Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense Forum

Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense ForumCNBC’s Morgan Brennan reports from the Reagan National Defense Forum, where leaders in technology and defense are expected to attend the invite-only event to present what’s next in defense.


Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense ForumCNBC’s Morgan Brennan reports from the Reagan National Defense Forum, where leaders in technology and defense are expected to attend the invite-only event to present what’s next in defense.
Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense Forum Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leaders, defense, present, expect, reports, heres, inviteonly, reagan, national, forum, morgan, whats, technology


Here's what to expect from the Reagan National Defense Forum

Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense Forum

CNBC’s Morgan Brennan reports from the Reagan National Defense Forum, where leaders in technology and defense are expected to attend the invite-only event to present what’s next in defense.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leaders, defense, present, expect, reports, heres, inviteonly, reagan, national, forum, morgan, whats, technology


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Ex-con man says every scam has one of these red flags

Ex-con man says every scam has one of these red flags1 Hour AgoEx-con man Frank Abagnale, made famous in the movie “Catch Me If You Can,” says technology may have changed the ways scammers operate, but it has not changed how scams work. Watch this video to learn about the two red flags you will see in almost every scam.


Ex-con man says every scam has one of these red flags1 Hour AgoEx-con man Frank Abagnale, made famous in the movie “Catch Me If You Can,” says technology may have changed the ways scammers operate, but it has not changed how scams work.
Watch this video to learn about the two red flags you will see in almost every scam.
Ex-con man says every scam has one of these red flags Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, man, ways, technology, watch, changed, scams, flags, excon, work, scam, video, red


Ex-con man says every scam has one of these red flags

Ex-con man says every scam has one of these red flags

1 Hour Ago

Ex-con man Frank Abagnale, made famous in the movie “Catch Me If You Can,” says technology may have changed the ways scammers operate, but it has not changed how scams work. Watch this video to learn about the two red flags you will see in almost every scam.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, man, ways, technology, watch, changed, scams, flags, excon, work, scam, video, red


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British Airways owner flies autonomous drones inside freight warehouse

IAG Cargo, the cargo handling division of British Airways parent International Airlines Group, says it has carried out a trial of autonomous drone technology at a warehouse in the Spanish capital of Madrid. A cargo business which serves more than 350 destinations globally, IAG Cargo employs over 2,400 people. When required, the drones used by IAG Cargo automatically fly back to charging stations to self-charge. In September, autonomous drone technology was used to deliver diabetes medication to


IAG Cargo, the cargo handling division of British Airways parent International Airlines Group, says it has carried out a trial of autonomous drone technology at a warehouse in the Spanish capital of Madrid.
A cargo business which serves more than 350 destinations globally, IAG Cargo employs over 2,400 people.
When required, the drones used by IAG Cargo automatically fly back to charging stations to self-charge.
In September, autonomous drone technology was used to deliver diabetes medication to
British Airways owner flies autonomous drones inside freight warehouse Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, british, cargo, iag, energy, freight, trials, used, warehouse, flies, owner, airways, drone, autonomous, inside, drones


British Airways owner flies autonomous drones inside freight warehouse

IAG Cargo, the cargo handling division of British Airways parent International Airlines Group, says it has carried out a trial of autonomous drone technology at a warehouse in the Spanish capital of Madrid.

In an announcement Wednesday, IAG Cargo said the technology had been “designed around the automation of freight checks” and that it would help to boost both the reliability and efficiency of operations.

A cargo business which serves more than 350 destinations globally, IAG Cargo employs over 2,400 people.

The trials were undertaken after IAG Cargo said it found that, on average, 6,500 hours per year were being spent recording the location data and barcodes of freight stored in its warehouses. They made use of technology from FlytBase, a start-up which specializes in drone software.

So far, two trials have been completed. Among other things, the tech enabled the drones to detect and read air waybills accurately and identify empty slot locations in the warehouse. An air waybill is a crucial document which contains key pieces of information related to a shipment.

When required, the drones used by IAG Cargo automatically fly back to charging stations to self-charge.

As technology develops, the applications for drones are becoming increasingly diverse.

In September, autonomous drone technology was used to deliver diabetes medication to a location off the west coast of Ireland. The contents of the delivery were insulin and glucagon, while the drone also collected a patient’s blood sample.

The National University of Ireland in Galway said the drone’s journey between Connemara Airport and Inis Mór, which is part of the Aran Islands, showed “the possibility of future deliveries of this kind within planned drone corridors.”

In the energy sector, researchers in the U.K. have developed autonomous drones that can inspect offshore energy sites.

The drones were developed by the Offshore Robotics for the Certification of Assets Hub, a consortium of five universities working with partners from industry sectors such as energy and technology.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, british, cargo, iag, energy, freight, trials, used, warehouse, flies, owner, airways, drone, autonomous, inside, drones


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Australia rolls out tech to catch people using cell phones while driving

Authorities in New South Wales, Australia, have launched a detection camera program that aims to stop people illegally using their smartphone while driving. It is illegal to hold and use a cellphone while driving or riding a vehicle in New South Wales. According to New South Wales’ Centre for Road Safety, the system utilizes both fixed and transportable cameras. The Centre for Road Safety says that “strict controls” are in place to make sure that images taken by the system are managed and stored


Authorities in New South Wales, Australia, have launched a detection camera program that aims to stop people illegally using their smartphone while driving.
It is illegal to hold and use a cellphone while driving or riding a vehicle in New South Wales.
According to New South Wales’ Centre for Road Safety, the system utilizes both fixed and transportable cameras.
The Centre for Road Safety says that “strict controls” are in place to make sure that images taken by the system are managed and stored
Australia rolls out tech to catch people using cell phones while driving Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wales, tech, rolls, phones, centre, using, safety, cell, south, road, images, drivers, cameras, australia, catch, driving, technology, system


Australia rolls out tech to catch people using cell phones while driving

Authorities in New South Wales, Australia, have launched a detection camera program that aims to stop people illegally using their smartphone while driving.

During the first three months of the new system, which went live Sunday, drivers caught by the technology will be sent a warning letter.

After this, offenders will be given five demerit points and a fine of 344 Australian dollars, which equates to around $235. The fine rises to 457 Australian dollars in school zones. It is illegal to hold and use a cellphone while driving or riding a vehicle in New South Wales.

According to New South Wales’ Centre for Road Safety, the system utilizes both fixed and transportable cameras. It also uses artificial intelligence to “automatically review images and detect offending drivers.”

Authorized personnel are used to verify images that the system picks out. The Centre for Road Safety says that “strict controls” are in place to make sure that images taken by the system are managed and stored securely.

“Independent modeling has shown these cameras could prevent around 100 fatal and serious injury crashes over five years,” Bernard Carlon, the executive director of transport for New South Wales’ Centre for Road Safety, said in a statement at the end of last week.

“There is strong community support for more enforcement, with 80% of people surveyed supporting the use of detection cameras to stop illegal mobile phone use,” Carlon added.

The rollout of the scheme follows a pilot which took place between January and June. During that trial, technology supplied by a firm called Acusensus was able to check 8.5 million vehicles and determined that over 100,000 drivers had been using their phones illegally.

As the cars we drive become increasingly sophisticated, the technology that underpins them poses a unique set of challenges.

“Currently, technology is more likely to create distractions in vehicles than it is to combat it,” Alain Dunoyer, SBD Automotive’s head of autonomous research and consulting, said in a statement sent to CNBC via email.

“These days, cars have a shopping list of features which has led to tasks that were historically quite simple becoming drastically more complicated and distracting,” he added.

“Through biometric testing, we have found that these once simple tasks, like changing the radio station or increasing the temperature, can now demand a level of a driver attention similar to that of negotiating a complex junction.”

Distracted driving is certainly a serious issue. In the U.S., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has described it as “any activity that diverts attention from driving.”

This can include talking or texting on a phone, eating or drinking while at the wheel, and even talking to other people in the vehicle. The NHTSA says that in 2017, 3,166 people were killed in crashes that involved distracted drivers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wales, tech, rolls, phones, centre, using, safety, cell, south, road, images, drivers, cameras, australia, catch, driving, technology, system


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Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

More recently, a group of former Google employees known as the “Thanksgiving Four” have claimed their pre-holiday dismissal amounted to retaliation for their attempts to organize workers. The company is not conventional and continues to make ambitious bets on new technology, especially with our Alphabet structure. Going forward, Sundar will be the CEO of both Google and Alphabet. He’s worked closely with us for 15 years, through the formation of Alphabet, as CEO of Google, and a member of the Al


More recently, a group of former Google employees known as the “Thanksgiving Four” have claimed their pre-holiday dismissal amounted to retaliation for their attempts to organize workers.
The company is not conventional and continues to make ambitious bets on new technology, especially with our Alphabet structure.
Going forward, Sundar will be the CEO of both Google and Alphabet.
He’s worked closely with us for 15 years, through the formation of Alphabet, as CEO of Google, and a member of the Al
Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steps, google, technology, bets, employees, structure, sundar, larry, letter, googles, page, person, alphabet, company, ceo, pichai


Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

Google has been forced to back off of certain projects have pushback from employees. In 2018, Google’s cloud chief at the time said the company would not renew its contract with the Department of Defense after it was set to expire in March 2019. The decision followed a petition signed by thousands of employees urging Pichai to keep Google out of the “business of war.” Google employees have also urged the company to back off its plans to build a censored search engine for China after The Intercept reported on the plans cryptically called Project Dragonfly.

More recently, a group of former Google employees known as the “Thanksgiving Four” have claimed their pre-holiday dismissal amounted to retaliation for their attempts to organize workers. The former employees have promised to file charges with the National Labor Relations Board, claiming unfair labor practices. Google denies any retaliation and has insisted the workers were let go for sharing confidential documents and breaching security.

Here is the full letter from Page and Brin:

Our very first founders’ letter in our 2004 S-1 began:

“Google is not a conventional company. We do not intend to become one. Throughout Google’s evolution as a privately held company, we have managed Google differently. We have also emphasized an atmosphere of creativity and challenge, which has helped us provide unbiased, accurate and free access to information for those who rely on us around the world.”

We believe those central tenets are still true today. The company is not conventional and continues to make ambitious bets on new technology, especially with our Alphabet structure. Creativity and challenge remain as ever-present as before, if not more so, and are increasingly applied to a variety of fields such as machine learning, energy efficiency and transportation. Nonetheless, Google’s core service—providing unbiased, accurate, and free access to information—remains at the heart of the company.

However, since we wrote our first founders’ letter, the company has evolved and matured. Within Google, there are all the popular consumer services that followed Search, such as Maps, Photos, and YouTube; a global ecosystem of devices powered by our Android and Chrome platforms, including our own Made by Google devices; Google Cloud, including GCP and G Suite; and of course a base of fundamental technologies around machine learning, cloud computing, and software engineering. It’s an honor that billions of people have chosen to make these products central to their lives—this is a trust and responsibility that Google will always work to live up to.

And structurally, the company evolved into Alphabet in 2015. As we said in the Alphabet founding letter in 2015:

“Alphabet is about businesses prospering through strong leaders and independence.”

Since we wrote that, hundreds of Phoenix residents are now being driven around in Waymo cars—many without drivers! Wing became the first drone company to make commercial deliveries to consumers in the U.S. And Verily and Calico are doing important work, through a number of great partnerships with other healthcare companies. Some of our “Other Bets” have their own boards with independent members, and outside investors.

Those are just a few examples of technology companies that we have formed within Alphabet, in addition to investment subsidiaries GV and Capital G, which have supported hundreds more. Together with all of Google’s services, this forms a colorful tapestry of bets in technology across a range of industries—all with the goal of helping people and tackling major challenges.

Our second founders’ letter began:

“Google was born in 1998. If it were a person, it would have started elementary school late last summer (around August 19), and today it would have just about finished the first grade.”

Today, in 2019, if the company was a person, it would be a young adult of 21 and it would be time to leave the roost. While it has been a tremendous privilege to be deeply involved in the day-to-day management of the company for so long, we believe it’s time to assume the role of proud parents—offering advice and love, but not daily nagging!

With Alphabet now well-established, and Google and the Other Bets operating effectively as independent companies, it’s the natural time to simplify our management structure. We’ve never been ones to hold on to management roles when we think there’s a better way to run the company. And Alphabet and Google no longer need two CEOs and a President. Going forward, Sundar will be the CEO of both Google and Alphabet. He will be the executive responsible and accountable for leading Google, and managing Alphabet’s investment in our portfolio of Other Bets. We are deeply committed to Google and Alphabet for the long term, and will remain actively involved as Board members, shareholders and co-founders. In addition, we plan to continue talking with Sundar regularly, especially on topics we’re passionate about!

Sundar brings humility and a deep passion for technology to our users, partners and our employees every day. He’s worked closely with us for 15 years, through the formation of Alphabet, as CEO of Google, and a member of the Alphabet Board of Directors. He shares our confidence in the value of the Alphabet structure, and the ability it provides us to tackle big challenges through technology. There is no one that we have relied on more since Alphabet was founded, and no better person to lead Google and Alphabet into the future.

We are deeply humbled to have seen a small research project develop into a source of knowledge and empowerment for billions—a bet we made as two Stanford students that led to a multitude of other technology bets. We could not have imagined, back in 1998 when we moved our servers from a dorm room to a garage, the journey that would follow.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steps, google, technology, bets, employees, structure, sundar, larry, letter, googles, page, person, alphabet, company, ceo, pichai


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Dexcom says the outage that kept diabetes patients from tracking blood sugar was a ‘complete surprise’

Dexcom’s technology chief admits that the maker of continuous blood sugar monitoring systems was caught flat-footed by a technology outage over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, and was ill-equipped to properly inform users of the problem. Because of a server glitch, a large number of Dexcom’s customers, who rely on the company’s technology to manage their diabetes treatment, weren’t alerted to potentially dangerous changes in their blood glucose levels. The issue was of particular concern to pa


Dexcom’s technology chief admits that the maker of continuous blood sugar monitoring systems was caught flat-footed by a technology outage over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, and was ill-equipped to properly inform users of the problem.
Because of a server glitch, a large number of Dexcom’s customers, who rely on the company’s technology to manage their diabetes treatment, weren’t alerted to potentially dangerous changes in their blood glucose levels.
The issue was of particular concern to pa
Dexcom says the outage that kept diabetes patients from tracking blood sugar was a ‘complete surprise’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dexcoms, outage, kept, users, sugar, diabetes, surprise, blood, system, leach, patients, problem, tracking, weekend, parents, rely, dexcom, technology, complete


Dexcom says the outage that kept diabetes patients from tracking blood sugar was a 'complete surprise'

Dexcom’s technology chief admits that the maker of continuous blood sugar monitoring systems was caught flat-footed by a technology outage over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, and was ill-equipped to properly inform users of the problem.

Because of a server glitch, a large number of Dexcom’s customers, who rely on the company’s technology to manage their diabetes treatment, weren’t alerted to potentially dangerous changes in their blood glucose levels. The issue was of particular concern to parents who use Dexcom’s system to monitor their kids’ health.

“It was a complete surprise,” said Jake Leach, Dexcom’s chief technology officer, in an interview late Monday, after CNBC published a story on the ongoing problem. Leach said the company didn’t have any scheduled updates over the weekend. “This is a real learning opportunity to look at our system architecture.”

Dexcom acknowledged that the bug affected a “large portion” of its users in the U.S. who rely on its Follow feature, which lets users share their glucose readings with caregivers or family members. It began very early Saturday morning, with some parents saying they figured out something was wrong after their kids went to bed Friday night.

The company says it has a system for monitoring technology problems 24 hours a day and recognized what was happening right away though it didn’t know that the outage was so widespread and that it was expanding. Leach said that over the weekend, Dexcom pulled in its internal engineers to work on restoring the system and recruited help from its technology infrastructure partners.

Dexcom relies on Google’s cloud service and also uses some Microsoft technology. Almost immediately, Leach’s team started reaching out to Google to see if it could troubleshoot the problem. Microsoft also offered to help fix what had rapidly become Dexcom’s largest ever glitch.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dexcoms, outage, kept, users, sugar, diabetes, surprise, blood, system, leach, patients, problem, tracking, weekend, parents, rely, dexcom, technology, complete


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The U.S. can’t use Cold War tactics to engage with China, says former NSA head Michael Rogers

Navy Adm. Michael Rogers, commander of the US Cyber Command, director of the National Security Agency and chief of Central Security Services. Rogers discussed the multi-faceted problems facing the U.S. over China technology in an interview that aired Tuesday on the cybersecurity podcast Task Force 7 Radio . After World War II, Rogers said, “It was the West who developed the core technologies that powered this economic growth. They didn’t have the global economic impact or capabilities that we ha


Navy Adm. Michael Rogers, commander of the US Cyber Command, director of the National Security Agency and chief of Central Security Services.
Rogers discussed the multi-faceted problems facing the U.S. over China technology in an interview that aired Tuesday on the cybersecurity podcast Task Force 7 Radio .
After World War II, Rogers said, “It was the West who developed the core technologies that powered this economic growth.
They didn’t have the global economic impact or capabilities that we ha
The U.S. can’t use Cold War tactics to engage with China, says former NSA head Michael Rogers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, rogers, chinas, engage, economic, war, head, cold, technology, cant, michael, security, companies, global, nsa, political, technological, tactics


The U.S. can't use Cold War tactics to engage with China, says former NSA head Michael Rogers

Navy Adm. Michael Rogers, commander of the US Cyber Command, director of the National Security Agency and chief of Central Security Services.

He said China’s main goal is to achieve 21st century technological dominance, and explained some of the tactics that are hard to counter, such as IP theft, government subsidies of tech companies, and linking corporate interests to education and government research. He also offered some concrete suggestions on how to counter China’s efforts while maintaining an American business philosophy.

Rogers discussed the multi-faceted problems facing the U.S. over China technology in an interview that aired Tuesday on the cybersecurity podcast Task Force 7 Radio .

The companies denied the claims then and have continued to deny them through 2019, but the information in the report precipitated 2019’s mounting legal actions against the company, including controversial bans of many Chinese-made technology goods in the U.S .

Rogers co-wrote a 50-page report in 2012 that which outlined what intelligence agencies said was the long-term partnership between those companies and Beijing’s Communist government.

Admiral Michael Rogers, former head of the U.S. National Security Agency and U.S. Cyber Command, was instrumental in some of the early intelligence reporting that put Chinese tech giants Huawei and ZTE on the radar of the intelligence community and Congress.

To deal with China effectively, U.S. businesspeople should understand the country’s goal is to achieve dominance in the technologies that will be important in the 21st century.

After World War II, Rogers said, “It was the West who developed the core technologies that powered this economic growth. That gave gave the west this military advantage which then translated into significant diplomatic and political power,” he said.

That power also came from developing global technological standards that allowed the U.S. to retain a global leadership position in technology, and then ushering in the creation of global technology corporations that could dominate in a variety of technology sectors.

China is looking to this model, but for the next generation of technological advances, Rogers said, and is therefore spending resources on quantum computing, 5G networking, biotechnology, nanotechnology and other key technologies.

Their thought process is: “We are going to develop those key technologies, we are going to get global bodies to adopt our technological standards, and then we’re going to develop Chinese companies that can out-compete the Western companies of the past.”Entering China’s ‘Gray Zone’

Rogers warned that when business or political leaders differentiate between national security and economic impacts they may be missing the point: “In the 21st Century, the two are very much intertwined.”

“Many of our potential adversaries are very focused on conflict in the ‘gray zone,'” Rogers said, or “gaining advantage on the United States that does not trip an armed response from the United States.”

This view is best illustrated by the current state of trade talks with China, which have vacillated based on conflicting views on China’s alleged thefts of intellectual property from U.S. companies or the disputed status of China’s tech giants as agents of the government.

It’s the economic part of the equation that makes China so challenging, Rogers said.

“The last time we had a near-competitor who we viewed as a potential adversary, in terms of a nation-state, was the Soviet Union. They were largely a political, diplomatic and a military challenge. They were never an economic challenge. They were never going to surpass the United States economically. They didn’t have the global economic impact or capabilities that we had. They never had those kind of things as options,” Rogers said.

“Fast forward to now: China also represents a significant diplomatic, political and military challenge. But what makes it so different is it combines all of that with this significant economic capability. We have also not had a near-peer economically who is also such a competitor, or potential adversary,” in those other ways, Rogers said.

But he cautioned that it would not be productive for political or business forces to default to treating China as an enemy.

“That takes us down a road that I don’t think is in our nation’s best interest,” he said.

He also said comparing our current trade, privacy or security stand-offs with China to a “Cold War” is also unhelpful.

“I would say that’s not a good analogy, rather, I would say that we are now competing against a nation-state that has a range of capabilities that we have not had to deal with before,” he said.

In particular, he argued, attempting a “containment” strategy probably wouldn’t work as it did with Soviet Union, he said, referring to a series of U.S. foreign policy decisions starting in the 1940s that focused on minimizing the spread of Soviet ideology and power.

“That’s a very flawed methodology. It has a low probability of success,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, rogers, chinas, engage, economic, war, head, cold, technology, cant, michael, security, companies, global, nsa, political, technological, tactics


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Verizon CEO says he doesn’t want a 5G ‘cold war’ between the US and China

Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg told CNBC on Tuesday that he does not want geopolitical tensions around 5G technology to become further inflamed. Asked whether he thought the fight between the U.S. and Chinese tech giant Huawei could result in a so-called 5G cold war, creating a fractured global network, Vestberg said, “I hope not.” Vestberg’s followed the announcement Tuesday that Verizon was partnering with Amazon Web Services to incorporate AWS’ WaveLength technology into parts of its wireless netw


Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg told CNBC on Tuesday that he does not want geopolitical tensions around 5G technology to become further inflamed.
Asked whether he thought the fight between the U.S. and Chinese tech giant Huawei could result in a so-called 5G cold war, creating a fractured global network, Vestberg said, “I hope not.”
Vestberg’s followed the announcement Tuesday that Verizon was partnering with Amazon Web Services to incorporate AWS’ WaveLength technology into parts of its wireless netw
Verizon CEO says he doesn’t want a 5G ‘cold war’ between the US and China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, vestberg, verizon, largest, war, told, cold, phone, china, ceo, network, doesnt, worlds, country, huawei


Verizon CEO says he doesn't want a 5G 'cold war' between the US and China

Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg told CNBC on Tuesday that he does not want geopolitical tensions around 5G technology to become further inflamed.

Asked whether he thought the fight between the U.S. and Chinese tech giant Huawei could result in a so-called 5G cold war, creating a fractured global network, Vestberg said, “I hope not.”

“Because one of the beauties of this industry is that we’ve done standardization, which means that you can bring your phone from whichever country you’re in and go to another country and it works,” Vestberg told CNBC’s Jon Fortt on “Power Lunch.”

“That has been the most accessible technology in the world,” Vestberg added.

Vestberg’s followed the announcement Tuesday that Verizon was partnering with Amazon Web Services to incorporate AWS’ WaveLength technology into parts of its wireless network.

5G is a next-generation mobile network that promises fast data speeds and other capabilities to support emerging technologies such as self-driving cars.

Products from Huawei, the world’s largest telecom equipment maker, are used by 45 of the world’s 50 largest phone carriers, according to The Associated Press.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, vestberg, verizon, largest, war, told, cold, phone, china, ceo, network, doesnt, worlds, country, huawei


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Amazon lets doctors record your conversations and put them in your medical files

Amazon’s next big step in health care is with voice transcription technology that’s designed to allow doctors to spend more time with patients and less time at the computer. At Amazon Web Services’ re:Invent conference on Tuesday, the company is launching a service called Amazon Transcribe Medical, which transcribes doctor-patient interactions and plugs the text straight into the medical record. In the medical sector, many doctors today rely on legacy dictation software that still requires them


Amazon’s next big step in health care is with voice transcription technology that’s designed to allow doctors to spend more time with patients and less time at the computer.
At Amazon Web Services’ re:Invent conference on Tuesday, the company is launching a service called Amazon Transcribe Medical, which transcribes doctor-patient interactions and plugs the text straight into the medical record.
In the medical sector, many doctors today rely on legacy dictation software that still requires them
Amazon lets doctors record your conversations and put them in your medical files Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wood, lets, medical, company, amazon, text, aws, transcription, conversations, doctors, files, tools, technology, service, record


Amazon lets doctors record your conversations and put them in your medical files

Amazon’s next big step in health care is with voice transcription technology that’s designed to allow doctors to spend more time with patients and less time at the computer.

At Amazon Web Services’ re:Invent conference on Tuesday, the company is launching a service called Amazon Transcribe Medical, which transcribes doctor-patient interactions and plugs the text straight into the medical record.

“Our overarching goal is to free up the doctor, so they have more attention going to where it should be directed,” said Matt Wood, vice president of artificial intelligence at AWS. “And that’s to the patient.”

At last year’s re:Invent, AWS introduced a related service called Amazon Comprehend Medical, which “allows developers to process unstructured medical text and identify information such as patient diagnosis, treatments, dosages, symptoms and signs, and more,” according to a blog post.

Wood said the two services are linked and can be used together.

Voice-to-text transcription is one of the many areas where Amazon is battling with cloud rivals Microsoft and Google. All three companies operate speech assistants that can in real time translate spoken words and sentences and offer text translation. Businesses can use the technology in a variety of ways to weave into their applications.

AWS’ software is designed so that it can be embedded into any device or an app via an application programming interface. It’s only available to customers using the AWS cloud, which presents a potential limitation because of the rising competition from Microsoft and Google. Microsoft Azure is working on similar tools with Nuance, and Google is researching the space with Stanford University.

In the medical sector, many doctors today rely on legacy dictation software that still requires them to spend hours on clinical documentation. Others rely on costly human scribes or will dictate notes into a recorder and then submit the voice files to a third-party transcription service, which can take a few days to return a response. Wood said Amazon’s service even has built-in punctuation, so there’s no need for a doctor to say out loud that a comma should be inserted.

The technology was developed with the help of some AWS customers, including electronic health IT company Cerner and Suki, a venture-backed transcription start-up. Wood said the company created the software because there was a “lot of demand for it.”

As Amazon moves deeper into the $3.5 trillion medical sector, it is juggling working with partners to develop tools on its behalf with potential initiatives that might someday prove competitive to the incumbents.

Amazon is taking aim at the pharmacy supply chain with its PillPack team and is looking to improve health-care services for its employees with Haven, a joint venture with J.P. Morgan Chase and Berkshire Hathaway. The company also has a primary care group, Amazon Care.

A big challenge for Amazon, a huge consumer company with tons of customer data, is ensuring that its health-care tools are compliant with privacy rules and regulations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and when it comes to transcription, maintaining an extremely high level of accuracy to avoid problematic outcomes or potential liability. Imagine, for instance, if the machine learning system inputs the term “hyper” instead of “hypo,” or if doctors noticed so many inaccuracies that they ended up doing the work manually anyway.

Wood said the service is HIPAA compliant. He said it took a lot of work for the technology to correctly annotate the “domain specific language and abbreviations” that are common in the medical field, and added that the accuracy is very high. Amazon hasn’t published research showing how its accuracy compares with other offerings, but Wood said the company hasn’t ruled it out.

WATCH: Lindsey Bell picks Amazon as her Last Chance Trade


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wood, lets, medical, company, amazon, text, aws, transcription, conversations, doctors, files, tools, technology, service, record


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What to watch out for when shopping online from work this Cyber Monday

Justin Lubin | NBCU Photo BankIf you’re like many workers, you’ll be shopping online while you’re working today. A recent survey from Robert Half Technology, a human resources consulting company, found that 52% of employees plan to shop online this Cyber Monday. Cyber Monday is the most popular day for online shopping at work — or “workshopping” — according to 43% of those surveyed, followed by Amazon Prime day, with 38%. Another group that’s most likely to search for goods at work: working pare


Justin Lubin | NBCU Photo BankIf you’re like many workers, you’ll be shopping online while you’re working today.
A recent survey from Robert Half Technology, a human resources consulting company, found that 52% of employees plan to shop online this Cyber Monday.
Cyber Monday is the most popular day for online shopping at work — or “workshopping” — according to 43% of those surveyed, followed by Amazon Prime day, with 38%.
Another group that’s most likely to search for goods at work: working pare
What to watch out for when shopping online from work this Cyber Monday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, workers, working, youre, web, shop, cyber, survey, watch, shopping, work, technology


What to watch out for when shopping online from work this Cyber Monday

Pictured: (l-r) Rainn Wilson as Dwight Schrute and Steve Carell as Michael Scott in an episode of “The Office.” Justin Lubin | NBCU Photo Bank

If you’re like many workers, you’ll be shopping online while you’re working today. A recent survey from Robert Half Technology, a human resources consulting company, found that 52% of employees plan to shop online this Cyber Monday. Cyber Monday is the most popular day for online shopping at work — or “workshopping” — according to 43% of those surveyed, followed by Amazon Prime day, with 38%. And 44% of workers admitted that their productivity suffers when they shop, according to the survey. Workers who are most likely to “workshop” include those ages 25 to 40. Men were more inclined than women to admit that scrolling for deals hurt their productivity.

Another group that’s most likely to search for goods at work: working parents. As you scour the web at work for sales, there are some risks you want to keep in mind.

Compromised security

With more shoppers online, there’s also an increase in predators who want to steal your credit card numbers and other personal information. When online shopping at work, you also run the risk of giving those bad actors access to your company server, which can cause all kinds of problems, said Bill Driscoll, senior district president at Robert Half Technology. To help avoid that, always use websites you know and make sure the web address starts with “https,” Driscoll said. More from Personal Finance:

Cyber Monday strategies: the do’s and don’ts this shopping season

How to avoid digging yourself deeper in debt this holiday season

Steps to take now to get a good financial start in 2020

Damaged reputation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, workers, working, youre, web, shop, cyber, survey, watch, shopping, work, technology


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