Singapore’s economy dodges technical recession after growing 0.6% in the third quarter

Singapore’s economy — often seen as a bellwether for global growth — avoided a technical recession after growing by 0.6% in the third quarter, compared to the previous three months. On a year-on-year basis, Singapore’s economy grew 0.1% in the third quarter. Economists polled by Reuters had expected Singapore’s gross domestic product from July to September to increase by 1.5% quarter-on-quarter and 0.3% year-on-year. A technical recession happens when there are two consecutive quarters of econom


Singapore’s economy — often seen as a bellwether for global growth — avoided a technical recession after growing by 0.6% in the third quarter, compared to the previous three months. On a year-on-year basis, Singapore’s economy grew 0.1% in the third quarter. Economists polled by Reuters had expected Singapore’s gross domestic product from July to September to increase by 1.5% quarter-on-quarter and 0.3% year-on-year. A technical recession happens when there are two consecutive quarters of econom
Singapore’s economy dodges technical recession after growing 0.6% in the third quarter Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recession, technical, trade, yearonyeara, economy, quarteronquarter, yearonyear, dodges, quarter, growth, global, growing, singapores


Singapore's economy dodges technical recession after growing 0.6% in the third quarter

Singapore’s economy — often seen as a bellwether for global growth — avoided a technical recession after growing by 0.6% in the third quarter, compared to the previous three months.

That quarter-on-quarter expansion marked a reversal from the revised 2.7% decline in the April-to-June period, official advance estimates by the Ministry of Trade and Industry showed on Monday. On a year-on-year basis, Singapore’s economy grew 0.1% in the third quarter.

But the latest growth figures were below expectations. Economists polled by Reuters had expected Singapore’s gross domestic product from July to September to increase by 1.5% quarter-on-quarter and 0.3% year-on-year.

A technical recession happens when there are two consecutive quarters of economic contraction. Talks of a global recession heightened in recent months amid a U.S.-China trade war that’s dragged on for more than a year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recession, technical, trade, yearonyeara, economy, quarteronquarter, yearonyear, dodges, quarter, growth, global, growing, singapores


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Tax-loss selling leaves these losing stocks with more room to fall, Morgan Stanley says

Morgan Stanley is warning clients certain underperforming stocks will have more room to fall heading in to the fourth quarter as tax loss selling accelerates. Investors often sell losing stocks at the end of the year to lower their tax bill from the capital increases. “As we head into 4Q, tax loss selling becomes a possible source of technical pressure on some stocks,” Michael Wilson, Morgan Stanley’s chief U.S. equity strategist said in a note on Monday. The bank ran a screen to find the stocks


Morgan Stanley is warning clients certain underperforming stocks will have more room to fall heading in to the fourth quarter as tax loss selling accelerates. Investors often sell losing stocks at the end of the year to lower their tax bill from the capital increases. “As we head into 4Q, tax loss selling becomes a possible source of technical pressure on some stocks,” Michael Wilson, Morgan Stanley’s chief U.S. equity strategist said in a note on Monday. The bank ran a screen to find the stocks
Tax-loss selling leaves these losing stocks with more room to fall, Morgan Stanley says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, screen, underperforming, quarter, stocks, room, selling, taxloss, stanley, technical, tax, end, morgan, losing, wilson, york, leaves, fall


Tax-loss selling leaves these losing stocks with more room to fall, Morgan Stanley says

Traders work after the closing bell at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on August 12, 2019 at Wall Street in New York City.

If you still own these stocks, watch out for more losses ahead.

Morgan Stanley is warning clients certain underperforming stocks will have more room to fall heading in to the fourth quarter as tax loss selling accelerates. Investors often sell losing stocks at the end of the year to lower their tax bill from the capital increases.

“As we head into 4Q, tax loss selling becomes a possible source of technical pressure on some stocks,” Michael Wilson, Morgan Stanley’s chief U.S. equity strategist said in a note on Monday.

The bank ran a screen to find the stocks most vulnerable to the tax selling pressure this time of the year. It found stocks that were well-liked by investors and analysts but have suffered at least 10% drop in prices from mid-January to the end of the third quarter.

“We used some simplifying assumptions to produce a list of stocks that may have a greater probability of underperforming into year end on this technical basis,” Wilson said. “Back testing shows this screening method has had some success in creating a group of stocks that may underperform in 4Q.”

Stocks from this screen have underperformed the broad market by 2.2% on average in the fourth quarter over the past 17 years, according to Morgan Stanley.

The bank’s list of stocks for this year include E-Trade, Tapestry, Cigna, Marathon Oil, FedEx, DuPont, and Align Technology, which have tumbled as much as 30% in the first three quarters of 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, screen, underperforming, quarter, stocks, room, selling, taxloss, stanley, technical, tax, end, morgan, losing, wilson, york, leaves, fall


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One auto stock could fall by more than 18% before bottoming, technical analyst says

Auto stocks are in reverse. Newton Advisors’ Mark Newton says one of those stocks is a no-touch right here. “If anything, I still think the stock gets down to right around $7 to $7.50,” he said. Even in the shorter term, Sanchez sees headwinds including trade tensions and a global slowdown that could challenge the auto stocks and the potential for any solid rebound. So I think the auto sector is really, really a place to stay away from right now,” said Sanchez.


Auto stocks are in reverse. Newton Advisors’ Mark Newton says one of those stocks is a no-touch right here. “If anything, I still think the stock gets down to right around $7 to $7.50,” he said. Even in the shorter term, Sanchez sees headwinds including trade tensions and a global slowdown that could challenge the auto stocks and the potential for any solid rebound. So I think the auto sector is really, really a place to stay away from right now,” said Sanchez.
One auto stock could fall by more than 18% before bottoming, technical analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, auto, analyst, stocks, fewer, really, sanchez, right, shares, fall, bottoming, shift, sort, think, stock, technical


One auto stock could fall by more than 18% before bottoming, technical analyst says

Auto stocks are in reverse.

Ford and General Motors have plummeted this week, weighed down by weak third-quarter sales and a GM workers strike that has stretched into a third week.

Newton Advisors’ Mark Newton says one of those stocks is a no-touch right here.

“Ford has literally been cut in half since 2013. It peaked right around almost $17 to $18 back in late 2013 and is about half of that, so a very difficult picture for Ford,” Newton said Wednesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.”

Ford shares closed out Wednesday’s session down more than 3% at $8.61. It’ has fallen 5% this week.

“If anything, I still think the stock gets down to right around $7 to $7.50,” he said.

A decline as low as $7 implies nearly 19% downside. Shares haven’t traded that low in a decade.

Gina Sanchez, CEO of Chantico Global, says a broader industry shift could be underway that hurts the U.S. automakers in the long term.

“The idea of the auto cycle assumes that there’s sort of another leg up to this leg down that we’ve seen, and I think the bigger concern that many analysts are starting to pose is what if car ownership is due for sort of a shift in terms of just simply fewer people owning fewer cars? If consumers own fewer cars, then the auto industry itself is going to have to make adjustments to deal with that new reality,” Sanchez said during the same segment.

Even in the shorter term, Sanchez sees headwinds including trade tensions and a global slowdown that could challenge the auto stocks and the potential for any solid rebound.

“Whether or not we go into recession, you’re going to have a hard time finding purchase until we start to see stronger fundamentals, and I don’t see those for the better part of a year. So I think the auto sector is really, really a place to stay away from right now,” said Sanchez.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, auto, analyst, stocks, fewer, really, sanchez, right, shares, fall, bottoming, shift, sort, think, stock, technical


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The stock market comeback is another ‘failure’ as chart analysts grow worried

Technical analysts are warning that there could be more downside after the fourth quarter got off to a rocky start as recession fears hit stocks. … We would see yield curves steepening,” Hayes said in a note to clients on Tuesday. The S&P falling below its 50-day moving average isn’t the only technical indicator breaking down, says MKM Chief Market Technician JC O’Hara. Softer inflows to stock ETFs and mutual fund are another sign that the market might be on the verge of turning a corner, Haye


Technical analysts are warning that there could be more downside after the fourth quarter got off to a rocky start as recession fears hit stocks. … We would see yield curves steepening,” Hayes said in a note to clients on Tuesday. The S&P falling below its 50-day moving average isn’t the only technical indicator breaking down, says MKM Chief Market Technician JC O’Hara. Softer inflows to stock ETFs and mutual fund are another sign that the market might be on the verge of turning a corner, Haye
The stock market comeback is another ‘failure’ as chart analysts grow worried Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, highs, failure, stocks, chart, worried, market, inflows, comeback, stock, yield, sign, technical, analysts, grow, hayes, weakness


The stock market comeback is another 'failure' as chart analysts grow worried

Technical analysts are warning that there could be more downside after the fourth quarter got off to a rocky start as recession fears hit stocks.

Stocks opened Wednesday’s trading day in the red, accelerating Tuesday’s sharp losses, when the Dow fell 344 points and the S&P 500 broke below its 50-day moving average — a key technical indicator. That decline came after manufacturing data hit its lowest level in a decade.

Ned Davis Research chief global investment strategist Tim Hayes remains underweight equities, pointing to a lack of breadth in the comeback in September, as well as slowing equity fund inflows and a failure of the yield curve to steepen. He says this rally is becoming “another round of failure.”

“If the outlook was turning bullish for equities, we would see the major benchmarks breaking to record highs with decisive and broad-based confirmation from breadth indicators. … We would see yield curves steepening,” Hayes said in a note to clients on Tuesday. He believes all of these factors are “a reflection of waning confidence in the macro environment globally.”

The S&P falling below its 50-day moving average isn’t the only technical indicator breaking down, says MKM Chief Market Technician JC O’Hara. He believes “the market is not in the best shape to make new highs from its current position” since “shorter term technical indicators started to show some negative divergences.” Specifically, he points to the relative strength index, which he says “started to roll over a week prior.”

“We believe more time is needed to allow those indicators to fully reset, and thus are in a better position to make new highs,” he said.

Hayes argues that the most recent rally has been uneven, and that could spell trouble ahead. He noted that not only have U.S. indexes failed to regain July highs, but outperformance in large-cap stocks is masking signs of weakness in other areas of the global stock market, specifically, the All World Country Index ETF, which tracks large and mid-cap stocks around the world.

“As the megacaps have been propping up the ACWI and other cap-weighted indices, underlying deterioration has been reflected by the equal-weighted ACWI,” he wrote, calling this divergence a sign of “mounting economic pessimism.”

Hayes also pointed to the bond market as a sign that the rally’s underlying fundamentals may not be supported, saying that if the overall outlook were positive “we would see yield curves steepening again.”

Softer inflows to stock ETFs and mutual fund are another sign that the market might be on the verge of turning a corner, Hayes said. In August, investors pulled $46.2 billion from equity ETFs, according to ETF Trends, while $13.5 billion flowed into bond funds. O’Hara reiterated this point, noting that Tuesday stock inflows were light, which was a “negative signal” given that “historically inflows have been present at the start of each month.”

But not everyone on the Street shares Hayes’ view that stocks could be set for a pullback. Fundstrat Global Advisors’ Rob Sluymer said in a note to clients on Tuesday that investors should buy any weakness in “anticipation of further upside through Q4.”

Though many traders and analysts remained worried. On a more granular basis, Tribeca Trade Group CEO Christian Fromhertz noted that individual sectors are beginning to show signs of weakness. “On the technicals, you’re losing breadth a little bit. You’re losing some groups. Health care is the next group to kind of watch that’s vulnerable. Sometimes it’s OK when you have a couple of groups that are weak … but we’re starting to see more groups tilt to the downside,” he said.

— CNBC’s Yun Li, Fred Imbert and Tom Franck contributed reporting.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, highs, failure, stocks, chart, worried, market, inflows, comeback, stock, yield, sign, technical, analysts, grow, hayes, weakness


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120 million workers will need retraining due to AI—but they may already have the skills employers want most

According to a new report from IBM, an estimated 120 million workers worldwide will need to be retrained as a result of AI and automation within the next three years. In fact, it’s soft skills companies are most on the hunt for. These all moved up in importance from a previous ranking in 2016, when executives said technical STEM skills and computer and software/application skills were most important. “While organizations still struggle to address gaps in technical skills, there have been signifi


According to a new report from IBM, an estimated 120 million workers worldwide will need to be retrained as a result of AI and automation within the next three years. In fact, it’s soft skills companies are most on the hunt for. These all moved up in importance from a previous ranking in 2016, when executives said technical STEM skills and computer and software/application skills were most important. “While organizations still struggle to address gaps in technical skills, there have been signifi
120 million workers will need retraining due to AI—but they may already have the skills employers want most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technical, companies, need, million, employers, 120, business, ability, today, skills, ibm, aibut, workers, address, retraining


120 million workers will need retraining due to AI—but they may already have the skills employers want most

According to a new report from IBM, an estimated 120 million workers worldwide will need to be retrained as a result of AI and automation within the next three years.

Despite these projections, however, technical know-how isn’t the most important thing employers want from their workforce.

In fact, it’s soft skills companies are most on the hunt for. Executives identified traits like adaptability, time management and ability to work well on teams as some of the most crucial to the workforce today. These all moved up in importance from a previous ranking in 2016, when executives said technical STEM skills and computer and software/application skills were most important.

There are a few likely reasons for this, researchers note. First, companies have made significant strides in the last few years to invest in and integrate emerging tech across industries. “Entirely new areas of expertise, such as data science and machine learning, have saturated nearly every industry in a new business environment laden with powerful technology,” the report reads. “While organizations still struggle to address gaps in technical skills, there have been significant efforts and investments to address these gaps at multiple levels to lessen the impact on organizations.”

While companies have covered more ground investing in technology and hiring people with a background in it, they’re now faced with a skills shortage among existing workers. To bridge the gap, business leaders want to know their employees will be able to learn such skills as quickly as new tech emerges.

These are the most important skills in the workforce today, according to executives:

Willingness to be flexible, agile and adaptable to change Time management skills and ability to prioritize Ability to work effectively in team environments Ability to communicate effectively in business context Analytics skills and business acumen Technical core capabilities for STEM Capacity for innovation and creativity Basic computer and software/application skills Ethics and integrity Foreign language proficiency Fundamental core capabilities around reading, writing and arithmetic Industry- or occupation-specific skills

This sentiment echoes a recent talk from Elon Musk, who said “AI will make jobs kind of pointless.” Even those who study engineering specifically may find their skill set obsolete when “eventually, the AI will just write its own software.” However, the Tesla CEO notes businesses focusing on human interaction will continue to thrive, further highlighting the necessary interpersonal skills that robots are less likely to replace, at least as quickly.

Additionally, where technical skills can be taught though a series of coursework, solid behavioral skills can only be practiced through experience.

“Reskilling for technical skills is typically driven by structured education with a defined objective with a clear start and end,” Amy Wright, IBM managing director for talent, told Bloomberg. “Building behavioral skills takes more time and is more complex.”

It takes longer for workers to close a skills gap now than ever before, according to IBM — on average 36 days of training today compared to three days in 2014. Furthermore, only half of companies surveyed said they had a strategy in place to address the skills gap in their sector, and the most common practice was hiring outside talent.

Such measures won’t fully address the skills shortage, IBM says, and it offers three recommendations instead. First, companies must personalize the employee development experience. Essentially, employers should use AI itself to get a better grasp of where workers are now, skills-wise, and personalize a learning plan to future-proof their career with the company.

Companies should also be transparent about the ways employees will need to grow their skills in areas that will impact to the business most.

And finally, promoting existing talent (not recruiting) will play a crucial role. IBM says employers will benefit by investing in workers who have an established background with the company who can then drive innovation from within.

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Don’t miss: How to answer this Facebook exec’s go-to interview question about problem-solving


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technical, companies, need, million, employers, 120, business, ability, today, skills, ibm, aibut, workers, address, retraining


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Watch out for this key level in Facebook, Piper Jaffray technical analyst says

The increased regulatory pressure from federal and state bodies hasn’t deterred Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray. So, we would continue to be a buyer here of Facebook shares,” said Johnson. Gina Sanchez, CEO of Chantico Global, says regulatory risk could knock Facebook down from its high valuations. Facebook trades at nearly 22 times forward earnings. If anything, I think that risk continues to grow,” said Sanchez.


The increased regulatory pressure from federal and state bodies hasn’t deterred Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray. So, we would continue to be a buyer here of Facebook shares,” said Johnson. Gina Sanchez, CEO of Chantico Global, says regulatory risk could knock Facebook down from its high valuations. Facebook trades at nearly 22 times forward earnings. If anything, I think that risk continues to grow,” said Sanchez.
Watch out for this key level in Facebook, Piper Jaffray technical analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, risk, level, facebook, analyst, think, shares, piper, technical, moving, trading, trades, times, watch, sanchez, key, jaffray, state


Watch out for this key level in Facebook, Piper Jaffray technical analyst says

Facebook is under a fresh wave of scrutiny.

New York State Attorney Letitia James launched a joint investigation into potential antitrust violations on Friday, joining Florida, Iowa, and Colorado among others in putting the heat on Facebook. The latest probe comes on top of an investigation by the Federal Trade Commission.

The increased regulatory pressure from federal and state bodies hasn’t deterred Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray.

“We’re still friendly toward the shares,” Johnson said on CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Friday. “When you look at this chart, we’re still making a series of higher highs and higher lows coming off the December lows, and we’re moving right up toward that 50-day moving average at $191.”

Facebook touched the 50-day moving average on Thursday, but dipped lower Friday. It has not traded above that trend line since early August.

“Any sort of move above that $191 level sets the stock up to move back toward the $204 or $205 range which I do think is a logical place to go. So, we would continue to be a buyer here of Facebook shares,” said Johnson.

Gina Sanchez, CEO of Chantico Global, says regulatory risk could knock Facebook down from its high valuations.

“Facebook, even despite all of this news, is still trading at a premium in terms of forward PE relative to the industry, and so I don’t know that it’s necessarily pricing in the risk that some of these probes present to Facebook,” Sanchez said on the same segment.

Facebook trades at nearly 22 times forward earnings. The XLC communication services ETF by comparison trades with an 18.5 times multiple.

“These probes don’t go away. If anything, I think that risk continues to grow,” said Sanchez. “At the end of the day, we continue to grapple with whether or not companies like this should even be run for profit or are they simply just a commodity and a utility that really isn’t going to make growth kinds of returns.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, risk, level, facebook, analyst, think, shares, piper, technical, moving, trading, trades, times, watch, sanchez, key, jaffray, state


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Gold heads for third weekly gain on trade, growth concerns

Gold prices edged lower on Friday but were headed for a third consecutive weekly gain, as fears over a global economic slowdown and a lack of clarity on the U.S.-China trade war boosted the metal’s safe-haven appeal. With the trade saga going nowhere, investors have hedged against a global slowdown by buying safe-haven assets like gold, Japanese yen and U.S. Treasuries. Earlier this week, 10-year Treasury yields dropped below the 2-year yield for the first time in 12 years. Meanwhile, the dollar


Gold prices edged lower on Friday but were headed for a third consecutive weekly gain, as fears over a global economic slowdown and a lack of clarity on the U.S.-China trade war boosted the metal’s safe-haven appeal. With the trade saga going nowhere, investors have hedged against a global slowdown by buying safe-haven assets like gold, Japanese yen and U.S. Treasuries. Earlier this week, 10-year Treasury yields dropped below the 2-year yield for the first time in 12 years. Meanwhile, the dollar
Gold heads for third weekly gain on trade, growth concerns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, safehaven, ounce, war, trade, heads, weekly, concerns, growth, gold, gain, week, yields, technical, tariffs


Gold heads for third weekly gain on trade, growth concerns

Gold prices edged lower on Friday but were headed for a third consecutive weekly gain, as fears over a global economic slowdown and a lack of clarity on the U.S.-China trade war boosted the metal’s safe-haven appeal.

Spot gold was down 0.1% at $1,521 per ounce as of 0400 GMT, but is up nearly 1.6% so far this week after rising in the previous two weeks.

U.S. gold futures were steady at $1,5231 an ounce.

“Gold is consolidating here. The important consideration is that none of the headwinds have gone away; the tariffs got delayed a bit, but the underlying trade war remains and lower yields are supportive for gold,” said Ilya Spivak, senior currency strategist with DailyFx.

“Markets are looking ahead for the Jackson Hole symposium. In context of recent gains that might give us some corrective pullbacks, as people reduce exposure before event risk.”

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Thursday he believed China wanted to make a trade deal and that the dispute would be fairly short.

This comes after Beijing vowed to counter the latest tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese goods but called on the United States to meet it halfway on a potential trade deal.

With the trade saga going nowhere, investors have hedged against a global slowdown by buying safe-haven assets like gold, Japanese yen and U.S. Treasuries.

Earlier this week, 10-year Treasury yields dropped below the 2-year yield for the first time in 12 years. Curve inversion is widely considered a warning that the economy is headed for recession.

Bullion has risen nearly 8%, or more than $100, since the beginning of the month amid the heightened trade tensions and a slew of disappointing economic data globally.

“The yellow metal continues to benefit from safe-haven inflows, which should ensure that any pullbacks are limited ahead of the weekend,” OANDA analyst Jeffrey Halley, said in a note.

Investors will shift their focus to the Federal Reserve’s annual symposium next week. Traders see about a one-in-three chance of a 50 basis-point rate cut by the Fed this September.

Meanwhile, the dollar index edged higher on Friday and was on course for a weekly gain.

On the technical side, spot gold may fall into a range of $1,483-$1,503 per ounce, as suggested by its wave pattern and a retracement analysis, said Reuters technical analyst Wang Tao.

Elsewhere, silver was down 0.2% at $17.22 per ounce but was on track for a second consecutive weekly gain.

Platinum fell 0.3% to $836.10 an ounce, while palladium rose 0.3% to $1,448.57 an ounce.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, safehaven, ounce, war, trade, heads, weekly, concerns, growth, gold, gain, week, yields, technical, tariffs


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The world’s top universities for IT developers — based on the skills employers want

Top university rankings rarely diverge far from the usual institutions that have for centuries produced top talent across various traditional industries. The report from HackerRank, a technical hiring platform, ranked universities across four important technical skills most sought by employers to determine the top universities for developers across North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe and the Middle East, and found some interesting outliers. Here’s the list of the top universities for developers


Top university rankings rarely diverge far from the usual institutions that have for centuries produced top talent across various traditional industries. The report from HackerRank, a technical hiring platform, ranked universities across four important technical skills most sought by employers to determine the top universities for developers across North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe and the Middle East, and found some interesting outliers. Here’s the list of the top universities for developers
The world’s top universities for IT developers — based on the skills employers want Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, skills, rankings, based, university, worlds, cs, iit, technical, list, universities, ranking, employers, developers


The world's top universities for IT developers — based on the skills employers want

Top university rankings rarely diverge far from the usual institutions that have for centuries produced top talent across various traditional industries. But when it comes to shaping minds for the jobs of the future, there’s some new competition.

Maskot | DigitalVision | Getty Images

That’s certainly the case for the developer industry, according to a new study, which has turned traditional analysis on its head to focus on graduates’ skills rather than universities’ quality of research and teaching. The report from HackerRank, a technical hiring platform, ranked universities across four important technical skills most sought by employers to determine the top universities for developers across North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe and the Middle East, and found some interesting outliers. The four skills measured were: problem solving

language proficiency

data structures knowledge

computer science (CS) fundamentals. The research, which is based on over 1.4 million assessments completed by students on HackerRank’s platform between January 2017 and June 2019, contrasts with traditional lists, such as the Times Higher Education CS rankings, which focus on factors including teaching, research, international outlook and industry income. Here’s the list of the top universities for developers — based on skills:

North America

University of California, Berkeley emerged as the leader in HackerRank’s list of top North American universities, despite failing to make the cut in the Times’ ranking. Berkeley placed within the top five across all four technical skills areas, well ahead of regular U.S. heavyweights including Stanford, MIT and Princeton.

HackerRank said that was likely because of UC-Berkley’s prominent developer culture and a “CS curriculum which emphasizes working on interdisciplinary real-world projects.” Elsewhere, the University of Southern California was another strong performer, ranking in three of the four categories. Just one Canadian university — the University of Toronto — made it into the U.S.-dominated list.

Asia Pacific

India leads the way when it comes to nurturing top developer skills, according to HackerRank’s study. Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) — a system of 23 independent but interconnected public universities across India — dominated the list, with IIT Guwahati, IIT Kanpur and IIT Madras performing especially well across the board.

Just two universities from outside the IIT system made the list: Banaras Hindu University and Vellore Institute of Technology (VIT). The latter scored particularly well, securing top three rankings across all four skill sections. Unlike the IIT system, VIT is a private university with what it calls a “futuristic technical education” including six specialty majors within computer science. VIT’s CS program placed in the bottom sixth of the Times’ CS ranking.

Europe

Set within a varied list, Imperial College London was the only university within Europe and the Middle East that placed across the board. The British university, which placed 11th in the Times’ CS ranking, puts an emphasis on practical work and developing “transferable problem solving skills, rather than the teaching of specific technologies.” More broadly, the U.K., France and Turkey emerged as the top locations for nurturing developers’ skills. Imperial College London was a particularly strong performer, ranking top within three categories. Meanwhile, the lesser known Bilkent University in Turkey, which ranked in the bottom sixth of the Times’ list, demonstrated particular strength in nurturing computer science fundamentals and data structure knowledge.

HackerRank’s co-founder and CEO Vivek Ravisankar told CNBC Make It that assessing universities on skills development is becoming increasingly important as employers look to operate in a fast-changing work environment. “These rankings show the value of practical skills-based curricula,” said Ravisankar. “Given that there’s still a gap between academia and real-world skills, I would suggest more universities to begin introducing skill-based classes in addition to theory and research-based courses.” That’s especially true for employers seeking high-demand, technical professionals in the developer space, he noted. “As the demand for developers continues to grow at a rapid pace, hiring managers need to look at a wide range of universities, not just the top-tier universities, look beyond resumes, and focus on skills to find the quality technical talent they need.” Don’t miss: These 10 universities produce the most ultra-rich in Asia Pacific Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, skills, rankings, based, university, worlds, cs, iit, technical, list, universities, ranking, employers, developers


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This rebound is a ‘bump in the road on the way down,’ says strategist predicting ‘Lehman-like’ drop

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on August 05, 2019 in New York City. The rebound, supported by dip buying and technical positioning by speculative traders, is bound to be a short-lived one as market sentiment continues to deteriorate, according to Nomura macro and quant strategist Masanari Takada. He garnered much attention this week for his call for a “Lehman-like” sell-off as soon as late August. “We see the rebound in US stocks as a mere technical rally that lo


Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on August 05, 2019 in New York City. The rebound, supported by dip buying and technical positioning by speculative traders, is bound to be a short-lived one as market sentiment continues to deteriorate, according to Nomura macro and quant strategist Masanari Takada. He garnered much attention this week for his call for a “Lehman-like” sell-off as soon as late August. “We see the rebound in US stocks as a mere technical rally that lo
This rebound is a ‘bump in the road on the way down,’ says strategist predicting ‘Lehman-like’ drop Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, york, nomura, technical, market, takada, way, road, strategist, predicting, drop, buying, bump, lehmanlike, rebound, traders, 2019


This rebound is a 'bump in the road on the way down,' says strategist predicting 'Lehman-like' drop

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on August 05, 2019 in New York City. T

The S&P 500 pulled off its most dramatic intraday turnaround this year on Tuesday, extending the rebound from its worst day of 2019, but investors shouldn’t be too optimistic about the comeback, Nomura warns.

The rebound, supported by dip buying and technical positioning by speculative traders, is bound to be a short-lived one as market sentiment continues to deteriorate, according to Nomura macro and quant strategist Masanari Takada. He garnered much attention this week for his call for a “Lehman-like” sell-off as soon as late August.

“We see the rebound in US stocks as a mere technical rally that looks like no more than a bump in the road on the way down,” Takada said in a note on Thursday. “We think the market is likely to resist further downside thanks to a combination of bargain hunting by fundamentals-oriented investors and contrarian buying by ultra-short-term traders through perhaps 15 August.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, york, nomura, technical, market, takada, way, road, strategist, predicting, drop, buying, bump, lehmanlike, rebound, traders, 2019


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Forget ‘FAANG’ growth stocks, one technical analyst touts ‘BAANG’ stocks for a new, scarier era

“We made this index BAANG in homage to the fading FAANG,” Roque said Monday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box. ” These gold miners are “much like gold. The BAANG stocks are up a whopping 42% since May 10, the analyst said. Roque said Canada-based gold miner Franco-Nevada is his favorite stock among BAANG. South Africa-based miner Gold Fields has skyrocketed nearly 60% this year.


“We made this index BAANG in homage to the fading FAANG,” Roque said Monday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box. ” These gold miners are “much like gold. The BAANG stocks are up a whopping 42% since May 10, the analyst said. Roque said Canada-based gold miner Franco-Nevada is his favorite stock among BAANG. South Africa-based miner Gold Fields has skyrocketed nearly 60% this year.
Forget ‘FAANG’ growth stocks, one technical analyst touts ‘BAANG’ stocks for a new, scarier era Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gold, nearly, miner, stocks, touts, growth, faang, tech, miners, stock, analyst, technical, week, forget, baang, scarier, roque, era


Forget 'FAANG' growth stocks, one technical analyst touts 'BAANG' stocks for a new, scarier era

“BAANG” is the new “FAANG.”

So says technical analyst John Roque of Wolfe Research, who believes a group of gold miners he coined as BAANG— Barrick Gold, AngloGold, Agnico Eagle Mines, Franco-Nevada and Gold Fields — are better plays than mega-cap FAANG names as they might have reached their peaks and started losing steam.

“We made this index BAANG in homage to the fading FAANG,” Roque said Monday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box. ” These gold miners are “much like gold. So gold has broken out but it’s still way down from its highs in the 1,900 thereabouts and we think both gold and those stocks have more room.”

Gold is trading above $1,400 for the first time since 2013 and it is up more than 12% year to date. The precious metal’s strength is backed by safe haven buying amid geopolitical uncertainties as well as the Federal Reserve’s openness to rate cuts this year. The BAANG stocks are up a whopping 42% since May 10, the analyst said.

Meanwhile, Facebook, Netflix and Google’s parent Alphabet are still in the red for the trailing 12 months despite their strong comeback this year. Investors are worried it would be hard for those tech giants to turn around as the government’s antitrust investigations heat up. Many market participants said Big Tech, which led much of the current bull market, is starting to lose its characteristic mojo amid trade tensions and a global economic slowdown.

Netflix continued its slide Monday after a surprising drop in its subscriptions number was released last week. Amazon and Facebook are set to report their second-quarter numbers this week. Apple reports later this month.

Roque said Canada-based gold miner Franco-Nevada is his favorite stock among BAANG. The company has risen nearly 28% this year so far.

AngloGold is the third-largest gold mining company in the world by production. Its stock has surged more than 50% in 2019. South Africa-based miner Gold Fields has skyrocketed nearly 60% this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gold, nearly, miner, stocks, touts, growth, faang, tech, miners, stock, analyst, technical, week, forget, baang, scarier, roque, era


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