What Trump does before trade deadline is the ‘wild card’ that will drive markets in the week ahead

Just in the past week, Trump said he would put new tariffs on Brazil, Argentina and France. He rattled markets when he said he could wait until after the election for a trade deal with China. If there’s no China deal, that could beat up stocks, send Treasury yields lower and send investors into other safe havens. Economic reports in the coming week include CPI inflation Wednesday, which could be an important input for the Fed. Fed aheadThe Fed has moved to the sidelines and says it is monitoring


Just in the past week, Trump said he would put new tariffs on Brazil, Argentina and France.
He rattled markets when he said he could wait until after the election for a trade deal with China.
If there’s no China deal, that could beat up stocks, send Treasury yields lower and send investors into other safe havens.
Economic reports in the coming week include CPI inflation Wednesday, which could be an important input for the Fed.
Fed aheadThe Fed has moved to the sidelines and says it is monitoring
What Trump does before trade deadline is the ‘wild card’ that will drive markets in the week ahead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, wild, markets, fed, deadline, tariffs, does, week, thats, deal, going, drive, trade, card, ahead, inflation, think, market, china


What Trump does before trade deadline is the 'wild card' that will drive markets in the week ahead

China’s President Xi Jinping (L) and US President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. AFP Contributor | AFP | Getty Images

The Trump administration’s Dec. 15 deadline for new tariffs on China looms large, and while most strategists expect them to be delayed while talks continue, they don’t rule out the unexpected. “That’s the biggest thing in the room next week. I don’t think he’s going to raise them. I think they’ll find a reason,” said James Pauslen, chief investment strategist at Leuthold Group. But Paulsen said President Donald Trump’s unpredictable nature makes it really impossible to tell what will happen as the deadline nears. “He’s the one off you’re never sure about. It’s not just tariffs. It could be damn near anything,” Paulsen said. “I think he goes out of his way to be a wild card.” Just in the past week, Trump said he would put new tariffs on Brazil, Argentina and France. He rattled markets when he said he could wait until after the election for a trade deal with China. Once dubbing himself “tariff man,” Trump reminded markets that he sees tariffs as a way of getting what he wants from an opponent, and traders were reminded tariffs may be around for a long time. Trade certainly could be the most important event for markets in the week ahead, which also includes a Fed interest rate decision Wednesday and the U.K.’s election that could set the course for Brexit. If there’s no China deal, that could beat up stocks, send Treasury yields lower and send investors into other safe havens. When Fed officials meet this week, they are not expected to change interest rates, but they are likely to discuss whether they believe their repo operations to drive liquidity in the short-term funding market are running smoothly, ahead of year end. Economic reports in the coming week include CPI inflation Wednesday, which could be an important input for the Fed.

Punt, but no deal

As of Friday, the White House did not appear any closer to striking a deal with China, though officials say talks are going fine. Back in August, Trump said if there is no deal, Dec. 15 is the date for a new wave of tariffs on $156 billion in Chinese goods, including cell phones, toys and lap top computers. Dan Clifton, head of policy research at Strategas, said it seems like a low probability there will be a deal in the coming week. “What the market is focused on right now is whether there’s going to be tariffs that to into effect on Dec. 15, or not. It’s being rated pretty binary,” said Clifton. “I think what’s happening here and the actions by China overnight looks like we’re setting up for a kick.” China removed some tariffs from U.S. agricultural products Friday, and administration officials have been talking about discussions going fine. Clifton said if tariffs are put on hold, it’s unclear for how long. “Those are going to be larger questions that have to be answered. This is really now about politics. Is it a better idea for the president to cut a deal without major structural reforms, or should he walk away? That’s the larger debate that has to happen after Dec. 15,” Clifton said. “I’m getting worried that some in the administration… they’re leaning toward no deal category.” Clifton said Trump’s approval rating falls when the trade wars heat up, so that may motivate him to complete the deal with China even if he doesn’t get everything he wants. Michael Schumacher, director of rates strategy at Wells Fargo, said his base case is for a trade deal to be signed in the next couple of months, but even so, he said he can’t entirely rule out another outcome. It would make sense for tariffs to be put on hold while talks continue. “The tweeter-in-chief controls that one, ” said Schumacher. “That’s anybody’s guess…I wouldn’t be at all surprised if he suspends it for a few weeks. If he doesn’t, that’s a pretty unpleasant result. That’s risk off. That’s pretty clear.” Because the next group of tariffs would be on consumer goods, economists fear they could hit the economy through the consumer, the strongest and largest engine behind economic growth.

Fed ahead

The Fed has moved to the sidelines and says it is monitoring economic data before deciding its next move. Friday’s strong November jobs report, with 266,000 jobs added, reinforces the Fed’s decision to move to neutral for now. So the most important headlines from its meeting this week could be about the repo market, basically the plumbing for the financial system where financial institutions fund themselves. Interest rates in that somewhat obscure market spiked in September. Market pros said the issue was a cash crunch in the short term lending market, made better when the Fed started repo operations. The Fed now has multiple operations running over year end, and Schumacher said it has latitude to do more. Strategists expect there to be more pressure on the repo market as banks rein in operations to spruce up their balance sheets at year end. “No one is going to come to the Fed and say you did too much in the year-end funding,” said Schumacher. “If repo happens to spike somewhat on one day, the Fed is going to hammer it the next day.” Paulsen said the markets will be attuned to this week’s inflation numbers. Consumer inflation, the CPI is reported on Wednesday and producer prices are Thursday. A pickup in inflation of any significance is one thing that could pull the Fed from the sidelines, and prod it to consider a rate hike. “I think the inflation reports might start to get a little attention. Given the jobs numbers, the employment rate, growth picking up a little bit and a better tone in manufacturing. I do think if you get some hot CPI number, I don’t know if the Fed can ignore it,” he said. “Core CPI is 2.3%.” He said it would get noticed if it jumped to 2.5% or better. The Fed’s inflation target is 2% but its preferred measure is the PCE inflation, and that remains under 2%. Stocks were sharply higher Friday but ended the past week flattish. The S&P 500 was slightly higher, up 0.2% at 3,145, and the Dow was down 0.1% at 28,015. The Nasdaq was 0.1% lower, ending the week at 8,656.

Week ahead calendar


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, wild, markets, fed, deadline, tariffs, does, week, thats, deal, going, drive, trade, card, ahead, inflation, think, market, china


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US futures higher ahead of November’s jobs report

U.S. stock index futures were higher on Friday. ET, Dow futures rose 55 points, indicating a positive open of more than 56 points. Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq were both slightly higher. Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, following an upbeat tone from President Donald Trump. Dec. 15 is the date when tariffs on another $156 billion in Chinese goods will go into effect.


U.S. stock index futures were higher on Friday.
ET, Dow futures rose 55 points, indicating a positive open of more than 56 points.
Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq were both slightly higher.
Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, following an upbeat tone from President Donald Trump.
Dec. 15 is the date when tariffs on another $156 billion in Chinese goods will go into effect.
US futures higher ahead of November’s jobs report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, chinese, higher, goods, jobs, worth, upbeat, futures, tariffs, washington, ahead, novembers, points, report, worlds


US futures higher ahead of November's jobs report

U.S. stock index futures were higher on Friday.

At around 02:15 a.m. ET, Dow futures rose 55 points, indicating a positive open of more than 56 points. Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq were both slightly higher.

Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, following an upbeat tone from President Donald Trump.

On Thursday, Trump said the world’s two largest economies were inching closer to a trade deal. His comments come as investors continue to closely monitor the prospect of a so-called “phase one” trade agreement, with less than 10 days to go before Washington is poised to impose even more tariffs on Chinese goods.

Dec. 15 is the date when tariffs on another $156 billion in Chinese goods will go into effect.

The U.S. and China have imposed tariffs on billions of dollars’ worth of one another’s goods since the start of 2018, battering financial markets and souring business and consumer sentiment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, chinese, higher, goods, jobs, worth, upbeat, futures, tariffs, washington, ahead, novembers, points, report, worlds


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China will waive import tariffs for some US soybeans and pork, finance ministry says

Customers select pork at a supermarket in Fuyang, in eastern China’s Anhui province on May 10, 2016. China will waive import tariffs for some soybeans and pork shipments from the United States, China’s finance ministry said on Friday, citing a decision by the country’s cabinet. The tariff waivers were based on applications by individual firms for U.S. soybeans and pork imports, the ministry said in a statement. China imposed tariffs of 25% on both U.S. soybeans and pork in July 2018 as a counter


Customers select pork at a supermarket in Fuyang, in eastern China’s Anhui province on May 10, 2016.
China will waive import tariffs for some soybeans and pork shipments from the United States, China’s finance ministry said on Friday, citing a decision by the country’s cabinet.
The tariff waivers were based on applications by individual firms for U.S. soybeans and pork imports, the ministry said in a statement.
China imposed tariffs of 25% on both U.S. soybeans and pork in July 2018 as a counter
China will waive import tariffs for some US soybeans and pork, finance ministry says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, finance, chinas, soybeans, tariffs, washington, world, china, waive, ministry, import, united, pork


China will waive import tariffs for some US soybeans and pork, finance ministry says

Customers select pork at a supermarket in Fuyang, in eastern China’s Anhui province on May 10, 2016.

China will waive import tariffs for some soybeans and pork shipments from the United States, China’s finance ministry said on Friday, citing a decision by the country’s cabinet.

The tariff waivers were based on applications by individual firms for U.S. soybeans and pork imports, the ministry said in a statement. It did not specify the quantities involved.

China imposed tariffs of 25% on both U.S. soybeans and pork in July 2018 as a countermeasure to tariffs levied by Washington over allegations that China steals and forces the transfer of American intellectual property to Chinese firms.

The waiver comes amid negotiations between the United States and China to conclude a ‘phase one’ or interim deal to de-escalate a 17-month trade war between the two countries. Lifting tariffs on each other’s goods is a key part of those talks.

China has also been scouring the world for more meat to fill a big shortage of protein after an outbreak of African swine fever devastated its massive hog herd, cutting supplies of pork.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, finance, chinas, soybeans, tariffs, washington, world, china, waive, ministry, import, united, pork


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Treasury yields tick higher as investors await jobs report

ET, the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 1.8034%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at around 2.2482%. Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, following an upbeat tone from President Donald Trump. On Thursday, Trump said the world’s two largest economies were inching closer to a trade deal. His comments come as investors continue to closely monitor the prospect of a so-called “phase one” trade a


ET, the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 1.8034%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at around 2.2482%.
Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, following an upbeat tone from President Donald Trump.
On Thursday, Trump said the world’s two largest economies were inching closer to a trade deal.
His comments come as investors continue to closely monitor the prospect of a so-called “phase one” trade a
Treasury yields tick higher as investors await jobs report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, chinese, worlds, higher, jobs, upbeat, trumpon, tariffs, yield, washington, treasury, yields, investors, report, tick, await


Treasury yields tick higher as investors await jobs report

At 02:50 a.m. ET, the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 1.8034%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at around 2.2482%.

Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, following an upbeat tone from President Donald Trump.

On Thursday, Trump said the world’s two largest economies were inching closer to a trade deal. His comments come as investors continue to closely monitor the prospect of a so-called “phase one” trade agreement, with less than 10 days to go before Washington is poised to impose even more tariffs on Chinese goods.

Dec. 15 is the date when tariffs on another $156 billion in Chinese goods will go into effect.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, chinese, worlds, higher, jobs, upbeat, trumpon, tariffs, yield, washington, treasury, yields, investors, report, tick, await


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China to waive tariffs on some US soybeans, pork in goodwill gesture

In a positive gesture, China said on Friday that it will waive import tariffs for some soybeans and pork shipments from the United States, as the two sides try to thrash out a broader agreement to defuse their protracted trade war. The tariff waivers were based on applications by individual firms for U.S. soybeans and pork imports, the finance ministry said in a statement, citing a decision by the country’s cabinet. That includes tariffs of 25% on both U.S. soybeans and pork in July 2018 and a f


In a positive gesture, China said on Friday that it will waive import tariffs for some soybeans and pork shipments from the United States, as the two sides try to thrash out a broader agreement to defuse their protracted trade war.
The tariff waivers were based on applications by individual firms for U.S. soybeans and pork imports, the finance ministry said in a statement, citing a decision by the country’s cabinet.
That includes tariffs of 25% on both U.S. soybeans and pork in July 2018 and a f
China to waive tariffs on some US soybeans, pork in goodwill gesture Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, war, trade, soybeans, waive, pork, tariffs, china, gesture, washington, goodwill, chinese, 2018


China to waive tariffs on some US soybeans, pork in goodwill gesture

In a positive gesture, China said on Friday that it will waive import tariffs for some soybeans and pork shipments from the United States, as the two sides try to thrash out a broader agreement to defuse their protracted trade war. The tariff waivers were based on applications by individual firms for U.S. soybeans and pork imports, the finance ministry said in a statement, citing a decision by the country’s cabinet. It did not specify the quantities involved. China had imposed the levies in response to tariffs launched by Washington over allegations that China steals and forces the transfer of American intellectual property to Chinese firms, known as Section 301. That includes tariffs of 25% on both U.S. soybeans and pork in July 2018 and a further 10% on pork and 5% on soybeans in September this year.

This photo taken on July 19, 2018 shows a worker loading sacks of animal feed made from soybeans at the Hopefull Grain and Oil Group in Sanhe, in China’s northern Hebei province. The company is currently using soybeans imported from Brazil, after recently changing from U.S. soybeans. Greg Baker | AFP | Getty Images

The waiver comes amid negotiations between the United States and China to conclude a ‘phase one’ or interim deal to de-escalate a 17-month trade war that has roiled financial markets, disrupted supply chains and weighed on global economic growth. A deal had initially been expected last month, but the two sides are said to be still seeking agreement on major issues such as which tariffs to roll back and the size of U.S. farm purchases China is willing to make. Though President Donald Trump struck an upbeat tone on progress in talks on Thursday, a new round of U.S. tariffs covering about $156 billion of Chinese imports is set to kick in just over a week away on Dec. 15. China’s tariff waivers on key U.S. agricultural products is a sign of its commitment to the deal, said an industry source who declined to be identified because of the sensitivity of the matter. “The goal (of this move) is to expand purchases and reassure the United States,” said a Chinese source who advises Beijing on the trade talks. “It should be interpreted as a positive signal. Despite the many political difficulties the two sides face, economic and trade cooperation and moves to stop the escalation of the trade war are in the interest of both parties.” Since late 2018, Washington has similarly exempted some Chinese goods from U.S. tariffs, even as the tone of the trade talks waxed and waned. At end-October, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) began accepting tariff exclusion requests for Chinese goods subject to additional taxes in effect since Sept. 1. Prior to that, 14 batches of exclusions for Chinese products had been granted between December 2018 and mid-October this year. Washington imposed additional tariffs on about $125 billion worth of Chinese goods on Sept. 1, on top of 25% tariffs levied on an earlier $250 billion list of industrial and consumer goods.

US Soybeans


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, war, trade, soybeans, waive, pork, tariffs, china, gesture, washington, goodwill, chinese, 2018


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Wall Street set for a higher open

Wall Street set for a higher open1 Hour AgoU.S. stock index futures were higher on Friday ahead of the November jobs report and on news that China offered to waive tariffs on some U.S. soybeans and pork. CNBC’s Frank Holland reports.


Wall Street set for a higher open1 Hour AgoU.S. stock index futures were higher on Friday ahead of the November jobs report and on news that China offered to waive tariffs on some U.S. soybeans and pork.
CNBC’s Frank Holland reports.
Wall Street set for a higher open Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, higher, stock, soybeans, waive, tariffs, wall, reports, open, street, report


Wall Street set for a higher open

Wall Street set for a higher open

1 Hour Ago

U.S. stock index futures were higher on Friday ahead of the November jobs report and on news that China offered to waive tariffs on some U.S. soybeans and pork. CNBC’s Frank Holland reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, higher, stock, soybeans, waive, tariffs, wall, reports, open, street, report


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Kudlow says a trade deal is close, but Trump is prepared to ‘walk away’ if some conditions not met

Larry Kudlow, White House National Economic Council director, said the U.S. and China are “close” to a trade deal but that the administration was prepared to walk away if it did not get the terms they wanted. We will walk away,” Kudlow said on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Friday. “The president has said that if we can not get the enforcement and the assurances, then we will not go forward.” The two countries are in talks to finalize a so-called phase one trade deal as 15% tariffs on $165 bil


Larry Kudlow, White House National Economic Council director, said the U.S. and China are “close” to a trade deal but that the administration was prepared to walk away if it did not get the terms they wanted.
We will walk away,” Kudlow said on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Friday.
“The president has said that if we can not get the enforcement and the assurances, then we will not go forward.”
The two countries are in talks to finalize a so-called phase one trade deal as 15% tariffs on $165 bil
Kudlow says a trade deal is close, but Trump is prepared to ‘walk away’ if some conditions not met Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fact, walk, away, good, kudlow, tariffs, close, president, trade, conditions, talks, met, trump, deal, prepared


Kudlow says a trade deal is close, but Trump is prepared to 'walk away' if some conditions not met

Larry Kudlow, White House National Economic Council director, said the U.S. and China are “close” to a trade deal but that the administration was prepared to walk away if it did not get the terms they wanted.

“The president has said many times if the deal is no good, if the assurances with respects to preventing future thefts, if the enforcement procedure is no good he has said we will not go for it. We will walk away,” Kudlow said on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Friday. “The president has said that if we can not get the enforcement and the assurances, then we will not go forward.”

The two countries are in talks to finalize a so-called phase one trade deal as 15% tariffs on $165 billion in Chinese imports are set to kick in Dec. 15. Kudlow said the two sides are moving closer to a deal.

“The deal is close. It’s probably even closer than in mid-November,” Kudlow said. “Deputy level met again … The reality is constructive talks, almost daily talks. We are in fact close…There’s no arbitrary deadlines, but the fact remains December 15 is a very important date with respect to a no go or go on tariffs.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: yun li
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Trump’s tricky decision: Hit Chinese goods with new tariffs or hold off?

U.S. President Donald Trump poses for a photo with China’s President Xi Jinping before their bilateral meeting during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019. In this multifront, multiyear trade war, with shifting deadlines and political headwinds, it has paid for investors to beware the ides of March. “If enough substantive progress had been made, he might” be willing to delay, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC this week. Republicans and Democrats alike would worry the Whit


U.S. President Donald Trump poses for a photo with China’s President Xi Jinping before their bilateral meeting during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019.
In this multifront, multiyear trade war, with shifting deadlines and political headwinds, it has paid for investors to beware the ides of March.
“If enough substantive progress had been made, he might” be willing to delay, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC this week.
Republicans and Democrats alike would worry the Whit
Trump’s tricky decision: Hit Chinese goods with new tariffs or hold off? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: kayla tausche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decision, hold, mnuchin, tariffs, goods, president, chinese, talking, trump, trade, secretary, tricky, donald, trumps, deal, hit


Trump's tricky decision: Hit Chinese goods with new tariffs or hold off?

U.S. President Donald Trump poses for a photo with China’s President Xi Jinping before their bilateral meeting during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019.

In this multifront, multiyear trade war, with shifting deadlines and political headwinds, it has paid for investors to beware the ides of March. May. August. October. And now, December.

In less than two weeks, President Donald Trump must decide whether to slap tariffs on $156 billion in consumer goods made in China — including toys, phones, laptops and clothes, right before the holidays — or move the goal post yet again in lieu of the comprehensive trade deal he’s been seeking.

“If enough substantive progress had been made, he might” be willing to delay, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC this week. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Thursday the two sides were still “on track,” for a deal and still talking, but he did not say whether the tariffs would be shelved.

During the Oval Office announcement of the latest truce, Mnuchin assured the public there would be more than enough time to finish the deal and permanently avert further tariffs.

That was two months ago.

Trump now has a complicated calculus to consider: Postponing the tariffs would avoid a market sell-off and higher holiday prices — and the ire of CEOs like Tim Cook and Jamie Dimon whom Trump has come to not only trust but revere. But doing so with anything short of a deal-signing — which Trump said in October was the next step — would mark the fifth instance this year that he delayed or canceled tariffs as a gesture of goodwill, further exposing him to criticism that the “phase one” deal exists only as a talking point.

Enacting the tariffs would cause its own problems. Republicans and Democrats alike would worry the White House was gambling with a U.S. economy already seeing some cracks in its strength. American farmers, many in swing states, would see exports further shrink and endure deeper financial suffering, not to mention continued retaliation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: kayla tausche
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China gives little indication US trade talks are progressing

Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng speaks at a press conference in Beijing, days ahead of an imminent US-China trade war, on July 5, 2018. BEIJING — China’s official spokespeople are keeping quiet on trade talks with the U.S. amid growing uncertainty on when even a phase-one agreement can be reached. “China believes if both sides reach a phase-one agreement, relevant tariffs must be lowered,” Gao Feng, Ministry of Commerce spokesman, said Thursday, according to a CNBC translation of


Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng speaks at a press conference in Beijing, days ahead of an imminent US-China trade war, on July 5, 2018.
BEIJING — China’s official spokespeople are keeping quiet on trade talks with the U.S. amid growing uncertainty on when even a phase-one agreement can be reached.
“China believes if both sides reach a phase-one agreement, relevant tariffs must be lowered,” Gao Feng, Ministry of Commerce spokesman, said Thursday, according to a CNBC translation of
China gives little indication US trade talks are progressing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commerce, gao, tariffs, china, ministry, feng, gives, spokesman, indication, talks, details, progressing, trade, provide, little, phaseone


China gives little indication US trade talks are progressing

Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng speaks at a press conference in Beijing, days ahead of an imminent US-China trade war, on July 5, 2018.

BEIJING — China’s official spokespeople are keeping quiet on trade talks with the U.S. amid growing uncertainty on when even a phase-one agreement can be reached.

“China believes if both sides reach a phase-one agreement, relevant tariffs must be lowered,” Gao Feng, Ministry of Commerce spokesman, said Thursday, according to a CNBC translation of his Mandarin-language remarks.

The comments reiterated the position Beijing has expressed in the last few weeks, since both countries indicated a rollback of tariffs would be part of a so-called phase-one agreement.

On Thursday, Gao noted both trade delegations remain in communication, but disclosed few additional details about the negotiations.

He did not provide a direct response when asked about China’s view on additional U.S. tariffs, which are set to take effect Dec. 15. Gao also did not provide details on the unreliable entities list. The commerce ministry raised the threat of such a designation in late May, shortly after U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration put Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei on a blacklist that effectively prevents it from buying from American suppliers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commerce, gao, tariffs, china, ministry, feng, gives, spokesman, indication, talks, details, progressing, trade, provide, little, phaseone


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Treasury yields little changed as investors await economic data, auctions

U.S. government debt prices were little changed on Thursday as investors monitored U.S.-China trade talks and awaited a fresh batch of economic data. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was flat at around 1.7818%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also little changed at around 2.2359%. President Donald Trump also said Wednesday that he believed trade talks with Beijing were going “very well.” Market participants are closely monitoring


U.S. government debt prices were little changed on Thursday as investors monitored U.S.-China trade talks and awaited a fresh batch of economic data.
The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was flat at around 1.7818%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also little changed at around 2.2359%.
President Donald Trump also said Wednesday that he believed trade talks with Beijing were going “very well.”
Market participants are closely monitoring
Treasury yields little changed as investors await economic data, auctions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, uschina, auctions, yield, investors, yields, report, data, limited, talks, trade, changed, await, goods, little, economic, treasury


Treasury yields little changed as investors await economic data, auctions

U.S. government debt prices were little changed on Thursday as investors monitored U.S.-China trade talks and awaited a fresh batch of economic data.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was flat at around 1.7818%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also little changed at around 2.2359%.

Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, following a media report suggesting the world’s two largest economies were on the cusp of signing a so-called “phase one” trade deal.

A Bloomberg report, which cited people familiar with U.S.-China trade talks, said both countries were inching closer to securing an agreement on the amount of tariffs that would be rolled back in a limited trade deal. President Donald Trump also said Wednesday that he believed trade talks with Beijing were going “very well.”

Market participants are closely monitoring the prospect of a limited trade agreement with 10 days to go before Washington is poised to impose even more tariffs on Chinese goods. Dec. 15 is the date when tariffs on another $156 billion in Chinese goods would go into effect.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, uschina, auctions, yield, investors, yields, report, data, limited, talks, trade, changed, await, goods, little, economic, treasury


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