Are you seeking top-rated responsible investing funds? There’s a rating for that

If you want to see how the funds you’re invested in fare when it comes to environmental, social and governance factors, there’s a rating for that. The Morningstar Sustainability Rating measures how well an investment fund’s holdings stack up on ESG issues compared to its peers. The measurement is put together using the thousands of portfolios that Morningstar collects from mutual funds, ETFs and managed portfolios around the world. Those symbols appear alongside other fund information, including


If you want to see how the funds you’re invested in fare when it comes to environmental, social and governance factors, there’s a rating for that. The Morningstar Sustainability Rating measures how well an investment fund’s holdings stack up on ESG issues compared to its peers. The measurement is put together using the thousands of portfolios that Morningstar collects from mutual funds, ETFs and managed portfolios around the world. Those symbols appear alongside other fund information, including
Are you seeking top-rated responsible investing funds? There’s a rating for that Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: lorie konish, getty images, vcg, lucas jackson, scott olson, mario tama, andres ruffo, adam gault
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, investing, sustainability, portfolios, responsible, toprated, morningstar, way, seeking, rating, score, firm, globes, theres, funds


Are you seeking top-rated responsible investing funds? There's a rating for that

If you want to see how the funds you’re invested in fare when it comes to environmental, social and governance factors, there’s a rating for that.

The Morningstar Sustainability Rating measures how well an investment fund’s holdings stack up on ESG issues compared to its peers.

The measurement is put together using the thousands of portfolios that Morningstar collects from mutual funds, ETFs and managed portfolios around the world. The firm then applies company-level data from its partner firm, Sustainalytics, to come up with asset-weighted scores for funds.

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Investors can access the ratings by going to the Morningstar website. The score appears as globes, with five representing the highest score and one the lowest. Those symbols appear alongside other fund information, including an overall Morningstar rating. The top 10 percent of funds in each category receive five globes.

The score has provided a way to see how well funds that are branded as ESG funds are executing on those strategies.

“Virtually all of the intentional funds do well, meaning they score at least four or five globes,” said Jon Hale, sustainability research expert at Morningstar.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: lorie konish, getty images, vcg, lucas jackson, scott olson, mario tama, andres ruffo, adam gault
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, investing, sustainability, portfolios, responsible, toprated, morningstar, way, seeking, rating, score, firm, globes, theres, funds


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Large fund firms’ support for combating climate change is all talk

Climate change questions don’t get more fundamental than this one: How much time is left to act before it is too late? Before he died, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle said one of the biggest issues the index fund would face in the future is its societal influence. BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, and Vanguard Group, the creator of the index fund, manage more than $11 trillion combined. And their market influence continues to grow: Vanguard has attracted roughly $1 trillion in the


Climate change questions don’t get more fundamental than this one: How much time is left to act before it is too late? Before he died, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle said one of the biggest issues the index fund would face in the future is its societal influence. BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, and Vanguard Group, the creator of the index fund, manage more than $11 trillion combined. And their market influence continues to grow: Vanguard has attracted roughly $1 trillion in the
Large fund firms’ support for combating climate change is all talk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: eric rosenbaum, getty images, pickstock, matthew davidson, eyeem, hero images, laflor, saul loeb, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firms, companies, change, fund, vanguard, talk, funds, large, index, combating, trillion, shareholder, climate, sustainability, support, vote, showing


Large fund firms' support for combating climate change is all talk

Climate change questions don’t get more fundamental than this one: How much time is left to act before it is too late?

Right now the difficulty of answering that question is showing up in a place where many individuals are heavily invested in getting the answer right: The index funds responsible for meeting millions of Americans personal financial goals, from saving for a house, to a child’s education, and a secure retirement.

Before he died, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle said one of the biggest issues the index fund would face in the future is its societal influence. Specifically, he meant the need to vote proxies on complex issues such as sustainability at annual meetings held by every publicly traded company and on behalf of so many individual fund shareholders.

BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, and Vanguard Group, the creator of the index fund, manage more than $11 trillion combined. Just in ETFs, they manage roughly $2.5 trillion. And their market influence continues to grow: Vanguard has attracted roughly $1 trillion in the past three years alone.

“Larger mutual funds companies, like Vanguard, Fidelity, BlackRock and State Street Global Advisors, can move the market,” said Mindy Lubber, CEO and president of Ceres, a nonprofit organization that works with big investors and companies on sustainability. “They can take a shareholder resolution from 10 percent to 40 percent.”

In 2017 both companies voted to require ExxonMobil to produce a report on climate change, a watershed moment showing what can occur when index funds punch their weight in proxy voting.

Yet shareholder advocates say there have not been nearly enough of those ExxonMobil vote moments.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: eric rosenbaum, getty images, pickstock, matthew davidson, eyeem, hero images, laflor, saul loeb, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firms, companies, change, fund, vanguard, talk, funds, large, index, combating, trillion, shareholder, climate, sustainability, support, vote, showing


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Microsoft to buy energy from 74-megawatt solar power facility in North Carolina

Microsoft has signed a 15-year power purchase agreement for the energy produced by a 74-megawatt solar power facility in North Carolina. The Wilkinson Solar Energy Center will be built, owned and operated by Invenergy, the companies said in a joint announcement Wednesday. The deal means that Microsoft’s renewable energy portfolio will stand at more than 1.3 gigawatts, the statement added. Microsoft is one of many big tech companies turning to renewable sources of energy. At the time, the busines


Microsoft has signed a 15-year power purchase agreement for the energy produced by a 74-megawatt solar power facility in North Carolina. The Wilkinson Solar Energy Center will be built, owned and operated by Invenergy, the companies said in a joint announcement Wednesday. The deal means that Microsoft’s renewable energy portfolio will stand at more than 1.3 gigawatts, the statement added. Microsoft is one of many big tech companies turning to renewable sources of energy. At the time, the busines
Microsoft to buy energy from 74-megawatt solar power facility in North Carolina Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: anmar frangoul, vesa moilanen, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, power, solar, energy, microsoft, sustainability, 74megawatt, renewable, microsofts, clean, north, buy, carolina, facility, companies


Microsoft to buy energy from 74-megawatt solar power facility in North Carolina

Microsoft has signed a 15-year power purchase agreement for the energy produced by a 74-megawatt solar power facility in North Carolina.

The Wilkinson Solar Energy Center will be built, owned and operated by Invenergy, the companies said in a joint announcement Wednesday.

The deal means that Microsoft’s renewable energy portfolio will stand at more than 1.3 gigawatts, the statement added.

The new facility is due to commence commercial operations in 2019, while it’s estimated that more than 500 jobs are set to be created during its construction.

“When we invest in renewable energy, we are investing in the future — enabling sustainable growth of our business, of the clean energy sector and the local communities that benefit economically from Microsoft’s commitment to sustainability,” Brian Janous, general manager of Energy and Sustainability at Microsoft, said Wednesday.

Microsoft is one of many big tech companies turning to renewable sources of energy.

In October 2017, for instance, Amazon announced that its Amazon Wind Farm Texas was operational. At the time, the business said the facility would add over 1 million megawatt hours of clean energy to the grid annually.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: anmar frangoul, vesa moilanen, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, power, solar, energy, microsoft, sustainability, 74megawatt, renewable, microsofts, clean, north, buy, carolina, facility, companies


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Jeans you can lease instead of buying? How fashion is coming to terms with sustainability

According to a submission from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, in 2015 the global fashion industry generated 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the Netherlands, a business called Mud Jeans wants to produce jeans in a sustainable manner using organic cotton and recycled denim. “Energy efficiency is very high up on our agenda,” Eva Engelen, who works on corporate social responsibility at Mud Jeans, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.” In a bid to prevent waste in the clothin


According to a submission from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, in 2015 the global fashion industry generated 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the Netherlands, a business called Mud Jeans wants to produce jeans in a sustainable manner using organic cotton and recycled denim. “Energy efficiency is very high up on our agenda,” Eva Engelen, who works on corporate social responsibility at Mud Jeans, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.” In a bid to prevent waste in the clothin
Jeans you can lease instead of buying? How fashion is coming to terms with sustainability Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coming, sustainability, energy, clothing, terms, fashion, told, mud, buying, productivity, lease, industry, jeans, instead, added, sustainable


Jeans you can lease instead of buying? How fashion is coming to terms with sustainability

For many of us, the availability of cheap, mass-produced clothing is a blessing. For a few dollars we can bulk buy everything from shirts and shorts to pants, underwear and sweaters.

While “fast fashion” may be a boon for our wallets because of its value, its impact on the environment is significant.

In October 2018, the U.K. Parliament’s Environmental Audit Committee highlighted just how much our appetite for clothing affects the planet, publishing submissions it had received from experts for an inquiry into the sustainability of the fashion industry.

The findings make sobering reading. According to a submission from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, in 2015 the global fashion industry generated 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. This represents more emissions than maritime shipping and international flights combined, the submission added. In 2017, the European Union said that the EU textile industry produced an estimated 16 million tons of waste annually.

In the Netherlands, a business called Mud Jeans wants to produce jeans in a sustainable manner using organic cotton and recycled denim. The company’s goal is to eventually design jeans produced from 100 percent recycled denim.

When it comes to the manufacturing process, it is also looking to use sustainable methods.

“Energy efficiency is very high up on our agenda,” Eva Engelen, who works on corporate social responsibility at Mud Jeans, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.” “We do this through prioritizing energy efficient production processes and supply chain partners.”

“For example, our fabric mill, Tejidos Royo, they have an energy generation system … in their factory, which uses the steam from the production lines to produce energy through a steam turbine,” she added. Engelen explained that the system allowed the site to be “100 percent self-sufficient with regards to energy.”

In a bid to prevent waste in the clothing industry, Mud Jeans has also developed a leasing system for its products, through which customers can pay 12 monthly instalments of 7.50 euros ($8.51).

At the end of that period, they can decide to keep the jeans or send them back to the business. Mud Jeans’ CEO Bert van Son told CNBC that if the latter took place, “we promise that we will use the raw material again.”

Looking at the broader picture, work still needs to be done to ensure that the fashion sector becomes sustainable.

“The clothing industry is recognized as possibly the second most polluting industry globally,” Steve Evans, director of research in industrial sustainability at the University of Cambridge’s Institute of Manufacturing, told CNBC.

“It knows this and it’s energetic in trying to change it,” Evans added. “It’s a very convoluted industry though: The brands don’t own their own factories, so their ability to influence what the factories do, how they create pollution in their local water, air and land, is difficult.”

Evans added that well-known brands were becoming more sustainable every year. Issues will not be sorted out overnight, however.

“Most factories and industries around the world are pushing very hard to make sure that their products arrive to consumers at the lowest possible cost,” Evans went on to explain. “You love them for doing that for you,” he added.

“Unfortunately, it means that they’re really focusing hard on labor productivity and capital productivity and they’ve put less attention on things like energy productivity. With 200 years of not tackling energy productivity, that gives them a really juicy thing to squeeze and if they do tackle it they can go a long way very quickly.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coming, sustainability, energy, clothing, terms, fashion, told, mud, buying, productivity, lease, industry, jeans, instead, added, sustainable


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Barney Swan skied Antarctica with clean energy to fight climate change

When Barney Swan walked out of a meeting with NASA in 2016, he felt frustrated. The then-23-year-old and a handful of colleagues had just partaken in a presentation highlighting the destructive impact Antarctica’s collapsing ice shelves are having on the planet. “It was terrifying, actually terrifying,” Swan said, recalling that meeting during a UN-partnered sustainability conference in in Singapore in January. “(Antarctica has) 90 percent of the world’s ice, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater


When Barney Swan walked out of a meeting with NASA in 2016, he felt frustrated. The then-23-year-old and a handful of colleagues had just partaken in a presentation highlighting the destructive impact Antarctica’s collapsing ice shelves are having on the planet. “It was terrifying, actually terrifying,” Swan said, recalling that meeting during a UN-partnered sustainability conference in in Singapore in January. “(Antarctica has) 90 percent of the world’s ice, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater
Barney Swan skied Antarctica with clean energy to fight climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: shirley tay, barney swan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sustainability, climate, swan, clean, change, barney, antarctica, meeting, terrifying, pole, ice, skied, energy, unpartnered, fight, nasa, walked


Barney Swan skied Antarctica with clean energy to fight climate change

When Barney Swan walked out of a meeting with NASA in 2016, he felt frustrated.

The then-23-year-old and a handful of colleagues had just partaken in a presentation highlighting the destructive impact Antarctica’s collapsing ice shelves are having on the planet.

“It was terrifying, actually terrifying,” Swan said, recalling that meeting during a UN-partnered sustainability conference in in Singapore in January.

“(Antarctica has) 90 percent of the world’s ice, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater is locked within that ice,” he said. “That place has the capacity alone to raise our sea level 20 feet, globally.”

“I walked out of that meeting with NASA feeling almost disabled,” said Swan.

But he didn’t let the experience deter him. Instead, Swan decided to do something about it: He teamed up with his father, Robert Swan — the first man to ski to both the South Pole and the North Pole in the late 1980s — and set out on an epic journey to prove that sustainability can be achieved on a large scale.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: shirley tay, barney swan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sustainability, climate, swan, clean, change, barney, antarctica, meeting, terrifying, pole, ice, skied, energy, unpartnered, fight, nasa, walked


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The EU’s palm oil policy is triggering condemnation from the other side of the globe

The European Union is phasing out the use of palm oil in transport fuel, triggering criticism of trade protectionism and threats of retaliation from major producersIndonesia and Malaysia. The palm oil industry, with its national epicenter on that island, is thought to be one of the biggest drivers of that loss, the coalition said. Indonesia and Malaysia together produce over 80 percent of the world’s palm oil. Versatile and widely used, palm oil has suffered a patchy reputation. Food giant Nestl


The European Union is phasing out the use of palm oil in transport fuel, triggering criticism of trade protectionism and threats of retaliation from major producersIndonesia and Malaysia. The palm oil industry, with its national epicenter on that island, is thought to be one of the biggest drivers of that loss, the coalition said. Indonesia and Malaysia together produce over 80 percent of the world’s palm oil. Versatile and widely used, palm oil has suffered a patchy reputation. Food giant Nestl
The EU’s palm oil policy is triggering condemnation from the other side of the globe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: huileng tan, jefta images, barcroft images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, triggering, used, globe, trade, sustainability, companies, worlds, condemnation, transport, policy, oil, eus, eu, large, palm


The EU's palm oil policy is triggering condemnation from the other side of the globe

The European Union is phasing out the use of palm oil in transport fuel, triggering criticism of trade protectionism and threats of retaliation from major producersIndonesia and Malaysia.

The European move comes after years of activist campaigns about the vegetable oil associated with rampant deforestation and labor abuses, highlighting how consumer concerns about sustainability are increasingly influencing businesses.

According to Eyes on the Forest, a coalition of environmental non-governmental organizations co-founded by the World Wildlife Fund, the large Indonesian island of Sumatra lost 56 percent of its 25 million hectares (250,000 square kilometers, or bigger than the size of the U.K.) of natural forests over 31 years.

The palm oil industry, with its national epicenter on that island, is thought to be one of the biggest drivers of that loss, the coalition said.

France and Norway have become the first few countries to start curbing use of palm oil in the last month, driving fears in major Southeast Asian producing countries, where the cash crop has powered economic growth. Indonesia and Malaysia together produce over 80 percent of the world’s palm oil.

More broadly, the EU agreed in June to phase out the use of palm oil in transport fuel from 2030 as part of a broader plan to increase the share of renewables in the bloc’s energy production. The EU is one of the world’s top consumers of palm oil, which is used in a wide range of products from baked goods to detergents.

“This is a most unwelcome decision and goes against the very principles of free and fair trade. The vote by the (French) parliamentarians is alarming and deserves the strongest condemnation,” said Malaysian Primary Industries Minister Teresa Kok, news agency Bernama reported.

Indonesia has threatened retaliation numerous times over such a move by the EU, with the country’s trade minister going as far as saying that the EU is asking for a “trade war” with its palm oil curbs, the Nikkei Asian Review reported.

Versatile and widely used, palm oil has suffered a patchy reputation.

“One of the most significant risks to the palm oil sector resides in its poor sustainability records and negative reputation in developed markets, which pose threats to future demand,” said Fitch Solutions in a recent note. “Although some large plantation companies are making efforts to improve their sustainability records … we note that the reputation of the global palm oil industry has not improved.”

High-profile companies catering to consumers are taking steps to stem any fallout to their businesses.

Other than the EU tightening its regulations, large food and drink companies are moving towards procuring sustainable palm oil in the short term and are putting increasing pressure on their traditional providers that are unable to comply with sustainability standards, added Fitch Solutions.

Food giant Nestle has set a goal to procure 100 percent sustainable certified palm oil by 2020. The Swiss company addresses questions and issues about sustainability on its website, including explaining how they have suspended or ended partnerships with specific suppliers who may have questions hanging over ethical sourcing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: huileng tan, jefta images, barcroft images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, triggering, used, globe, trade, sustainability, companies, worlds, condemnation, transport, policy, oil, eus, eu, large, palm


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Amazon and ASOS quizzed by lawmakers over ‘fast fashion’ sustainability

Lawmakers in the U.K. have questioned online “fast fashion” retailers about the impact of their production processes on workers and the environment. Stella Claxton, senior lecturer in fashion management, marketing and communication at Nottingham Trent University, said the UK fashion industry in its current form was “not that environmentally sustainable.” “Thinking about how consumption in Asia is going to rise in the next few years and how UK brands are looking to service those markets. Further


Lawmakers in the U.K. have questioned online “fast fashion” retailers about the impact of their production processes on workers and the environment. Stella Claxton, senior lecturer in fashion management, marketing and communication at Nottingham Trent University, said the UK fashion industry in its current form was “not that environmentally sustainable.” “Thinking about how consumption in Asia is going to rise in the next few years and how UK brands are looking to service those markets. Further
Amazon and ASOS quizzed by lawmakers over ‘fast fashion’ sustainability Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: chloe taylor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fashion, environmental, workers, letters, asos, sustainability, looking, uk, amazon, fast, quizzed, lawmakers, retailers, global, committee


Amazon and ASOS quizzed by lawmakers over 'fast fashion' sustainability

Lawmakers in the U.K. have questioned online “fast fashion” retailers about the impact of their production processes on workers and the environment.

Mary Creagh, chair of the U.K. government’s Environmental Audit Committee, wrote to five online-only fashion retailers — including global firms Amazon and ASOS — to request information on areas including staff wages, the life-cycle of the garments sold, and steps being taken to reduce the environmental and social impact of their businesses.

The committee said it was considering policy recommendations on reducing the harm caused by cheap garment production, and would factor in the retailers’ responses when delivering those recommendations to fellow lawmakers.

Published Friday, letters to Amazon and ASOS asked the retailers how they had ensured that all garment workers are paid the minimum wage; whether they educated suppliers on the cost of U.K. labour; and what recycled materials were used in their products.

Retailers were given a deadline of November 15 to respond to the letters, with MPs suggesting they could ask certain companies to give evidence in parliament.

In a statement on Friday, Creagh said evidence the committee had heard on October 30 from industry experts “raised alarm bells about the fast growing online-only retail sector.”

“Low quality £5 ($6.51) dresses aimed at young people are said to be made by workers on illegally low wages and are discarded almost instantly, causing mountains of non-recycled waste to pile up,” she said.

“We will be calling some of these online retailers in front of the Committee to answer questions, but in the meantime, my letters encourage them to face up to the social and environmental consequences of their business models. We want to know that they are fully compliant with employment law, that garments have a decent life-span, and that profit is not put before environmental damage.”

Stella Claxton, senior lecturer in fashion management, marketing and communication at Nottingham Trent University, said the UK fashion industry in its current form was “not that environmentally sustainable.”

“Coupled with that we have a situation where chasing low prices has led to global supply chains looking for cheaper manufacturing, which is normally in developing countries,” she said. “Thinking about how consumption in Asia is going to rise in the next few years and how UK brands are looking to service those markets. Although it is a UK problem, it is a global problem as well.”

Further evidence raised concern that suppliers in developing countries outsourced to sweatshops or were not paying workers the minimum wage. “Sweatshop” is a term for a workplace that has very poor, socially unacceptable working conditions.

Amazon declined to comment on the issue. In an email to CNBC, an ASOS spokesperson said: “ASOS is looking forward to co-operating with the committee.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: chloe taylor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fashion, environmental, workers, letters, asos, sustainability, looking, uk, amazon, fast, quizzed, lawmakers, retailers, global, committee


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Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


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China-led AIIB on funding infrastructure projects, debt sustainability

Projects funded by the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank must not add to the receiving country’s debt burden, the lender’s president Jin Liqun said on Tuesday. The AIIB — a China-led multilateral development bank — also faced similar skepticism given its focus on infrastructure financing, including projects under the BRI. Getting the private sector involved is key to making sure any infrastructure development is sustainable, Jin said. “(The) private sector can create jobs for people and priva


Projects funded by the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank must not add to the receiving country’s debt burden, the lender’s president Jin Liqun said on Tuesday. The AIIB — a China-led multilateral development bank — also faced similar skepticism given its focus on infrastructure financing, including projects under the BRI. Getting the private sector involved is key to making sure any infrastructure development is sustainable, Jin said. “(The) private sector can create jobs for people and priva
China-led AIIB on funding infrastructure projects, debt sustainability Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, projects, sure, work, infrastructure, jin, countries, sustainability, skepticism, private, chinaled, aiib, bank, funding, debt, sector


China-led AIIB on funding infrastructure projects, debt sustainability

Projects funded by the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank must not add to the receiving country’s debt burden, the lender’s president Jin Liqun said on Tuesday.

“We do not simply lend to the countries for their sovereign guarantees,” Jin told CNBC’s “Street Signs.”

“We work actively with the private sector companies in those countries so that our investments would not build up heavy pressure on their debt burden,” he added. “It’s very important for our members to continually invest in infrastructure and other productive sectors without creating debt burden.”

Jin’s comments came amid mounting criticisms that the push for massive infrastructure building in developing countries has increased their debt in an unsustainable way. Those criticisms were particularly directed at China’s mega program called the Belt and Road Initiative.

The AIIB — a China-led multilateral development bank — also faced similar skepticism given its focus on infrastructure financing, including projects under the BRI.

Making sure recipient countries can pay back their debt is a priority of the Chinese government, said Zou Jiayi, vice minister of China’s Ministry of Finance.

“The Chinese government attached a lot of importance to the debt sustainability when we pursued BRI because we are the creditor, we are the stakeholder. Those are our money,” she said earlier this month at the annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank in Bali.

Getting the private sector involved is key to making sure any infrastructure development is sustainable, Jin said. That has been AIIB’s focus, which has helped to silence skeptics, he added.

“I’m pleased to see that the skepticism is now history,” said Jin. “(The) private sector can create jobs for people and private sector companies can help the developing countries move up on the value chain. So, we think it makes a lot of sense for us to work with the private sector.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, projects, sure, work, infrastructure, jin, countries, sustainability, skepticism, private, chinaled, aiib, bank, funding, debt, sector


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HP Inc. CEO discusses importance of trust from ‘the epicenter of innovation’

HP Inc. CEO discusses importance of trust from ‘the epicenter of innovation’8 Hours AgoJim Cramer sits down with HP Inc. President and CEO Dion Weisler in the place where Hewlett-Packard began to discuss brand trust, sustainability and HP Inc.’s recent success.


HP Inc. CEO discusses importance of trust from ‘the epicenter of innovation’8 Hours AgoJim Cramer sits down with HP Inc. President and CEO Dion Weisler in the place where Hewlett-Packard began to discuss brand trust, sustainability and HP Inc.’s recent success.
HP Inc. CEO discusses importance of trust from ‘the epicenter of innovation’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, innovation, importance, sustainability, epicenter, success, place, president, weisler, hp, sits, recent, trust, discusses, ceo


HP Inc. CEO discusses importance of trust from 'the epicenter of innovation'

HP Inc. CEO discusses importance of trust from ‘the epicenter of innovation’

8 Hours Ago

Jim Cramer sits down with HP Inc. President and CEO Dion Weisler in the place where Hewlett-Packard began to discuss brand trust, sustainability and HP Inc.’s recent success.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, innovation, importance, sustainability, epicenter, success, place, president, weisler, hp, sits, recent, trust, discusses, ceo


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