Advisors help clients tackle the complexities of Social Security

Eva would be best off waiting until 70 to collect her Social Security, because her benefit would be much larger. Eva and Jim Dion Source: Eva and Jim Dion”Every six months Jim said, ‘I really think Eva should be claiming Social Security,'” McClanahan said. More than 40 percent of people say they worry about the Social Security system a “great deal,” according to a recent poll by Gallup. Less than a third of Americans expect Social Security to be a major source of their retirement income. Advisor


Eva would be best off waiting until 70 to collect her Social Security, because her benefit would be much larger. Eva and Jim Dion Source: Eva and Jim Dion”Every six months Jim said, ‘I really think Eva should be claiming Social Security,'” McClanahan said. More than 40 percent of people say they worry about the Social Security system a “great deal,” according to a recent poll by Gallup. Less than a third of Americans expect Social Security to be a major source of their retirement income. Advisor
Advisors help clients tackle the complexities of Social Security Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: annie nova, deborah nason, paul smith, president ceo of cfa institute
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, advisors, claim, tackle, mcclanahan, financial, jim, complexities, eva, help, security, clients, benefits, social, software


Advisors help clients tackle the complexities of Social Security

Tom Grill | Getty Images

Eva Dion’s 62nd birthday meant one thing to her husband, Jim. It was time for her to collect Social Security. “I’m from the old school,” Jim, 74, said. “Grab the money while you can.” Yet before Eva made her decision, she mulled it over with her financial advisor, Carolyn McClanahan, the founder of Life Planning Partners in Jacksonville, Florida. McClanahan, a certified financial planner, plugged all of Eva’s details into a software program called SSanalyzer, which runs thousands of claiming strategies and spits out the best options. The findings didn’t match up with Jim. Eva would be best off waiting until 70 to collect her Social Security, because her benefit would be much larger. Her health was good, and many years were likely ahead of her. Ultimately, Eva held back, though McClanahan had to often remind her and Jim that their patience would pay off.

Eva and Jim Dion Source: Eva and Jim Dion

“Every six months Jim said, ‘I really think Eva should be claiming Social Security,'” McClanahan said. “It was really a challenge.” When to actually claim Social Security — at the earliest age of 62 to the maximum age of 70 — is a complex issue and a very important conversation for financial advisors to have with their clients. If one of the main goals of financial advisors is to help their clients make decisions that are more rational than gut-derived, and be wealthier for it, it only makes sense that more planners are offering help with Social Security. Americans have a lot of anxiety about the social safety net program. A recent government report found the cost of the system will exceed its revenue next year for the first time since 1982. Meanwhile, the reserve fund is projected to run out in 16 years, at which point recipients will see reduced benefits if Congress doesn’t step in. More than 40 percent of people say they worry about the Social Security system a “great deal,” according to a recent poll by Gallup. Less than a third of Americans expect Social Security to be a major source of their retirement income.

Carolyn McClanahan Source: Carolyn McClanahan

“Nobody on Wall Street would ever leave this opportunity untouched,” Kotlikoff said. Still, less than 5% of Americans wait until 70 to file. Some people — such as those in poor health, for example — shouldn’t delay their benefits, and advisors can help their clients make the best decision based on their personal circumstances, said Joe Elsasser, founder and president of Social Security Timing (whose software Anspach uses). “Most people think it’s claim early or claim later, or an individual decision instead of one coordinated across the household,” Elsasser said. The reality, he said, is more complicated. A married couple, for example, could have more than 80 ways to claim their check. His software accounts for Social Security spousal, widow and survivor benefits, he said. Advisors also need to be able to understand the earnings test with Social Security, said William Meyer, co-founder of SSanalyzer. The government withholds benefits if a person younger than their full retirement age (66, for most people) earns above a certain amount.

Economist Laurence Kotlikoff is hoping his company’s software can prevent individuals from making costly financial decisions. Bridget Jourgensen


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: annie nova, deborah nason, paul smith, president ceo of cfa institute
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, advisors, claim, tackle, mcclanahan, financial, jim, complexities, eva, help, security, clients, benefits, social, software


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UK scientists aiming to use bionic leaves to tackle air pollution

Imperial College London is to work with a start-up called Arborea to develop innovative new technology that it hopes will boost air quality in the U.K. capital. In an announcement Monday, Imperial said that the BioSolar Leaf technology purified air by using the photosynthesis of microscopic plants. Air pollution is a serious problem globally. According to the World Heal Organization (WHO), 4.2 million people die each year “as a result of exposure” to outdoor air pollution, while 91% of the plane


Imperial College London is to work with a start-up called Arborea to develop innovative new technology that it hopes will boost air quality in the U.K. capital. In an announcement Monday, Imperial said that the BioSolar Leaf technology purified air by using the photosynthesis of microscopic plants. Air pollution is a serious problem globally. According to the World Heal Organization (WHO), 4.2 million people die each year “as a result of exposure” to outdoor air pollution, while 91% of the plane
UK scientists aiming to use bionic leaves to tackle air pollution Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pollution, dioxide, standards, vehicles, ulez, tackle, quality, aiming, system, leaves, bionic, air, scientists, london, euro, uk


UK scientists aiming to use bionic leaves to tackle air pollution

Imperial College London is to work with a start-up called Arborea to develop innovative new technology that it hopes will boost air quality in the U.K. capital.

In an announcement Monday, Imperial said that the BioSolar Leaf technology purified air by using the photosynthesis of microscopic plants.

Photosynthesis is a process through which plants use the energy of the sun to convert water and carbon dioxide into glucose and oxygen.

Arborea’s system enables plant-life like microalgae and phytoplankton to grow on “solar panel-like structures.” These can be installed in the urban environment to improve the quality of air, although they do not themselves generate electricity like a conventional solar panel would.

Imperial will give the company — which was set up by a former student, Julian Melchiorri — funding to develop an outdoor pilot of its cultivation system on its campus in White City — a district in the west of London.

According to the company, one acre of its system can remove carbon dioxide and produce oxygen 100 times more than one acre of forest.

Melchiorri said the company was “excited” about its collaboration with Imperial.

“In our ever-growing modern cities, cooperation between start-ups, academic institutions and governmental bodies is critical to enable and accelerate sustainable innovation that benefits both our society and environment,” he added.

He went on to state that the pilot plant would “produce sustainable healthy food additives while purifying the air, producing oxygen and removing carbon dioxide from the surrounding environment.”

Air pollution is a serious problem globally. According to the World Heal Organization (WHO), 4.2 million people die each year “as a result of exposure” to outdoor air pollution, while 91% of the planet’s population live in areas where the air quality exceeds WHO guideline limits.

Authorities in London are looking to mitigate the impact of air pollution through an Ultra-Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) that operates in central London 24-hours a day, seven days a week.

The ULEZ is built around something called “Euro Standards.” A framework introduced in 1992, the standards encompass emissions controls which set limitations for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter from a vehicle’s engine.

Petrol vehicles that do not meet Euro 4 standards and diesel vehicles that do not meet Euro 6 standards will have to pay a daily £12.50 ($16.14) ULEZ charge in addition to an existing £11.50 Congestion Charge.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pollution, dioxide, standards, vehicles, ulez, tackle, quality, aiming, system, leaves, bionic, air, scientists, london, euro, uk


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The UK is going after Big Tech over harmful content: Here’s why it matters

Britain just announced plans for a tough new law aimed at forcing tech giants like Facebook and Twitter to clean up their platforms. The rules, unveiled in a white paper on Monday, would impose a legally binding duty of care on social networks to make sure they tackle harmful content. It could have the power to slap internet firms with heavy fines, block people’s access to websites and potentially hold executives personally liable for violations. U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said the new


Britain just announced plans for a tough new law aimed at forcing tech giants like Facebook and Twitter to clean up their platforms. The rules, unveiled in a white paper on Monday, would impose a legally binding duty of care on social networks to make sure they tackle harmful content. It could have the power to slap internet firms with heavy fines, block people’s access to websites and potentially hold executives personally liable for violations. U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said the new
The UK is going after Big Tech over harmful content: Here’s why it matters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: ryan browne, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, heres, online, uk, tech, websites, white, twitter, big, unveiled, tough, going, content, wright, violationsuk, harmful, matters


The UK is going after Big Tech over harmful content: Here's why it matters

Britain just announced plans for a tough new law aimed at forcing tech giants like Facebook and Twitter to clean up their platforms.

The rules, unveiled in a white paper on Monday, would impose a legally binding duty of care on social networks to make sure they tackle harmful content.

A new industry-funded regulator will be introduced under the proposals. It could have the power to slap internet firms with heavy fines, block people’s access to websites and potentially hold executives personally liable for violations.

U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said the new policy would put an end to the “era of self-regulation for online companies.”

“Voluntary actions from industry to tackle online harms have not been applied consistently or gone far enough,” he said in a statement Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: ryan browne, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, heres, online, uk, tech, websites, white, twitter, big, unveiled, tough, going, content, wright, violationsuk, harmful, matters


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The UK is going after Big Tech over harmful content: Here’s why it matters

Britain just announced plans for a tough new law aimed at forcing tech giants like Facebook and Twitter to clean up their platforms. The rules, unveiled in a white paper on Monday, would impose a legally binding duty of care on social networks to make sure they tackle harmful content. It could have the power to slap internet firms with heavy fines, block people’s access to websites and potentially hold executives personally liable for violations. U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said the new


Britain just announced plans for a tough new law aimed at forcing tech giants like Facebook and Twitter to clean up their platforms. The rules, unveiled in a white paper on Monday, would impose a legally binding duty of care on social networks to make sure they tackle harmful content. It could have the power to slap internet firms with heavy fines, block people’s access to websites and potentially hold executives personally liable for violations. U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said the new
The UK is going after Big Tech over harmful content: Here’s why it matters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: ryan browne, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, heres, online, uk, tech, websites, white, twitter, big, unveiled, tough, going, content, wright, violationsuk, harmful, matters


The UK is going after Big Tech over harmful content: Here's why it matters

Britain just announced plans for a tough new law aimed at forcing tech giants like Facebook and Twitter to clean up their platforms.

The rules, unveiled in a white paper on Monday, would impose a legally binding duty of care on social networks to make sure they tackle harmful content.

A new industry-funded regulator will be introduced under the proposals. It could have the power to slap internet firms with heavy fines, block people’s access to websites and potentially hold executives personally liable for violations.

U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said the new policy would put an end to the “era of self-regulation for online companies.”

“Voluntary actions from industry to tackle online harms have not been applied consistently or gone far enough,” he said in a statement Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: ryan browne, chip somodevilla, getty images
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Volvo to put cameras and sensors in its cars to tackle drunk driving

Volvo Cars is set to install in-car cameras and sensors to monitor drivers for signs of intoxication and distraction. Actions the car could take include limiting speed to slowing down and then parking the car in a safe place. The system, Volvo Cars said, will be on the lookout for a range of potentially dangerous behaviors. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), nearly 30 people in the U.S. die each day because of drunk driving crashes. “There are many accidents


Volvo Cars is set to install in-car cameras and sensors to monitor drivers for signs of intoxication and distraction. Actions the car could take include limiting speed to slowing down and then parking the car in a safe place. The system, Volvo Cars said, will be on the lookout for a range of potentially dangerous behaviors. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), nearly 30 people in the U.S. die each day because of drunk driving crashes. “There are many accidents
Volvo to put cameras and sensors in its cars to tackle drunk driving Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: anmar frangoul, volvo car group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serious, result, monitor, speed, drivers, technology, cameras, driving, drunk, volvo, cars, sensors, safety, car, tackle


Volvo to put cameras and sensors in its cars to tackle drunk driving

Volvo Cars is set to install in-car cameras and sensors to monitor drivers for signs of intoxication and distraction.

The firm said the technology will be used to monitor drivers and, when needed, enable the car “to intervene if a clearly intoxicated or distracted driver does not respond to warning signals and is risking an accident involving serious injury or death.”

Actions the car could take include limiting speed to slowing down and then parking the car in a safe place. Installation of the technology will start in the early 2020s.

Wednesday’s announcement represents the latest attempt by the company to boost the safety of its vehicles. At the beginning of March, it announced it would introduce a 180 kilometers per hour (112 miles per hour) speed limit on all its cars from 2020.

“When it comes to safety, our aim is to avoid accidents altogether rather than limit the impact when an accident is imminent and unavoidable,” Henrik Green, Volvo Cars’ senior vice president, research and development, said in a statement Wednesday.

“In this case, cameras will monitor for behavior that may lead to serious injury or death,” Green added.

The system, Volvo Cars said, will be on the lookout for a range of potentially dangerous behaviors. These include drivers who display a “complete lack of steering input for extended periods of time” or have their eyes closed or off the road for long periods. Technology will also monitor “excessively slow reaction times” and “extreme weaving across lanes.”

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), nearly 30 people in the U.S. die each day because of drunk driving crashes. There were 10,874 deaths in the U.S. from drunk driving crashes in 2017, the NHTSA adds.

“There are many accidents that occur as a result of intoxicated drivers,” Trent Victor, professor of Driver Behaviour at Volvo Cars, said. “Some people still believe that they can drive after having had a drink, and that this will not affect their capabilities. We want to ensure that people are not put in danger as a result of intoxication.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: anmar frangoul, volvo car group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serious, result, monitor, speed, drivers, technology, cameras, driving, drunk, volvo, cars, sensors, safety, car, tackle


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‘See something, say something’ to tackle online extremism: Stratfor

‘See something, say something’ to tackle online extremism: Stratfor5 Hours AgoScott Stewart of Stratfor says, with the help of the internet, terrorists now have the ability to become their own “mass media,” and more needs to be done to take this ability away from them.


‘See something, say something’ to tackle online extremism: Stratfor5 Hours AgoScott Stewart of Stratfor says, with the help of the internet, terrorists now have the ability to become their own “mass media,” and more needs to be done to take this ability away from them.
‘See something, say something’ to tackle online extremism: Stratfor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, stratfor, tackle, needs, stratfor5, say, extremism, stewart, online, ability, terrorists


'See something, say something' to tackle online extremism: Stratfor

‘See something, say something’ to tackle online extremism: Stratfor

5 Hours Ago

Scott Stewart of Stratfor says, with the help of the internet, terrorists now have the ability to become their own “mass media,” and more needs to be done to take this ability away from them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, stratfor, tackle, needs, stratfor5, say, extremism, stewart, online, ability, terrorists


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7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou


She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou
7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here's how to tackle them

Nevertheless, approaching difficult conversations is not only an important workplace skill, it could also be what enables your next step forward, said Sarah Sheehan, Bravely’s chief customer officer, who co-founded the company with Hervey as a platform for confidential professional advice.

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work.

1. Consider viewpoints beyond your own

“It’s easy to think about yourself and only yourself when you’re dealing with something challenging at work, but take the time to think through how someone might see it from the other side, and whether certain circumstances could be creating the situation at hand,” said Sheehan.

Your manager is a person, too, noted Sheehan, so sometimes the best thing you can do is to put yourself in their shoes and try to think things through from a new perspective.

2. Expect the best, but prepare for the worst

While you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted.

“Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. That way, you might be less likely to react with emotion,” she said.

3. Say it out loud

Finally, try rehearsing the conversation, either to yourself or someone else, to hone your message and perfect your delivery, said Sheehan.

“It will no doubt feel awkward at first,” she said, adding that “forcing yourself to say the words will help you hone how you deliver it, control the tone (which is super important!), and ensure you stick the landing.”

Don’t miss: Think your boss hates you? You could be onto something

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


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ECB in panic mode? Experts warn it’ll take more than a central bank to help Europe recover

New monetary stimulus from the European Central Bank (ECB) will do “little” to boost the region’s sluggish economy and tackle its biggest risks, analysts told CNBC. ECB President Mario Draghi said that interest rates would remain at record lows at least until December. Growth forecasts for the euro zone were slashed for this year and new loans to euro zone banks were announced. “(The announcements) are also a bit of a gamble as they will do very little to tackle the biggest risks for the euro zo


New monetary stimulus from the European Central Bank (ECB) will do “little” to boost the region’s sluggish economy and tackle its biggest risks, analysts told CNBC. ECB President Mario Draghi said that interest rates would remain at record lows at least until December. Growth forecasts for the euro zone were slashed for this year and new loans to euro zone banks were announced. “(The announcements) are also a bit of a gamble as they will do very little to tackle the biggest risks for the euro zo
ECB in panic mode? Experts warn it’ll take more than a central bank to help Europe recover Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: silvia amaro, -christoph schon, executive director at axioma
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mode, stimulus, central, experts, tackle, euro, ecbs, warn, panic, told, risks, recover, europe, little, ecb, help, zone, economy, itll


ECB in panic mode? Experts warn it'll take more than a central bank to help Europe recover

New monetary stimulus from the European Central Bank (ECB) will do “little” to boost the region’s sluggish economy and tackle its biggest risks, analysts told CNBC.

“(The ECB’s) announcements have some flavor of panic as the ECB’s base case scenario still foresees a gradual recovery and the 2020 and 2021 forecasts were hardly revised downwards,” Carsten Brzeski, chief economist at ING Germany, said in a note Thursday.

The Frankfurt-based institution surprised markets with a renewed dovish tone. ECB President Mario Draghi said that interest rates would remain at record lows at least until December. Growth forecasts for the euro zone were slashed for this year and new loans to euro zone banks were announced.

“The measures as such are not such a big surprise but the timing of the announcement is,” Brzeski added. “(The announcements) are also a bit of a gamble as they will do very little to tackle the biggest risks for the euro zone economy, which according to the ECB stem from external sources.”

Draghi even acknowledged this fact in a press conference following the ECB’s formal rate decision on Thursday. “We are aware that our decisions (new stimulus) certainly increase the resilience of the euro zone economy, but actually can they address these factors that are weighing on the euro zone economy in the rest of the world? They cannot,” Draghi told reporters, adding that protectionism and geopolitics were among those outside risks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: silvia amaro, -christoph schon, executive director at axioma
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Global treaty needed to tackle obesity, researchers say

Obesity should be tackled using a global treaty that shuts “Big Food” out of policy decisions, medical researchers said on Sunday. The commission accused “Big Food” of intimidating politicians, as well as using their commercial influence and “privileged access to decision makers,” to prevent policies from being implemented. To offset industry opposition, it called for a global treaty to be established to create effective policies for tackling obesity. It noted that measures such as warning label


Obesity should be tackled using a global treaty that shuts “Big Food” out of policy decisions, medical researchers said on Sunday. The commission accused “Big Food” of intimidating politicians, as well as using their commercial influence and “privileged access to decision makers,” to prevent policies from being implemented. To offset industry opposition, it called for a global treaty to be established to create effective policies for tackling obesity. It noted that measures such as warning label
Global treaty needed to tackle obesity, researchers say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: chloe taylor, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, obesity, unhealthy, global, say, tobacco, treaty, using, researchers, big, report, food, needed, commission, tackle


Global treaty needed to tackle obesity, researchers say

Obesity should be tackled using a global treaty that shuts “Big Food” out of policy decisions, medical researchers said on Sunday.

In a report published in “The Lancet” medical journal, the Lancet Commission on Obesity – comprised of 26 researchers from 14 countries – said there had been inadequate political leadership when it came to addressing the obesity crisis.

The commission accused “Big Food” of intimidating politicians, as well as using their commercial influence and “privileged access to decision makers,” to prevent policies from being implemented.

To offset industry opposition, it called for a global treaty to be established to create effective policies for tackling obesity. The commission suggested following the example of the WHO’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which explicitly excluded the tobacco industry from being involved in policy development.

Member states of such a treaty should “translate the principles and guidelines into national laws to protect their populations from practices that undermine healthy food environments,” the report said. It noted that measures such as warning labels on food and restricting advertising to children could help reduce obesity rates.

“Although food clearly differs from tobacco because it is necessary to support human life, unhealthy food and beverages are not,” said William Dietz, co-chair of the commission, in a press release on Sunday.

“The similarities with Big Tobacco lie in the damage they induce and the behaviours of the corporations that profit from them. A Framework Convention on Food Systems would help empower individual nations against vested commercial interests, redirect the vast subsidies that currently benefit unhealthy industries, and provide full transparency.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: chloe taylor, getty images
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Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert

Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert19 Hours AgoEdward Alden of the Council on Fore­­­ign Relations says the U.S. public is “frustrated” by the inability of American leaders to seriously tackle problems in the country’s border with Mexico.


Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert19 Hours AgoEdward Alden of the Council on Fore­­­ign Relations says the U.S. public is “frustrated” by the inability of American leaders to seriously tackle problems in the country’s border with Mexico.
Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seriously, silly, leaders, public, fundamentally, expert, gridlock, wall, problems, border, tackle, relations, mexico


Gridlock over US border wall is 'fundamentally silly': Expert

Gridlock over US border wall is ‘fundamentally silly’: Expert

19 Hours Ago

Edward Alden of the Council on Fore­­­ign Relations says the U.S. public is “frustrated” by the inability of American leaders to seriously tackle problems in the country’s border with Mexico.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seriously, silly, leaders, public, fundamentally, expert, gridlock, wall, problems, border, tackle, relations, mexico


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