A therapist shares the biggest mistake people with low emotional intelligence make: ‘It always backfires’

When I ask people what comes to mind when they think about “emotional intelligence,” their answers are often centered around themselves. It all adds up to the common misconception that emotional intelligence is about examining oneself — my emotions, my feelings, my approach to others. EQ = self + relationships + environmentThis isn’t surprising: Most of the literature out there focuses on how people can build emotional intelligence for their own benefit. People with low emotional intelligence (o


When I ask people what comes to mind when they think about “emotional intelligence,” their answers are often centered around themselves.
It all adds up to the common misconception that emotional intelligence is about examining oneself — my emotions, my feelings, my approach to others.
EQ = self + relationships + environmentThis isn’t surprising: Most of the literature out there focuses on how people can build emotional intelligence for their own benefit.
People with low emotional intelligence (o
A therapist shares the biggest mistake people with low emotional intelligence make: ‘It always backfires’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: kerry goyette
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, low, alex, change, work, mistake, biggest, team, environment, intelligence, needed, feedback, wanted, backfires, therapist, emotional


A therapist shares the biggest mistake people with low emotional intelligence make: 'It always backfires'

When I ask people what comes to mind when they think about “emotional intelligence,” their answers are often centered around themselves. I hear things things like “knowing my personal competencies,” “being self-aware” or “managing my emotions.” It all adds up to the common misconception that emotional intelligence is about examining oneself — my emotions, my feelings, my approach to others.

EQ = self + relationships + environment

This isn’t surprising: Most of the literature out there focuses on how people can build emotional intelligence for their own benefit. The typical advice often follows a similar pattern: do some soul-searching to understand yourself better, practice expressing empathy, then benefit by earning the trust of your employees or getting a promotion. People with low emotional intelligence (or lack it entirely) often make the mistake of only recognizing and exercising their own emotional strengths. As a result, they fail to truly connect with their environment and the people around them — and it always backfires in one way or another. The most emotionally intelligent people know that in addition to understanding their own emotions, it’s important to perceive the emotions of others, and the way that their environment impacts those emotions.

Case study: when ‘we’ works for everyone

Recently, I was called in to work with an engineering plant to help them improve their teams and systems. The products this company makes have very little room for error, and the stakes are high. If the team isn’t accurate, then errors can cause a lot of harm. One of the company’s problems had to do with a manager, whom I’ll call “Alex.” Alex was a people-pleaser — a nice guy who connected his self-worth to whether or not people liked him.

Our emotional intelligence exists within an ecosystem.

When his team members wanted feedback to improve their work and reduce errors, they went around Alex and asked his boss or other employees for help. They knew that going to Alex would mean only praise, whether or not it was warranted. He failed to give constructive feedback, which inevitably resulted in problems. Alex had, in effect, lost credibility and trust with his team, so everything around him had started to unravel. At first it was slow, but like water swirling around a drain, it started to move more and more quickly. If we were to apply the common misconception about emotional intelligence here, we might say Alex needed to take a hard look at himself and realize that he was people-pleasing because of a need to be liked, and that need was harming the work culture and the company. We might even remind Alex that it’s impossible to please everyone, and that trying to do so was damaging his work and his relationships with others. This strategy might work — but only for a short amount of time. In fact, the team leaders had already tried telling Alex to change. It failed for a predictable reason: telling someone to change without helping them to change their environment rarely leads to success. If you wanted to quit eating junk food, for example, would you continue to buy chips and candy? Or would you try to change what’s in your kitchen? What wasn’t being considered was the “why” behind Alex’s people-pleasing. They didn’t have a system in place to show him the impact and cost of covering for his employees. He needed to change, but he needed his environment to support that change. By the time I was asked to work with the executives at Alex’s company, they were facing high rates of turnover and low employee engagement across the board.

…telling someone to change without helping them to change their environment rarely leads to success.

One executive voiced her lack of trust in Alex because he had attempted to protect an employee by covering up their error-ridden work. Alex had claimed, “We can’t expect this person to be perfect.” It left the other executives wondering if they could trust Alex at all. They felt they needed a management team that consistently held people accountable. The company had invested a lot of time, energy and resources in Alex. They didn’t want to see him go; they just wanted to see some improvement. So we focused on the three core elements of change: Self-recognition: We spent time doing one-on-one individual work so that Alex could begin to recognize when he was engaging in counterproductive behavior. Was he doing what was needed or was he just telling people what he thought they wanted to hear? Social recognition: Alex’s first assignment was to observe and investigate how his people-pleasing was impacting his team. After requesting feedback from one of the supervisors that reported to him, he was surprised and disappointed by what he heard. The supervisor recounted a recent situation when Alex reversed a tough decision to send an employee home after a safety incident. The supervisor told Alex how this had undermined him, and Alex started to see the impact of his actions. Design structure: Finally, I worked with Alex and his colleagues to create structure within his environment for addressing his people-pleasing tendencies. We designed a system for tracking accountability. Alex liked metrics, so he began to track when an issue first surfaced, the number of days until it was resolved, the resolution, and the impact to the team. The final piece was getting feedback from his team to determine if they felt the issues were resolved. Alex began to see the value in feedback and recognized that it was key to keeping him from avoiding issues. Avoiding the hard stuff was his emotional reaction — and it was a reaction rooted in fear. Once he was finally resolving issues, his team and the CEO recognized his efforts. Suddenly, positive reinforcements began coming in from all over — other executives, me, his team members. Alex started to rely less on his need for people to like him. Why? Because the environment had changed; it was now a place where objective decisions were rewarded. These weren’t earth-shattering changes. They were just relatively small habits that made a big difference.

Emotional intelligence matters


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: kerry goyette
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, low, alex, change, work, mistake, biggest, team, environment, intelligence, needed, feedback, wanted, backfires, therapist, emotional


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Swimming in ice cold waters, martial arts and other alternative ways these start-ups look to unwind

CNBC takes a look at companies across Europe incorporating different, more inclusive ways for their employees to take a break from the daily grind and spend time together. Martial artsThe co-founder of U.K. healthy fast-food chain Leon, John Vincent, started to train in martial art Wing Tsun after finding that work-related stress was impacting on his health. Twice a year all the managers and head office staff go to Vincent’s house for a wellbeing event, where they can practice Wing Tsun, yoga an


CNBC takes a look at companies across Europe incorporating different, more inclusive ways for their employees to take a break from the daily grind and spend time together.
Martial artsThe co-founder of U.K. healthy fast-food chain Leon, John Vincent, started to train in martial art Wing Tsun after finding that work-related stress was impacting on his health.
Twice a year all the managers and head office staff go to Vincent’s house for a wellbeing event, where they can practice Wing Tsun, yoga an
Swimming in ice cold waters, martial arts and other alternative ways these start-ups look to unwind Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, office, ways, martial, swimming, work, ice, unwind, different, trip, look, working, employees, tsun, waters, wing, team, startups, cold, arts


Swimming in ice cold waters, martial arts and other alternative ways these start-ups look to unwind

Workers are increasingly looking for alternative ways to bond with colleagues, ditching office drinks in favor of “sober socials,” driven by a desire for a healthier lifestyle and bank balance. In fact, three out of five employees said they wanted their employer to pick booze-free locations for work events, according to a survey of 2,400 U.K. workers by jobs website Totaljobs. Half (54%) of those surveyed called work-related drinking perks “outdated,” with another 42% saying they would reject job offers from businesses boasting boozy cultures. CNBC takes a look at companies across Europe incorporating different, more inclusive ways for their employees to take a break from the daily grind and spend time together.

Swimming in the seas of Reykjavik

Employees at Icelandic firm Travelade, which creates personalized travel guides, regularly go swimming in the sea off the coast of the country’s capital Reykjavik. CEO Andri Kristinsson says an afternoon spent in the ice-cold ocean has both health benefits and ensures the team “bond on a different level” than when they go out for drinks. “We do not hesitate to do something outdoorsy and active together if we’re feeling a bit restless at work,” he told CNBC. For instance, employees went on an impromptu whale watching trip in the summer, he says. As well as having a positive effect on employees mental and physical health, Kristinsson likes that it encouraged people to go outside their comfort zone and “shake up the usual dynamics of the group.”

Martial arts

The co-founder of U.K. healthy fast-food chain Leon, John Vincent, started to train in martial art Wing Tsun after finding that work-related stress was impacting on his health. He has since sought to integrate its philosophy into Leon’s business model. Employees are able to take free classes at its martial arts studio, known as a kwoon. Twice a year all the managers and head office staff go to Vincent’s house for a wellbeing event, where they can practice Wing Tsun, yoga and get a massage. Vincent has written a book with instructor Julian Hitch, “Winning Not Fighting: Why you need to rethink success and how you achieve it with the ancient art of Wing Tsun”, due to be published next month. In it, he talks about working with Hitch to create a blueprint as to how he could lead the business “without burning out.” Together they have held sessions with Leon’s management to explore how applying Wing Tsun principles can change the way they work. “Because we want it to be a practical and physical tool too, not just a tool for management, Julian has begun a program of training the baristas (and the team members who work in the kitchen) in Wing Tsun, with remarkable results for their coffee-making speed and quality, as well as for their heart rate and stress (now relaxation) levels,” Vincent explains in the book.

Relocating abroad

Johnny Warström, the CEO of Sweden-based interactive presentation platform Mentimeter, moves the entire office abroad for one month a year. This year’s trip was to Palermo, Italy, while previous locations have been Barcelona, Spain and San Francisco. Warström tries to pick locations where Mentimeter has clients as this enables employees to better understand their corporate culture and cultural background, improving their working relationship. The trip is optional and employees can decide how long they would like to stay but the cost of travel, accommodation and some of the group outings are covered by the company. Warström builds group activities into the trip, as well as allowing his team free time to explore the area. “By experiencing different cultures, employees are encouraged to experiment with different ways of working, leading to enhanced productivity and new creative ideas,” he said. “In fact, one of the most popular features on our platform was invented while away on our first month abroad to San Francisco in 2015.”

Cooking classes

Memory, a start-up based in Norway developing AI-powered productivity tools, regularly hosts cooking evenings in its office kitchen, inviting different members of the team to introduce colleagues to their local cuisine. CEO Mathias Mikkelsen says this helps bring the team closer by allowing them to learn about everyone’s different backgrounds. Social activities through work can sometimes feel forced upon employees, he says, with “often no more effort is put into these than bosses simply opening a bar tab.” The cooking sessions are voluntary, though Mikkelsen adds the evenings have become so popular it is often hard to fit everyone in the kitchen. “I think the problem is when ‘fun work activities’ are automatically associated with a boozy night out,” he said.

Bringing family to work


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, office, ways, martial, swimming, work, ice, unwind, different, trip, look, working, employees, tsun, waters, wing, team, startups, cold, arts


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‘Never back down’—How to negotiate for a raise like Megan Rapinoe

But Rapinoe says this balancing act is part and parcel of being a female athlete. In the United States, women work longer hours of unpaid labor, doing tasks like cleaning, child care and taking care of sick family members, compared to men. When you add both paid and unpaid work together, women work longer hours and still must spend time and energy advocating for themselves. When you do face challenges, Rapinoe suggests finding a group of peers you can rely on for support. If Rapinoe’s current ba


But Rapinoe says this balancing act is part and parcel of being a female athlete.
In the United States, women work longer hours of unpaid labor, doing tasks like cleaning, child care and taking care of sick family members, compared to men.
When you add both paid and unpaid work together, women work longer hours and still must spend time and energy advocating for themselves.
When you do face challenges, Rapinoe suggests finding a group of peers you can rely on for support.
If Rapinoe’s current ba
‘Never back down’—How to negotiate for a raise like Megan Rapinoe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, megan, youre, womens, gap, rapinoe, sport, balancing, energy, raise, women, negotiate, work, team, downhow


'Never back down'—How to negotiate for a raise like Megan Rapinoe

According to the lawsuit, if the men’s and women’s teams won each of the 20 non-tournament games they are contractually required to play, women’s team players would earn a maximum of $99,000 ($4,950 per game), while men’s team players would earn $263,320 ($13,166 per game).

To be sure, few athletes have schedules as packed as Rapinoe. This year, the 2019 FIFA best women’s player award-winner helped the United States clinch a record-breaking fourth World Cup championship and co-founded a business — all while leading her team through their lawsuit against the USSF for gender discrimination and unequal pay.

“The attention’s not exhausting,” she says. “The logistics of it all is exhausting.”

From the outside, all the activity and attention seem exhausting.

The player is currently in the training for the 2020 Summer Olympics and is also involved in highly-publicized negotiations with the U.S. Soccer Federation. She is also being constantly pulled for photos and interviews.

It’s a rainy Wednesday on the night of the Women’s Sports Foundation’s Annual Salute and Megan Rapinoe, midfielder for the U.S. Women’s National Team, is about to win an award for being the 2019 Team Sportswoman of the Year.

Megan Rapinoe accepts her WSF Sportswoman Of The Year Award (Team Sport) at The Women’s Sports Foundation’s 40th Annual Salute to Women in Sports Awards Gala, celebrating the most accomplished women in sports and the girls they inspire at Cipriani Wall Street on October 16, 2019 in New York City.

Balancing her commitments on and off the field is an imperfect art, she admits.

“In order for me to be my absolute best [in soccer], I have to not do anything else,” she tells CNBC Make It. “But in order for me to capitalize on everything that I’m doing on the field, I have to be pulled away from what I’m doing.”

But Rapinoe says this balancing act is part and parcel of being a female athlete.

“It’s what female athletes do. We have to do everything,” she says. “Not only do we have to do everything you need for our sport, we have to maximize everything financially outside of our sport, which takes days and time and flights. And then there’s the advocacy part.”

This balancing act is something many women can relate to. In the United States, women work longer hours of unpaid labor, doing tasks like cleaning, child care and taking care of sick family members, compared to men. When you add both paid and unpaid work together, women work longer hours and still must spend time and energy advocating for themselves.

Economists estimate that the U.S. gender pay gap — the gap between the median salaries of all working men and women in the U.S. — is about 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man. For black, Latina and Native American women, this gap is even wider.

Rapinoe’s advice to women who are working on balancing it all while advocating and negotiating for themselves is simple: “Do not back down,” she says. “You’re probably going against your employer or your boss and it can be very daunting, but believe in yourself and believe in what you’re doing and just don’t back down.”

When you do face challenges, Rapinoe suggests finding a group of peers you can rely on for support.

“It’s hard sometimes, but seek out other women or networks to boost your confidence,” she explains. “We’re really lucky being on a team; we have 23 other women. If ever you’re feeling a wavering moment, everyone’s like ‘We’ve got this!’ We’re lucky in that sense.

“But yeah, just never back down.”

As for the USWNT’s negotiations, the team isn’t showing signs of backing down either. In August, mediation talks between the USWNT and the USSF fell apart, and the case is scheduled to go to trial on May 5, 2020, if a resolution is not found.

Rapinoe says she hopes the two groups can come to a settlement before then. “I don’t think a really public trial is in their best interest for sure, but hopefully not ours,” she says. “It’s gonna take a lot of time and energy on everyone’s part to go through a whole public trial.”

If Rapinoe’s current balancing act is any evidence, it seems she is prepared to give her time and energy to the cause.

“Hopefully it ends in something that both sides feel good about,” she says.

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Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, megan, youre, womens, gap, rapinoe, sport, balancing, energy, raise, women, negotiate, work, team, downhow


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How Joe Biden’s cash problems are squeezing his campaign, fundraisers

How Joe Biden’s cash problems are squeezing his campaign, fundraisers4 Hours AgoBrian Schwartz, CNBC.com politics and finance reporter, joins the “Power Lunch” team to break down Former Vice President Joe Biden’s cash crunch for his presidential bid campaign. Biden’s top donors are mixed on the next steps for the campaign after it was revealed it only has $8.9 million on hand.


How Joe Biden’s cash problems are squeezing his campaign, fundraisers4 Hours AgoBrian Schwartz, CNBC.com politics and finance reporter, joins the “Power Lunch” team to break down Former Vice President Joe Biden’s cash crunch for his presidential bid campaign.
Biden’s top donors are mixed on the next steps for the campaign after it was revealed it only has $8.9 million on hand.
How Joe Biden’s cash problems are squeezing his campaign, fundraisers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: steve marcus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schwartz, squeezing, problems, fundraisers, campaign, revealed, vice, joe, bidens, steps, cash, team


How Joe Biden's cash problems are squeezing his campaign, fundraisers

How Joe Biden’s cash problems are squeezing his campaign, fundraisers

4 Hours Ago

Brian Schwartz, CNBC.com politics and finance reporter, joins the “Power Lunch” team to break down Former Vice President Joe Biden’s cash crunch for his presidential bid campaign. Biden’s top donors are mixed on the next steps for the campaign after it was revealed it only has $8.9 million on hand.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: steve marcus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schwartz, squeezing, problems, fundraisers, campaign, revealed, vice, joe, bidens, steps, cash, team


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The Impossible Whopper is driving steady traffic to Burger King, data shows

In this photo illustration, an ‘Impossible Whopper’ sits on a table at a Burger King restaurant on April 1, 2019 in Richmond Heights, Missouri. Burger King announced on Monday that it is testing out Impossible Whoppers, made with plant-based patties from Impossible Foods, in 59 locations in and around St. Louis area. Burger King began testing the new burgers exclusively at St. Louis locations in April. The analysis showed traffic grew about 18% in the St. Louis locations versus no comparable gai


In this photo illustration, an ‘Impossible Whopper’ sits on a table at a Burger King restaurant on April 1, 2019 in Richmond Heights, Missouri.
Burger King announced on Monday that it is testing out Impossible Whoppers, made with plant-based patties from Impossible Foods, in 59 locations in and around St. Louis area.
Burger King began testing the new burgers exclusively at St. Louis locations in April.
The analysis showed traffic grew about 18% in the St. Louis locations versus no comparable gai
The Impossible Whopper is driving steady traffic to Burger King, data shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, king, whopper, burger, shows, barclays, driving, steady, team, impossible, traffic, data, louis, locations


The Impossible Whopper is driving steady traffic to Burger King, data shows

In this photo illustration, an ‘Impossible Whopper’ sits on a table at a Burger King restaurant on April 1, 2019 in Richmond Heights, Missouri. Burger King announced on Monday that it is testing out Impossible Whoppers, made with plant-based patties from Impossible Foods, in 59 locations in and around St. Louis area.

Data reveals that the introduction of Burger King’s meat-alternative patties increased traffic at the global fast-food franchise both during city-specific testing as well as after a nationwide rollout.

Researchers at Barclays studied the ratio of traffic share between Burger King restaurants in St. Louis and locations nationwide during the company’s trial phase of its new Impossible Whopper, a plant-based burger produced by Impossible Foods. Burger King began testing the new burgers exclusively at St. Louis locations in April.

The analysis showed traffic grew about 18% in the St. Louis locations versus no comparable gains for McDonald’s St. Louis restaurants or Burger King’s Kansas City locations.

“Since mid-July, we have seen BK gain traffic nationally relative to McDonald’s with the gains accelerating as we approached the nationwide launch of the Impossible Whopper,” the Barclays team wrote. Our research suggests that, “following the national launch of the Impossible Whopper, BK stores have seen an ~2 percentage point traffic lift nationally, relative to McDonald’s.”

Source: Barclays Research

The success of the meat-less Impossible Whopper have kept investor expectations reasonable and put Burger King on track for a 3.5% bump in U.S. same-store sales, the Barclays team added.

Burger King is a subsidiary of Canadian multinational fast food holding company, Restaurant Brands International. The stock was last seen trading at CA$91.59; the Barclays team sees the stock rallying 23% to $86, or about CA$113, over the next 12 months.

And their forecast success, the Barclays team wrote, is in part thanks to the demand for Impossible Whoppers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, king, whopper, burger, shows, barclays, driving, steady, team, impossible, traffic, data, louis, locations


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Facebook employee says he was fired for speaking out about his colleague’s suicide

A Facebook software engineer told CNBC on Tuesday that he was fired by the company in part for speaking out about his colleague’s suicide last month. We need a fair investigation on what on earth had happened,” Yin told ABC 7 at the protest on Sept. 26. “I really want people to be aware of the H-1B abuse and also the PSC system,” Yin told CNBC. Yin said he was not the only Facebook employee to attend the protest on Sept. 26, but his colleagues hid their employee badges while he did not. A Facebo


A Facebook software engineer told CNBC on Tuesday that he was fired by the company in part for speaking out about his colleague’s suicide last month.
We need a fair investigation on what on earth had happened,” Yin told ABC 7 at the protest on Sept. 26.
“I really want people to be aware of the H-1B abuse and also the PSC system,” Yin told CNBC.
Yin said he was not the only Facebook employee to attend the protest on Sept. 26, but his colleagues hid their employee badges while he did not.
A Facebo
Facebook employee says he was fired for speaking out about his colleague’s suicide Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, speaking, fired, suicide, yin, facebook, protest, team, colleagues, employee, chen, sept, facebooks


Facebook employee says he was fired for speaking out about his colleague's suicide

Yin Yi joined Facebook’s core growth team in July and he was fired after he participated in a protest demanding justice for Qin Chen, an employee who committed suicide at the company’s headquarters on Sept. 19.

A Facebook software engineer told CNBC on Tuesday that he was fired by the company in part for speaking out about his colleague’s suicide last month.

Yi Yin joined Facebook’s core growth team in July and he was fired after he participated in a protest demanding justice for Qin Chen, an employee who committed suicide at the company’s headquarters on Sept. 19.

“We need the truth. We need a fair investigation on what on earth had happened,” Yin told ABC 7 at the protest on Sept. 26.

Yin told CNBC he spoke with the press at the protest because he had heard rumors that Chen may have been an H-1B visa worker and worried about his future after receiving a poor performance review by his superiors. Chen worked in Facebook’s advertisement engineering team, which Yin and others said is notorious for being a high-stress unit. Yin did not know Chen, but said he believes rumors that Chen was bullied by his manager at Facebook.

“I really want people to be aware of the H-1B abuse and also the PSC system,” Yin told CNBC. The PSC, or performance summary cycle, is Facebook’s performance review system, in which employees go through semi-annual reviews that include extensive peer reviews. Some employees have criticized the system for penalizing people who are good performers, but don’t participate in social activities with peers.

Yin said he was not the only Facebook employee to attend the protest on Sept. 26, but his colleagues hid their employee badges while he did not. Yin informed the director of the core growth team about his participation and wrote a summary of the event.

After the protest, Yin was contacted by Facebook’s human resources department. “To respect the privacy of [Chen] and his family please do not discuss the incident with anyone especially outside the company,” reads an email Yin received from Facebook HR on Sept. 26, which CNBC has seen.

Yin says he received a final warning letter from HR on Oct. 1. On Oct. 3, he asked his team mentor if the final warning letter meant that he was going to be fired. On Oct. 7, Yin says, he received a call from HR informing him that he was being fired for speaking with the press and for making comments that made his colleague feel uncomfortable.

“I’ve been under intense psychological pressure from HR,” Yin told CNBC.

In an email confirming his firing, which CNBC has seen, Facebook also told Yin he would be required to pay back a portion of his sign-on bonus. Yin said he just paid back the bonus, which came out to $39,000.

A Facebook spokesperson denied that Yin was fired for participating in the protest or talking to the media.

“This employee was not fired for joining a protest or talking about the recent tragedy on our campus. He was here for a matter of weeks, and showed poor judgement in a string of policy violations. We won’t stand for our employees intimidating one another.”

Facebook declined to offer further details about Yin’s case, saying, “We won’t get into the specifics of confidential, internal conversations.”

Since his termination, Yin has spoken with the lawyers who are representing Chen’s family about his own situation. Like Chen, Yin is from China and on a work visa, so he must find a new job by the end of January or return to his home country.

Additionally, Yin said he wrote a piano sonata dedicated to the Sept. 26 protest that he hopes to play in public this January.

“The reason why I stood out protesting and speaking to the media is because I don’t want Mr. Chen’s incident somehow happening to anyone again,” Yin said.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, speaking, fired, suicide, yin, facebook, protest, team, colleagues, employee, chen, sept, facebooks


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NFL player Efe Obada was abandoned in London as a kid—now he’s making $575,000 with the Panthers

It will be a homecoming of sorts for one Panther player: Efe Obada, who was first introduced to the sport that would change his life in the United Kingdom. Obada didn’t pick up a football until his early 20s, let alone play college ball like most NFL draft prospects. After just five games of experience with the Warriors, the Cowboys signed Obada to its practice squad in 2015. After years on the sidelines, Obada played in his first NFL game last season as a Carolina Panther — and he seized the op


It will be a homecoming of sorts for one Panther player: Efe Obada, who was first introduced to the sport that would change his life in the United Kingdom. Obada didn’t pick up a football until his early 20s, let alone play college ball like most NFL draft prospects. After just five games of experience with the Warriors, the Cowboys signed Obada to its practice squad in 2015. After years on the sidelines, Obada played in his first NFL game last season as a Carolina Panther — and he seized the op
NFL player Efe Obada was abandoned in London as a kid—now he’s making $575,000 with the Panthers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, nfl, hes, obada, kidnow, abandoned, game, team, signed, efe, panthers, player, squad, carolina, london, rivera


NFL player Efe Obada was abandoned in London as a kid—now he's making $575,000 with the Panthers

On Sunday, the Carolina Panthers will play the division-rival Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium in London. Kick off is set for 9:30 a.m. ET.

It will be a homecoming of sorts for one Panther player: Efe Obada, who was first introduced to the sport that would change his life in the United Kingdom.

Born in Nigeria, Obada was trafficked from the Netherlands to the U.K. when he was 10 and then abandoned on the streets of London, ESPN reports. He ended up in foster care, bouncing from home to home.

Obada didn’t pick up a football until his early 20s, let alone play college ball like most NFL draft prospects. When he was 22 and working as a security guard for Grace Foods, a friend invited him to join a practice with the British American football team, the London Warriors.

The coaching squad was immediately impressed with his speed, especially considering his 6-foot-6-inch frame. One coach, who had been an intern with the Dallas Cowboys, flagged Obada to his former team and recommended they offer him a tryout. After just five games of experience with the Warriors, the Cowboys signed Obada to its practice squad in 2015.

He was sent from Dallas to the Kansas City Chiefs to the Atlanta Falcons before finally landing in Carolina in 2017.

After years on the sidelines, Obada played in his first NFL game last season as a Carolina Panther — and he seized the opportunity. Playing defensive end, he posted a sack and an interception in his debut game. His performance earned him the game ball from head coach Ron Rivera and the distinction of being named NFC Defensive Player of the Week.

As ESPN notes, his story is far from complete: Obada needs to prove his ability on the field in order “to extend his work visa beyond the one year, $570,000 contract he signed with Carolina in January. If he doesn’t get re-signed or find another opportunity, he will have to move back to London.”

The stakes are high — but for Obada, it fuels the fire. “He practices 100 miles per hour,” Rivera told ESPN.

As Obada put it: “I go hard every time.”

Don’t miss: NFL player who saves nearly 90% of his income teaches a money class at Penn called ‘Life 101’

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, nfl, hes, obada, kidnow, abandoned, game, team, signed, efe, panthers, player, squad, carolina, london, rivera


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The biggest interview mistake young people should avoid, according to a Lyft executive who’s hired dozens

As someone who has conducted a lot of interviews in her career, Sverchek tells CNBC Make It there is one critical mistake young people should always avoid when looking to get hired. After serving as an outside counsel for Lyft for more than two years, Sverchek was officially hired as a full-time employee in 2012. Lyft’s general counsel, Kristin Sverchek, knows what it takes to ace an interview and get hired. “When you approach your interview as a conversation,” Welch explains, “you’re not just m


As someone who has conducted a lot of interviews in her career, Sverchek tells CNBC Make It there is one critical mistake young people should always avoid when looking to get hired. After serving as an outside counsel for Lyft for more than two years, Sverchek was officially hired as a full-time employee in 2012. Lyft’s general counsel, Kristin Sverchek, knows what it takes to ace an interview and get hired. “When you approach your interview as a conversation,” Welch explains, “you’re not just m
The biggest interview mistake young people should avoid, according to a Lyft executive who’s hired dozens Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biggest, hired, welch, thats, young, youre, lyft, interview, avoid, weakness, mistake, team, executive, tells, dozens, conversation, whos, sverchek


The biggest interview mistake young people should avoid, according to a Lyft executive who's hired dozens

As someone who has conducted a lot of interviews in her career, Sverchek tells CNBC Make It there is one critical mistake young people should always avoid when looking to get hired.

After serving as an outside counsel for Lyft for more than two years, Sverchek was officially hired as a full-time employee in 2012. During her time with the ride-sharing platform, she’s seen the company grow from five employees to a team of thousands. In the legal department alone, Sverchek personally grew the team of one (herself) to more than 130 employees.

Lyft’s general counsel, Kristin Sverchek, knows what it takes to ace an interview and get hired.

“I hate when I ask someone, ‘What’s your biggest weakness,’ and they say something like, ‘I’m too diligent,'” she says. “That’s not a genuine answer because everybody has a weakness, and there is power in being vulnerable and sharing that weakness.”

Sverchek says offering a vague response in an interview can easily place you below your competition. To stand out, offer concrete examples of your experience to illustrate how you’re dealing with a problem.

“I’m really looking for somebody who can talk their way through a problem and how they felt it, versus speaking in generalities,” she says. “And often it will be a great springboard into different questions around a specific topic.”

Bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch agrees with Sverchek.

She tells CNBC Make It one of the easiest ways to ace an interview is to turn the meeting into a dynamic conversation where there is room for a back-and-forth discussion. That’s why, when asked about your greatest weakness, she suggests interviewees respond by saying something like, “I’ve always wanted to be a better public speaker. It’s not something that comes naturally to me. But I’m actually taking an online class right now to improve.”

Afterwards, Welch says, say something like, “I’d love to hear about the kind of public speaking this job involves.”

By doing this, she says, you’ve opened up the floor for a two-way conversation to take place, where you and the interviewer are comfortably asking and answering questions.

“When you approach your interview as a conversation,” Welch explains, “you’re not just more engaged, you’re more engaging. You’re more human.”

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Don’t miss: This Lyft executive asks a go-to interview question about failure at work — how to answer it


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biggest, hired, welch, thats, young, youre, lyft, interview, avoid, weakness, mistake, team, executive, tells, dozens, conversation, whos, sverchek


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65% of stressed-out cybersecurity, IT workers think about quitting

A recent report found that the average tenure of a chief information security officer (CISO) is only 18 to 24 months, citing constant stress and urgency of the job as the core reasons. For comparison, the average tenure of a chief financial officer is 6.2 years and the average tenure of a chief executive officer is 8.4 years. A recent report from the Ponemon Institute found that 65% of IT and security professionals consider quitting due to burnout. Prior to the breach taking place, employees rai


A recent report found that the average tenure of a chief information security officer (CISO) is only 18 to 24 months, citing constant stress and urgency of the job as the core reasons. For comparison, the average tenure of a chief financial officer is 6.2 years and the average tenure of a chief executive officer is 8.4 years. A recent report from the Ponemon Institute found that 65% of IT and security professionals consider quitting due to burnout. Prior to the breach taking place, employees rai
65% of stressed-out cybersecurity, IT workers think about quitting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: stephen boyer, bitsight cto, usa network, nbcuniversal, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, chief, cybersecurity, cisos, average, staff, breach, recent, quitting, security, officer, think, workers, stressedout, tenure


65% of stressed-out cybersecurity, IT workers think about quitting

A recent report found that the average tenure of a chief information security officer (CISO) is only 18 to 24 months, citing constant stress and urgency of the job as the core reasons. For comparison, the average tenure of a chief financial officer is 6.2 years and the average tenure of a chief executive officer is 8.4 years.

The revolving door is not limited to the C-suite when it comes to key tech roles. A recent report from the Ponemon Institute found that 65% of IT and security professionals consider quitting due to burnout. And there arenearly 3 million unfilled cybersecurity positions at companies worldwide.

Beyond the massive pressure CISOs are under to keep their organizations and customers secure, the talent shortage for skilled CISOs means frequent recruitment to new jobs, with offers of up to $6.5 million in salary and profit sharing. Between CISOs being aggressively recruited and a large percentage of the security workforce weighing their employment options — not to mention a growing and increasingly volatile landscape that requires the top security leadership to manage and mitigate — organizations can’t afford to make the wrong choice when it comes to hiring (and retaining) a CISO.

Consider a recent high-profile data breach at a large financial corporation. It was reported that staff suggested the CISO, who came from a federal government background, clashed with employees. Prior to the breach taking place, employees raised concerns about a high turnover rate within the cybersecurity team — which included about one-third of the entire team staff in 2018. To some close to the organization, this and other missteps indicate that the breach did not entirely come out of the blue.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: stephen boyer, bitsight cto, usa network, nbcuniversal, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, chief, cybersecurity, cisos, average, staff, breach, recent, quitting, security, officer, think, workers, stressedout, tenure


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Dyson scraps its electric car plans

“The Dyson automotive team has developed a fantastic car: they have been ingenious in their approach while remaining faithful to our philosophies,” Dyson wrote in the email. The $2.7 billion originally intended for the electric car project will be spent developing other products for the privately held company, including on battery technology, Dyson said. Dyson originally planned to unveil the electric car in 2020, but last year that was pushed back to 2021 after the company announced it would bu


“The Dyson automotive team has developed a fantastic car: they have been ingenious in their approach while remaining faithful to our philosophies,” Dyson wrote in the email. The $2.7 billion originally intended for the electric car project will be spent developing other products for the privately held company, including on battery technology, Dyson said. Dyson originally planned to unveil the electric car in 2020, but last year that was pushed back to 2021 after the company announced it would bu
Dyson scraps its electric car plans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: elijah shama
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plans, scraps, project, car, electric, dyson, technology, battery, wrote, email, company, team


Dyson scraps its electric car plans

British appliance maker Dyson has scrapped its plans for an electric vehicle according to a companywide email that said it “simply can no longer see a way to make it commercially viable.”

In the email, which the company provided to CNBC, CEO James Dyson said that he and the board of directors decided to stop the project after failing to find a buyer for it.

“The Dyson automotive team has developed a fantastic car: they have been ingenious in their approach while remaining faithful to our philosophies,” Dyson wrote in the email. “However, though we have tried very hard throughout the development process we simply can no longer see a way to make it commercially viable.”

The $2.7 billion originally intended for the electric car project will be spent developing other products for the privately held company, including on battery technology, Dyson said.

Dyson originally planned to unveil the electric car in 2020, but last year that was pushed back to 2021 after the company announced it would build a manufacturing plant in Singapore.

Plans for that plant have now been canceled, according to a Dyson spokesperson.

The company stressed that the cancellation of the project was not because of a lack of research and development.

“This is not a product failure, or a failure of the team, for whom this news will be hard to hear and digest. Their achievements have been immense – given the enormity and complexity of the project,” Dyson wrote in the email.

Previously Dyson had floated the idea of a whole lineup of vehicles with his name, with the company working on solid-state battery technology for the EV.

In 2015, Dyson underscored his commitment to the project with the purchase of Michigan-based Sakti3, a start-up that was developing a new type of battery known as solid state.

Proponents of the technology said it could offer significant advantages over the more familiar lithium-ion batteries currently in widespread use, by boosting range and reducing charge times. While suited for electric vehicles, the batteries are also effective in the cordless appliances the vacuum maker has been shifting toward.

The company said in the email that it is working to find “alternative roles” within Dyson for “as many of the team as possible” and said it had “sufficient vacancies to absorb most of the people into our Home business.”

Dyson’s electric car project had employed 523 people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: elijah shama
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plans, scraps, project, car, electric, dyson, technology, battery, wrote, email, company, team


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