monday that Kavanaugh has said that he was not at the party. Kavanaugh gave the same account to Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, a Hatch aide told NBC News.

Collins also continued to demand a hearing on the issue with Kavanaugh and his accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, a position which seemingly puts her at odds with GOP leadership. Collins’ first demanded a hearing, with both parties under oath, in a tweet earlier Monday.

Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, has proposed holding phone calls with Kavanaugh and Ford, a plan which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., endorsed Monday from the Senate floor.

Collins said Monday that she assumed staff interviews “would be the prelude to some sort of hearing.”

She said that during a phone call with Kavanaugh Friday, after the contours of the accusation against him were public but before Ford came forward by name, the nominee told her “that he had never acted that way not only with this unnamed accuser but with any woman.”

“He emphatically denied that the allegations were true,” Collins said.

Collins has criticized Democrats for their handling of the allegation. In an interview with The New York Times on Sunday, Collins said that if Democrats believed Ford, “why didn’t they surface this information earlier so that he could be questioned about it? And if they didn’t believe her and chose to withhold the information, why did they decide at the 11th hour to release it?”

“It is really not fair to either of them the way it is was handled,” she said in the interview.

The Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination on Thursday, though all ten Democrats on the committee and a number of prominent Republicans have argued for the vote to be delayed pending further investigation. Counsel to Republican members of the committee are scheduled to hold a conference call with Kavanaugh Monday evening, a White House source told NBC News. Democrats have said they will not join the call.

Democrats have targeted Collins, as well as her Senate colleague Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, as Republicans who may break with their party to vote against Trump’s nominee. Trump nominated Kavanaugh in July to replace former Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kavanaugh appeared on track to easily secure a confirmation vote until Ford came forward this weekend with her accusation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: tucker higgins, joshua roberts, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, collins, disqualifying, party, committee, senate, scotus, brett, lied, told, kavanaugh, nominee, susan, ford, vote, democrats, sen


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For about $20 million, you could be Warren Buffett’s landlord

For an asking price of $20 million, someone could become Warren Buffett’s landlord. The 15-story Kiewit Plaza in Omaha, Nebraska, recently went up for sale, and that could be the going price, according to Omaha.com. The 176,000-square-foot office tower is home to Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway as well as Kiewit, a construction and mining company that built the structure in 1961. Berkshire takes up a floor of the building. It was previously reported that daughter Susan Buffett’s Sherwood Foundation


For an asking price of $20 million, someone could become Warren Buffett’s landlord. The 15-story Kiewit Plaza in Omaha, Nebraska, recently went up for sale, and that could be the going price, according to Omaha.com. The 176,000-square-foot office tower is home to Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway as well as Kiewit, a construction and mining company that built the structure in 1961. Berkshire takes up a floor of the building. It was previously reported that daughter Susan Buffett’s Sherwood Foundation
For about $20 million, you could be Warren Buffett’s landlord Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: liz moyer, david a grogan, michelle bishop, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, went, susan, berkshire, million, building, landlord, tower, kiewit, warren, takes, buffetts, 20, price


For about $20 million, you could be Warren Buffett's landlord

For an asking price of $20 million, someone could become Warren Buffett’s landlord.

The 15-story Kiewit Plaza in Omaha, Nebraska, recently went up for sale, and that could be the going price, according to Omaha.com. The 176,000-square-foot office tower is home to Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway as well as Kiewit, a construction and mining company that built the structure in 1961. Berkshire takes up a floor of the building. It was previously reported that daughter Susan Buffett’s Sherwood Foundation was moving out of the building to locate elsewhere.

Kiewit, which has 20,000 employees, is building a new headquarters in another part of the city and will move out in 2021, the report said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: liz moyer, david a grogan, michelle bishop, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, went, susan, berkshire, million, building, landlord, tower, kiewit, warren, takes, buffetts, 20, price


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Warren Buffett has raised nearly $30 million for charity—here’s why

When they were in their 30s, Susan inspired Warren to support social issues. “When the children were growing up, I was very involved in civil rights. I was immersed in it and I think that’s what made Warren a Democrat. He would go with me to hear speakers,” Susan says in the HBO documentary “Becoming Warren Buffett.” Together they supported Omaha’s nonviolent activists in the midst of the civil rights movement during the 1950s and 1960s, as well as late civil rights activist and icon Martin Luth


When they were in their 30s, Susan inspired Warren to support social issues. “When the children were growing up, I was very involved in civil rights. I was immersed in it and I think that’s what made Warren a Democrat. He would go with me to hear speakers,” Susan says in the HBO documentary “Becoming Warren Buffett.” Together they supported Omaha’s nonviolent activists in the midst of the civil rights movement during the 1950s and 1960s, as well as late civil rights activist and icon Martin Luth
Warren Buffett has raised nearly $30 million for charity—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-31  Authors: zameena mejia, photo courtesy of the glide foundation, photo thomas walsh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 30, glide, million, train, traveled, wife, true, rights, buffett, warren, civil, williams, raised, nearly, susan, charityheres


Warren Buffett has raised nearly $30 million for charity—here's why

When they were in their 30s, Susan inspired Warren to support social issues. “When the children were growing up, I was very involved in civil rights. I was immersed in it and I think that’s what made Warren a Democrat. He would go with me to hear speakers,” Susan says in the HBO documentary “Becoming Warren Buffett.”

Together they supported Omaha’s nonviolent activists in the midst of the civil rights movement during the 1950s and 1960s, as well as late civil rights activist and icon Martin Luther King Jr.

In the 1990s, Susan traveled with Williams and Mirikitani four-to-five times a year, for three years, going to different American cities to train other churches on how to start programs similar to the ones Glide offered.

But when Warren first heard about Glide, he was skeptical.

“My wife told me a lot about Cecil and I thought, ‘This sounds too good to be true,’ and I am a suspicious guy by nature,” Buffett tells CNBC reporter Becky Quick in a 2017 interview. “So she didn’t sell me.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-31  Authors: zameena mejia, photo courtesy of the glide foundation, photo thomas walsh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 30, glide, million, train, traveled, wife, true, rights, buffett, warren, civil, williams, raised, nearly, susan, charityheres


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Brett Kavanaugh told Sen. Susan Collins Roe v. Wade is settled law

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh thinks the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling on abortion rights is settled law. That’s according to Sen. Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine who met for two hours with the judge on Tuesday. Collins, who supports abortion rights, says she talked “at great length” with Kavanaugh about the application of established precedent to abortion cases. She says she will not make a decision on how to vote until after the Senate Judiciary Committee holds confirmatio


Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh thinks the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling on abortion rights is settled law. That’s according to Sen. Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine who met for two hours with the judge on Tuesday. Collins, who supports abortion rights, says she talked “at great length” with Kavanaugh about the application of established precedent to abortion cases. She says she will not make a decision on how to vote until after the Senate Judiciary Committee holds confirmatio
Brett Kavanaugh told Sen. Susan Collins Roe v. Wade is settled law Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-21  Authors: andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wade, susan, told, thinks, vote, talked, sen, roe, rights, settled, abortion, tuesdaycollins, thats, kavanaugh, law, collins


Brett Kavanaugh told Sen. Susan Collins Roe v. Wade is settled law

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh thinks the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling on abortion rights is settled law. That’s according to Sen. Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine who met for two hours with the judge on Tuesday.

Collins, who supports abortion rights, says she talked “at great length” with Kavanaugh about the application of established precedent to abortion cases. She says they also discussed executive power and his judicial philosophy, among other subjects.

Collins is considered a potential swing vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination. She says she will not make a decision on how to vote until after the Senate Judiciary Committee holds confirmation hearings in early September.

Republicans hope to have Kavanaugh confirmed by the start of the court’s next session, which starts Oct. 1.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-21  Authors: andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wade, susan, told, thinks, vote, talked, sen, roe, rights, settled, abortion, tuesdaycollins, thats, kavanaugh, law, collins


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