Pentagon is scrambling as China ‘sells the hell out of’ armed drones to US allies

As one visitor at Abu Dhabi’s international defense expo, IDEX, put it this week, “China has been selling the hell out of its drones,” to Gulf militaries like those of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia. The U.S., while a top security partner to these states, currently does not supply them with its armed drone technology due to strict export regulations. Lt. Gen. Charles Hooper, director of the Pentagon’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), emphasized changes underway to the


As one visitor at Abu Dhabi’s international defense expo, IDEX, put it this week, “China has been selling the hell out of its drones,” to Gulf militaries like those of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia. The U.S., while a top security partner to these states, currently does not supply them with its armed drone technology due to strict export regulations. Lt. Gen. Charles Hooper, director of the Pentagon’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), emphasized changes underway to the
Pentagon is scrambling as China ‘sells the hell out of’ armed drones to US allies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: natasha turak, isaac brekken, getty images, markus matzel, ullstein bild via getty images, -jack watling, land warfare expert, royal united services institute
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unmanned, scrambling, armed, china, allies, include, hell, hooper, sells, gulf, policy, changes, drones, defense, security, systems, pentagon


Pentagon is scrambling as China 'sells the hell out of' armed drones to US allies

As one visitor at Abu Dhabi’s international defense expo, IDEX, put it this week, “China has been selling the hell out of its drones,” to Gulf militaries like those of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia.

The U.S., while a top security partner to these states, currently does not supply them with its armed drone technology due to strict export regulations. But in the face of record Middle East defense spending and encroaching foreign competition, it’s under renewed pressure to do just that.

Lt. Gen. Charles Hooper, director of the Pentagon’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), emphasized changes underway to the Conventional Arms Transfer (CAT) policy, which has thus far prevented the sale of armed drones to Washington’s Arab allies.

“As an element of the changes to the CAT policy, we’ve reviewed and are in the process of implementing changes to our policy with respect to unmanned aerial systems,” Hooper told media at the conference Sunday.

“We want to make many of our unmanned aerial systems available to our partners. Many of them have been asking for some time, we’re going to move forward as quickly as possible.”

Those systems that Gulf allies have wanted include the deadly MQ-9 Reaper, produced by General Atomics, a hunter-killer drone that can carry up to four hellfire missiles as well as laser-guided bombs and joint direct attack munitions (JDAMs). What’s been stopping the sales include concerns over proliferation, or risks that it could end up in the wrong hands.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: natasha turak, isaac brekken, getty images, markus matzel, ullstein bild via getty images, -jack watling, land warfare expert, royal united services institute
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unmanned, scrambling, armed, china, allies, include, hell, hooper, sells, gulf, policy, changes, drones, defense, security, systems, pentagon


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Pentagon is scrambling as China ‘sells the hell out of’ armed drones to US allies

As one visitor at Abu Dhabi’s international defense expo, IDEX, put it this week, “China has been selling the hell out of its drones,” to Gulf militaries like those of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia. The U.S., while a top security partner to these states, currently does not supply them with its armed drone technology due to strict export regulations. Lt. Gen. Charles Hooper, director of the Pentagon’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), emphasized changes underway to the


As one visitor at Abu Dhabi’s international defense expo, IDEX, put it this week, “China has been selling the hell out of its drones,” to Gulf militaries like those of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia. The U.S., while a top security partner to these states, currently does not supply them with its armed drone technology due to strict export regulations. Lt. Gen. Charles Hooper, director of the Pentagon’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), emphasized changes underway to the
Pentagon is scrambling as China ‘sells the hell out of’ armed drones to US allies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: natasha turak, isaac brekken, getty images, markus matzel, ullstein bild via getty images, -jack watling, land warfare expert, royal united services institute
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unmanned, scrambling, armed, china, allies, include, hell, hooper, sells, gulf, policy, changes, drones, defense, security, systems, pentagon


Pentagon is scrambling as China 'sells the hell out of' armed drones to US allies

As one visitor at Abu Dhabi’s international defense expo, IDEX, put it this week, “China has been selling the hell out of its drones,” to Gulf militaries like those of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia.

The U.S., while a top security partner to these states, currently does not supply them with its armed drone technology due to strict export regulations. But in the face of record Middle East defense spending and encroaching foreign competition, it’s under renewed pressure to do just that.

Lt. Gen. Charles Hooper, director of the Pentagon’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), emphasized changes underway to the Conventional Arms Transfer (CAT) policy, which has thus far prevented the sale of armed drones to Washington’s Arab allies.

“As an element of the changes to the CAT policy, we’ve reviewed and are in the process of implementing changes to our policy with respect to unmanned aerial systems,” Hooper told media at the conference Sunday.

“We want to make many of our unmanned aerial systems available to our partners. Many of them have been asking for some time, we’re going to move forward as quickly as possible.”

Those systems that Gulf allies have wanted include the deadly MQ-9 Reaper, produced by General Atomics, a hunter-killer drone that can carry up to four hellfire missiles as well as laser-guided bombs and joint direct attack munitions (JDAMs). What’s been stopping the sales include concerns over proliferation, or risks that it could end up in the wrong hands.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: natasha turak, isaac brekken, getty images, markus matzel, ullstein bild via getty images, -jack watling, land warfare expert, royal united services institute
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unmanned, scrambling, armed, china, allies, include, hell, hooper, sells, gulf, policy, changes, drones, defense, security, systems, pentagon


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BAE Systems warns of risk from German stance on Saudi arms

BAE Systems said German moves to block exports to Saudi Arabia could damage its major deals with the Kingdom and weigh on Britain’s biggest defence company’s financial performance. BAE said it was reliant on the approval of export licences by a number of governments in order to continue supplies to Saudi Arabia. Germany is part of the consortium that builds the Eurofighter Typhoon, a fighter jet that BAE has sold to Saudi Arabia, through Airbus and MTU Aero Engines. On Wednesday, German Foreign


BAE Systems said German moves to block exports to Saudi Arabia could damage its major deals with the Kingdom and weigh on Britain’s biggest defence company’s financial performance. BAE said it was reliant on the approval of export licences by a number of governments in order to continue supplies to Saudi Arabia. Germany is part of the consortium that builds the Eurofighter Typhoon, a fighter jet that BAE has sold to Saudi Arabia, through Airbus and MTU Aero Engines. On Wednesday, German Foreign
BAE Systems warns of risk from German stance on Saudi arms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: photographer, collection, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, systems, uk, bae, exports, issue, woodburn, saudi, risk, warns, stance, arms, arabia, working, financial, german


BAE Systems warns of risk from German stance on Saudi arms

BAE Systems said German moves to block exports to Saudi Arabia could damage its major deals with the Kingdom and weigh on Britain’s biggest defence company’s financial performance.

BAE said it was reliant on the approval of export licences by a number of governments in order to continue supplies to Saudi Arabia.

“BAE Systems is therefore working closely with the UK government to minimise the risk of any such occurrence and the impact it would have on financial performance, the supply chain and relationships,” it said in its annual results on Thursday.

Shares in BAE slid 5.9 percent in early trading in London.

Germany is part of the consortium that builds the Eurofighter Typhoon, a fighter jet that BAE has sold to Saudi Arabia, through Airbus and MTU Aero Engines.

Germany’s government is trying to halt weapons exports to Saudi Arabia after the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, but Britain has urged the country to exempt big defence projects or face damage to its commercial credibility.

On Wednesday, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said that future decisions on whether to deliver arms to Saudi Arabia will develop on how the conflict develops in Yemen.

BAE makes 14 percent of its annual sales from selling Typhoons and other arms to the kingdom, and the tensions have raised questions about the UK government’s 10 billion pound deal to sell Saudi Arabia 48 new Typhoons.

The deal, confirmed in a memorandum of understanding last March, has not been finalised, and is not reflected in BAE’s 2018 financial statements.

“The issue of German licences is a political issue and as such requires it to be resolved at the political level,” Chief Executive Charles Woodburn told reporters on Thursday.

“To that end, we’re working closely with the UK government,” before adding “there’s also a concern among industry partners such as Airbus.”

Despite the issue of Saudi exports and other geopolitical uncertainty, BAE said its earnings would grow in 2019 compared to a flat 2018.

BAE said it expected mid-single digit growth in underlying earnings per share in 2019, compared to a full-year figure for last year of 42.9p, roughly flat on the previous year and in line with expectations.

“The Group made good progress in strengthening the outlook and geographic base of the business, with a number of significant contract wins,” Woodburn said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: photographer, collection, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, systems, uk, bae, exports, issue, woodburn, saudi, risk, warns, stance, arms, arabia, working, financial, german


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Pedestrian crash avoidance systems pass tests, with one notable exception

In recent years automakers have been adding pedestrian crash avoidance technology to the safety packages offered in many vehicles, but as of now, these systems are not mandatory in all vehicles. Still, there are enough equipped models for the IIHS to test if these safety systems actually work. There were two models that struggled in the IIHS tests. We’re always working to improve our vehicles’ across-the-board crash and crash-prevention systems and processes, and will study the results of this r


In recent years automakers have been adding pedestrian crash avoidance technology to the safety packages offered in many vehicles, but as of now, these systems are not mandatory in all vehicles. Still, there are enough equipped models for the IIHS to test if these safety systems actually work. There were two models that struggled in the IIHS tests. We’re always working to improve our vehicles’ across-the-board crash and crash-prevention systems and processes, and will study the results of this r
Pedestrian crash avoidance systems pass tests, with one notable exception Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: phil lebeau, source, insurance institute for highway safety
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vehicles, exception, avoidance, technology, pedestrian, safety, vehicle, pass, iihs, suvs, crash, tests, test, notable, systems


Pedestrian crash avoidance systems pass tests, with one notable exception

Wondering if the technology in your car or truck will actually keep you from hitting someone who might walk in front of you as you’re driving? The answer, in most cases, is yes, your car will probably stop.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety conducted a series of tests putting crash dummies in some of the most common pedestrian collision scenarios to see if 11 small SUVs stop in time or significantly slow down before a crash.

“Overall, these systems performed very well,” said David Aylor, active safety testing manager for IIHS. “Nine of the 11 models avoided or significantly slowed down to mitigate the impact of a crash.”

The tests come as pedestrian fatalities in the United States are close to a record high. In 2017, the number of people hit and killed by vehicles totaled 5,997, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association.

In recent years automakers have been adding pedestrian crash avoidance technology to the safety packages offered in many vehicles, but as of now, these systems are not mandatory in all vehicles. Still, there are enough equipped models for the IIHS to test if these safety systems actually work.

IIHS ran three tests: a crash test dummy crossing in front of a vehicle, a dummy walking beside a vehicle (to test what happens when a person walking on the shoulder of a road strays into traffic) and a child dummy darting out into a street from behind a parked vehicle. The SUVs were tested travelling at 12 miles per hour and 25 mph.

In the vast majority of tests, the SUVs either stopped in time or slowed down significantly to limit the impact of the vehicle/pedestrian collision.

“These tests show the technology works,” said Aylor. “And because cameras and radar trigger the SUVs to slow down, the technology works regardless of what the driver is doing.”

There were two models that struggled in the IIHS tests.

The 2019 Mitsubishi Outlander was rated as “basic,” with IIHS saying the Outlander’s autobrake earned a superior rating in front crash prevention tests but reduced the vehicle’s speed minimally in other scenarios.

Mitsubishi said, “We’re proud of the Mitsubishi Outlander’s consistent highest-possible “Good” ratings in Insurance Institute for Highway Safety – IIHS – crashworthiness testing, as well as the vehicle’s top-level “Superior” front-crash prevention. We’re always working to improve our vehicles’ across-the-board crash and crash-prevention systems and processes, and will study the results of this round of testing as we develop new vehicles and systems.”

Meanwhile, the 2018-19 BMW X1 was given the lowest designation of “no credit” by the IIHS.

“There were several scenarios where the X1 did not stop at all and other scenarios where it only scrubbed off a few miles per hour of speed before the collision,” said Aylor.

A spokesperson for BMW said, “Our collision avoidance system is designed to a detect a vehicle. It can detect pedestrians, but in some situations it is not designed to detect a person.”

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety says it plans to test how well pedestrian crash avoidance systems perform with other classes of vehicles.

“Hopefully, this technology will help lower the number of pedestrians who are hit by cars,” said Aylor.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: phil lebeau, source, insurance institute for highway safety
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vehicles, exception, avoidance, technology, pedestrian, safety, vehicle, pass, iihs, suvs, crash, tests, test, notable, systems


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Epic CEO Judy Faulkner: We would never sell to Apple

But Epic Systems CEO Judy Faulkner is not like most CEOs. In January, CNBC’s Jim Cramer suggested that Apple should consider buying Epic, one of the largest private health IT companies in the world. But a buyer needs a seller, and Epic isn’t interested. Among them: Epic Systems doesn’t do deals, and it will never go public. Faulkner also dismissed the ambitions of cloud providers Amazon, Microsoft and Google as they try to sell to large hospitals.


But Epic Systems CEO Judy Faulkner is not like most CEOs. In January, CNBC’s Jim Cramer suggested that Apple should consider buying Epic, one of the largest private health IT companies in the world. But a buyer needs a seller, and Epic isn’t interested. Among them: Epic Systems doesn’t do deals, and it will never go public. Faulkner also dismissed the ambitions of cloud providers Amazon, Microsoft and Google as they try to sell to large hospitals.
Epic CEO Judy Faulkner: We would never sell to Apple Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: christina farr, via epic systems
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, health, investors, epic, microsoft, sell, theyre, judy, isnt, largest, faulkner, systems, apple, ceo


Epic CEO Judy Faulkner: We would never sell to Apple

Most CEOs would not balk at the idea of Apple buying their company.

But Epic Systems CEO Judy Faulkner is not like most CEOs.

In January, CNBC’s Jim Cramer suggested that Apple should consider buying Epic, one of the largest private health IT companies in the world. The move would help Apple convince customers and investors that it’s serious about health care, as Epic sells its medical record software to many of the largest hospitals in America.

But a buyer needs a seller, and Epic isn’t interested.

“We’re not going to do that,” Faulkner told HealthCareITNews at the HIMSS health conference earlier this week.

Faulkner, who founded the company nearly 40 years ago and grew it to billions of dollars in revenues, is now the third richest woman in the country. The 75-year-old founder rarely gives interviews, but has made her guiding principles very clear to employees and investors. Among them: Epic Systems doesn’t do deals, and it will never go public. These rules are plastered everywhere on the company’s campus in Verona, Wisconsin, including in every bathroom and breakroom.

Faulkner went on to explain that none of her customers were concerned about the possibility. “It was just very gratifying that not a single health system contacted us about it and said they were worried. They all said they laughed,” she said.

“I think the thing that amazed me most about it is not that he said it. But that the message is so clear around the whole industry that we wouldn’t do that,” she said. “And nobody questioned it. That was a real achievement, I think.”

Faulkner also dismissed the ambitions of cloud providers Amazon, Microsoft and Google as they try to sell to large hospitals. All three companies attended the same conference, HIMSS, to tout their offerings in the cloud.

“They might come to us. (But) right now they’re not going to the major cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Because they’re not yet – because as far as I understand it, the large amount of data that they would have to run their databases isn’t how those three organizations have organized, so they would have to change some things in order to be able to handle that,” she explained. “And I know that we do have at least one customer, probably two, trying to work with them for disaster recovery. And there’s hurdles to get them. They’ve got to figure out those hurdles.”

Read the full interview with HealthcareITNews here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: christina farr, via epic systems
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, health, investors, epic, microsoft, sell, theyre, judy, isnt, largest, faulkner, systems, apple, ceo


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Epic CEO Judy Faulkner: We would never sell to Apple

But Epic Systems CEO Judy Faulkner is not like most CEOs. In January, CNBC’s Jim Cramer suggested that Apple should consider buying Epic, one of the largest private health IT companies in the world. But a buyer needs a seller, and Epic isn’t interested. Among them: Epic Systems doesn’t do deals, and it will never go public. Faulkner also dismissed the ambitions of cloud providers Amazon, Microsoft and Google as they try to sell to large hospitals.


But Epic Systems CEO Judy Faulkner is not like most CEOs. In January, CNBC’s Jim Cramer suggested that Apple should consider buying Epic, one of the largest private health IT companies in the world. But a buyer needs a seller, and Epic isn’t interested. Among them: Epic Systems doesn’t do deals, and it will never go public. Faulkner also dismissed the ambitions of cloud providers Amazon, Microsoft and Google as they try to sell to large hospitals.
Epic CEO Judy Faulkner: We would never sell to Apple Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: christina farr, via epic systems
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, health, investors, epic, microsoft, sell, theyre, judy, isnt, largest, faulkner, systems, apple, ceo


Epic CEO Judy Faulkner: We would never sell to Apple

Most CEOs would not balk at the idea of Apple buying their company.

But Epic Systems CEO Judy Faulkner is not like most CEOs.

In January, CNBC’s Jim Cramer suggested that Apple should consider buying Epic, one of the largest private health IT companies in the world. The move would help Apple convince customers and investors that it’s serious about health care, as Epic sells its medical record software to many of the largest hospitals in America.

But a buyer needs a seller, and Epic isn’t interested.

“We’re not going to do that,” Faulkner told HealthCareITNews at the HIMSS health conference earlier this week.

Faulkner, who founded the company nearly 40 years ago and grew it to billions of dollars in revenues, is now the third richest woman in the country. The 75-year-old founder rarely gives interviews, but has made her guiding principles very clear to employees and investors. Among them: Epic Systems doesn’t do deals, and it will never go public. These rules are plastered everywhere on the company’s campus in Verona, Wisconsin, including in every bathroom and breakroom.

Faulkner went on to explain that none of her customers were concerned about the possibility. “It was just very gratifying that not a single health system contacted us about it and said they were worried. They all said they laughed,” she said.

“I think the thing that amazed me most about it is not that he said it. But that the message is so clear around the whole industry that we wouldn’t do that,” she said. “And nobody questioned it. That was a real achievement, I think.”

Faulkner also dismissed the ambitions of cloud providers Amazon, Microsoft and Google as they try to sell to large hospitals. All three companies attended the same conference, HIMSS, to tout their offerings in the cloud.

“They might come to us. (But) right now they’re not going to the major cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Because they’re not yet – because as far as I understand it, the large amount of data that they would have to run their databases isn’t how those three organizations have organized, so they would have to change some things in order to be able to handle that,” she explained. “And I know that we do have at least one customer, probably two, trying to work with them for disaster recovery. And there’s hurdles to get them. They’ve got to figure out those hurdles.”

Read the full interview with HealthcareITNews here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: christina farr, via epic systems
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, health, investors, epic, microsoft, sell, theyre, judy, isnt, largest, faulkner, systems, apple, ceo


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‘Shark Tank’ star Robert Herjavec’s first big splurge cost $6 million — and it wasn’t a house

“Shark Tank” star Robert Herjavec still remembers his first big splurge after becoming rich. It was shortly after he sold his computer company BRAK Systems to AT&T Canada in 2000. “Now, it sounds really fancy…but if we go back in time it was this tiny little airplane,” Herjavec tells CNBC Make It. Though Herjavec sold BRAK Systems for a reported $30.2 million CAD (which at the time would have been around $20 million US), he didn’t come from money. But Herjavec worked hard — first, waiting tabl


“Shark Tank” star Robert Herjavec still remembers his first big splurge after becoming rich. It was shortly after he sold his computer company BRAK Systems to AT&T Canada in 2000. “Now, it sounds really fancy…but if we go back in time it was this tiny little airplane,” Herjavec tells CNBC Make It. Though Herjavec sold BRAK Systems for a reported $30.2 million CAD (which at the time would have been around $20 million US), he didn’t come from money. But Herjavec worked hard — first, waiting tabl
‘Shark Tank’ star Robert Herjavec’s first big splurge cost $6 million — and it wasn’t a house Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, splurge, robert, tank, canada, star, million, company, sold, herjavecs, house, brak, systems, thought, shark, computer, airplane, wasnt, cost, herjavec


'Shark Tank' star Robert Herjavec's first big splurge cost $6 million — and it wasn't a house

“Shark Tank” star Robert Herjavec still remembers his first big splurge after becoming rich.

It was shortly after he sold his computer company BRAK Systems to AT&T Canada in 2000. Herjavec bought himself a $6 million plane.

“Now, it sounds really fancy…but if we go back in time it was this tiny little airplane,” Herjavec tells CNBC Make It. “It had a propeller and only one engine, but I thought it was the biggest jet in the world.

“I just couldn’t believe that people could own their own airplane,” he adds. “My god, I thought I was so fancy. The first time I got on it, I must have taken 600 pictures on the way from the terminal to the airplane.”

Though Herjavec sold BRAK Systems for a reported $30.2 million CAD (which at the time would have been around $20 million US), he didn’t come from money. His family fled Yugoslavia in 1970. He arrived in Canada by boat with his parents, a single suitcase and just $20. But Herjavec worked hard — first, waiting tables and delivering newspapers, and eventually launching a computer company from his basement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, splurge, robert, tank, canada, star, million, company, sold, herjavecs, house, brak, systems, thought, shark, computer, airplane, wasnt, cost, herjavec


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Chinese drone maker creates no-fly zones around airports in 32 European countries

Chinese drone maker DJI will roll out a system in 32 European countries this month to prevent its drones entering airport flightpaths. The Chinese firm said Tuesday that its state of the art geofencing will be implemented into drones’ GPS systems, using complex shapes and three-dimensional “bow tie” zones around runways. DJI will apply its Geospatial Environment Online (GEO) 2.0 system to 19 new countries, as well as the 13 that already had existing geofencing systems in place. GEO 2.0 will crea


Chinese drone maker DJI will roll out a system in 32 European countries this month to prevent its drones entering airport flightpaths. The Chinese firm said Tuesday that its state of the art geofencing will be implemented into drones’ GPS systems, using complex shapes and three-dimensional “bow tie” zones around runways. DJI will apply its Geospatial Environment Online (GEO) 2.0 system to 19 new countries, as well as the 13 that already had existing geofencing systems in place. GEO 2.0 will crea
Chinese drone maker creates no-fly zones around airports in 32 European countries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: chloe taylor, bruce bennett, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airports, system, nofly, zones, 20, using, drones, creates, european, sensitive, systems, chinese, dji, countries, 32, maker, threedimensional, drone, geofencing


Chinese drone maker creates no-fly zones around airports in 32 European countries

Chinese drone maker DJI will roll out a system in 32 European countries this month to prevent its drones entering airport flightpaths.

The Chinese firm said Tuesday that its state of the art geofencing will be implemented into drones’ GPS systems, using complex shapes and three-dimensional “bow tie” zones around runways.

The decision from DJI comes a few months after London’s Gatwick airport suffered three days of flight disruption in December after drones were sighted flying in its vicinity. It led to 1,000 flights being cancelled or diverted, with airline easyJet estimating a loss of almost $20 million as a direct result.

DJI will apply its Geospatial Environment Online (GEO) 2.0 system to 19 new countries, as well as the 13 that already had existing geofencing systems in place.

GEO 2.0 will create detailed three-dimensional safety zones around runway flight paths. Drones using DJI software will have the safety zones integrated into their navigational systems and be unable to breach the areas.

The strictest controls – used for highly sensitive airports – will be applied to a 0.75-mile area around runways, as well as three-dimensional areas around flightpaths where planes take off and land.

At less sensitive airports, more flexible geofencing restrictions will be applied.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: chloe taylor, bruce bennett, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airports, system, nofly, zones, 20, using, drones, creates, european, sensitive, systems, chinese, dji, countries, 32, maker, threedimensional, drone, geofencing


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Chinese drone maker creates no-fly zones around airports in 32 European countries

Chinese drone maker DJI will roll out a system in 32 European countries this month to prevent its drones entering airport flightpaths. The Chinese firm said Tuesday that its state of the art geofencing will be implemented into drones’ GPS systems, using complex shapes and three-dimensional “bow tie” zones around runways. DJI will apply its Geospatial Environment Online (GEO) 2.0 system to 19 new countries, as well as the 13 that already had existing geofencing systems in place. GEO 2.0 will crea


Chinese drone maker DJI will roll out a system in 32 European countries this month to prevent its drones entering airport flightpaths. The Chinese firm said Tuesday that its state of the art geofencing will be implemented into drones’ GPS systems, using complex shapes and three-dimensional “bow tie” zones around runways. DJI will apply its Geospatial Environment Online (GEO) 2.0 system to 19 new countries, as well as the 13 that already had existing geofencing systems in place. GEO 2.0 will crea
Chinese drone maker creates no-fly zones around airports in 32 European countries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: chloe taylor, bruce bennett, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airports, system, nofly, zones, 20, using, drones, creates, european, sensitive, systems, chinese, dji, countries, 32, maker, threedimensional, drone, geofencing


Chinese drone maker creates no-fly zones around airports in 32 European countries

Chinese drone maker DJI will roll out a system in 32 European countries this month to prevent its drones entering airport flightpaths.

The Chinese firm said Tuesday that its state of the art geofencing will be implemented into drones’ GPS systems, using complex shapes and three-dimensional “bow tie” zones around runways.

The decision from DJI comes a few months after London’s Gatwick airport suffered three days of flight disruption in December after drones were sighted flying in its vicinity. It led to 1,000 flights being cancelled or diverted, with airline easyJet estimating a loss of almost $20 million as a direct result.

DJI will apply its Geospatial Environment Online (GEO) 2.0 system to 19 new countries, as well as the 13 that already had existing geofencing systems in place.

GEO 2.0 will create detailed three-dimensional safety zones around runway flight paths. Drones using DJI software will have the safety zones integrated into their navigational systems and be unable to breach the areas.

The strictest controls – used for highly sensitive airports – will be applied to a 0.75-mile area around runways, as well as three-dimensional areas around flightpaths where planes take off and land.

At less sensitive airports, more flexible geofencing restrictions will be applied.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: chloe taylor, bruce bennett, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airports, system, nofly, zones, 20, using, drones, creates, european, sensitive, systems, chinese, dji, countries, 32, maker, threedimensional, drone, geofencing


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Here’s how Amazon could use the Wi-Fi tech it just bought

Eero was a venture-backed start-up that sold mesh Wi-Fi networking systems through a wide variety of retailers, including Amazon and Best Buy. They allow you to spread WiFi all around your home instead of relying on a single Wi-Fi router and boosters to cover the whole house. If you have areas that never seem to get good coverage, a mesh Wi-Fi system can help solve that. The biggest players aside from Eero are Netgear and Google Wi-Fi. In fact, one likely reason Amazon bought Eero was to stay ah


Eero was a venture-backed start-up that sold mesh Wi-Fi networking systems through a wide variety of retailers, including Amazon and Best Buy. They allow you to spread WiFi all around your home instead of relying on a single Wi-Fi router and boosters to cover the whole house. If you have areas that never seem to get good coverage, a mesh Wi-Fi system can help solve that. The biggest players aside from Eero are Netgear and Google Wi-Fi. In fact, one likely reason Amazon bought Eero was to stay ah
Here’s how Amazon could use the Wi-Fi tech it just bought Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: todd haselton, matt winkelmeyer, getty images, source, andrew burton, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eero, heres, wide, wifi, amazon, competition, systems, tech, venturebacked, youve, google, mesh, bought


Here's how Amazon could use the Wi-Fi tech it just bought

Eero was a venture-backed start-up that sold mesh Wi-Fi networking systems through a wide variety of retailers, including Amazon and Best Buy.

It sounds boring, but if you’ve never used one, these sorts of systems are great. They allow you to spread WiFi all around your home instead of relying on a single Wi-Fi router and boosters to cover the whole house. If you have areas that never seem to get good coverage, a mesh Wi-Fi system can help solve that. Eero made it super simple to set up, too.

The competition in the space is pretty minimal. The biggest players aside from Eero are Netgear and Google Wi-Fi. In fact, one likely reason Amazon bought Eero was to stay ahead of Google, whose Google Home and Nest products provide Amazon’s strongest competition for the connected home.

Other companies, such as Samsung and Belkin subsidiary Linksys, make them, too.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: todd haselton, matt winkelmeyer, getty images, source, andrew burton, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eero, heres, wide, wifi, amazon, competition, systems, tech, venturebacked, youve, google, mesh, bought


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