Jack Dorsey asked Elon Musk how he would run Twitter–here’s what Musk said

When you have Elon Musk on the line, you ask him for business advice — even if you’re Jack Dorsey. Dorsey asked Musk in the video, which was tweeted Thursday. Dorsey even joked with Musk, “By the way, do you want to run Twitter?” “Some way to differentiate between, this is a real person and this is someone just trying to manipulate the system. I like how @elonmusk uses Twitter,” Dorsey tweeted.


When you have Elon Musk on the line, you ask him for business advice — even if you’re Jack Dorsey.
Dorsey asked Musk in the video, which was tweeted Thursday.
Dorsey even joked with Musk, “By the way, do you want to run Twitter?”
“Some way to differentiate between, this is a real person and this is someone just trying to manipulate the system.
I like how @elonmusk uses Twitter,” Dorsey tweeted.
Jack Dorsey asked Elon Musk how he would run Twitter–here’s what Musk said Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asked, musk, twitter, tweeted, person, tesla, run, trying, twitterheres, whats, jack, real, elon, system, dorsey


Jack Dorsey asked Elon Musk how he would run Twitter–here's what Musk said

When you have Elon Musk on the line, you ask him for business advice — even if you’re Jack Dorsey.

In an undated video of what appears to be a Twitter company event, CEO Dorsey asks Tesla and SpaceX CEO Musk over video chat: “Give us some direct feedback, critique.”

“What are we doing horribly? What could we be doing better? What’s your hope for [Twitter’s] potential as a service?” Dorsey asked Musk in the video, which was tweeted Thursday.

“If you were running Twitter, what would you do?”

Dorsey even joked with Musk, “By the way, do you want to run Twitter?”

Musk told Dorsey and the audience that Twitter could do better at distinguishing bots from real people, something the company has invested in.

“I think it would be helpful to differentiate between real and you know, not just like a verified person, but is this a real person, or is this a bot net or a sort of troll army or something like that? Basically, how do you tell if the feedback is real or someone trying to manipulate the system? Or probably real or probably trying to manipulate the system,” Musk said.

“Some way to differentiate between, this is a real person and this is someone just trying to manipulate the system. I see people trying to sway public opinion, and sometimes it can be difficult to figure out what’s real public opinion and what’s not,” he said.

“What are people actually upset about versus manipulation of the system by various interest groups? And there are many such groups.”

Along with his feedback on Twitter operations, Musk also told Dorsey he believes the first human to send a tweet from Mars will happen “five years from now… probably not more than nine years from now.”

(Musk has said he’ll get humans to Mars by 2024. In a March tweet, he revealed plans to send manned SpaceX rockets to the planet, creating a fully “self-sustaining city” on Mars by 2050.)

Musk, who joined Twitter in June 2009, has over 30 million followers and is extremely active on the platform, often using it to communicate with Tesla customers.

But Twitter has also gotten Musk in trouble.

Most recently, in December, Musk won a defamation case brought by Vernon Unsworth, the British cave explorer whom Musk called “pedo guy” on Twitter in 2018.

And in October 2018, Musk agreed to relinquish his role as chairman at Tesla and pay a hefty fine as part of a settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission over an August 2018 tweet. Musk tweeted that he had secured enough funding to take Tesla private, and the SEC alleged Musk’s statements were “false and misleading” and that he didn’t properly notify regulators, CNBC reported.

In February, the SEC accused Musk of violating the agreement when he tweeted about Tesla production numbers, however the sides agreed to resolve the situation by amending the original settlement for clarity.

Dorsey, however, has complimented Musk’s use of Twitter.

When journalist Kara Swisher interviewed Dorsey over Twitter in February, she asked him to name the “most exciting” and “influential” person on the platform.

“To me personally? I like how @elonmusk uses Twitter,” Dorsey tweeted. “He’s focused on solving existential problems and sharing his thinking openly. I respect that a lot, and all the ups and downs that come with it.”

To that, Musk replied, “Thanks Jack, Twitter rocks!”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asked, musk, twitter, tweeted, person, tesla, run, trying, twitterheres, whats, jack, real, elon, system, dorsey


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Airbus releases photos of automatic take-offs

Airbus looks to have taken pilotless commercial jet flight one step closer after revealing that one of its test aircraft has taken off automatically. An Airbus test pilot is shown with one hand at rest as an A350-1000, fitted with image recognition technology, takes off automatically at Toulouse-Blagnac airport on December 18, 2019. The nose of the aircraft began to lift up automatically to take the expected take-off pitch value and a few seconds later we were airborne,” said Airbus Test Pilot C


Airbus looks to have taken pilotless commercial jet flight one step closer after revealing that one of its test aircraft has taken off automatically.
An Airbus test pilot is shown with one hand at rest as an A350-1000, fitted with image recognition technology, takes off automatically at Toulouse-Blagnac airport on December 18, 2019.
The nose of the aircraft began to lift up automatically to take the expected take-off pitch value and a few seconds later we were airborne,” said Airbus Test Pilot C
Airbus releases photos of automatic take-offs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takeoff, automatically, taken, technology, pilot, system, takeoffs, test, automatic, aircraft, airbus, releases, photos, toulouseblagnac


Airbus releases photos of automatic take-offs

Airbus looks to have taken pilotless commercial jet flight one step closer after revealing that one of its test aircraft has taken off automatically. The European planemaker said that in tests conducted at Toulouse-Blagnac airport on December 18, an A350-1000 with two pilots sitting ready to take over, conducted eight takeoffs on auto-pilot. Accompanying the press release was a photograph showing a pilot sitting with one hand at rest as the plane pitched up.

An Airbus test pilot is shown with one hand at rest as an A350-1000, fitted with image recognition technology, takes off automatically at Toulouse-Blagnac airport on December 18, 2019. Source: Airbus

“We moved the throttle levers to the take-off setting and we monitored the aircraft. It started to move and accelerate automatically maintaining the runway center line, at the exact rotation speed as entered in the system. The nose of the aircraft began to lift up automatically to take the expected take-off pitch value and a few seconds later we were airborne,” said Airbus Test Pilot Captain Yann Beaufils. The technology behind the takeoff is different from the Instrument Landing System (ILS) currently used around the world, Airbus said in its press release Thursday. Instead, the company said the automatic takeoff was made possible by image recognition technology installed directly on the aircraft. The company says the next step is automatic vision-based landing and taxi sequences taking place by mid-2020.

March to automation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takeoff, automatically, taken, technology, pilot, system, takeoffs, test, automatic, aircraft, airbus, releases, photos, toulouseblagnac


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Pharma execs pitch ideas at #JPM20 to lower drug costs. None of them include dropping their own prices

CEOs from the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies pitched ideas for lowering drug prices at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco this week. “We need reform to the insurance system, so we avoid these upside-down economics for patients.” It likely serves as a preview of Big Pharma’s stance on health-care costs in 2020. Health costs in 2019 saw their largest gain in 12 years, rising 4.6%, the Labor Department said this week. Some expressed doubt that sweeping drug pricing leg


CEOs from the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies pitched ideas for lowering drug prices at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco this week.
“We need reform to the insurance system, so we avoid these upside-down economics for patients.”
It likely serves as a preview of Big Pharma’s stance on health-care costs in 2020.
Health costs in 2019 saw their largest gain in 12 years, rising 4.6%, the Labor Department said this week.
Some expressed doubt that sweeping drug pricing leg
Pharma execs pitch ideas at #JPM20 to lower drug costs. None of them include dropping their own prices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, healthcare, pitch, lower, dropping, pharma, insurance, execs, system, ideas, health, prices, include, jpm20, pricing, conference, ceo, drug, costs


Pharma execs pitch ideas at #JPM20 to lower drug costs. None of them include dropping their own prices

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar listens as U.S. President Donald Trump delivers a speech about lowering prescription drug prices from the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 11, 2018.

CEOs from the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies pitched ideas for lowering drug prices at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco this week. None, however, offered to cut prices on any of their own drugs.

Some of the executives, like Regeneron CEO Leonard Schleifer, suggested making changes to Medicare, the federal government’s health insurance plan for the elderly, by adding an out-of-pocket maximum for beneficiaries. Others, including Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla, supported passing rebates paid to pharmacy benefit managers through to consumers, arguing the current system drove up list prices and out-of-pocket costs.

“We were disappointed that eventually the plans [in Washington] to have reformed the rebate [system] didn’t materialize,” Bourla said in an interview with CNBC’s Meg Tirrell on Tuesday.

They also faulted hospitals and insurers. During a panel on drug pricing reform Tuesday evening, Bristol-Myers Squibb CEO Giovanni Caforio and Roche CEO Bill Anderson blasted hospitals for marking up the price of medicines, sometimes by triple-digit percentages. Caforio specifically called the practice “extraordinary.”

“That’s not helping” patients, Caforio said. “That’s a good example of how you have to look at the entire system.”

Eli Lilly CEO David Ricks blamed health insurers for high drug costs, arguing that they ultimately determine what patients pay at the pharmacy counter.

“We’ve built insurance designs that make insurance more affordable for more people but have less benefit to those who are sick,” Ricks said during a fireside chat at the conference Tuesday. “We need reform to the insurance system, so we avoid these upside-down economics for patients.”

Executives at the conference, the biggest health-care investing event of the year, largely stuck to the same arguments they used last year to fend off attacks from Congress and the Trump administration to crack down on high prescription drug prices. It likely serves as a preview of Big Pharma’s stance on health-care costs in 2020.

Health costs in 2019 saw their largest gain in 12 years, rising 4.6%, the Labor Department said this week. In December alone, health costs jumped 0.6% after rising 0.3% in the previous month, boosted by a 2.1% acceleration in prices for prescription drugs as well as consumers paying more for hospital services and doctor visits.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is pushing drug pricing legislation that would allow the government to negotiate lower prices with pharmaceutical companies on the costliest drugs each year. In the Senate, Republican Chuck Grassley and Democrat Ron Wyden are working on a bill that would cap drug pricing increases at the rate of inflation, among other measures. President Donald Trump is also looking to enact changes.

Despite the threat of policy change out, drugmakers rang in the new year by hiking the list price on more than 200 drugs.

When asked about the increases, executives at the conference said the cost of drugs in the U.S. health-care system represented only a small fraction of overall costs. They agreed that something needed to be done legislatively about the high costs seniors pay for medicines and mentioned their copay coupons and other forms of assistance.

Some expressed doubt that sweeping drug pricing legislation like Pelosi’s would ever become law.

“We don’t believe that some of the more radical solutions will take hold,” Regeneron’s Schleifer said.

–CNBC’s Kevin Stankiewicz contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, healthcare, pitch, lower, dropping, pharma, insurance, execs, system, ideas, health, prices, include, jpm20, pricing, conference, ceo, drug, costs


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Despite how earnings go, US banks remain far behind on this big tech issue

Unlike other countries, non-banks are dependent on big banks to gain access to payment systems in the U.S. Preventing direct access to the payment rails and forcing access via banks leads to lower competition and higher costs for U.S. consumers and businesses. Also, such a model adds more inherent risk to the financial system as a handful of banks become access points for all non-banks to gain access. This makes said banks single points of failure for a large number of financial services that pe


Unlike other countries, non-banks are dependent on big banks to gain access to payment systems in the U.S.
Preventing direct access to the payment rails and forcing access via banks leads to lower competition and higher costs for U.S. consumers and businesses.
Also, such a model adds more inherent risk to the financial system as a handful of banks become access points for all non-banks to gain access.
This makes said banks single points of failure for a large number of financial services that pe
Despite how earnings go, US banks remain far behind on this big tech issue Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: harsh sinha, chief technology officer at transferwise, uptin saiidi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, far, earnings, issue, despite, access, remain, big, systems, tech, system, financial, banks, services, money, payment, fees, sending


Despite how earnings go, US banks remain far behind on this big tech issue

While newer real-time payment systems will help the flow of funds, there is still a large hurdle that prevents real access of faster payments and innovative financial services at the cheapest cost to consumers and businesses. This is the lack of direct access to the domestic payment rails for non-banks. Unlike other countries, non-banks are dependent on big banks to gain access to payment systems in the U.S.

Preventing direct access to the payment rails and forcing access via banks leads to lower competition and higher costs for U.S. consumers and businesses. Also, such a model adds more inherent risk to the financial system as a handful of banks become access points for all non-banks to gain access. This makes said banks single points of failure for a large number of financial services that people start to depend on, leading to a large impact if these partner banks have issues.

Faster payments support financial inclusion, helping consumers avoid hefty fees from overdraft fees and check cashing. These systems also unlock working capital for small businesses who otherwise have to wait days for money to appear in their accounts.

The U.S. has the FedWire system, which allows real-time payments, but sending money through it is prohibitively expensive for most Americans. Banks can charge, on average, anywhere from $25 to $40 for the sender and typically charge recipients receiving fees for sending money instantly in the domestic wire-transfer system.

For sending money abroad, the fees are even higher, with banks on average charging 6% to 8% in fees with the money reaching the recipient in three to five days on average. Wire services, like ​Western Union or Moneygram​, provide some faster options but can be significantly costlier for both sender and recipient. Neobanks and fintechs like Novo and N26 are trying to cater to this demand but are barred by a system that restricts bank and non-bank collaboration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: harsh sinha, chief technology officer at transferwise, uptin saiidi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, far, earnings, issue, despite, access, remain, big, systems, tech, system, financial, banks, services, money, payment, fees, sending


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How to upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10

Microsoft officially stopped supporting Windows 7 on Tuesday, which means it’s not issuing any more security updates that will protect you from cyberattacks. That means it’s time to either buy a new computer or upgrade your system to Windows 10. Microsoft says you should buy a new computer if yours is more than 3 years old, since Windows 10 might run slowly on older hardware and won’t offer all the new features. If you have a computer that’s still running Windows 7 but is still fairly new, then


Microsoft officially stopped supporting Windows 7 on Tuesday, which means it’s not issuing any more security updates that will protect you from cyberattacks.
That means it’s time to either buy a new computer or upgrade your system to Windows 10.
Microsoft says you should buy a new computer if yours is more than 3 years old, since Windows 10 might run slowly on older hardware and won’t offer all the new features.
If you have a computer that’s still running Windows 7 but is still fairly new, then
How to upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, means, upgrade, supporting, thats, buy, wont, windows, updates, computer, system


How to upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10

Microsoft officially stopped supporting Windows 7 on Tuesday, which means it’s not issuing any more security updates that will protect you from cyberattacks.

That means it’s time to either buy a new computer or upgrade your system to Windows 10.

Microsoft says you should buy a new computer if yours is more than 3 years old, since Windows 10 might run slowly on older hardware and won’t offer all the new features. If you have a computer that’s still running Windows 7 but is still fairly new, then you should upgrade it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, means, upgrade, supporting, thats, buy, wont, windows, updates, computer, system


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Human Rights Watch says China is trying to censor critics abroad

The head of Human Rights Watch said Tuesday the Chinese government has not only constructed “an Orwellian high-tech surveillance state” at home but is using its growing economic clout to silence critics abroad. It begins with his keynote essay entitled, “China’s Global Threat to Human Rights.” He indicated that Human Rights Watch is among organizations that support and instigate “anti-China activists … to engage in radical violent crimes, and incite separatist activities hyping Hong Kong indep


The head of Human Rights Watch said Tuesday the Chinese government has not only constructed “an Orwellian high-tech surveillance state” at home but is using its growing economic clout to silence critics abroad.
It begins with his keynote essay entitled, “China’s Global Threat to Human Rights.”
He indicated that Human Rights Watch is among organizations that support and instigate “anti-China activists … to engage in radical violent crimes, and incite separatist activities hyping Hong Kong indep
Human Rights Watch says China is trying to censor critics abroad Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinas, governments, critics, system, chinese, report, rights, censor, abroad, trying, china, international, roth, human, watch


Human Rights Watch says China is trying to censor critics abroad

A display for facial recognition and artificial intelligence is seen on monitors at Huawei’s Bantian campus on April 26, 2019 in Shenzhen, China.

The head of Human Rights Watch said Tuesday the Chinese government has not only constructed “an Orwellian high-tech surveillance state” at home but is using its growing economic clout to silence critics abroad.

Kenneth Roth accused China of carrying out “the most intense attack on the global system for enforcing human rights since that system began to emerge in the mid-20th century.”

He warned that if human rights aren’t defended, the world could face “a dystopian future in which no one is beyond the reach of Chinese censors” and a global rights system so weakened that it can no longer serve “as a check on government repression.”

Roth held a news conference at the United Nations Correspondents Association in New York after being denied entry to Hong Kong, where he had been scheduled to release the rights group’s annual report. It begins with his keynote essay entitled, “China’s Global Threat to Human Rights.”

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Monday: “It is China’s sovereignty to allow one’s entry or not.”

He indicated that Human Rights Watch is among organizations that support and instigate “anti-China activists … to engage in radical violent crimes, and incite separatist activities hyping Hong Kong independence.” He added: “These organizations deserve sanctions and must pay a price.”

U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric, asked Tuesday about Roth’s denial of entry to Hong Kong, said: “In principle, we support the rights and work of human rights defenders around the world.”

Chinese diplomat Xing Jisheng, who attended the U.N. press launch, spoke at the end calling the report “very prejudicial,” saying it has “fabrications” and telling journalists “we completely reject the content.”

Xing said the government has made every effort to advance human rights in China and any human rights report that doesn’t mention that 700 million Chinese people have escaped from poverty over the last 40 years “fails to be balanced and neutral.”

Roth responded saying the report does mention “the emancipation of the Chinese people” and asked: “What did we get wrong? If there’s something wrong we will change it.”

In the essay, Roth said the Chinese Communist Party is “worried that permitting political freedom would jeopardize its grasp on power” and “is running scared of its own people.”

“The consequence under President Xi Jinping is China’s most pervasive and brutal oppression in decades,” he said.

Roth pointed to the closure of the “modest opening” that existed briefly in recent years for Chinese people to express themselves, civic groups shut down, independent journalism gone, online conversations curtailed, ethnic and religious minorities facing severe persecution, and severe challenges to Hong Kong’s limited freedoms under “one country, two systems.”

To avoid a global backlash against its surveillance, internet censorship and oppression at home, Roth said the government is trying to undermine international institutions designed to protect human rights.

It is increasingly targeting critics of rights violations, “whether they represent a foreign government, are part of an overseas company or university, or join real or virtual avenues of public protest.”

Using its economic clout and influence and sometimes its veto in the U.N. Security Council, Roth said, China has sought to block United Nations measures “to protect some of the world’s most persecuted people.”

He cited China’s failure to support Syrian civilians facing indiscriminate airstrikes by Russian and Syrian planes, Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslims who faced murder, rape and arson at the hands of Myanmar’s army, Yemen’s civilians facing bombardment by a Saudi-led coalition, or Venezuelans suffering “economic devastation due to the corrupt mismanagement of Nicolas Maduro.”

Human rights organizations say up to 1 million ethnic Uighur Muslims in China’s western Xinjiang region have been detained in camps where they are subjected to political indoctrination and pressured to give up their religion. The Associated Press reported last year that some are forced to work in factories, and tracked clothing made in one camp to an American sportswear company.

Roth stressed that “no other government is simultaneously detaining a million members of an ethnic minority for forced indoctrination and attacking anyone who dares to challenge its repression.”

“And while other governments commit serious human rights violations, no other government flexes its political muscles with such vigor and determination to undermine the international human rights standards and institutions that could hold it to account,” he said.

Roth said the report shows that China isn’t the only threat to human rights, pointing to serious violations by the warring parties in Syria and Yemen.

He also cited “autocratic populists” who come to power by demonizing minorities and retain it by attacking independent journalists, judges and activists who try to provide checks and balances on their rule.

“Some leaders, such as U.S. President Donald Trump, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, and Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, bridle at the same body of international human rights law that China undermines, galvanizing their publics by shadow boxing with the `globalists’ who dare suggest that governments everywhere should be bound by the same standards,” Roth said.

He lamented that some governments that once could be counted on to sometimes defend human rights “have largely abandoned the cause.”

But even against this backdrop, Roth said, China stands out.

“The result for the human rights cause is a `perfect storm’ — a powerful centralized state, a coterie of like-minded rulers, a void of leadership among countries that might have stood for human rights, and a disappointing collection of democracies willing to sell the rope that is strangling the system of rights that they purport to uphold,” he said.

Nonetheless, Roth said “much can still be done to defend human rights worldwide from Beijing’s frontal attack.”

He urged governments, companies, universities, international institutions and others to stand with people in China and from China who are struggling to secure their rights.

Roth said governments and international financial institutions should offer human rights-respecting alternatives to China’s “no strings” loans and development aid. He said government should “deliberately counter China’s divide-and-conquer strategy for securing silence about its oppression.” And he said universities and companies should promote “codes of conduct” with strong standards for dealing with China


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinas, governments, critics, system, chinese, report, rights, censor, abroad, trying, china, international, roth, human, watch


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Two key moves from the Federal Reserve have boosted stocks, but they could come with a price

The stock market has picked up 2020 pretty much where 2019 left off, thanks in large part to two key Federal Reserve moves that could keep the rally going, at least until something goes wrong. “That’s a really big message that I can’t think of another Fed really delivering.” Friedman said the change means the Fed has gone from considering 2% a ceiling for inflation to perhaps a floor. The Fed since implemented its own repo operations on an as-needed basis, then decided to extend its operations t


The stock market has picked up 2020 pretty much where 2019 left off, thanks in large part to two key Federal Reserve moves that could keep the rally going, at least until something goes wrong.
“That’s a really big message that I can’t think of another Fed really delivering.”
Friedman said the change means the Fed has gone from considering 2% a ceiling for inflation to perhaps a floor.
The Fed since implemented its own repo operations on an as-needed basis, then decided to extend its operations t
Two key moves from the Federal Reserve have boosted stocks, but they could come with a price Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, operations, stocks, system, sheet, federal, really, boosted, rates, key, moves, higher, reserve, price, market, inflation, repo, fed, come


Two key moves from the Federal Reserve have boosted stocks, but they could come with a price

The stock market has picked up 2020 pretty much where 2019 left off, thanks in large part to two key Federal Reserve moves that could keep the rally going, at least until something goes wrong. Amid an already strong backdrop for Wall Street, the Fed issued two directives right around the same time in October — one, an open commitment to providing liquidity in the short-term borrowing market for banks, the other a pledge not to increase interest rates until inflation rose substantially higher. Taken together, the moves have been seen as stimulus that while stealthier than the measures taken to pull the economy out of the financial crisis, nevertheless represent important backing that has been positive for the kind of risks that stocks embody.

“The biggest thing the Fed has done, which is really out of the box, is just this insistence … that their goal is to raise inflation,” said Jim Paulsen, chief investment strategist at The Leuthold Group. “That’s a really big message that I can’t think of another Fed really delivering.” While that message has been seen as unequivocally positive for the market and economic projections in 2020, there is concern about danger further down the line.

Looking for ‘significant’ move

The big moment regarding inflation came in late October when Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said he would need to see a “really significant” move higher before hiking interest rates. The statement came after the central bank had approved its third rate cut of the year and as investors were looking for guidance on what the next move might be. Since then, Fed officials have underlined the effort to bring inflation up with statements indicating that they might tolerate a level higher than the 2% they’ve previously targeted as in line with their congressional mandate for price stability. At a time when the market was just getting over fears that a recession was on the horizon, the Fed’s pledge helped soothe some jangled nerves. “This change in the Fed strategy is extremely significant,” said Steve Friedman, senior macroeconomist at MacKay Shields. “To me, it means they want to see inflation above 2%. This is very supportive of risk assets and economic growth in the year ahead.” Friedman said the change means the Fed has gone from considering 2% a ceiling for inflation to perhaps a floor. Inflation is associated with rising prices and interest rates, though MacKay Shields expects the Fed’s moves will result in “somewhat higher” government bond yields though a continued low-rate environment overall.

QE or not QE, it doesn’t matter

The other side of the Fed’s move came from its intervention in the overnight borrowing system, through a process known as “repo” that provides the basic plumbing for the banking industry. The process involves banks’ exchanging high-quality collateral for cash and liquidity from the Fed. A financial system cash crunch in mid-September briefly sent very short-term rates surging and raised fears that the Fed’s efforts to reduce the bonds it holds on its balance sheet were sucking reserves out of the system and jeopardizing the repo market’s usually smooth operations. The Fed since implemented its own repo operations on an as-needed basis, then decided to extend its operations through at least the second quarter of this year.

To some market observers, the move resembles the quantitative easing process the Fed used during and after the crisis to hold rates down and revive the housing market. QE helped boost market prices by providing greater liquidity to the system, but officials insist the nature of these operations is different and geared only toward keeping its benchmark for short-term lending within a range of 1.5%-1.75%. Still, the increase in the balance sheet through the Fed repo has been in near lockstep with the stock market’s rise during the same period. The balance sheet has expanded more than 10% since early September; the S&P 500 is up about 11% since then.

Even if this is not technically another round of easing — QE4, as the markets call it — the impact has been the same. “In this post-crisis regime of QE-everywhere, people just associate money printing and an expansion of one’s balance sheet with an attempt to lift asset prices,” said Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group. “Some of it is not direct. A lot of it is psychological.”

The danger of wanting inflation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, operations, stocks, system, sheet, federal, really, boosted, rates, key, moves, higher, reserve, price, market, inflation, repo, fed, come


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17-year-old discovers planet 6.9 times larger than Earth on third day of internship with NASA

During his junior year at Scarsdale High School in New York, Wolf Cukier landed a two-month internship with NASA. (The citizen science project allows people who don’t work for NASA to help with finding new planets.) Just three days into his internship, Cukier discovered a new planet. “About three days into my internship, I saw a signal from a system called TOI 1338. “I noticed a dip, or a transit, from the TOI 1338 system, and that was the first signal of a planet,” Cukier explains to NBC 4 New


During his junior year at Scarsdale High School in New York, Wolf Cukier landed a two-month internship with NASA.
(The citizen science project allows people who don’t work for NASA to help with finding new planets.)
Just three days into his internship, Cukier discovered a new planet.
“About three days into my internship, I saw a signal from a system called TOI 1338.
“I noticed a dip, or a transit, from the TOI 1338 system, and that was the first signal of a planet,” Cukier explains to NBC 4 New
17-year-old discovers planet 6.9 times larger than Earth on third day of internship with NASA Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nasa, internship, toi, system, work, planet, discovers, york, times, larger, day, cukier, earth, thought, 17yearold, 1338


17-year-old discovers planet 6.9 times larger than Earth on third day of internship with NASA

During his junior year at Scarsdale High School in New York, Wolf Cukier landed a two-month internship with NASA. So during the summer of 2019, he traveled down to NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

His first assignment was to examine variations in star brightness captured by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, known as TESS, as a part of the Planet Hunters TESS citizen science project. (The citizen science project allows people who don’t work for NASA to help with finding new planets.)

Just three days into his internship, Cukier discovered a new planet.

NASA announced the news on their website this week, after confirming the teenager’s work, submitting a paper that Cukier co-authored for scientific review and announcing the discovery of the planet, now named “TOI 1338 b,” at the 235th American Astronomical Society meeting.

“I was looking through the data for everything the volunteers had flagged as an eclipsing binary, a system where two stars circle around each other, and from our view eclipse each other every orbit,” 17-year-old Cukier tells NASA. “About three days into my internship, I saw a signal from a system called TOI 1338. At first I thought it was a stellar eclipse, but the timing was wrong. It turned out to be a planet.”

“I noticed a dip, or a transit, from the TOI 1338 system, and that was the first signal of a planet,” Cukier explains to NBC 4 New York. “I first saw the initial dip and thought, ‘Oh that looked cool,’ but then when I looked at the full data from the telescope at that star, I, and my mentor also noticed, three different dips in the system.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nasa, internship, toi, system, work, planet, discovers, york, times, larger, day, cukier, earth, thought, 17yearold, 1338


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US should get rid of all paid political advertising, billionaire media mogul Barry Diller says

Billionaire media mogul Barry Diller told CNBC on Thursday that he believes the U.S. should not have paid political advertising. “What this country should do is get rid of all advertising for politics,” the IAC chairman said on “Closing Bell.” But candidates generally have to agree to certain restrictions, such as spending limits, which is why Obama said he opted against taking public money. Lamenting the influence of money in politics, Diller said elected officials shouldn’t have to spend signi


Billionaire media mogul Barry Diller told CNBC on Thursday that he believes the U.S. should not have paid political advertising.
“What this country should do is get rid of all advertising for politics,” the IAC chairman said on “Closing Bell.”
But candidates generally have to agree to certain restrictions, such as spending limits, which is why Obama said he opted against taking public money.
Lamenting the influence of money in politics, Diller said elected officials shouldn’t have to spend signi
US should get rid of all paid political advertising, billionaire media mogul Barry Diller says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, system, politics, rid, democratic, paid, political, media, advertising, diller, york, trump, mogul, money, public, billionaire, barry


US should get rid of all paid political advertising, billionaire media mogul Barry Diller says

Billionaire media mogul Barry Diller told CNBC on Thursday that he believes the U.S. should not have paid political advertising.

“What this country should do is get rid of all advertising for politics,” the IAC chairman said on “Closing Bell.” “We should have a system where in fact the government subsidizes getting the message out.”

Diller has been supportive of publicly financed elections in the past, backing an effort in 2012 to bring them to New York State, but his comments take on new light given his support for Facebook’s political advertising policy.

The social media company has been heavily criticized for its decision to not fact-check political ads on its platform, but Diller reiterated that he believes it is the right approach due to the difficulty of policing promotional speech.

“When you promote you tend to exaggerate both the negatives and the positives,” he said Thursday, the same day Facebook released an updated policy that allows users to see fewer political ads.

Diller is a major Democratic donor and a staunch critic of President Donald Trump. He has labeled Trump an “evil miracle” and called his presidency a “joke.”

Some states and municipalities in the U.S. already allow for public financing of elections — and presidential candidates have the option available to them, too. In fact, in 2008, then-Sen. Barack Obama was the first major party candidate to decline public financing since the system was created in 1976.

But candidates generally have to agree to certain restrictions, such as spending limits, which is why Obama said he opted against taking public money.

Lamenting the influence of money in politics, Diller said elected officials shouldn’t have to spend significant portions of time fundraising. He also called the current political advertising landscape a “circus.”

“The idea that you have money in politics is simply crackpot,” Diller said, arguing it has “very, very, very bad consequences.”

Diller made four political donations in 2019, according to Federal Election Commission records. Since 2006, Diller has contributed more than $1 million to various campaigns and organizations such as state Democratic parties, FEC records show.

Last year, he made $2,800 donations to the Democratic presidential campaigns of former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar.

Diller was highly complimentary Thursday of Buttigieg and Klobuchar’s primary opponent, fellow billionaire and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

“You couldn’t have a better candidate” than Bloomberg,” Diller said, citing his track record of success in politics and business. Bloomberg has already spent more than $100 million of his money on political ads.

Diller also contributed $2,800 to Lindsey Boylan, a Democrat who is running to unseat incumbent Rep. Jerry Nadler in New York’s 10th District.

After leading Paramount Pictures and Fox, Diller established IAC. It is the holding company of internet brands such as video streaming service Vimeo. It also recently announced plans to spin off Match Group, which includes youth-oriented dating app Tinder.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, system, politics, rid, democratic, paid, political, media, advertising, diller, york, trump, mogul, money, public, billionaire, barry


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Ghosn speaks out about his escape from Japan, calls reports on the cost ‘very, very generous’

Ghosn adamantly denied all charges against him and defended his decision to become an international fugitive by fleeing Japan as a necessity to receive a fair trial and “escape injustice.” ‘It’s about confession'”I want to be able to speak, I want to be able to defend myself,” Ghosn told CNBC’s Michelle Caruso-Cabrera following a more than two-hour press conference in Lebanon. Regarding his escape from Japan, Ghosn declined to provide specifics, saying he did not want to get anyone who helped hi


Ghosn adamantly denied all charges against him and defended his decision to become an international fugitive by fleeing Japan as a necessity to receive a fair trial and “escape injustice.”
‘It’s about confession'”I want to be able to speak, I want to be able to defend myself,” Ghosn told CNBC’s Michelle Caruso-Cabrera following a more than two-hour press conference in Lebanon.
Regarding his escape from Japan, Ghosn declined to provide specifics, saying he did not want to get anyone who helped hi
Ghosn speaks out about his escape from Japan, calls reports on the cost ‘very, very generous’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nissan, reports, ghosn, generous, told, cost, speaks, japan, calls, trial, escape, truth, able, system, lebanon


Ghosn speaks out about his escape from Japan, calls reports on the cost 'very, very generous'

Following a secretive escape last week from Japan to Lebanon, former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn publicly defended himself Wednesday — for the first time since his initial arrest in November 2018 — against accusations of financial misconduct and misuse of corporate resources. Ghosn adamantly denied all charges against him and defended his decision to become an international fugitive by fleeing Japan as a necessity to receive a fair trial and “escape injustice.”

‘It’s about confession’

“I want to be able to speak, I want to be able to defend myself,” Ghosn told CNBC’s Michelle Caruso-Cabrera following a more than two-hour press conference in Lebanon. “I want a justice system where attack and defense have the same rights, and it’s balanced and let the truth happen. I was in the system where it’s not about the truth, it’s about winning. It’s about confession.” Regarding his escape from Japan, Ghosn declined to provide specifics, saying he did not want to get anyone who helped him in trouble. The plan reportedly included a former U.S. Army Green Beret and the ex-executive hiding in a music equipment case.

Former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn told CNBC’s Michelle Caruso-Cabrera that he has been “reborn” since escaping from Japan to Lebanon. CNBC

“I’m not going to confirm or say anything,” he said. “But I can tell you that it is obviously, you know, you have a lot of anxiety when you are in a period where you are transitioning out of the country but you’re not still out of reach.” Ghosn said some reports of the cost of his escape have been “very, very generous,” adding you “don’t need that kind of money to be able to organize.” “Obviously, the simpler it is, the better it is, the more chance you have to be successful,” Ghosn said. “And the more discreet you will be.”

‘Reborn’

Since arriving in Lebanon, Ghosn said he has been “reborn” and the anxiety and emotions he felt during his escape have diminished by the joy of seeing his family, specifically his wife: “I’m a different man today,” he said. Ghosn, who simultaneously led three automakers as part of the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi alliance, said he did not attempt to contact Greg Kelly, a former colleague and alleged co-conspirator who remains in Japan awaiting trial, about escaping with him. Calling Kelly a “great person,” Ghosn said contact between the two was “forbidden” as a condition of his bail.

Ghosn described his captivity in Japan to reporters earlier Wednesday as a “nightmare” that included intense interrogations of up to eight hours a day, without access to a lawyer, and threats that his family would suffer if he didn’t confess. “The feeling of hopelessness was profound,” he said. He later added, “I left Japan because I wanted justice. It is the only way to reestablish my reputation. If I don’t get it in Japan, I will get it somewhere else.”

Nissan conspiracy?

Ghosn reiterated to CNBC that he believes the charges against him were part of a conspiracy by Nissan executives to stop the well-known executive from further integrating Nissan with Renault. He said “without any doubt” the company was willing to destroy his reputation to retain the automaker’s Japanese roots. During the Wednesday press conference, Ghosn accused former Nissan CEO Hiroto Saikawa, who resigned in September, and Hari Nada, a former senior vice president of the automaker, among those involved in the alleged conspiracy. Hitoshi Kawaguchi, who previously handled government affairs for Nissan; Hidetoshi Imazu, the auto firm’s statutory auditor; and board member Masakazu Toyoda were also identified by Ghosn as the three main people behind a plot to topple him.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nissan, reports, ghosn, generous, told, cost, speaks, japan, calls, trial, escape, truth, able, system, lebanon


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