Taiwan’s president is planning another stopover in the US. China will be infuriated

Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen waves while registering as the ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) 2020 presidential candidate at the party’s headquarter in Taipei on March 21, 2019. Taiwan’s president is expected to transit in the U.S. on Friday for the second time this month, when she returns from visiting diplomatic allies in the Caribbean — a move that will make China very angry. Tsai Ing-wen, the island’s pro-independence leader, is due to make her second stopover in Denver on Friday.


Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen waves while registering as the ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) 2020 presidential candidate at the party’s headquarter in Taipei on March 21, 2019. Taiwan’s president is expected to transit in the U.S. on Friday for the second time this month, when she returns from visiting diplomatic allies in the Caribbean — a move that will make China very angry. Tsai Ing-wen, the island’s pro-independence leader, is due to make her second stopover in Denver on Friday.
Taiwan’s president is planning another stopover in the US. China will be infuriated Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ties, stopover, tsais, state, planning, taipei, tsai, china, president, selfruled, visit, infuriated, taiwan, taiwans, transit


Taiwan's president is planning another stopover in the US. China will be infuriated

Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen waves while registering as the ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) 2020 presidential candidate at the party’s headquarter in Taipei on March 21, 2019.

Taiwan’s president is expected to transit in the U.S. on Friday for the second time this month, when she returns from visiting diplomatic allies in the Caribbean — a move that will make China very angry.

Tsai Ing-wen, the island’s pro-independence leader, is due to make her second stopover in Denver on Friday.

“China opposes official exchange between the US and Taiwan. This position is firm and clear,” the Chinese foreign ministry said on July 12. The U.S. should not to allow Tsai’s transit and must “stop the official exchange with Taiwan,” said Geng Shuang, spokesperson for the Chinese foreign ministry.

The visit comes on the heels of the U.S. State Department recently approving a $2.2 billion sale of weapons to Taiwan— a self-ruled island viewed by Beijing as a breakaway province that has no right to state-to-state ties.

The timing of both is significant and reflects a “much higher risk tolerance from the Donald Trump administration when it comes to growing U.S.-Taiwan ties, ” said Kelsey Broderick, China analyst at the Eurasia Group, a risk consultancy.

The U.S. State Department sought to downplay Tsai’s visit, describing it as “private and unofficial.”

Earlier in July, Tsai transited through New York — another major U.S. city — when she was on her way to the Caribbean. That visit saw her meeting members of the U.S. Congress as well as representatives from Taiwan’s 17 remaining diplomatic allies, and speaking at Columbia University. She also addressed a 1,000-strong crowd of supporters, according to the Taipei Times.

Her visits come at a low point in U.S.-China relations. In addition to sparring over trade, the world’s two biggest economies are also at loggerheads over Taiwan.

Washington’s ties with the self-ruled island are technically unofficial. But under the Taiwan Relations Act, “the United States shall provide Taiwan with arms of a defensive character.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ties, stopover, tsais, state, planning, taipei, tsai, china, president, selfruled, visit, infuriated, taiwan, taiwans, transit


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China is urging the US to cancel a $2.2 billion arms sale to Taiwan

China has asked the U.S. to cancel any planned arms sale to Taiwan, accusing Washington of interfering in domestic Chinese affairs. On Monday, the Pentagon announced to Congress it is likely to make a major sale of arms to the East Asian state when it outlined a $2.2 billion deal to provide tanks, anti-aircraft missiles and related equipment. Taiwan is officially known as the Republic of China (ROC), whereas mainland China to its west is known as the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Beijing pol


China has asked the U.S. to cancel any planned arms sale to Taiwan, accusing Washington of interfering in domestic Chinese affairs. On Monday, the Pentagon announced to Congress it is likely to make a major sale of arms to the East Asian state when it outlined a $2.2 billion deal to provide tanks, anti-aircraft missiles and related equipment. Taiwan is officially known as the Republic of China (ROC), whereas mainland China to its west is known as the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Beijing pol
China is urging the US to cancel a $2.2 billion arms sale to Taiwan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 22, china, arms, united, washington, tanks, diplomatic, relations, cancel, taiwan, urging, billion, island, sale


China is urging the US to cancel a $2.2 billion arms sale to Taiwan

US-made M60 A3 tanks are fired during a life-fire drill on May 25, 2017.

China has asked the U.S. to cancel any planned arms sale to Taiwan, accusing Washington of interfering in domestic Chinese affairs.

On Monday, the Pentagon announced to Congress it is likely to make a major sale of arms to the East Asian state when it outlined a $2.2 billion deal to provide tanks, anti-aircraft missiles and related equipment.

Taiwan is officially known as the Republic of China (ROC), whereas mainland China to its west is known as the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Beijing policy dictates that China will refuse diplomatic relations with any country that recognizes the island as a sovereign state.

Added to that historical tension, the military sale comes at a time when relations between Washington and Beijing are at a particularly low ebb due to the ongoing trade war.

China’s foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters Tuesday that the sale of weapons “seriously violates the one-China principle,” and “grossly interferes in China’s internal affairs and undermines China’s sovereignty and security interests.”

Geng added that China had already lodged formal complaints opposing any sale through “diplomatic channels, “and urged Washington that to avoid to disrupting stability in the Taiwan Strait, it must “immediately cancel the planned arms sale and stop military relations with Taipei.”

The possible deal would include 108 General Dynamics M1A2T Abrams tanks and 250 Stinger missiles. The sale could also include mounted machine guns and ammunitions.

In 1982, the United States issued the “Six Assurances” — six foreign policy principles designed to reassure Taiwan that it would continue to support the island even in the absence of formal diplomatic relations.

In a statement on its English-language website, the Taiwan Presidential Office expressed “sincere thanks” to the United States for helping the island strengthen its defense.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 22, china, arms, united, washington, tanks, diplomatic, relations, cancel, taiwan, urging, billion, island, sale


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Citi says Asian markets badly hit in the trade war are now looking promising

Citi Private Bank said on Tuesday it has maintained an “overweight” stance on several Asian stock markets that have been badly hit in the ongoing trade fight between the U.S. and China. But he said there are reasons to remain optimistic about those markets for now. “We’re still most positive on Asia,” he told reporters at the bank’s mid-year outlook in Singapore. He added that friction between the U.S. and China in technology could end up benefiting companies in South Korea and Taiwan. More gene


Citi Private Bank said on Tuesday it has maintained an “overweight” stance on several Asian stock markets that have been badly hit in the ongoing trade fight between the U.S. and China. But he said there are reasons to remain optimistic about those markets for now. “We’re still most positive on Asia,” he told reporters at the bank’s mid-year outlook in Singapore. He added that friction between the U.S. and China in technology could end up benefiting companies in South Korea and Taiwan. More gene
Citi says Asian markets badly hit in the trade war are now looking promising Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, badly, war, hit, asia, looking, trade, china, taiwan, peng, promising, korea, companies, private, asian, south, citi


Citi says Asian markets badly hit in the trade war are now looking promising

Citi Private Bank said on Tuesday it has maintained an “overweight” stance on several Asian stock markets that have been badly hit in the ongoing trade fight between the U.S. and China.

Stocks in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and South Korea have been among the biggest losers since tensions between the world’s top two economies escalated last month — a point acknowledged by Ken Peng, head of Asia investment strategy at Citi Private Bank. But he said there are reasons to remain optimistic about those markets for now.

“We’re still most positive on Asia,” he told reporters at the bank’s mid-year outlook in Singapore.

He added that friction between the U.S. and China in technology could end up benefiting companies in South Korea and Taiwan. Chinese tech firms are facing greater challenges doing business with U.S. companies, and that could potentially allow South Korean or Taiwanese players to fill the void and gain market share globally, he explained.

More generally, much of the global economic growth will center in Asia given the region’s rising middle class that will drive consumption demand, said Peng. That’s set to benefit sectors such as health care, autos and insurance, he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, badly, war, hit, asia, looking, trade, china, taiwan, peng, promising, korea, companies, private, asian, south, citi


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As US-China relations sour, Taiwan’s value as a ‘chess piece’ may rise

Taiwan has always been a “chess piece” that Washington can play with in U.S.-China relations, said Zhiqun Zhu, a professor of political science and international relations at Bucknell University. “Taiwan’s value to the U.S. will only increase as tensions between the U.S. and China escalate,” Zhu told CNBC. Chinese President Xi Jinping has said before that China “must be and will be” reunified with Taiwan — by force if necessary. However, recent military and diplomatic actions from Washington hav


Taiwan has always been a “chess piece” that Washington can play with in U.S.-China relations, said Zhiqun Zhu, a professor of political science and international relations at Bucknell University. “Taiwan’s value to the U.S. will only increase as tensions between the U.S. and China escalate,” Zhu told CNBC. Chinese President Xi Jinping has said before that China “must be and will be” reunified with Taiwan — by force if necessary. However, recent military and diplomatic actions from Washington hav
As US-China relations sour, Taiwan’s value as a ‘chess piece’ may rise Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taiwans, sour, chess, ustaiwan, tsai, chinese, rise, china, grossman, uschina, trump, relations, beijing, taiwan, value, piece, president


As US-China relations sour, Taiwan's value as a 'chess piece' may rise

Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-Wen waves to assembled guests from the deck of the ‘Ming Chuan’ frigate during a ceremony to commission two Perry-class guided missile frigates from the U.S. into the Taiwan Navy, in the southern port of Kaohsiung on November 8, 2018. Chris Stowers | AFP | Getty Images

As the United States and China remain deadlocked in a deepening dispute over trade and technology, some experts say Taiwan’s value as a bargaining chip has increased. The self-governed island — which Beijing deems to be a renegade Chinese province — is one of many flashpoints in the rivalry between the world’s two superpowers. Taiwan has always been a “chess piece” that Washington can play with in U.S.-China relations, said Zhiqun Zhu, a professor of political science and international relations at Bucknell University. “Taiwan’s value to the U.S. will only increase as tensions between the U.S. and China escalate,” Zhu told CNBC. Under the Chinese Communist Party’s “One China” policy, the self-ruled island is part of mainland China. Chinese President Xi Jinping has said before that China “must be and will be” reunified with Taiwan — by force if necessary. However, recent military and diplomatic actions from Washington have been seen by Beijing as U.S. support for Taiwan’s independence movement. At the Shangri-la dialogue in Singapore last weekend, Chinese Lieutenant General Shao Yuanming said Washington’s support for Taipei has sent “terribly wrong signals to Taiwan’s independence forces, which could undermine regional peace and stability. ” “If anyone wants to separate Taiwan from the country, the Chinese military will resolutely defend the unity of our motherland at all costs,” Shao added.

‘Upgrade’ in US-Taiwan relations

The U.S. using Taiwan as a card is a new factor in the dynamic of the trilateral relationship that “really did not exist” before President Donald Trump came into power, said Bonnie Glaser, senior advisor for Asia at Washington-based think tank Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). “Trump is a transactional president and he often seems to be willing to put anything on the table,” she told CNBC. On the military front, the Trump administration has ramped up arms sales to Taipei over the years, invoking the ire of Beijing. Washington is reportedly preparing a sale of more than $2 billion worth of tanks and weapons to Taiwan. Diplomatic issues have also come to the fore. In May, high-level security officials from the U.S. and Taiwan met for the first time in nearly four decades, drawing an angry response from Beijing. Chinese Foreign Minister Lu Kang said Beijing is “strongly dissatisfied” with and “resolutely opposed” to any official meetings between the U.S. and Taiwan. “I believe we’re inching closer & closer to Beijing’s redline on US-Taiwan senior official mtgs–those that are publicized at least,” Derek Grossman, a senior defense analyst at California-based think tank RAND Corporation, said on Twitter after the U.S.-Taiwan meeting.

Chinese President Xi Jinping arrives for an event to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Message to Compatriots in Taiwan at the Great Hall of the People January 2, 2019 in Beijing, China. Mark Schiefelbein | Pool | Getty Images

Grossman told CNBC on email that his understanding is that such meetings “have been ongoing for some time in private.” “My hunch is that it was publicized this time via intentional leak from one or both sides to signal to China that the upgrade in U.S.-Taiwan relations is here to stay,” he added.

Taiwan’s next leader is key

Taiwan is set to have its presidential elections in January 2020 — and experts said the polls would likely determine the direction of cross-strait ties. Grossman said that if the incumbent Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-Wen is re-elected, which is “likely,” cross-strait tensions are likely to escalate further from 2020 to 2024. Glaser from CSIS echoed that sentiment, adding that if a candidate from the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party was elected, China would ratchet up military, diplomatic and economic pressure. “I think the Chinese would be worried that there’s always this potential for things to go in a very negative direction because the combination of Trump being president and the possibility that Tsai gets re-elected … could really embolden Tsai to move toward the direction of independence,” she added.

China could miscalculate and think the United States would get involved in a conflict, and that would really be a very dangerous situation. Bonnie Glaser senior advisor for Asia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies

According to Grossman, the best hope for keeping tensions under wraps would be if a candidate from the opposition Kuomintang (KMT) party wins the next Taiwan presidential race and recognizes the “One China” policy. That said, Grossman added, public opinion polling in Taiwan has shown that voters will not likely support the opposition KMT in doing so. “The Taiwanese have been observing how China’s ‘One Country, Two Systems’ approach has worked out in Hong Kong, and it isn’t too inspiring,” Grossman added. A public opinion survey conducted by the Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council in May also found that 83.6% of Taiwan opposes Xi’s “one country, two systems” policy.

A ‘small’ risk of escalation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taiwans, sour, chess, ustaiwan, tsai, chinese, rise, china, grossman, uschina, trump, relations, beijing, taiwan, value, piece, president


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US is preparing big weapons sale to Taiwan in a challenge to China amid trade war

The potential sale included 108 General Dynamics M1A2 Abrams tanks worth around $2 billion as well as anti-tank and anti-aircraft munitions, three of the sources said. The United States has no formal ties with Taiwan but is bound by law to help provide it with the means to defend itself. China and the United States are engaged in a fierce trade war, with clashes over Taiwan and the South China Sea exacerbating tensions. China claims almost all of the strategic South China Sea and frequently lamb


The potential sale included 108 General Dynamics M1A2 Abrams tanks worth around $2 billion as well as anti-tank and anti-aircraft munitions, three of the sources said. The United States has no formal ties with Taiwan but is bound by law to help provide it with the means to defend itself. China and the United States are engaged in a fierce trade war, with clashes over Taiwan and the South China Sea exacerbating tensions. China claims almost all of the strategic South China Sea and frequently lamb
US is preparing big weapons sale to Taiwan in a challenge to China amid trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worth, united, amid, states, tanks, challenge, sources, taiwan, china, sales, trade, war, weapons, sale, big, preparing


US is preparing big weapons sale to Taiwan in a challenge to China amid trade war

The United States is pursuing the sale of more than $2 billion worth of tanks and weapons to Taiwan, four people familiar with the negotiations said, in a move likely to anger China as a trade war between the world’s two biggest economies escalates.

An informal notification of the proposed sale has been sent to the U.S. Congress, the four sources said on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak about the possible deal.

The potential sale included 108 General Dynamics M1A2 Abrams tanks worth around $2 billion as well as anti-tank and anti-aircraft munitions, three of the sources said. Taiwan has been interested in refreshing its existing U.S.-made battle tank inventory, which includes M60 Patton tanks.

The United States is the main arms supplier to Taiwan, which China deems its own and has never renounced the use of force to bring the self-ruled island under its control.

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen said in March the United States was responding positively to Taipei’s requests for new arms sales to bolster its defenses in the face of pressure from China. The United States has no formal ties with Taiwan but is bound by law to help provide it with the means to defend itself.

China and the United States are engaged in a fierce trade war, with clashes over Taiwan and the South China Sea exacerbating tensions.

A spokesman for the State Department, which oversees foreign military sales, said the U.S. government does not comment on or confirm potential or pending arms sales or transfers before they have been formally notified to Congress.

The congressional notifications included a variety of anti-tank munitions, including 409 Raytheon and Lockheed Martin Corp-made Javelin missiles worth as much as $129 million, two of the sources said.

The notifications also included 1,240 TOW anti-tank missiles worth as much as $299 million, one of the sources said. There were also 250 stinger missiles worth as much as $223 million in the notification, the source said.

Stingers are often used in portable anti-aircraft weapons systems.

Taiwan’s Defense Ministry confirmed it had requested those weapons and that the request was proceeding normally.

The U.S. commitment to providing Taiwan with the weapons to defend itself helps Taiwan’s military to raise its combat abilities, consolidates the Taiwan-U.S. security partnership and ensures Taiwan’s security, the ministry said in a statement.

There was no immediate response from Beijing.

U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration rolled out a long-awaited overhaul of U.S. arms export policy in 2018 aimed at expanding sales to allies, saying it would bolster the American defense industry and create jobs at home.

Trump’s trade advisor Peter Navarro was one of the administration’s architects of that policy. Navarro, a China hawk, wrote about the possible sale of tanks to Taiwan in a March opinion column in the New York Times ahead of a presidential trip to the Lima, Ohio, plant where they are made.

At a low point, the U.S. Army had only one tank coming from the plant a month, General Dynamics CEO Phebe Novakovic said during an April conference call with investors, but said “we’ll be rolling out 30 tanks a month by the end of this year,” partly because of international orders.

The Pentagon announced last week it would sell 34 ScanEagle drones, made by Boeing, to the governments of Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam for $47 million.

The drones would afford greater intelligence-gathering capabilities, potentially curbing Chinese activity in the region.

China claims almost all of the strategic South China Sea and frequently lambastes the United States and its allies over naval operations near Chinese-occupied islands. Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam all have competing claims.

China’s Defense Minister Wei Fenghe warned the United States at the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore last weekend not to meddle in security disputes over Taiwan and the South China Sea.

Acting U.S. Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan told the meeting that the United States would no longer “tiptoe” around China’s behavior in Asia.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worth, united, amid, states, tanks, challenge, sources, taiwan, china, sales, trade, war, weapons, sale, big, preparing


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Taiwan’s president orders military to ‘forcefully expel’ future incursions of China warplanes

The duration of the latest incursion — about 10 minutes — implies it was intentional, and reflects escalating tensions between China and Taiwan amid the broader U.S.-China geopolitical struggle, Stratfor said in a post on Monday. China’s defense ministry did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comments. When asked about the encounter in the Taiwan Strait at a scheduled press conference on Monday, China’s foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said he was “not aware” of the matter. Taiw


The duration of the latest incursion — about 10 minutes — implies it was intentional, and reflects escalating tensions between China and Taiwan amid the broader U.S.-China geopolitical struggle, Stratfor said in a post on Monday. China’s defense ministry did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comments. When asked about the encounter in the Taiwan Strait at a scheduled press conference on Monday, China’s foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said he was “not aware” of the matter. Taiw
Taiwan’s president orders military to ‘forcefully expel’ future incursions of China warplanes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02  Authors: huileng tan, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, uschina, incursions, expel, future, strait, orders, taiwans, ministry, incursion, amid, military, taiwan, west, spokesman, forcefully, warplanes, report, president


Taiwan's president orders military to 'forcefully expel' future incursions of China warplanes

The duration of the latest incursion — about 10 minutes — implies it was intentional, and reflects escalating tensions between China and Taiwan amid the broader U.S.-China geopolitical struggle, Stratfor said in a post on Monday.

“China’s apparent ending of the informal nonincursion agreement might be an effort to test Taipei’s response, and it could compel Taipei to seek negotiations on avoiding escalations from such encounters,” said Stratfor.

“It could result in Taiwanese fighters making their own incursions on the west side of the line, which in turn could lead to a cycle of tit-for-tat provocations coming amid already-tense cross-strait relations,” the report added.

China’s defense ministry did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comments.

When asked about the encounter in the Taiwan Strait at a scheduled press conference on Monday, China’s foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said he was “not aware” of the matter.

Taiwan is one of a growing number of flashpoints in the U.S.-China relationship, which includes an ongoing trade war and Beijing’s increasingly aggressive military posture in the South China Sea.

In late March, the U.S. sent Navy and Coast Guard ships through the Taiwan Strait, as part of an increase in the frequency of movement through the waterway — despite opposition from Beijing.

After the incursion on Sunday, a spokesman for Taiwan’s presidential office, Huang Chung-yen, said Beijing “should stop behavior of this sort, which endangers regional peace, and not be an international troublemaker,” Reuters reported.

— Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02  Authors: huileng tan, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, uschina, incursions, expel, future, strait, orders, taiwans, ministry, incursion, amid, military, taiwan, west, spokesman, forcefully, warplanes, report, president


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Taiwan condemns Beijing after Chinese jets cross maritime line

Taiwan on Sunday condemned what it called a “provocative” move by China after two Chinese fighter jets crossed a maritime border separating the two sides amid growing friction between Taipei and Beijing. Earlier on Sunday Taiwan scrambled aircraft to drive away the two Chinese planes, the self-ruled island’s defence ministry said. There was no immediate reaction from Beijing, which views Taiwan as a renegade Chinese province. China has repeatedly sent military aircraft and ships to circle Taiwan


Taiwan on Sunday condemned what it called a “provocative” move by China after two Chinese fighter jets crossed a maritime border separating the two sides amid growing friction between Taipei and Beijing. Earlier on Sunday Taiwan scrambled aircraft to drive away the two Chinese planes, the self-ruled island’s defence ministry said. There was no immediate reaction from Beijing, which views Taiwan as a renegade Chinese province. China has repeatedly sent military aircraft and ships to circle Taiwan
Taiwan condemns Beijing after Chinese jets cross maritime line Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-01  Authors: gallo images, orbital horizon copernicus sentinel data, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jets, cross, war, chinese, beijing, ministry, military, line, taiwan, regional, sent, maritime, growing, china, condemns, ships


Taiwan condemns Beijing after Chinese jets cross maritime line

Taiwan on Sunday condemned what it called a “provocative” move by China after two Chinese fighter jets crossed a maritime border separating the two sides amid growing friction between Taipei and Beijing.

Earlier on Sunday Taiwan scrambled aircraft to drive away the two Chinese planes, the self-ruled island’s defence ministry said.

China’s move had “seriously impacted regional safety and stability,” the ministry said in a statement.

There was no immediate reaction from Beijing, which views Taiwan as a renegade Chinese province.

Huang Chung-yen, a spokesman for Taiwan’s Presidential Office, said Beijing “should stop behaviour of this sort, which endangers regional peace, and not be an international troublemaker.”

President Tsai Ing-wen had urged the army “to complete all tasks on war preparation,” he added.

China has repeatedly sent military aircraft and ships to circle Taiwan during drills in recent years and worked to isolate the island internationally, whittling down its few remaining diplomatic allies.

The United States last week sent Navy and Coast Guard ships through the Taiwan Strait, as part of an increase in the frequency of movement through the strategic waterway despite opposition from China.

Taiwan is one of a growing number of flashpoints in the U.S.-China relationship, which also include a trade war and China’s increasingly muscular military posture in the South China Sea.

China has never renounced the use of force to bring Taiwan under its control.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-01  Authors: gallo images, orbital horizon copernicus sentinel data, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jets, cross, war, chinese, beijing, ministry, military, line, taiwan, regional, sent, maritime, growing, china, condemns, ships


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Google is building a solar power project above fishing ponds in Taiwan, its first in Asia

That massive “underwater spine” has been slow to progress, but Google is moving ahead with its first water-based renewable energy project — it is just a little smaller in scale: Solar panels atop a series of fishing ponds in Taiwan. For the 10-megawatt solar array in Tainan City, Taiwan, Google will install poles, with solar panels at the top of them, above fishing ponds. The idea of building solar projects sited on water — known as floating photovoltaics, or “flotovoltaics” — is becoming more p


That massive “underwater spine” has been slow to progress, but Google is moving ahead with its first water-based renewable energy project — it is just a little smaller in scale: Solar panels atop a series of fishing ponds in Taiwan. For the 10-megawatt solar array in Tainan City, Taiwan, Google will install poles, with solar panels at the top of them, above fishing ponds. The idea of building solar projects sited on water — known as floating photovoltaics, or “flotovoltaics” — is becoming more p
Google is building a solar power project above fishing ponds in Taiwan, its first in Asia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: donovan russo, kevin frayer, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, project, power, google, panels, ponds, projects, building, taiwan, floating, china, worlds, energy, asia, renewable, solar, fishing


Google is building a solar power project above fishing ponds in Taiwan, its first in Asia

Google unveiled an ambitious plan eight years ago to build a wind energy project in the Atlantic Ocean running all the way from New York to Virginia. That massive “underwater spine” has been slow to progress, but Google is moving ahead with its first water-based renewable energy project — it is just a little smaller in scale: Solar panels atop a series of fishing ponds in Taiwan. The deal marks Google’s entry into the Asian renewable energy market.

Google, a subsidiary of Alphabet, recently became the first company to make a purchase under the 2017 Taiwan Electricity Act, which allows non-utility companies to purchase renewable energy. For the 10-megawatt solar array in Tainan City, Taiwan, Google will install poles, with solar panels at the top of them, above fishing ponds.

The idea of building solar projects sited on water — known as floating photovoltaics, or “flotovoltaics” — is becoming more popular.

Last year China built the world’s largest floating solar farm on a lake that used to be a coal mine, one of several flooded mine sites in China used for solar projects. It includes 166,000 solar panels and has a capacity of 40 megawatts, which can power 15,000 homes. The World Economic Forum reported that China is expected to add 40 percent of the world’s new solar panels by 2020. Japan is the world leader in floating photovoltaic installations, with more than 60 projects built since its first in 2007.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: donovan russo, kevin frayer, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, project, power, google, panels, ponds, projects, building, taiwan, floating, china, worlds, energy, asia, renewable, solar, fishing


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Taiwan takes a dig at Chinese democracy in new year message

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen took a dig at China’s lack of freedom in a message to mark Tuesday’s start of the Lunar New Year, saying she hoped ethnic Chinese all over the world could experience the “blessing” of democracy. Taiwan is able to maintain cultural traditions and is committed to uphold the values of freedom and democracy, Tsai said in the message, posted late on Sunday on her official social media accounts. We hope that ethnic Chinese all over the world can experience this blessing,”


Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen took a dig at China’s lack of freedom in a message to mark Tuesday’s start of the Lunar New Year, saying she hoped ethnic Chinese all over the world could experience the “blessing” of democracy. Taiwan is able to maintain cultural traditions and is committed to uphold the values of freedom and democracy, Tsai said in the message, posted late on Sunday on her official social media accounts. We hope that ethnic Chinese all over the world can experience this blessing,”
Taiwan takes a dig at Chinese democracy in new year message Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, tsai, message, freedom, party, takes, xi, democracy, china, democratic, ethnic, dig, taiwan


Taiwan takes a dig at Chinese democracy in new year message

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen took a dig at China’s lack of freedom in a message to mark Tuesday’s start of the Lunar New Year, saying she hoped ethnic Chinese all over the world could experience the “blessing” of democracy.

Self-governed Taiwan is China’s most sensitive issue and is claimed by Beijing as its sacred territory.

President Xi Jinping has stepped up pressure on the democratic island since Tsai, from the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party, became president in 2016.

He kicked off 2019 with a speech warning that China reserves the right to use force to bring Taiwan under its control, though it will strive for peaceful “reunification”.

Taiwan is able to maintain cultural traditions and is committed to uphold the values of freedom and democracy, Tsai said in the message, posted late on Sunday on her official social media accounts.

“Those in places lacking democracy may not understand this commitment. We hope that ethnic Chinese all over the world can experience this blessing,” she added, without directly mentioning China.

“So I want to make three new year’s wishes for our ethnic Chinese friends both at home and abroad. I hope that you may all enjoy democracy, freedom and continued prosperity.”

There was no immediate reaction from Beijing. Xi’s new year’s speech, also on Sunday, did not mention Taiwan, apart from new year wishes to people on the island.

Taiwan is gearing up for presidential elections early next year. Tsai’s party suffered stinging losses to the China-friendly Kuomintang in mayoral and local elections in November.

Tsai has repeatedly called on China to respect Taiwan’s democracy, and to embrace democratic reforms itself.

Taiwan has shown no interest in being ruled by autocratic China, where Xi has overseen a sweeping crackdown on dissent since assuming office six years ago and the ruling Communist Party has tightened controls on all facets of society.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, tsai, message, freedom, party, takes, xi, democracy, china, democratic, ethnic, dig, taiwan


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US warships pass through Taiwan Strait amid China tensions

The United States sent two warships through the Taiwan Strait on Thursday in the first such operation this year, the Taiwanese government said, as it increases the frequency of transits through the strategic waterway amid tensions with China. The voyage risks further heightening tensions with China, which considers Taiwan its own and has not ruled out the use of force to bring the self-ruled island under its control. The move will likely be viewed in Taiwan as a sign of support from U.S. Preside


The United States sent two warships through the Taiwan Strait on Thursday in the first such operation this year, the Taiwanese government said, as it increases the frequency of transits through the strategic waterway amid tensions with China. The voyage risks further heightening tensions with China, which considers Taiwan its own and has not ruled out the use of force to bring the self-ruled island under its control. The move will likely be viewed in Taiwan as a sign of support from U.S. Preside
US warships pass through Taiwan Strait amid China tensions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-25  Authors: smith collection, gado, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, operation, pass, tsai, strait, voyage, china, ministry, warships, amid, taiwans, taiwan, sent, support, tensions


US warships pass through Taiwan Strait amid China tensions

The United States sent two warships through the Taiwan Strait on Thursday in the first such operation this year, the Taiwanese government said, as it increases the frequency of transits through the strategic waterway amid tensions with China.

The voyage risks further heightening tensions with China, which considers Taiwan its own and has not ruled out the use of force to bring the self-ruled island under its control.

Taiwan’s defense ministry said in a statement late on Thursday the ships were moving in a northerly direction and that their voyage was in accordance with regulations.

It said Taiwan closely monitored the operation to “ensure the security of the seas and regional stability”.

The move will likely be viewed in Taiwan as a sign of support from U.S. President Donald Trump’s government amid growing friction between Taipei and Beijing.

China has stepped up pressure on Taiwan since President Tsai Ing-wen, from the pro-independence ruling party, took office in 2016. It has regularly sent military aircraft and ships to circle the island on drills in the past few years.

Beijing sent several bombers and aircraft through the Bashi Channel, which separates Taiwan from the Philippines, earlier on Thursday, Taiwan’s defense ministry said in a separate statement.

A similar Chinese operation was conducted on Tuesday, the ministry said, and both were monitored closely.

Chinese President Xi Jinping said in early January China reserves the right to use force to bring Taiwan under its control. In response, Tsai vowed to defend the island’s democracy and called for international support to protect Taiwan’s way of life.

Trump recently signed into law the Asia Reassurance Initiative Act reaffirming the U.S. commitment to Taiwan, including arms sales.

Washington has no formal ties with Taiwan but is bound by law to help it defend itself and is its main source of arms.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-25  Authors: smith collection, gado, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, operation, pass, tsai, strait, voyage, china, ministry, warships, amid, taiwans, taiwan, sent, support, tensions


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