Xiaomi shares plunge despite the Chinese tech giant’s earnings beat

Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi saw its stock swoon during Wednesday trade despite posting a fourth-quarter earnings report that beat expectations the previous day. Xiaomi’s net profit for the fourth quarter more than tripled to 1.85 billion yuan (approx. $276 million), beating the 1.7 billion yuan average estimate of 10 analysts, according to Refinitiv data. Still, revenue for the period increased 27 percent to 44.4 billion yuan, which was lower than the 47.4 billion yuan average estimate of 13


Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi saw its stock swoon during Wednesday trade despite posting a fourth-quarter earnings report that beat expectations the previous day. Xiaomi’s net profit for the fourth quarter more than tripled to 1.85 billion yuan (approx. $276 million), beating the 1.7 billion yuan average estimate of 10 analysts, according to Refinitiv data. Still, revenue for the period increased 27 percent to 44.4 billion yuan, which was lower than the 47.4 billion yuan average estimate of 13
Xiaomi shares plunge despite the Chinese tech giant’s earnings beat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20  Authors: eustance huang, josep lago, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yuan, smartphone, chinese, earnings, plunge, billion, tech, successful, beat, reason, 2018, shares, refinitiv, according, revenue, despite, xiaomi, giants


Xiaomi shares plunge despite the Chinese tech giant's earnings beat

Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi saw its stock swoon during Wednesday trade despite posting a fourth-quarter earnings report that beat expectations the previous day.

In Wednesday’s trading session in Hong Kong, shares of Xiaomi dropped 4.59 percent.

That move came a day after Xiaomi announced quarterly earnings that bested expectations. That’s despite 2018 being the “worst year ever for smartphone shipments,” according to market research company IDC, with tech heavyweights such as Apple and Samsung Electronics all warning of weakening sales.

Xiaomi’s net profit for the fourth quarter more than tripled to 1.85 billion yuan (approx. $276 million), beating the 1.7 billion yuan average estimate of 10 analysts, according to Refinitiv data.

Still, revenue for the period increased 27 percent to 44.4 billion yuan, which was lower than the 47.4 billion yuan average estimate of 13 analysts, according to Refinitiv data.

In an interview with CNBC’s “Squawk Box” ahead of the market open on Wednesday, Xiaomi CFO Shou Zi Chew attributed the company’s fourth-quarter performance to keeping efficiency at “a very high level.”

“Our entire operating expense for the year 2018 was still below 10 percent of our revenue and what we have done is, you know, we kept forcing ourselves to be more efficient as a company and return the savings to our users,” Chew said. “This is the reason why we were successful in 2018 and this is the reason why we will be successful going into the future.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20  Authors: eustance huang, josep lago, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yuan, smartphone, chinese, earnings, plunge, billion, tech, successful, beat, reason, 2018, shares, refinitiv, according, revenue, despite, xiaomi, giants


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here’s what investors need to know about the political calls for big tech regulation

Here’s what investors need to know about the political calls for big tech regulation4 Hours AgoFacebook is making some big changes on how it targets ads to users in the face of anger from both sides of the political aisle. Gene Munster, founder and managing partner of Loup Ventures, and Ed Lee, New York Times media reporter, join “Squawk Box” to discuss the regulations facing the tech industry.


Here’s what investors need to know about the political calls for big tech regulation4 Hours AgoFacebook is making some big changes on how it targets ads to users in the face of anger from both sides of the political aisle. Gene Munster, founder and managing partner of Loup Ventures, and Ed Lee, New York Times media reporter, join “Squawk Box” to discuss the regulations facing the tech industry.
Here’s what investors need to know about the political calls for big tech regulation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calls, heres, regulation, investors, tech, times, targets, users, ventures, squawk, know, york, need, sides, political, big


Here's what investors need to know about the political calls for big tech regulation

Here’s what investors need to know about the political calls for big tech regulation

4 Hours Ago

Facebook is making some big changes on how it targets ads to users in the face of anger from both sides of the political aisle. Gene Munster, founder and managing partner of Loup Ventures, and Ed Lee, New York Times media reporter, join “Squawk Box” to discuss the regulations facing the tech industry.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calls, heres, regulation, investors, tech, times, targets, users, ventures, squawk, know, york, need, sides, political, big


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Antitrust case against Google similar to Microsoft’s: Mississippi AG

Google controls a “pipeline” of data and “we’re preparing” an antitrust case against them akin to the federal case against Microsoft in the 1990s, Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood told CNBC on Monday. “We attorneys general have authority under consumer protection acts to do both,” Hood said on “The Exchange.” Several state attorneys generals recently spoke about their willingness to go after the likes of Facebook, Google and other tech giants in interviews with The Washington Post. In a sta


Google controls a “pipeline” of data and “we’re preparing” an antitrust case against them akin to the federal case against Microsoft in the 1990s, Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood told CNBC on Monday. “We attorneys general have authority under consumer protection acts to do both,” Hood said on “The Exchange.” Several state attorneys generals recently spoke about their willingness to go after the likes of Facebook, Google and other tech giants in interviews with The Washington Post. In a sta
Antitrust case against Google similar to Microsoft’s: Mississippi AG Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ag, attorneys, general, microsofts, data, case, point, state, similar, google, mississippi, antitrust, information, companies, tech, hood


Antitrust case against Google similar to Microsoft's: Mississippi AG

Google controls a “pipeline” of data and “we’re preparing” an antitrust case against them akin to the federal case against Microsoft in the 1990s, Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood told CNBC on Monday.

The privacy practices of the Alphabet unit will also be called into question, added Hood, who is one of several state attorneys general turning up the heat on powerful tech companies.

“We attorneys general have authority under consumer protection acts to do both,” Hood said on “The Exchange.” “So it’ll be a multifaceted suit or, hopefully, we can get a settlement if we can get some agreement with them.”

Several state attorneys generals recently spoke about their willingness to go after the likes of Facebook, Google and other tech giants in interviews with The Washington Post.

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich compared them to the monopolies of old in an interview with CNBC on Friday. He also pointed to the “inaction or inability” of Washington, D.C., to do anything about it.

In a statement emailed to CNBC, Google said: “Privacy and security are built into all of our products, and we will continue to engage constructively with state Attorneys General on policy issues.”

Hood, who was elected to his post in 2003, said he wants Big Tech to adopt best practices, similar to the European Union’s data policy, when it comes to handling user data. The Democrat said he would prefer tech companies to present proposals. His office is moving forward with litigation — although it “takes forever” — that could lead to a settlement.

“At some point in the future, there will be a reckoning,” he said. “It’ll either be in Congress or in a court of law.”

Hood mentioned his state’s pending 2017 suit against Google for mining students’ data in public schools. He claimed the search engine profiled students to gain a competitive advertising advantage the “equivalent of gold.”

Google claims user information is extracted before the data is used and that it is not used to analyze student behaviors, according a 2018 article in The Clarion-Ledger of Jackson, Mississippi.

“At some point if we don’t have successful legislation, at some point some court is going to rule to the effect that a person’s private information is the equivalent of their intellectual property and that companies have to pay people for it,” Hood said Monday.

In the late 1990s, the federal government charged Microsoft with acting as a monopoly and limiting competition on PCs with its Windows 98 operating system and Internet Explorer web browser. The company was not forced to split up in the end, but the settlement diminished its web browser dominance. Stock growth stymied for about 15 years, but the company reclaimed its status as one of the world’s most valuable public companies by market cap last year.

About two decades later, Hood is accusing Big Tech of having a monopoly on data. Last week, Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich also said he is prepared to go after Big Tech.

“They control the pipeline and have the duty to protect that information as well as these other smaller companies,” he said. “I wanna see us do some things like, you know, if you download an app, for example, you have to opt in to allow them to mine your data.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ag, attorneys, general, microsofts, data, case, point, state, similar, google, mississippi, antitrust, information, companies, tech, hood


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Beto O’Rourke received backing from big tech in 2018 – that could be a blessing and a curse for 2020

Likewise, perceived coziness with big tech could pose political risks with rising bipartisan calls to crack down on and regulate the industry. Chris Espinosa, who was designated Apple’s eighth employee after the company was founded in the 1970s, gave O’Rourke $2,700. Apple employees gave O’Rourke’s campaign just over $90,000 during the 2018 campaign. O’Rourke himself was once involved in the tech industry, having founded the internet services and software company Stanton Street Technology Group.


Likewise, perceived coziness with big tech could pose political risks with rising bipartisan calls to crack down on and regulate the industry. Chris Espinosa, who was designated Apple’s eighth employee after the company was founded in the 1970s, gave O’Rourke $2,700. Apple employees gave O’Rourke’s campaign just over $90,000 during the 2018 campaign. O’Rourke himself was once involved in the tech industry, having founded the internet services and software company Stanton Street Technology Group.
Beto O’Rourke received backing from big tech in 2018 – that could be a blessing and a curse for 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: brian schwartz, joshua lott, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2018, 2020, democratic, donors, gave, campaign, backing, orourkes, support, beto, blessing, received, industry, tech, big, curse, orourke


Beto O'Rourke received backing from big tech in 2018 – that could be a blessing and a curse for 2020

Beto O’Rourke enjoyed strong support from tech industry workers and executives during his ultimately unsuccessful U.S. Senate campaign last year in Texas, which could give the breakout Democratic star a fundraising edge over his primary opponents as he seeks to challenge President Donald Trump in 2020.

Yet, it will likely be a point of contention for the new campaign.

O’Rourke – who announced Monday that he raked in a record $6.1 million in the first 24 hours of his 2020 campaign – and several of his Democratic rivals have made it a point to distance themselves from corporate money. Likewise, perceived coziness with big tech could pose political risks with rising bipartisan calls to crack down on and regulate the industry.

During his shockingly close loss to Republican Sen. Ted Cruz in deep red Texas, O’Rourke raised tens of millions of dollars, much of it from so-called small donors, or people who give $200 or less. As the Democratic former congressman touted his success among smaller donors, while rejecting money from corporations and super PACs, he also reaped the benefits from bigger-dollar donors, such as executives and employees from major tech companies such as Apple, Facebook and Amazon.

Amazon’s top spokesman, Jay Carney, gave $1,500 directly to the O’Rourke campaign. Carney previously served as White House press secretary to President Barack Obama, to whom O’Rourke has been compared. Brian Olsavsky, the company’s financial chief, wrote a check for $2,700 to O’Rourke’s 2018 campaign, which is the most an individual can give in an election. Amazon employees, overall, gave $75,751 to his campaign.

O’Rourke finished the 2018 campaign having raised $80 million, with 45 percent coming from small donors. The rest came from people giving more than $200, including important players at Facebook and Apple.

Chris Espinosa, who was designated Apple’s eighth employee after the company was founded in the 1970s, gave O’Rourke $2,700. Apple employees gave O’Rourke’s campaign just over $90,000 during the 2018 campaign.

Alex Stamos, who was Facebook’s chief security officer until August, also gave $2,700 to O’Rourke’s campaign. Stamos told CNBC that he has not decided whom to support among the Democratic field. But he did say he is advising campaigns on cybersecurity in the wake of Russia’s interference and hacking during the 2016 cycle.

“One of the great benefits of not being a professional political operative is that I don’t have to pick sides 20 months before the general election,” Stamos said. “I’ve been trying to be helpful to multiple Democratic campaigns, and right now my focus is on helping them get their campaign technology stacks set up in a secure manner.”

He declined to name the campaigns he’s helping.

It is also not clear whether Carney, Olsavsky or Espinosa would support O’Rourke during the 2020 campaign. Representatives from Facebook, Amazon and Apple did not return repeated requests for comment. A spokesman for O’Rourke did not return an email seeking comment.

O’Rourke’s 2020 campaign has yet to announce how much of his recent $6.1 million haul came from smaller donations. The Texas Democrat has repeatedly said his campaign will not be financed by political action committees, corporations or special interests. In the run-up to O’Rourke’s first big fundraising splash of the presidential campaign, Louis Susman, a bundler for Obama, had been privately making calls to “family and friends” to coax support for O’Rourke, he told CNBC last week.

O’Rourke himself was once involved in the tech industry, having founded the internet services and software company Stanton Street Technology Group. Up until the middle of 2017, his wife, Amy, ran the business, which is based in their home city of El Paso. A recent Reuters report, meanwhile, revealed that O’Rourke was involved decades ago with America’s oldest hacking group, the Cult of the Dead Cow.

Support from people in the tech industry could have downsides for O’Rourke as several of his rivals have taken aim at Silicon Valley.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, for instance, has called for the breakup of big firms, such as Google and Apple.

“Today’s big tech companies have too much power — too much power over our economy, our society, and our democracy. They’ve bulldozed competition, used our private information for profit, and tilted the playing field against everyone else. And in the process, they have hurt small businesses and stifled innovation,” she said in a blog post.

Another 2020 Democratic candidate, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, has called for tighter regulations on tech companies. Trump himself has attacked Amazon and Google.

O’Rourke has yet to cite specific policy stances on regulating the tech industry.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: brian schwartz, joshua lott, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2018, 2020, democratic, donors, gave, campaign, backing, orourkes, support, beto, blessing, received, industry, tech, big, curse, orourke


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trading Nation: Buy this tech stock instead of Facebook


Trading Nation: Buy this tech stock instead of Facebook Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trading, nation, stock, buy, instead, tech, facebook


Trading Nation: Buy this tech stock instead of Facebook


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trading, nation, stock, buy, instead, tech, facebook


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

We’ll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies. “When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.” “We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.” Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.” “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the


Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies. “When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.” “We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.” Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.” “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the
We’ll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arizona, dc, look, statement, big, maybe, brnovich, state, rights, necessary, tech, doing, general, privacy, washington, attorney


We'll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies.

And he’s not alone.

“When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.”

“We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.”

Brnovich is one of several state attorneys general who spoke recently to the Washington Post about their willingness to take action against Facebook, Google and other tech giants, which they say have grown too powerful.

Brnovich said they are “worried about this massive amount of data that is being collected, manipulated. Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.”

The states are stepping up because the federal government isn’t, said Brnovich. “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the last decade — where good ideas go to die.”

What’s being seen is the “inaction or inability of the bureaucrats in Washington D.C. to do anything about protecting individual Americans, their privacy rights, how they are being manipulated when it comes to news feeds and news coverage,” he said.

Facebook and Google did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

However, in a statement to the Washington Post, Facebook’s vice president of state and local public policy, said the company has had “productive conversations” with state AGs. “Many officials have approached us in a constructive manner, focused on solutions that ensure all companies are protecting people’s information, and we look forward to working with them,” he said.

Google also gave the paper a statement that said, “Privacy and security are built into all of our products, and we will continue to engage constructively with state attorneys general on policy issues.”

Brnovich wouldn’t comment on individual companies.

“I will assure you that no matter how big the company is that if they are violating the rights of Arizonians, we are going to take a look at them and we are going to come after them hard in the courtroom if that is appropriate.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arizona, dc, look, statement, big, maybe, brnovich, state, rights, necessary, tech, doing, general, privacy, washington, attorney


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

China plans a solar power play in space that NASA abandoned decades ago

Now the studies conducted on feasibility are decades old and simply no longer relevant to the discussion, Mankins said. “We no longer need a stupendously huge factory in space and hundreds of astronauts to put it together. Thin film solar panels are lightweight, which reduces launch cost. Thin film may also have a structural advantage in space — the lighter weight is no issue in the zero-gravity environment. In India and in Europe scientists are working on additional concepts for solar based pow


Now the studies conducted on feasibility are decades old and simply no longer relevant to the discussion, Mankins said. “We no longer need a stupendously huge factory in space and hundreds of astronauts to put it together. Thin film solar panels are lightweight, which reduces launch cost. Thin film may also have a structural advantage in space — the lighter weight is no issue in the zero-gravity environment. In India and in Europe scientists are working on additional concepts for solar based pow
China plans a solar power play in space that NASA abandoned decades ago Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: eric rosenbaum, donovan russo, nasa, getty images news, getty images, mark hopkins, national space society, sps-alpha concept, image provided john c mankins, -john mankins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, power, china, abandoned, cost, ago, launch, issue, decades, weight, huge, play, thing, solar, nasa, space, plans, weighing


China plans a solar power play in space that NASA abandoned decades ago

Mankins said this view is becoming quickly outdated due to a dramatic lowering of rocket launch costs through efforts funded by billionaires including Tesla founder Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin. Meanwhile, developments in robotics and modular-manufacturing — being able to produce many small modular pieces to make a whole rather than one huge piece of equipment — could lead to cost-effective ways to construct these projects in orbit without having to build a multi-billion-dollar factory in space. He referenced a major review conducted by the federal government in 1981 that when looked at in today’s dollars would have cost up to $1 trillion to deliver the first kilowatt/hour of solar from space. “The whole program was killed in the U.S.,” he said.

Now the studies conducted on feasibility are decades old and simply no longer relevant to the discussion, Mankins said. “Whenever a gray-haired senior scientist tells you something can be done, they are almost certainly right. When they tell you it can’t be done, he or she may very well be wrong,” he said, referencing an adage by science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke from his famous “three laws.”

“We have had a revolution in robotics, drones and warehouse robots that didn’t exist. Previously, the whole thing had to be built as one huge system, an enormous thing like a aircraft carrier shipyard in space to fabricate one enormous object weighing 10,000 tonnes rather than 10 million small units each weighing a few pounds that can use mass production,” he said. “We no longer need a stupendously huge factory in space and hundreds of astronauts to put it together. The whole world, other than the space program, has moved forward to mass-produced modular network devices. That’s the way you would do it, and it was unthinkable 40 years ago, but suddenly it is physically, technically and economically doable.”

American scientists are tinkering with the idea to this day. A group at the California Institute of Technology claims to have created a prototype that is able to capture and transmit solar energy from space, using light weight tiles, work sponsored by a $17.5 million research agreement with Northrop Grumman. Weight has always been a key issue to resolve because of the cost of rocket launches being based on weight of cargo. Thin film solar panels are lightweight, which reduces launch cost. Though as launch costs come down it may be less of a make-or-break issue. Thin film may also have a structural advantage in space — the lighter weight is no issue in the zero-gravity environment.

Other nations are exploring the concept. In India and in Europe scientists are working on additional concepts for solar based power in space. Japan’s JAXA, an aerospace exploration agency, has been researching how to overcome technological barriers, such as microwave wireless power transmission tech and robotic assembly tech.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: eric rosenbaum, donovan russo, nasa, getty images news, getty images, mark hopkins, national space society, sps-alpha concept, image provided john c mankins, -john mankins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, power, china, abandoned, cost, ago, launch, issue, decades, weight, huge, play, thing, solar, nasa, space, plans, weighing


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

PagerDuty files to go public in what should be a big year for tech IPOs

PagerDuty, whose software helps companies respond quickly when their websites go down, is preparing to hit the public markets. By today’s standards, PagerDuty is small for a software company at the time of IPO. The company generated $32.1 million in the quarter that ended Oct. 31, and had a net loss of $15.3 million. T. Rowe Price Group led a $90 million investment in PagerDuty in September at a $1.3 billion valuation. The filing says PagerDuty is looking to raise as much as $100 million in the


PagerDuty, whose software helps companies respond quickly when their websites go down, is preparing to hit the public markets. By today’s standards, PagerDuty is small for a software company at the time of IPO. The company generated $32.1 million in the quarter that ended Oct. 31, and had a net loss of $15.3 million. T. Rowe Price Group led a $90 million investment in PagerDuty in September at a $1.3 billion valuation. The filing says PagerDuty is looking to raise as much as $100 million in the
PagerDuty files to go public in what should be a big year for tech IPOs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, ipos, software, files, pagerduty, million, company, big, public, respond, investors, ipo, san, companies


PagerDuty files to go public in what should be a big year for tech IPOs

PagerDuty, whose software helps companies respond quickly when their websites go down, is preparing to hit the public markets.

The company filed its IPO prospectus on Friday, and plans to trade on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “PD.”

By today’s standards, PagerDuty is small for a software company at the time of IPO. The company generated $32.1 million in the quarter that ended Oct. 31, and had a net loss of $15.3 million. And for the year ended Jan. 31, 2018, sales rose 41 percent to $79.6 million.

PagerDuty has over 10,000 customer, including, Gap, GE, IBM and Netflix, according to its website. Competitors include Atlassian and Splunk, which have both acquired their way into the market. PagerDuty’s software helps technical staff at companies spot problems and respond to incidents such as customer complaints.

Morgan Stanley and J.P. Morgan Chase are among the banks leading the deal. Investors include Accel, Andreessen Horowitz, Baseline Ventures and Bessemer Venture Partners. T. Rowe Price Group led a $90 million investment in PagerDuty in September at a $1.3 billion valuation.

The company was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. Last year several technology companies started trading on the public markets, including Dropbox, DocuSign and Zuora. Lyft filed to go public earlier this month, and Uber, Airbnb, Pinterest and Slack are among other big names that investors could see debut this year.

The filing says PagerDuty is looking to raise as much as $100 million in the IPO.

WATCH: Tech IPOs could impact San Francisco real estate, here’s why


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, ipos, software, files, pagerduty, million, company, big, public, respond, investors, ipo, san, companies


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

These tech companies aim to cure pain without pills

In 1992, doctors told Sana Health founder and CEO Richard Hanbury that he had just five years to live. It was a 1990’s movie — “Hudson Hawk” — that led Hanbury to develop a cure. In the film, Hawk, played by Bruce Willis, is just out of prison and gets pulled back into a series of heists, including stealing famous works of art. “Bruce Willis did literally save my life with that film,” Hanbury said in an interview. “The film went from good and bad to good and bad the whole way through.


In 1992, doctors told Sana Health founder and CEO Richard Hanbury that he had just five years to live. It was a 1990’s movie — “Hudson Hawk” — that led Hanbury to develop a cure. In the film, Hawk, played by Bruce Willis, is just out of prison and gets pulled back into a series of heists, including stealing famous works of art. “Bruce Willis did literally save my life with that film,” Hanbury said in an interview. “The film went from good and bad to good and bad the whole way through.
These tech companies aim to cure pain without pills Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: lora kolodny, katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hanbury, film, pain, good, cure, hawk, morphine, worse, bad, aim, companies, willis, yemen, pills, tech


These tech companies aim to cure pain without pills

In 1992, doctors told Sana Health founder and CEO Richard Hanbury that he had just five years to live.

A Jeep accident in Yemen at age 19 left him in a wheelchair and in such intense pain that he was rarely able to sleep, he recalls. Prescription drugs, even morphine, lost their effectiveness and the chronic pain from nerve damage only got worse, to the point that it threatened to kill him.

It was a 1990’s movie — “Hudson Hawk” — that led Hanbury to develop a cure. In the film, Hawk, played by Bruce Willis, is just out of prison and gets pulled back into a series of heists, including stealing famous works of art.

“Bruce Willis did literally save my life with that film,” Hanbury said in an interview. “The film went from good and bad to good and bad the whole way through. As I was watching, I realized that had changed my pain levels more than morphine. That’s where the whole idea of using a visual stimulus to create a different state of consciousness came from.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: lora kolodny, katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hanbury, film, pain, good, cure, hawk, morphine, worse, bad, aim, companies, willis, yemen, pills, tech


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

We’ll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies. “When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.” “We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.” Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.” “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the


Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies. “When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.” “We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.” Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.” “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the
We’ll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arizona, dc, look, statement, big, maybe, brnovich, state, rights, necessary, tech, doing, general, privacy, washington, attorney


We'll go after big tech if necessary because DC is doing nothing: Arizona attorney general

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich told CNBC on Friday he is prepared to go after big tech companies.

And he’s not alone.

“When you have these tech companies dominate the market share, they essentially are akin to the monopolies of old,” Brnovich said on “Closing Bell.”

“We as state AGs we are taking a look at maybe whether we should do something and if so what should be done.”

Brnovich is one of several state attorneys general who spoke recently to the Washington Post about their willingness to take action against Facebook, Google and other tech giants, which they say have grown too powerful.

Brnovich said they are “worried about this massive amount of data that is being collected, manipulated. Sometimes it’s misleading and maybe ends up maybe compromising some of our privacy rights.”

The states are stepping up because the federal government isn’t, said Brnovich. “Washington D.C. has been — at least in the last decade — where good ideas go to die.”

What’s being seen is the “inaction or inability of the bureaucrats in Washington D.C. to do anything about protecting individual Americans, their privacy rights, how they are being manipulated when it comes to news feeds and news coverage,” he said.

Facebook and Google did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

However, in a statement to the Washington Post, Facebook’s vice president of state and local public policy, said the company has had “productive conversations” with state AGs. “Many officials have approached us in a constructive manner, focused on solutions that ensure all companies are protecting people’s information, and we look forward to working with them,” he said.

Google also gave the paper a statement that said, “Privacy and security are built into all of our products, and we will continue to engage constructively with state attorneys general on policy issues.”

Brnovich wouldn’t comment on individual companies.

“I will assure you that no matter how big the company is that if they are violating the rights of Arizonians, we are going to take a look at them and we are going to come after them hard in the courtroom if that is appropriate.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arizona, dc, look, statement, big, maybe, brnovich, state, rights, necessary, tech, doing, general, privacy, washington, attorney


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post