Fed chief faces tough task in Congressional testimony: ‘Walking a tightrope over Niagara Falls’

The prevailing view, priced into the futures market, is for a 100% chance of a quarter point rate cut July 31. If you’re testifying in front of Congress, you don’t want to tell Congress: ‘Things are slowing down, and I’m going to cut, cut, cut,'” said Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group. Others, like Jim Caron, portfolio manager with Morgan Stanley Investment Management, see a half-percentage point rate cut coming as early as late July. “The markets are going to s


The prevailing view, priced into the futures market, is for a 100% chance of a quarter point rate cut July 31. If you’re testifying in front of Congress, you don’t want to tell Congress: ‘Things are slowing down, and I’m going to cut, cut, cut,'” said Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group. Others, like Jim Caron, portfolio manager with Morgan Stanley Investment Management, see a half-percentage point rate cut coming as early as late July. “The markets are going to s
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, niagara, faces, rates, market, task, walking, congress, powell, falls, testimony, tightrope, fed, cut, global, president, point, tough, rate, congressional


Fed chief faces tough task in Congressional testimony: 'Walking a tightrope over Niagara Falls'

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell holds a press conference following a two day Federal Open Market Committee policy meeting in Washington, January 30, 2019. Leah Millis | Reuters

When Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies before Congress on Wednesday and Thursday, he is expected to talk about slowing economic activity and increased risks, showing that the Fed is ready to cut interest rates as needed. But Powell is also likely to keep the markets — and the White House — guessing about how soon and how deep the Fed intends to trim rates, when it meets at the end of July. The prevailing view, priced into the futures market, is for a 100% chance of a quarter point rate cut July 31. “There is no part of what he has to do over the next two days that does not resemble walking a tightrope over Niagara Falls,” said Julian Emanuel, chief equity and derivatives strategist at BTIG. Just the divergence in market views could make for volatile trading, when Powell appears before the House Financial Services Committee Wednesday morning and at Senate Banking on Thursday. Powell laid out the case for rate cuts when he spoke after the last Fed meeting, stressing that the global economy and trade wars were risks to U.S. growth. “He’s going to do his best to play both sides. If you’re testifying in front of Congress, you don’t want to tell Congress: ‘Things are slowing down, and I’m going to cut, cut, cut,'” said Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group. “He’s going to tell Congress the economy’s good, but there’s some pockets, and he’ll play up the idea of an insurance cut. Congress is his boss. You don’t want to tell the boss you’re behind the curve, and the December rate hike was a mistake.”

July Fed meeting

Last Friday’s surprisingly strong report of 224,000 jobs added in June has raised some doubts about whether the Fed would see a need to make a half-percentage point cut in July, as some had expected, but the market remains convinced the central bank will slice rates by at least a quarter point. Emanuel, however, said the Fed has leeway, and while he does ultimately expect a half-percentage point in cuts this year, the Fed may start in September instead of July. Others, like Jim Caron, portfolio manager with Morgan Stanley Investment Management, see a half-percentage point rate cut coming as early as late July. “My sense is that Powell is more concerned about global financial conditions (weak global PMIs, low global inflation, weakening growth everywhere) than he is pacified by a strong US labor market,” Caron wrote in an email. “I know the market is pricing 25bps in July. I’m leaning toward 50bps but it’s a close call. I think it’s a closer call than the market is pricing.”

Trump factor

More than other Fed chiefs, Powell has faced a barrage of public criticism from a president who disagrees with the way the Fed has been handling monetary policy. President Donald Trump has also reportedly looked into replacing the Fed chief, but Larry Kudlow, top White House economist, said Tuesday the president has no such plans for now. Still, Congress is likely to home in on the theme of Fed independence. “If he has to repeatedly assert his political independence in the Q and Q period, it’s very difficult to see how that wouldn’t come across as more hawkish than the market expects, given the president’s insistence that monetary policy is too restrictive,” said Emanuel. Michael Arone, chief investment strategist at State Street Global Advisors, said the Fed chief’s comments could sound hawkish, but the minutes from its last meeting, expected Wednesday afternoon, could be dovish. “The markets are going to see there was healthy debate about whether they should have cut rates in June,” he said, noting there was a dissent from St. Louis Fed President James Bullard. Arone said Powell’s testimony could disappoint investors who were hoping for clarity on the timing of interest rate cuts, and how much the Fed would be willing to move the fed funds target rate range, now at 2.25% to 2.50%. “With the strong jobs report and stock market at all-time highs, I think Chair Powell and the Fed will want to keep their options open. He won’t want to be seen giving into political pressure,” said Arone.

Financial market reaction


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, niagara, faces, rates, market, task, walking, congress, powell, falls, testimony, tightrope, fed, cut, global, president, point, tough, rate, congressional


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FedEx sues the US government over the ‘impossible’ task of policing exports to China

Fears that China would blacklist FedEx as a result sent its shares down 2.7% on Monday. The United States and China have been engaged in a trade fight for nearly a year on issues such as tariffs, subsidies, technology, regulations, and cybersecurity. Getty ImagesThe U.S. Commerce Department has banned a number of Chinese firms in recent weeks from buying sensitive U.S. technology. China is also drawing up its own “Unreliable Entities List” of foreign firms, groups and individuals. State-run news


Fears that China would blacklist FedEx as a result sent its shares down 2.7% on Monday. The United States and China have been engaged in a trade fight for nearly a year on issues such as tariffs, subsidies, technology, regulations, and cybersecurity. Getty ImagesThe U.S. Commerce Department has banned a number of Chinese firms in recent weeks from buying sensitive U.S. technology. China is also drawing up its own “Unreliable Entities List” of foreign firms, groups and individuals. State-run news
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25
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FedEx sues the US government over the 'impossible' task of policing exports to China

U.S. parcel delivery firm FedEx on Monday sued the U.S. government, saying it should not be held liable if it inadvertently shipped products that violated a Trump administration ban on exports to some Chinese companies. The move came after FedEx reignited Chinese ire over its business practices when a package containing a Huawei phone sent to the United States was returned last week to its sender in Britain, in what FedEx said was an “operational error.” Fears that China would blacklist FedEx as a result sent its shares down 2.7% on Monday. FedEx’s suit and delivery error come against a backdrop of increasing tension between the world’s two biggest economies. The United States and China have been engaged in a trade fight for nearly a year on issues such as tariffs, subsidies, technology, regulations, and cybersecurity.

FedEx Airbus A310-200 freighter taking-off at dusk with a Douglas DC-3, offices and hills behind. Getty Images

The U.S. Commerce Department has banned a number of Chinese firms in recent weeks from buying sensitive U.S. technology. In court filings in the District of Columbia, FedEx said it should not be expected to enforce the export ban, and could not reasonably be held liable for shipping products that it did not know about. Export restriction rules “essentially deputize FedEx to police the contents of the millions of packages it ships daily even though doing so is a virtually impossible task, logistically, economically, and in many cases, legally,” it said in a filing. A U.S. Commerce Department spokesman responded that, “We have not yet reviewed the complaint, but nevertheless look forward to defending Commerce’s role in protecting U.S. national security.” Chinese telecoms company Huawei Technologies in May was added to the U.S. “Entity List” of people and companies the government said posed a risk to the United States, essentially barring it from buying U.S. technology upon which it was heavily reliant. China is also drawing up its own “Unreliable Entities List” of foreign firms, groups and individuals. State-run newspaper Global Times on Sunday tweeted that FedEx was likely to be added to that list.

‘Operational error’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sent, policing, task, chinese, states, china, products, impossible, error, united, exports, list, technology, sues, fedex


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Goldman Sachs in talks to buy B&B Hotels from PAI Partners

Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the… Politicsread more


Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the… Politicsread more
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Goldman Sachs in talks to buy B&B Hotels from PAI Partners

Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…

Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the…

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US Treasury yields tick higher ahead of comments from Fed’s Powell

Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the… Politicsread more


Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the… Politicsread more
US Treasury yields tick higher ahead of comments from Fed’s Powell Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: sam meredith
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US Treasury yields tick higher ahead of comments from Fed's Powell

Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…

Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the…

Politics

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6 signs you’re way more productive than the average person

If you consider yourself to be someone who is easily overwhelmed with work, you’re in good company. And that’s understandable, especially with all of the everyday office distractions. A 2018 study from the workplace learning platform Udemy revealed the biggest workplace distractions that harm employee productivity. If you identify with any of the tendencies below, be assured that you’re a lot more productive than your peers. You avoid context-switchingContext-switching is when you stop what you’


If you consider yourself to be someone who is easily overwhelmed with work, you’re in good company. And that’s understandable, especially with all of the everyday office distractions. A 2018 study from the workplace learning platform Udemy revealed the biggest workplace distractions that harm employee productivity. If you identify with any of the tendencies below, be assured that you’re a lot more productive than your peers. You avoid context-switchingContext-switching is when you stop what you’
6 signs you’re way more productive than the average person Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: benjamin spall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, average, distractions, productive, person, workplace, work, slack, office, signs, youre, productivity, working, task, way


6 signs you're way more productive than the average person

On a scale of one to 10, how would you rate your level of productivity? If you consider yourself to be someone who is easily overwhelmed with work, you’re in good company. In the current “always on” work culture, even the most productive people feel like they don’t accomplish much on a daily. And that’s understandable, especially with all of the everyday office distractions. A 2018 study from the workplace learning platform Udemy revealed the biggest workplace distractions that harm employee productivity. The team collected data from more than 1,000 working Americans (ages 18 or older) and found that the biggest distractions and productivity killers were colleague interruptions (80%), office noise (70%) and smartphones (65%). The good news is that you might be more skilled at managing your time than you realize. If you identify with any of the tendencies below, be assured that you’re a lot more productive than your peers.

1. You have a strategy for dealing with offline interruptions

Interruptions from colleagues and general office noise (i.e. printers, phones and outside sirens) were cited as the top two causes of workplace disruptions, according to the Udemy study. If you’ve developed strategies for how to deal with this, you’re already ahead of the game. These might range from wearing noise-canceling headphones to making it a habit to step outside once or twice a day to reset your focus. It also helps to have places in mind where you can retreat to if the interruptions become too unbearable. This might be a home office, coffee shop, library or even a private meeting room in your office that you can book. The most productive people also know how to set boundaries with their colleagues and aren’t afraid to say things like, “Sorry, I’m in the middle of something right now. Can I get back to you later?”

2. You’re rarely surprised by how fast time has gone by

Have you ever had to look something up on Google Maps for work only to find yourself, 20 minutes later, with a dozen browser tabs open as you try in vain to find the best pizza spot in town? It happens to the best of us. Productive people keep track of time — not in an obsessive way, but they often monitor how long they’re spending on a certain task to see if they need to speed up or start wrapping up and moving on to the next project.

We’re all human, so we have a tendency to procrastinate at every chance we get, but there are many helpful tools out there to help us manage every minute of our day, including website blockers that disable access to distracting websites.

3. You limit your communication channels

These days, there are more than enough ways in which anyone can get in contact with us at any time. From phone calls to text messages, emails to Slack notifications and Twitter DMs to Instagram comments, that’s a lot to stay on top of. The key to not letting all these communication channels distract you is to simply limit your access to them. If you’re the type to get frustrated with never-ending Slack notifications and prefer to do work communication over email, there’s no shame in being direct with your colleagues. In fact, most of them will appreciate your candidness. No one likes to sit around waiting and wondering why you haven’t responded to the Slack message they sent two hours ago.

4. You prioritize your daily, and weekly tasks

In his book, “Deep Work: Rules for Staying Focused Success in a Distracted World,” Cal Newport, an associate professor of computer science at Georgetown University, notes that most people simply don’t know how to prioritize efficiently. On either Sunday night or Monday morning, review your tasks for the week ahead and see if the timeline makes sense. If one task is more important and may take you longer to complete, consider moving it to an earlier day in the week. Then, repeat the process at the end of each workday. Keep in mind that urgent requests may come up, and a task you thought would take just a half hour could end up taking three.

5. You avoid context-switching

Context-switching is when you stop what you’re working on to check your email or text messages for just a few minutes, then get back to what you were previously working on. This tendency can be a threat to your productivity: Each time you switch from one thing to another (before making progress on either), you experience a “transaction cost,” which drains your energy and slows you down.

6. You get enough sleep


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: benjamin spall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, average, distractions, productive, person, workplace, work, slack, office, signs, youre, productivity, working, task, way


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Homeland Security is reportedly considering labeling fentanyl as a weapon of mass destruction

The Department of Homeland Security is considering classifying fentanyl as a weapon of mass destruction, or WMD, according to an internal memo attained by military news outlet Task & Purpose. Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid that can be up to 100 times more potent than morphine. The memo said the Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction office would only focus on quantities and configurations of the drug that could be used as mass casualty weapons. In a statement to CNBC, a DHS official sai


The Department of Homeland Security is considering classifying fentanyl as a weapon of mass destruction, or WMD, according to an internal memo attained by military news outlet Task & Purpose. Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid that can be up to 100 times more potent than morphine. The memo said the Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction office would only focus on quantities and configurations of the drug that could be used as mass casualty weapons. In a statement to CNBC, a DHS official sai
Homeland Security is reportedly considering labeling fentanyl as a weapon of mass destruction Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: ashley turner, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, destruction, mass, fentanyl, memo, department, security, weapon, technology, wmd, task, reportedly, homeland, labeling, according, opioid, dhs, considering


Homeland Security is reportedly considering labeling fentanyl as a weapon of mass destruction

The Department of Homeland Security is considering classifying fentanyl as a weapon of mass destruction, or WMD, according to an internal memo attained by military news outlet Task & Purpose.

The memo said the painkiller would be labeled a WMD “when certain criteria are met,” and that federal officials have “long regarded fentanyl as a chemical weapons threat.”

Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid that can be up to 100 times more potent than morphine. It is prescribed to treat severe pain but is also sold illegally in the U.S. Fentanyl-related deaths in the country spiked more than 1,000% from 2011 to 2016, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2017, more than 28,000 U.S. citizens fatally overdosed on the drug.

The drug’s high toxicity and increasing availability are “attractive” to potential adversaries “seeking nonconventional materials for a chemical attack,” James McDonnell, an assistant secretary at DHS, wrote in the memo, according to Task & Purpose.

McDonnell wrote that “as little as” 2 to 3 milligrams of fentanyl can induce respiratory depression, respiratory arrest and possibly death.

The memo said the Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction office would only focus on quantities and configurations of the drug that could be used as mass casualty weapons.

However, the memo leaves out some key details, according to Dr. Michael Kuhlman, chief scientist specializing in WMD issues at Battelle, a science and technology nonprofit organization.

“What the memo doesn’t spell out the details of is: In what quantities and what do they mean by configurations?” Kuhlman said.

Kuhlman said a chemical powder is not in itself a WMD and that it needs to be combined with some form of delivery method for it to be considered so.

“You need something to weaponize it,” he said.

In a statement to CNBC, a DHS official said, “DHS is constantly assessing new and emerging threats that may impact the nation’s security. We coordinate closely with partners at [the Department of Defense], [Department of Justice], and throughout the interagency to better protect the American people.”

The official declined to offer further comment on the specifics of those discussions. The Department of Justice also declined to comment. When CNBC twice called to confirm if the Department of Defense proposed designating fentanyl as a WMD, a person who answered the phone hung up both times.

The memo said the CWMD office would assist in countering fentanyl by managing and developing requirements for technology development, deploying detection technology and providing analytical expertise. It also said the agency would conduct an official analysis of smuggling routes by which fentanyl enters the U.S. Large amounts of the drug have been traced to China and Mexico.

The internal memo comes at the same time the Trump administration touts progress in combating the U.S. opioid epidemic. President Donald Trump has vowed to battle the opioid crisis, securing $6 billion in funding over two years to fight drug abuse. But health experts say there is little evidence that opioid deaths have decreased as a result of administrative action.

Kuhlman said it’s possible the DHS is targeting fentanyl because it is responsible for so many deaths in the U.S. However, he said “the memo that I saw could just have easily have said heroin” in mass quantities could be considered a WMD, too.

“Clearly, I think all of us would wish for a better ability to prevent fentanyl, heroin and other illicit drugs from reaching our country,” Kuhlman said, adding that increased detection methods could help.

Read the full memo at Task & Purpose’s site.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: ashley turner, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, destruction, mass, fentanyl, memo, department, security, weapon, technology, wmd, task, reportedly, homeland, labeling, according, opioid, dhs, considering


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Mark Cuban wakes up every morning at 6:30—here’s the first thing he does

Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban packs a lot into each day. “Whatever the stressful things are, I try to get those out of the way in the morning.” As author Brian Tracy, who has studied time management for more than 30 years, writes in his book “Eat That Frog! He continues: “The key to reaching high levels of performance and productivity is to develop the lifelong habit of tackling your major task first thing each morning. You must develop the routine of ‘eating your frog’ before you do anything


Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban packs a lot into each day. “Whatever the stressful things are, I try to get those out of the way in the morning.” As author Brian Tracy, who has studied time management for more than 30 years, writes in his book “Eat That Frog! He continues: “The key to reaching high levels of performance and productivity is to develop the lifelong habit of tackling your major task first thing each morning. You must develop the routine of ‘eating your frog’ before you do anything
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: kathleen elkins, -mark cuban, owner of the dallas mavericks
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wakes, cuban, frog, tackling, routine, lot, stressful, thing, does, morning, day, mark, 630heres, task


Mark Cuban wakes up every morning at 6:30—here's the first thing he does

Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban packs a lot into each day. The father of three stars on ABC’s “Shark Tank,” owns the Dallas Mavericks and still finds time to read daily and to work out for at least an hour.

Cuban, 60, recently shared the details of his day with Vanity Fair, including his morning routine, which starts at 6:30 a.m.

“The first thing I do when I’m laying in bed still is, I’ll grab a phone and start going through my email,” he says. “Whatever the stressful things are, I try to get those out of the way in the morning.”

There’s value to tackling high-priority items right away, even if they’re unpleasant. As author Brian Tracy, who has studied time management for more than 30 years, writes in his book “Eat That Frog!”: “Mark Twain once said that if the first thing you do each morning is to eat a live frog, you can go through the day with the satisfaction of knowing that that is probably the worst thing that is going to happen to you all day long. Your ‘frog’ is your biggest, most important task, the one you are most likely to procrastinate on if you don’t do something about it.”

He continues: “The key to reaching high levels of performance and productivity is to develop the lifelong habit of tackling your major task first thing each morning. You must develop the routine of ‘eating your frog’ before you do anything else.”

After tackling the most stressful tasks on his to-do list, the rest of Cuban’s day includes catching up on the news, dropping his 15-year-old daughter off at school, playing pick-up basketball and dealing with a lot of email.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: kathleen elkins, -mark cuban, owner of the dallas mavericks
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You switch tasks every 40 seconds, productivity expert says—here are his 5 tips for staying focused

You focus on one thing for 40 seconds, on average, before getting distracted and moving on to something else. It also takes you an average of 25 minutes to resume working on that original task. All of this is according to productivity expert Chris Bailey, who is the author of the recently released book “Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distractions.” Non-stop technology distractions that include email, social media and Slack messaging alerts makes staying focused on one task m


You focus on one thing for 40 seconds, on average, before getting distracted and moving on to something else. It also takes you an average of 25 minutes to resume working on that original task. All of this is according to productivity expert Chris Bailey, who is the author of the recently released book “Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distractions.” Non-stop technology distractions that include email, social media and Slack messaging alerts makes staying focused on one task m
You switch tasks every 40 seconds, productivity expert says—here are his 5 tips for staying focused Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: courtney connley, getty images, compassionate eye foundation morsa images, digitalvision, peopleimages
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You switch tasks every 40 seconds, productivity expert says—here are his 5 tips for staying focused

You focus on one thing for 40 seconds, on average, before getting distracted and moving on to something else. When this happens, it takes you 50 percent longer to complete your work, compared to when you stick to one task from start to finish without interruption. It also takes you an average of 25 minutes to resume working on that original task.

All of this is according to productivity expert Chris Bailey, who is the author of the recently released book “Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distractions.” For a year, Bailey ran a productivity project where he conducted intense research on how we can be as productive as possible in a world full of technology.

“The fascinating thing that I discovered about our attention is that we are wired to be distracted,” he tells CNBC Make It. “We are wired to pay attention to anything that is pleasurable, threatening or novel. And this has actually served us pretty well up until this point in our evolution.”

Non-stop technology distractions that include email, social media and Slack messaging alerts makes staying focused on one task more and more difficult.

But, according to Bailey, for every minute you spend taming the many workplace distractions you face, you gain an extra 10 minutes in productivity.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: courtney connley, getty images, compassionate eye foundation morsa images, digitalvision, peopleimages
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Bill Gates: ‘Everyone can benefit’ from learning this skill

Bill Gates has been fixated on programming since age 13, when his school got its first computer terminal. “The machine was huge and slow, and it didn’t even have a screen,” he writes on his blog, Gates Notes. He spent as much time as he could learning about computers, hacking and coding. “That introduction to computer science changed the course of my life,” says the Microsoft co-founder. Today, half a century later, Gates still believes that “everyone can benefit from learning the basics of comp


Bill Gates has been fixated on programming since age 13, when his school got its first computer terminal. “The machine was huge and slow, and it didn’t even have a screen,” he writes on his blog, Gates Notes. He spent as much time as he could learning about computers, hacking and coding. “That introduction to computer science changed the course of my life,” says the Microsoft co-founder. Today, half a century later, Gates still believes that “everyone can benefit from learning the basics of comp
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-06  Authors: kathleen elkins, adam galica, -alexis ohanian, co-founder of reddit, initialized capital
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Bill Gates: 'Everyone can benefit' from learning this skill

Bill Gates has been fixated on programming since age 13, when his school got its first computer terminal. “The machine was huge and slow, and it didn’t even have a screen,” he writes on his blog, Gates Notes. “But I was hooked.”

He spent as much time as he could learning about computers, hacking and coding. “That introduction to computer science changed the course of my life,” says the Microsoft co-founder.

Today, half a century later, Gates still believes that “everyone can benefit from learning the basics of computer science. The questions it teaches you to ask — How do you accomplish a task? Can you find a pattern? What data do you need? — are useful no matter where you go in life.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-06  Authors: kathleen elkins, adam galica, -alexis ohanian, co-founder of reddit, initialized capital
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TaskRabbit’s CEO went undercover and was hired to clean someone’s apartment

The next time you meet someone on TaskRabbit — the online start-up that lets you hire a freelance worker nearby to perform a task, like cleaning your bathroom or fixing a leaky sink — it could be the company’s CEO. TaskRabbit CEO Stacy Brown-Philpot, who joined the company as COO five years ago and became CEO in 2016, is a regular user of the company’s platform — and she’s not afraid to get her hands dirty. And that policy extends to the CEO as well, Brown-Philpot says. “I love it,” she tells Fo


The next time you meet someone on TaskRabbit — the online start-up that lets you hire a freelance worker nearby to perform a task, like cleaning your bathroom or fixing a leaky sink — it could be the company’s CEO. TaskRabbit CEO Stacy Brown-Philpot, who joined the company as COO five years ago and became CEO in 2016, is a regular user of the company’s platform — and she’s not afraid to get her hands dirty. And that policy extends to the CEO as well, Brown-Philpot says. “I love it,” she tells Fo
TaskRabbit’s CEO went undercover and was hired to clean someone’s apartment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-19  Authors: tom huddleston jr, simon dawson bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hired, ceo, went, pressure, fortune, user, task, someones, work, clean, deposit, apartment, brownphilpot, taskrabbit, taskrabbits, undercover, perform


TaskRabbit’s CEO went undercover and was hired to clean someone’s apartment

The next time you meet someone on TaskRabbit — the online start-up that lets you hire a freelance worker nearby to perform a task, like cleaning your bathroom or fixing a leaky sink — it could be the company’s CEO.

TaskRabbit CEO Stacy Brown-Philpot, who joined the company as COO five years ago and became CEO in 2016, is a regular user of the company’s platform — and she’s not afraid to get her hands dirty.

In an effort to better understand what it’s like to be both a TaskRabbit client (a user who hires someone to perform a task) and a “tasker” (the person being paid to do some work), Brown-Philpot has her own TaskRabbit account and she even occasionally gets hired, the CEO said in an interview at Fortune magazine’s Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, Colorado on July 17.

TaskRabbit, which last year was acquired by Swedish furniture retailer Ikea for an undisclosed price, asks its employees to work as taskers once every few months, according to The Wall Street Journal. And that policy extends to the CEO as well, Brown-Philpot says.

“I love it,” she tells Fortune, adding that she recently found herself in a somewhat high-pressure situation doing just that. “I actually cleaned somebody’s apartment who was moving out and needed to get their deposit back.”

The pressure for Brown-Philpot, who lives in the San Francisco Bay Area, came from the fact that she had only about two hours to clean the space well enough to ensure the security deposit refund.

“That was a lot of pressure,” she says. “Because it wasn’t just cleaning it so you could sleep nice tonight; it was money on the line.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-19  Authors: tom huddleston jr, simon dawson bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hired, ceo, went, pressure, fortune, user, task, someones, work, clean, deposit, apartment, brownphilpot, taskrabbit, taskrabbits, undercover, perform


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