Grammy winning rapper Chamillionaire launches $100,000 competition for minority-founded start-ups

Grammy-award winning rapper and investor Hakeem “Chamillionaire” Seriki announced Monday on “Squawk Alley” that he and hip hop artist E-40 will invest $100,000 in a minority or woman founded start-up company. “Being an entrepreneur isn’t easy, but it’s even harder for minority and women led companies,” Seriki said. He previously invested in Ring (acquired by Amazon), Cruise (acquired by GM) and Maker Studios (acquired by Disney). “I am so excited to be one of the judges in the $100,000 pitch com


Grammy-award winning rapper and investor Hakeem “Chamillionaire” Seriki announced Monday on “Squawk Alley” that he and hip hop artist E-40 will invest $100,000 in a minority or woman founded start-up company.
“Being an entrepreneur isn’t easy, but it’s even harder for minority and women led companies,” Seriki said.
He previously invested in Ring (acquired by Amazon), Cruise (acquired by GM) and Maker Studios (acquired by Disney).
“I am so excited to be one of the judges in the $100,000 pitch com
Grammy winning rapper Chamillionaire launches $100,000 competition for minority-founded start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: brandon gomez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winning, competition, chamillionaire, pitch, talking, investor, startup, invest, women, white, 100000, minorityfounded, seriki, acquired, launches, grammy, rapper, startups


Grammy winning rapper Chamillionaire launches $100,000 competition for minority-founded start-ups

Grammy-award winning rapper and investor Hakeem “Chamillionaire” Seriki announced Monday on “Squawk Alley” that he and hip hop artist E-40 will invest $100,000 in a minority or woman founded start-up company.

“Being an entrepreneur isn’t easy, but it’s even harder for minority and women led companies,” Seriki said. “These people are solving new and unique problems and I think the only thing in their way is capital.”

Seriki was an early Lyft investor and remains bullish on the stock, while holding investments in more than 40 start-up companies. He previously invested in Ring (acquired by Amazon), Cruise (acquired by GM) and Maker Studios (acquired by Disney).

But this competition comes as part of the investor-slash-rapper’s larger push to bring awareness to a demographic of start-ups that he said have been historically underrepresented in the investment world.

Seriki highlighted the demographic divide in the venture capital landscape, citing a cultural trickle-down of funding from white male investors to white male led companies.

“When people say they can’t find African-American startups to invest in, it just sounds a little crazy to me,” Seriki said. “At one point I was getting 30 candidates a month, but when I said I only wanted to invest in women or minorities I started getting just two candidates a month.”

Start-ups will submit their pitches on Convoz, a face-to-face social app launched by Seriki in 2016 to enhance public collaborative communication.

Pitches submitted via the app with be reviewed by Seriki, his team and Republic.co, an SEC-registered platform that makes investing accessible to non-accredited investors.

All start-up leaders from diverse backgrounds are encourage to apply, with one word of advice from the award-winning artist.

“We’re not just talking about an idea. We’re talking about a real company,” Seriki said.

Seriki, E-40 and Republic.co will partner with “Shark Tank” investor Daymond John who will help the group narrow application to five finalists and choose a winner.

“I am so excited to be one of the judges in the $100,000 pitch competition,” John said. “If you feel that you are ready to pitch and knock it out of the park, I can not wait.”

The pitch competition will run from Nov. 11 to Dec. 6.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: brandon gomez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winning, competition, chamillionaire, pitch, talking, investor, startup, invest, women, white, 100000, minorityfounded, seriki, acquired, launches, grammy, rapper, startups


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Bond yields are surging, and the scary recession warning everyone was talking about has gone away

Short duration yields are no longer higher than the rates on the long end, like the benchmark 10-year yield. That phenomena is called an inverted yield curve, and it is a signal in financial markets that a recession could be on the horizon. The 3-month Treasury bill yield was 36 basis points below the 10-year note yield on Thursday, after dipping to as low as negative 54 basis points in August. “One way to interpret the flattened or inverted yield curve is it’s a potential indicator of a monetar


Short duration yields are no longer higher than the rates on the long end, like the benchmark 10-year yield.
That phenomena is called an inverted yield curve, and it is a signal in financial markets that a recession could be on the horizon.
The 3-month Treasury bill yield was 36 basis points below the 10-year note yield on Thursday, after dipping to as low as negative 54 basis points in August.
“One way to interpret the flattened or inverted yield curve is it’s a potential indicator of a monetar
Bond yields are surging, and the scary recession warning everyone was talking about has gone away Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gone, 10year, away, surging, points, basis, curve, talking, trade, scary, recession, yield, rates, warning, bond, market, yields, high


Bond yields are surging, and the scary recession warning everyone was talking about has gone away

Since the summer, when fear of a global economic meltdown gripped the bond market, conditions in the Treasury market and economy have changed. So has the outlook for U.S.-China trade talks, and as a result bond yields, which move opposite price, are rising.

The bond market has officially switched off its recession alarm and is pointing to the potential for stronger growth.

Now that the Fed has cut rates three times, short-end yields, like the 2-year, are not rising as fast as long duration yields. The 2-year at its high, was up 10 basis points on Thursday but the 10-year yield snapped higher by about 14 basis points on reports that tariffs could be dropped. The yield rose to 1.95% in its biggest one-day move since the 2016 presidential election.

The 10-year was also at its highest level since August 1, the day that Trump tweeted he could put new tariffs on China, a negative event for markets. It was also the day after the Fed cut interest rates by a quarter point, its first of three cuts.

Short duration yields are no longer higher than the rates on the long end, like the benchmark 10-year yield. That phenomena is called an inverted yield curve, and it is a signal in financial markets that a recession could be on the horizon. That sentiment peaked in late August and September.

Now the curve has steepened, and the closely watched 3-month to 10-year spread is at the highest it’s been since last January, a month after the Fed’s final rate hike. The 3-month Treasury bill yield was 36 basis points below the 10-year note yield on Thursday, after dipping to as low as negative 54 basis points in August.

“One way to interpret the flattened or inverted yield curve is it’s a potential indicator of a monetary policy error. We’re seeing the probability of that getting significantly reduced. You had the Fed cut three times despite a tight labor market and a near high in equities,” said Jon Hill, senior rate strategist at BMO. “Economic momentum might have hit a trough. The concern about the manufacturing slowdown, the global synchronized recession seems to have been over blown.”

Strategists say yields are in an uptrend, in large part because of progress in trade talks. But they do not see the 10-year moving much above 2% in the short term, as the markets watch trade developments and economic data. Hill said the next high watermark to watch on the 10-year would be 2.06, the high on Aug. 1.

Greg Faranello, Amerivet Securities head of U.S. rates, sees yields continuing to move higher.

“The ability for the yield curve to steepen needs to come from headwinds alleviating on the global macro side, and the long end releasing more than the short end. The dynamics have clearly aligned for a trade the market is not really prepared for,” he said, adding the 10-year could rise above 2% in the near future.

“Ultimately, you’ve got to pick your spots. 2.25% is a level I would say, ‘how do valuations look?’ But right now, this is going to feed upon itself,” he said.

On a historic level, the curve is not that steep, but the the 3-month to 10-year spread has moved by more than 90 basis points, from the largest point of inversion in late August.

“It turns out when you cut short rates 75 basis points, you can steepened that curve by 93 basis points. In general it looks more and more like the Fed might achieve their soft landing. It’s by no means a done deal. This is still predicated on the trade deal being completed and continued positive economic data,” said Hill.

CNBC’s Fred Imbert contributed to this story


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gone, 10year, away, surging, points, basis, curve, talking, trade, scary, recession, yield, rates, warning, bond, market, yields, high


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Huawei founder says not yet talking directly with US firms to license 5G

Huawei Technologies is not yet directly engaged with any U.S. company over the firm’s proposal to ease concerns about the security of its platform by licensing its 5G network technology, its founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei said on Wednesday. The idea of a one-off fee in exchange for access to Huawei’s 5G patents, licenses, code, and know-how was first floated by Ren in interviews with the New York Times and the Economist in September. It has also brought criminal charges against the company, allegi


Huawei Technologies is not yet directly engaged with any U.S. company over the firm’s proposal to ease concerns about the security of its platform by licensing its 5G network technology, its founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei said on Wednesday.
The idea of a one-off fee in exchange for access to Huawei’s 5G patents, licenses, code, and know-how was first floated by Ren in interviews with the New York Times and the Economist in September.
It has also brought criminal charges against the company, allegi
Huawei founder says not yet talking directly with US firms to license 5G Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, founder, licensing, huaweis, technology, telecoms, million, firms, license, talking, ren, company, directly, huawei


Huawei founder says not yet talking directly with US firms to license 5G

Huawei Technologies is not yet directly engaged with any U.S. company over the firm’s proposal to ease concerns about the security of its platform by licensing its 5G network technology, its founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei said on Wednesday.

A Huawei executive told Reuters in October that the company was in early-stage talks with some U.S. telecoms companies about licensing its technology but warned that conversations were at an early stage and would likely take a long time to conclude.

The idea of a one-off fee in exchange for access to Huawei’s 5G patents, licenses, code, and know-how was first floated by Ren in interviews with the New York Times and the Economist in September. But it was not clear whether there was any interest from U.S. companies.

“There are currently no U.S. companies talking to us directly because middlemen who have come to talk do not necessarily represent the big U.S. companies, as this is a big and difficult introduction,” Ren said in a conversation broadcast by the company.

“It is only when someone is willing to come and discuss this issue with us will we find an investment bank to help us find an intermediary to discuss the deal, contract, and cooperation, but not yet,” he said.

The U.S. government, fearing Huawei’s equipment could be used by China for spying, placed the world’s largest telecoms equipment provider on a blacklist banning it from buying American-made parts and has led a campaign to convince allies to bar it from their 5G networks. It has also brought criminal charges against the company, alleging bank fraud, violations of U.S. sanctions against Iran, and theft of trade secrets, all of which Huawei denies.

Ren said on Wednesday that the company was coping well with the U.S. blacklisting and Huawei was continuing to innovate without U.S. support, even though he hoped the ban would not be a long-term issue.

He said that the company expects to sell 240-250 million smartphones this year.

Huawei said last month that it had sold more than 200 million phones in the year to Oct. 23, hitting that milestone more than two months earlier than it did in 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, founder, licensing, huaweis, technology, telecoms, million, firms, license, talking, ren, company, directly, huawei


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‘I care’ — billionaire investor tears up talking about America, Elizabeth Warren and Donald Trump

Billionaire investor Leon Cooperman teared up on Monday as he discussed the political divide in the U.S. and his concerns about the American dream. Cooperman’s response came in the midst of a political battle between the longtime investor and presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren. Cooperman has been a vocal critic of Warren’s proposed wealth tax and her general distrust of America’s richest individuals. The two have sparred in recent weeks, with Warren contending that the billionaire should


Billionaire investor Leon Cooperman teared up on Monday as he discussed the political divide in the U.S. and his concerns about the American dream.
Cooperman’s response came in the midst of a political battle between the longtime investor and presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren.
Cooperman has been a vocal critic of Warren’s proposed wealth tax and her general distrust of America’s richest individuals.
The two have sparred in recent weeks, with Warren contending that the billionaire should
‘I care’ — billionaire investor tears up talking about America, Elizabeth Warren and Donald Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talking, care, investor, donald, political, billionaires, vocal, cnbcs, elizabeth, world, america, trump, billionaire, tears, warren, cooperman


'I care' — billionaire investor tears up talking about America, Elizabeth Warren and Donald Trump

Billionaire investor Leon Cooperman teared up on Monday as he discussed the political divide in the U.S. and his concerns about the American dream.

“I care,” the hedge-fund manager answered on CNBC’s “Halftime Report,” tearing up after CNBC’s Scott Wapner asked why he has been so vocal about the 2020 election.

Cooperman’s response came in the midst of a political battle between the longtime investor and presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren. Cooperman has been a vocal critic of Warren’s proposed wealth tax and her general distrust of America’s richest individuals.

The two have sparred in recent weeks, with Warren contending that the billionaire should contribute more in taxes to help improve economic inequality in the U.S.

“I don’t need Elizabeth Warren telling me that I’m a deadbeat and that billionaires are deadbeats. The vilification of billionaires makes no sense to me. The world is a sustainably better place because of Bill Gates, Michael Bloomberg, David Rubenstein, Bernie Marcus, Ken Langone,” Cooperman said.

“This is idiocy! It’s appealing to the lowest common denominator and basically trying to turn people’s heads around by promising a lot of free stuff,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talking, care, investor, donald, political, billionaires, vocal, cnbcs, elizabeth, world, america, trump, billionaire, tears, warren, cooperman


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The US slapped tariffs on the EU. But they’ve also started talking

The early signs of an intense trade conflict between the U.S. and the EU may have appeared this month, but the two sides have also quietly started talking in a bid to resolve certain issues. In an email to CNBC, the European Commission confirmed the phone call saying the two spoke regarding the Airbus and Boeing cases at the World Trade Organization (WTO). “Commissioner Malmström reiterated the EU’s desire to find a negotiated solution,” a spokesperson for the Commission said Thursday morning. T


The early signs of an intense trade conflict between the U.S. and the EU may have appeared this month, but the two sides have also quietly started talking in a bid to resolve certain issues.
In an email to CNBC, the European Commission confirmed the phone call saying the two spoke regarding the Airbus and Boeing cases at the World Trade Organization (WTO).
“Commissioner Malmström reiterated the EU’s desire to find a negotiated solution,” a spokesperson for the Commission said Thursday morning.
T
The US slapped tariffs on the EU. But they’ve also started talking Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commissioner, started, commission, talking, slapped, robert, told, tariffs, trade, theyve, wto, european, sides, solution


The US slapped tariffs on the EU. But they've also started talking

European Commissioner for Trade Cecilia Malmstrom (R) and US trade representative Robert Lighthizer (L) arrive for a meeting for talks after US President imposes tariffs of 25 percent on steel and 10 percent on aluminum, on March 10, 2018 at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels.

The early signs of an intense trade conflict between the U.S. and the EU may have appeared this month, but the two sides have also quietly started talking in a bid to resolve certain issues.

EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom and Robert Lighthizer, the U.S. trade representative, “had a call last Thursday” where they took stock of the issues dividing the two, one European official, who is aware of the discussions but didn’t want to be named due to their sensitive nature, told CNBC Wednesday.

“No breakthrough, but good to talk. We still want to find a negotiated solution,” the official told CNBC.

In an email to CNBC, the European Commission confirmed the phone call saying the two spoke regarding the Airbus and Boeing cases at the World Trade Organization (WTO). “Commissioner Malmström reiterated the EU’s desire to find a negotiated solution,” a spokesperson for the Commission said Thursday morning.

The phone call marked the first conversation between both sides after the U.S. announced tariffs on $7.5 billion of European goods earlier this month. The U.S. had complained more than a decade ago that European countries were giving unfair subsidies to Airbus — which was causing losses on its U.S. rival Boeing. The WTO recently ruled in favor of Washington which paved the way for the tariffs on EU goods.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commissioner, started, commission, talking, slapped, robert, told, tariffs, trade, theyve, wto, european, sides, solution


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5 pairs of best friends share their salaries and how much debt they’re in

Would you tell your best friend how much money you make? If just the thought makes you squirm, you’re not alone. But recently, CNBC Make It asked best friends to do just that. We had five sets of friends share their financial details with each other, including their salaries, how much debt they have, if they’ve ever gone on a date just to get a free meal and more. I think I was actually in a relationship for just going out for free meals.


Would you tell your best friend how much money you make?
If just the thought makes you squirm, you’re not alone.
But recently, CNBC Make It asked best friends to do just that.
We had five sets of friends share their financial details with each other, including their salaries, how much debt they have, if they’ve ever gone on a date just to get a free meal and more.
I think I was actually in a relationship for just going out for free meals.
5 pairs of best friends share their salaries and how much debt they’re in Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: emmie martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tell, youre, salaries, think, friends, share, pairs, best, friend, thought, free, talking, theyve, debt, theyre


5 pairs of best friends share their salaries and how much debt they're in

Would you tell your best friend how much money you make? If just the thought makes you squirm, you’re not alone. Only about one in 10 Americans would feel comfortable talking about how much they make at a dinner party, according to a 2018 poll by Lexington Law of over 3,000 U.S. adults. Only one in five say they would ask a friend their salary. But recently, CNBC Make It asked best friends to do just that. We had five sets of friends share their financial details with each other, including their salaries, how much debt they have, if they’ve ever gone on a date just to get a free meal and more.

I think I was actually in a relationship for just going out for free meals. Mikayla 25-year-old actress


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: emmie martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tell, youre, salaries, think, friends, share, pairs, best, friend, thought, free, talking, theyve, debt, theyre


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PayPal CFO: We’ve been talking about the death of cash for years — and now ‘it’s here’

The death of cash has arrived, PayPal CFO John Rainey told CNBC on Thursday. “We’ve been talking about this phenomenon or trend for years now, and it’s here,” Rainey said on “Squawk Alley.” “The unique aspect of those 2 billion people is roughly 70% have a mobile device,” Rainey said. “With that combination together, we can put all the power of a bank branch and all the financial services in the palm of their hand.” Rainey’s comments on the rise of mobile payments come one day after PayPal poste


The death of cash has arrived, PayPal CFO John Rainey told CNBC on Thursday.
“We’ve been talking about this phenomenon or trend for years now, and it’s here,” Rainey said on “Squawk Alley.”
“The unique aspect of those 2 billion people is roughly 70% have a mobile device,” Rainey said.
“With that combination together, we can put all the power of a bank branch and all the financial services in the palm of their hand.”
Rainey’s comments on the rise of mobile payments come one day after PayPal poste
PayPal CFO: We’ve been talking about the death of cash for years — and now ‘it’s here’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mobile, services, billion, cash, payments, world, weve, population, paypal, cfo, financial, really, talking, death, rainey


PayPal CFO: We've been talking about the death of cash for years — and now 'it's here'

The death of cash has arrived, PayPal CFO John Rainey told CNBC on Thursday.

“We’ve been talking about this phenomenon or trend for years now, and it’s here,” Rainey said on “Squawk Alley.” “We experience it today.”

There are factors responsible for the decaying presence of cash, Rainey said. The first is the digitization of payments. The second is the growth of mobile devices.

“It’s where those two come together that really create opportunities like PayPal to really expand the suite of financial services, to large swaths of the population that are really underserved by how we characterize that today,” Rainey said.

Rainey said the size of the “underserved” population is about 2 billion people globally who “don’t have access to things that you and I take for granted, like a checking account or a savings account.”

“The unique aspect of those 2 billion people is roughly 70% have a mobile device,” Rainey said. “With that combination together, we can put all the power of a bank branch and all the financial services in the palm of their hand.”

A 2018 study from the World Bank estimated the world’s unbanked population to be 1.7 billion people.

Rainey’s comments on the rise of mobile payments come one day after PayPal posted better-than-expected quarterly profit numbers. Its stock rose more than 7% Thursday.

The value of payments completed through PayPal’s platform grew by 25% to $178.67 billion, and it also saw an increase in number of payments from its active users.

Rainey said PayPal, which owns the mobile payment app Venmo, has work to do increasing its presence outside of industrialized nations such as the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.

“We’re less strong in some of these faster growth regions of the world like an India, like places in Latin America, certainly Africa,” he said.

“And that’s where really we can take our value proposition and the digitization of payments, and give those people access to financial services and importantly access to the online world that they cannot experience without some sort of financial instrument to pay online,” Rainey said.

Earlier this month, PayPal backed out of its participation in Facebook’s foray into cryptocurrency.

As Facebook attempts to launch its digital currency, libra, the social media giant has touted its potential benefits to people who are unbanked. CEO Mark Zuckerberg emphasized it in his congressional testimony Wednesday.

When asked about PayPal’s decision, Rainey said the two companieis are “very much aligned” in their mission to democratize finance. But PayPal wants to focus on its own priorities, he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mobile, services, billion, cash, payments, world, weve, population, paypal, cfo, financial, really, talking, death, rainey


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EU regulator expects to clear Boeing 737 MAX in January at earliest

Boeing 737 Max-8 aircraft are parked up at a gate in the terminal of Manchester Airport on March 12, 2019 in Manchester, England. European regulators expect to clear Boeing’s grounded 737 MAX to return to service in January at the earliest, following flight trials by European test pilots currently scheduled for mid-December, Europe’s top air safety official told Reuters. “For me it is going to be the beginning of next year, if everything goes well. He said a return to service of the MAX would be


Boeing 737 Max-8 aircraft are parked up at a gate in the terminal of Manchester Airport on March 12, 2019 in Manchester, England.
European regulators expect to clear Boeing’s grounded 737 MAX to return to service in January at the earliest, following flight trials by European test pilots currently scheduled for mid-December, Europe’s top air safety official told Reuters.
“For me it is going to be the beginning of next year, if everything goes well.
He said a return to service of the MAX would be
EU regulator expects to clear Boeing 737 MAX in January at earliest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middecember, 737, safety, max, boeing, talking, weeks, service, regulator, clear, regulators, flight, easa, agencies, expects, return, earliest


EU regulator expects to clear Boeing 737 MAX in January at earliest

Boeing 737 Max-8 aircraft are parked up at a gate in the terminal of Manchester Airport on March 12, 2019 in Manchester, England.

European regulators expect to clear Boeing’s grounded 737 MAX to return to service in January at the earliest, following flight trials by European test pilots currently scheduled for mid-December, Europe’s top air safety official told Reuters.

The head of the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) declined to estimate when U.S. regulators would make their own decision to lift a flight ban imposed in March, but said any gap between the agencies would be a matter of weeks not months.

Boeing has said it aims to return the jet to service by year-end following changes to cockpit software and training in the wake of two fatal crashes that sparked the grounding in March.

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has primary responsibility for lifting the ban and is expected to be followed by other regulators including EASA, but there have been concerns that other agencies could be slow to act.

“For me it is going to be the beginning of next year, if everything goes well. As far as we know today, we have planned for our flight tests to take place in mid-December which means decisions on a return to service for January, on our side,” EASA executive director Patrick Ky said late on Friday.

He said a return to service of the MAX would be coordinated with the FAA as much as possible, but that the two agencies had slightly different processes and consultation requirements.

“So we may end up with a couple of weeks of time difference but we are not talking about six months; we are talking about a delay which, if it happens, will be due mostly to process or administrative technicalities,” Ky added.

Ky was speaking shortly before the disclosure on Friday of internal pilot messages from 2016 plunged Boeing into fresh turmoil. On Monday, he declined comment on the messages.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middecember, 737, safety, max, boeing, talking, weeks, service, regulator, clear, regulators, flight, easa, agencies, expects, return, earliest


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Mike Bloomberg keeps talking to allies about running for president as Joe Biden struggles against Elizabeth Warren

Mike Bloomberg might end up running for president, after all. “Bloomberg is in if Biden is out,” said another New York billionaire with ties to Bloomberg. Axios reported in April that Bloomberg might still run for president, despite his announcement a month earlier. House Democrats are conducting an impeachment inquiry into Trump after he asked the Ukrainian president to investigate Joe and Hunter Biden. In January, when he was considering a run for president, he took a shot at Warren’s wealth t


Mike Bloomberg might end up running for president, after all. “Bloomberg is in if Biden is out,” said another New York billionaire with ties to Bloomberg. Axios reported in April that Bloomberg might still run for president, despite his announcement a month earlier. House Democrats are conducting an impeachment inquiry into Trump after he asked the Ukrainian president to investigate Joe and Hunter Biden. In January, when he was considering a run for president, he took a shot at Warren’s wealth t
Mike Bloomberg keeps talking to allies about running for president as Joe Biden struggles against Elizabeth Warren Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bloomberg, warren, struggles, keeps, joe, run, recent, democrat, democratic, biden, primary, running, mike, talking, president, elizabeth


Mike Bloomberg keeps talking to allies about running for president as Joe Biden struggles against Elizabeth Warren

Mike Bloomberg might end up running for president, after all.

Bloomberg, the billionaire former mayor of New York, has indicated to associates in recent weeks that Joe Biden’s recent struggles against Sen. Elizabeth Warren are making him rethink his decision to stay out of the 2020 Democratic primary. That’s according to people familiar with the discussions who spoke on condition of anonymity because the conversations were deemed private.

Bloomberg has signaled he’s “still looking at” running for president, but people close him say that the only way he could even go down that path is if Biden’s fortunes suffer so much that he drops out before or during the early stages of the primary. Bloomberg could then enter the race as one of the rare moderates with enough name recognition and campaign funding to make a run. Forbes estimates his net worth at $51 billion, and he was planning to spend over $100 million on a campaign for president if he ran.

“I think it’s something he wants. He has not been shy about that,” one of Bloomberg’s allies familiar with the talks told CNBC. “Nothing can happen unless Biden drops out, and that’s not happening anytime soon,” this person added.

“He’s like everyone else. They can’t get it out of their system,” said a banking executive who has known Bloomberg for decades. “Bloomberg is in if Biden is out,” said another New York billionaire with ties to Bloomberg.

During his three terms as mayor, Bloomberg was a Republican and an independent. He registered as a Democrat again one month before the party’s triumph in the 2018 midterm congressional elections, during which Bloomberg was a big donor. He has said he would run as a Democrat if he pursued the White House this time.

Axios reported in April that Bloomberg might still run for president, despite his announcement a month earlier. Fox Business reported in September that he still has a team of political advisors and has kept the door open to running in 2020.

Bloomberg, who is 77, considered running in the 2016 election, but announced he wouldn’t do it. He eventually endorsed Democrat Hillary Clinton in the race. Before that, there was speculation he would run in 2012, but he declined and eventually backed President Barack Obama.

Representatives for Bloomberg did not respond to repeated requests for comment after several days of outreach. A spokesperson for the Biden campaign did not return a request for comment.

Biden, 76, is neck and neck with Warren, 70, in polling averages. The latest Quinnipiac poll has the Massachusetts Democrat receiving 29% of support from Democratic voters, while Biden has 26%. FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver pointed out that Biden continues to remain ahead of Warren in a combined average of recent polls, despite attacks from President Donald Trump.

Biden has been under siege from Trump, who has ripped the former vice president over his son Hunter’s business ties in Ukraine and China.

The Bidens have denied all accusations of wrongdoing. House Democrats are conducting an impeachment inquiry into Trump after he asked the Ukrainian president to investigate Joe and Hunter Biden.

Trump, 73, on Monday teed off again after Hunter Biden disclosed that he would step down from a Chinese-backed private equity firm.

Biden is set to take part in a debate on Tuesday night with 11 other candidates. Billionaire Tom Steyer, 62, is among the participants.

The primary season kicks off Feb. 3 with the Iowa caucuses. There is no indication Biden or any of the top Democrats are planning to withdraw from the race anytime soon. Biden’s team told donors at a recent donor summit in Philadelphia that they are looking to ramp up their fundraising efforts in order to make their mark on Super Tuesday, which takes place in March.

When Bloomberg announced in March he would not run, he specifically mentioned the hurdle of winning the Democratic nomination due to the amount of candidates in the race.

“And I believe I would defeat Donald Trump in a general election. But I am clear-eyed about the difficulty of winning the Democratic nomination in such a crowded field,” he wrote in an op-ed. He said he would instead focus on some of his pet policy initiatives, including combating climate change, the opioid epidemic and reducing gun violence.

Since then, Bloomberg has said in numerous interviews that he is comfortable with the decision he made with not taking part in the primary. He has yet to commit to endorsing a candidate, including Biden.

“I didn’t think that it was the right thing for me to do at this time,” he said in August to MSNBC. He noted to CBS’ “Face the Nation” that Biden has to “earn his spurs” before winning the nomination.

“No, I think — and Joe would certainly tell you — that he’s not a lock for the nomination,” Bloomberg told CBS then. “There are 20 candidates, of which the majority of them have a really legitimate chance.”

Still, Bloomberg’s chances of making inroads in a primary that’s filled with progressive front-runners, including Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders, 78, have been a question mark for voters.

In a poll taken by Morning Consult and Politico in February, a month before Bloomberg’s announcement to not take part in the contest, 19% of registered Democrats said they would probably not vote for him in a caucus or a primary and 14% said they would definitely not back him.

Bloomberg has had his run-ins with Warren, setting up a possible battle between the two, regardless of whether he enters the race.

During a recent forum hosted by Everytown for Gun Safety, a group Bloomberg founded and continues to financially support, the former New York mayor seemed to take a swipe at her anti-corporate policies.

“I just said to Senator Warren on the way out, ‘Senator, congratulations, it’s a nice talk. But let me just remind you if my company hadn’t been successful, we wouldn’t be here today, so enough with this stuff,'” he said.

In January, when he was considering a run for president, he took a shot at Warren’s wealth tax proposal, calling it unconstitutional.

“It’s called Venezuela,” he said at the time.

A representative for Warren did not return a request for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bloomberg, warren, struggles, keeps, joe, run, recent, democrat, democratic, biden, primary, running, mike, talking, president, elizabeth


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Apparent White House talking points on Trump’s Ukraine call about Biden accidentally emailed to Democrats

A detailed list of what appeared to be White House talking points about a controversial call by President Donald Trump with Ukraine’s president was accidentally emailed to the offices of Democratic members of Congress on Wednesday, according to NBC News. The talking points were sent from the federal department that handles communication with other government offices. Trump’s Republican defenders used language echoing the talking points Wednesday after notes summarizing the July 25 call between T


A detailed list of what appeared to be White House talking points about a controversial call by President Donald Trump with Ukraine’s president was accidentally emailed to the offices of Democratic members of Congress on Wednesday, according to NBC News. The talking points were sent from the federal department that handles communication with other government offices. Trump’s Republican defenders used language echoing the talking points Wednesday after notes summarizing the July 25 call between T
Apparent White House talking points on Trump’s Ukraine call about Biden accidentally emailed to Democrats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, emailed, white, trump, zelensky, house, email, biden, democratic, talking, democrats, apparent, president, trumps, offices, ukraine


Apparent White House talking points on Trump's Ukraine call about Biden accidentally emailed to Democrats

President Donald Trump attends a multilateral meeting with Western Hemisphere leaders about Venezuela during the 74th session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) at U.N. headquarters in New York, September 25, 2019. Jonathan Ernst | Reuters

Well, that’s awkward. A detailed list of what appeared to be White House talking points about a controversial call by President Donald Trump with Ukraine’s president was accidentally emailed to the offices of Democratic members of Congress on Wednesday, according to NBC News. The talking points were sent from the federal department that handles communication with other government offices. Trump’s Republican defenders used language echoing the talking points Wednesday after notes summarizing the July 25 call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky were released.

The subject line of the email was “What You Need To Know | President Trump’s Call with President Zelenskyy.” Afterward, Democratic offices that had received the list of talking points from the director of Government Communications received an email announcing a “RECALL” of the original email containing the messaging about the call. The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC when asked if the administration had created the talking points about the call. During that call, Trump asked Zelensky to “look into” former Vice President Joe Biden, who is currently seeking the Democratic nomination for president, and his son, Hunter Biden. Trump suggested, without evidence, that Joe Biden in 2016 had improperly thwarted a Ukrainian prosecutor’s probe into a company in that nation whose board Hunter Biden served on. At the time of the call, Trump had blocked the release of $400 million in military aid to Ukraine. That money since has been released.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, emailed, white, trump, zelensky, house, email, biden, democratic, talking, democrats, apparent, president, trumps, offices, ukraine


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