‘Spider-Man: Into the SpiderVerse’: beloved superhero gets AR boost

There’s a new Spider-Man on the block, and his concept of high technology doesn’t involve an automated costume. But with “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” Sony is staking a claim of its own, utilizing top shelf technology to boost the prospects of a movie that’s been widely praised for its ingenuity. In the process, “Into the Spider-Verse” is helping to break new ground with AR technology, which most tech-savvy users may recognize from the cultural phenomenon of “Pokemon Go.” “What this AR do


There’s a new Spider-Man on the block, and his concept of high technology doesn’t involve an automated costume. But with “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” Sony is staking a claim of its own, utilizing top shelf technology to boost the prospects of a movie that’s been widely praised for its ingenuity. In the process, “Into the Spider-Verse” is helping to break new ground with AR technology, which most tech-savvy users may recognize from the cultural phenomenon of “Pokemon Go.” “What this AR do
‘Spider-Man: Into the SpiderVerse’: beloved superhero gets AR boost Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-15  Authors: donovan russo, special to cnbccom, sony pictures
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, web, boost, superhero, pictures, movie, beloved, technology, ar, thats, sony, murphychutorian, gets, spiderverse, spiderman


'Spider-Man: Into the SpiderVerse': beloved superhero gets AR boost

There’s a new Spider-Man on the block, and his concept of high technology doesn’t involve an automated costume.

In the age of the blockbuster movie, it’s a given that extravagant special effects are a big part of driving the narrative. With its wildly successful “Avengers” franchise, Marvel appears to have the market cornered on computer graphics and deftly written scripts that dazzle audience.

But with “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” Sony is staking a claim of its own, utilizing top shelf technology to boost the prospects of a movie that’s been widely praised for its ingenuity. Not related to the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s friendly-neighborhood wall-crawler, the animated feature that opened on Friday centers on Miles Morales, a teen that’s taken on the costumed alter-ego of Peter Parker after a dramatic turn of events.

In order to bring the black and Puerto Rican superhero to life for moviegoers, Sony teamed up with 8th Wall, a cross-platform augmented-reality (AR) start-up, and Trigger, a mixed-reality agency. For added effect, the mobile web experience uses Sumerian, a tool for building interactive scenes from public cloud provider Amazon Web Services.

In the process, “Into the Spider-Verse” is helping to break new ground with AR technology, which most tech-savvy users may recognize from the cultural phenomenon of “Pokemon Go.” Now, AR is being used with increasing regularity to make animated features, and promote them as well.

“AR allows characters to come to life. You can experience and engage in ways that you never could with traditional media,” said Erik Murphy-Chutorian, 8th Wall’s founder and CEO, told CNBC in a recent interview. He explained how the emerging technology has helped to boost interest among mobile users.

“What this AR does is you take your phone, you go to a web page, and you can take pictures with Spider-Man. For fans, it is a way to engage with the franchise. It is the digital equivalent of going to a theme park and taking pictures with your favorite character,” Murphy-Chutorian added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-15  Authors: donovan russo, special to cnbccom, sony pictures
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, web, boost, superhero, pictures, movie, beloved, technology, ar, thats, sony, murphychutorian, gets, spiderverse, spiderman


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Airlines experiment with biometric scanning to speed up airport lines

The airline industry is taking a page from smartphone and computer hardware makers, by dabbling in facial recognition technology to speed up the convenience factor for customers. Recently, Delta Air Lines was the first to launch a biometric terminal in the U.S. for international flights at its Atlanta hub. Separately, American Airlines and JetBlue are also working on their own facial recognition programs. According to airport technology company SITA, an airport tech company, over 70 percent of a


The airline industry is taking a page from smartphone and computer hardware makers, by dabbling in facial recognition technology to speed up the convenience factor for customers. Recently, Delta Air Lines was the first to launch a biometric terminal in the U.S. for international flights at its Atlanta hub. Separately, American Airlines and JetBlue are also working on their own facial recognition programs. According to airport technology company SITA, an airport tech company, over 70 percent of a
Airlines experiment with biometric scanning to speed up airport lines Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: trent gillies, monty rakusen, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, passengers, biometric, recognition, passport, experiment, airlines, security, technology, lines, face, scanning, airport, gate, speed, facial


Airlines experiment with biometric scanning to speed up airport lines

On your next flight, your face could be your ticket.

Foreign countries still require travel documentation, which is why passengers will still need to carry a passport. However, your face scan can be your boarding pass to get you to your seat faster.

The airline industry is taking a page from smartphone and computer hardware makers, by dabbling in facial recognition technology to speed up the convenience factor for customers. Recently, Delta Air Lines was the first to launch a biometric terminal in the U.S. for international flights at its Atlanta hub. Passengers can choose to check-in with the optional technology to speed up the process.

Separately, American Airlines and JetBlue are also working on their own facial recognition programs. According to airport technology company SITA, an airport tech company, over 70 percent of airports and airlines are planning trials or full rollouts of their own biometric scanning systems.

Here’s how it works: At the self-service airport kiosk or at the counter, you can have a photo taken that’s matched with your passport photo in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) database. Next, that serves as your identification at the TSA security checkpoint. And when passengers are at the gate and ready to board, their face is again scanned in just two seconds, and they cleared to go right to your seat.

Delta said the technology will speed things up for passengers, especially at the boarding gate.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: trent gillies, monty rakusen, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, passengers, biometric, recognition, passport, experiment, airlines, security, technology, lines, face, scanning, airport, gate, speed, facial


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Not enough people are asking if artificial intelligence should be built in the first place

One is about artificial intelligence — the golden promise and hard sell of these companies. has a problem: Bias. bias problem, eager to tweak and improve the data and algorithms that drive artificial intelligence. In accepting the existing narratives about A.I., vast zones of contest and imagination are relinquished. Artificial intelligence evokes a mythical, objective omnipotence, but it is backed by real-world forces of money, power, and data.


One is about artificial intelligence — the golden promise and hard sell of these companies. has a problem: Bias. bias problem, eager to tweak and improve the data and algorithms that drive artificial intelligence. In accepting the existing narratives about A.I., vast zones of contest and imagination are relinquished. Artificial intelligence evokes a mythical, objective omnipotence, but it is backed by real-world forces of money, power, and data.
Not enough people are asking if artificial intelligence should be built in the first place Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: julia powles, helen nissenbaum, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asking, ai, system, problem, artificial, bias, built, societal, vast, technology, intelligence, companies, place, data, systems


Not enough people are asking if artificial intelligence should be built in the first place

This story originally ran on Medium on December 7, 2018.

The rise of Apple, Amazon, Alphabet, Microsoft and Facebook as the world’s most valuable companies has been accompanied by two linked narratives about technology. One is about artificial intelligence — the golden promise and hard sell of these companies. A.I. is presented as a potent, pervasive, unstoppable force to solve our biggest problems, even though it’s essentially just about finding patterns in vast quantities of data. The second story is that A.I. has a problem: Bias.

The tales of bias are legion: Online ads that show men higher-paying jobs; delivery services that skip poor neighborhoods; facial recognition systems that fail people of color; recruitment tools that invisibly filter out women. A problematic self-righteousness surrounds these reports: Through quantification, of course we see the world we already inhabit. Yet each time, there is a sense of shock and awe and a detachment from affected communities in the discovery that systems driven by data about our world replicate and amplify racial, gender, and class inequality.

Serious thinkers in academia and business have swarmed to the A.I. bias problem, eager to tweak and improve the data and algorithms that drive artificial intelligence. They’ve latched onto fairness as the objective, obsessing over competing constructs of the term that can be rendered in measurable, mathematical form. If the hunt for a science of computational fairness was restricted to engineers, it would be one thing. But given our contemporary exaltation and deference to technologists, it has limited the entire imagination of ethics, law and the media as well.

There are three problems with this focus on A.I. bias. The first is that addressing bias as a computational problem obscures its root causes. Bias is a social problem, and seeking to solve it within the logic of automation is always going to be inadequate.

Second, even apparent success in tackling bias can have perverse consequences. Take the example of a facial recognition system that works poorly on women of color because of the group’s underrepresentation both in the training data and among system designers. Alleviating this problem by seeking to “equalize” representation merely co-opts designers in perfecting vast instruments of surveillance and classification.

When underlying systemic issues remain fundamentally untouched, the bias fighters simply render humans more machine readable, exposing minorities in particular to additional harms.

Third — and most dangerous and urgent of all — is the way in which the seductive controversy of A.I. bias, and the false allure of “solving” it, detracts from bigger, more pressing questions. Bias is real, but it’s also a captivating diversion.

What has been remarkably underappreciated is the key interdependence of the twin stories of A.I. inevitability and A.I. bias. Against the corporate projection of an otherwise sunny horizon of unstoppable A.I. integration, recognizing and acknowledging bias can be seen as a strategic concession — one that subdues the scale of the challenge. Bias, like job losses and safety hazards, becomes part of the grand bargain of innovation.

The reality that bias is primarily a social problem and cannot be fully solved technically becomes a strength, rather than a weakness, for the inevitability narrative. It flips the script. It absorbs and regularizes the classification practices and underlying systems of inequality perpetuated by automation, allowing relative increases in “fairness” to be claimed as victories — even if all that is being done is to slice, dice and redistribute the makeup of those negatively affected by actuarial decision-making.

In short, the preoccupation with narrow computational puzzles distracts us from the far more important issue of the colossal asymmetry between societal cost and private gain in the rollout of automated systems. It also denies us the possibility of asking: Should we be building these systems at all?

In accepting the existing narratives about A.I., vast zones of contest and imagination are relinquished. What is achieved is resignation — the normalization of massive data capture, a one-way transfer to technology companies, and the application of automated, predictive solutions to each and every societal problem.

Given this broader political and economic context, it should not surprise us that many prominent voices sounding the alarm on bias do so with blessing and support from the likes of Facebook, Microsoft, Alphabet, Amazon and Apple. These convenient critics spotlight important questions, but they also suck attention from longer-term challenges. The endgame is always to “fix” A.I. systems, never to use a different system or no system at all.

Once we recognize the inherently compromised nature of the A.I. bias debate, it reveals opportunities deserving of sustained policy attention. The first has to be the wholesale giveaway of societal data that undergirds A.I. system development. We are well overdue for a radical reappraisal over who controls the vast troves of data currently locked down by technology incumbents. Our governors and communities should act decisively to disincentivize and devalue data hoarding with creative policies, including carefully defined bans, levies, mandated data sharing, and community benefit policies, all backed up by the brass knuckles of the law. Smarter data policies would reenergize competition and innovation, both of which have unquestionably slowed with the concentrated market power of the tech giants. The greatest opportunities will flow to those who act most boldly.

The second great opportunity is to wrestle with fundamental existential questions and to build robust processes for resolving them. Which systems really deserve to be built? Which problems most need to be tackled? Who is best placed to build them? And who decides? We need genuine accountability mechanisms, external to companies and accessible to populations. Any A.I. system that is integrated into people’s lives must be capable of contest, account, and redress to citizens and representatives of the public interest. And there must always be the possibility to stop the use of automated systems with appreciable societal costs, just as there is with every other kind of technology.

Artificial intelligence evokes a mythical, objective omnipotence, but it is backed by real-world forces of money, power, and data. In service of these forces, we are being spun potent stories that drive toward widespread reliance on regressive, surveillance-based classification systems that enlist us all in an unprecedented societal experiment from which it is difficult to return. Now, more than ever, we need a robust, bold, imaginative response.

Julia Powles is a Research Fellow in the Information Law Institute at New York University and a 2018 Poynter Fellow at Yale University.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: julia powles, helen nissenbaum, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asking, ai, system, problem, artificial, bias, built, societal, vast, technology, intelligence, companies, place, data, systems


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Tech regulations must happen at the federal level, says Nextdoor CEO

Tech regulations must happen at the federal level, says Nextdoor CEO19 Hours AgoSarah Friar, CEO of Nextdoor and former CFO of Square, joins ‘Squawk Box’ to discuss the challenges facing the technology industry including user privacy, antitrust regulation and consumer trust.


Tech regulations must happen at the federal level, says Nextdoor CEO19 Hours AgoSarah Friar, CEO of Nextdoor and former CFO of Square, joins ‘Squawk Box’ to discuss the challenges facing the technology industry including user privacy, antitrust regulation and consumer trust.
Tech regulations must happen at the federal level, says Nextdoor CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulation, squawk, level, tech, happen, federal, technology, trust, privacy, nextdoor, ceo, square, regulations, user


Tech regulations must happen at the federal level, says Nextdoor CEO

Tech regulations must happen at the federal level, says Nextdoor CEO

19 Hours Ago

Sarah Friar, CEO of Nextdoor and former CFO of Square, joins ‘Squawk Box’ to discuss the challenges facing the technology industry including user privacy, antitrust regulation and consumer trust.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulation, squawk, level, tech, happen, federal, technology, trust, privacy, nextdoor, ceo, square, regulations, user


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UK banks may have been used for Iran payments related to Huawei: WSJ

British banks Standard Chartered and HSBC were reportedly among financial institutions misled by Chinese technology giant Huawei into funneling illicit payments from Iran, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing sources familiar with the matter. According to the Journal, Huawei allegedly used a third-party intermediary — a small Hong Kong-based technology firm called Skycom — to channel payments between the company and Iran. The Journal reported that a spokesman for Huawei declined to


British banks Standard Chartered and HSBC were reportedly among financial institutions misled by Chinese technology giant Huawei into funneling illicit payments from Iran, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing sources familiar with the matter. According to the Journal, Huawei allegedly used a third-party intermediary — a small Hong Kong-based technology firm called Skycom — to channel payments between the company and Iran. The Journal reported that a spokesman for Huawei declined to
UK banks may have been used for Iran payments related to Huawei: WSJ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: kate fazzini, jane wolsak, fred dufour, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, used, standard, iran, huawei, violations, meng, wsj, hsbc, journal, chartered, declined, uk, travel, payments, banks, related


UK banks may have been used for Iran payments related to Huawei: WSJ

British banks Standard Chartered and HSBC were reportedly among financial institutions misled by Chinese technology giant Huawei into funneling illicit payments from Iran, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing sources familiar with the matter.

According to the Journal, Huawei allegedly used a third-party intermediary — a small Hong Kong-based technology firm called Skycom — to channel payments between the company and Iran. The Journal reported that a spokesman for Huawei declined to comment.

Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou was arrested during a layover in Vancouver, Canada on Dec. 1 at the request of U.S. authorities. Beijing has threatened unspecified “severe consequences” if Canadian courts don’t release Meng, the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei. Meng returns to court for a bail hearing Monday.

Both HSBC and Standard Chartered are based in the U.K., and both have been under scrutiny from global regulators for past money-laundering violations. The two banks also have had federal monitors in place to watch for the types of transactions described in the Huawei filings — but neither bank has been accused of any wrongdoing as part of this case.

Responding to CNBC, Standard Chartered declined to comment but clarified that the bank was not a target of investigations related to Huawei. HSBC also declined to comment on the WSJ story.

“The US Department of Justice has confirmed that HSBC is not under investigation in this case,” said Stuart Levey, Chief Legal Officer at HSBC in a response to an email from CNBC.

Huawei has also been under U.S. government scrutiny since 2012 for a wide range of purported issues, such as alleged government-supported cyber espionage, intellectual property theft and violations of sanctions, including those related to Iran.

According to the court case outlined on Friday, Huawei executives allegedly knew of an investigation into sanctions violations as early as 2017, and had been “altering their travel patterns to avoid any travel to or through the United States.” Meng’s attorney has countered that trade-war tensions were responsible for the travel changes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: kate fazzini, jane wolsak, fred dufour, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, used, standard, iran, huawei, violations, meng, wsj, hsbc, journal, chartered, declined, uk, travel, payments, banks, related


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Transport giant Scania is working on a hydrogen-powered refuse truck

Swedish transport firm Scania is developing a hydrogen fuel cell refuse truck with waste handling company Renova. “We are highly interested in gaining more experience of fuel cells in actual customer operations,” Scania’s Marita Nilsson said in a statement. It’s expected that the fuel cell truck will be delivered either at the end of 2019 or beginning of 2020. Scania is among a number of companies looking to develop and launch hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. In September, for example, railway manuf


Swedish transport firm Scania is developing a hydrogen fuel cell refuse truck with waste handling company Renova. “We are highly interested in gaining more experience of fuel cells in actual customer operations,” Scania’s Marita Nilsson said in a statement. It’s expected that the fuel cell truck will be delivered either at the end of 2019 or beginning of 2020. Scania is among a number of companies looking to develop and launch hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. In September, for example, railway manuf
Transport giant Scania is working on a hydrogen-powered refuse truck Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: anmar frangoul, johannes eisele, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, truck, scania, refuse, giant, cells, vehicles, working, hydrogen, cell, transport, zackrisson, technology, swedish, hydrogenpowered, fuel


Transport giant Scania is working on a hydrogen-powered refuse truck

Swedish transport firm Scania is developing a hydrogen fuel cell refuse truck with waste handling company Renova.

In an announcement Monday, the business said the vehicle would have a fully electrified power-train and an electrified compactor.

“We are highly interested in gaining more experience of fuel cells in actual customer operations,” Scania’s Marita Nilsson said in a statement. “Fuel cells constitute a promising technology in the needed decarbonisation of transports,” Nilsson added.

Scania added that it was cooperating with both the Swedish Energy Agency and Stockholm’s Royal Institute of Technology on the project. It’s expected that the fuel cell truck will be delivered either at the end of 2019 or beginning of 2020.

Hans Zackrisson, Renova’s head of development, said Monday that electrification using fuel cells fueled by hydrogen was a “highly appealing alternative” for heavy commercial vehicles like refuse trucks.

“The trucks benefit from all the advantages of electrification while maintaining some of the best aspects of fossil-fuel operations, namely range, hours in service and payload,” Zackrisson added.

The European Commission has described hydrogen as an energy carrier with “great potential for clean, efficient power in stationary, portable and transport applications.”

Scania is among a number of companies looking to develop and launch hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. In September, for example, railway manufacturer Alstom launched what it described as the world’s first hydrogen fuel cell train.

Its Coradia iLint uses fuel cells that turn hydrogen and oxygen into electricity. In terms of speed, the zero-emission train can travel up to 140 kilometers per hour.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: anmar frangoul, johannes eisele, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, truck, scania, refuse, giant, cells, vehicles, working, hydrogen, cell, transport, zackrisson, technology, swedish, hydrogenpowered, fuel


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Google gears up for congressional hearing with patriotic prepared remarks

Google has staunchly denied these accusations when they’ve come up in the past, and did so again in Pichai’s remarks. Critics have contrasted this move with how Google has worked with China on controversial plans to launch a censored search engine there. “As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users,” he wrote. Today, Google is more than a search engine. As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed


Google has staunchly denied these accusations when they’ve come up in the past, and did so again in Pichai’s remarks. Critics have contrasted this move with how Google has worked with China on controversial plans to launch a censored search engine there. “As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users,” he wrote. Today, Google is more than a search engine. As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed
Google gears up for congressional hearing with patriotic prepared remarks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, remarks, google, technology, search, american, today, congressional, work, hearing, company, patriotic, prepared, gears, users, googles


Google gears up for congressional hearing with patriotic prepared remarks

CEO Sundar Pichai put an emphasis on Google’s patriotism in his prepared remarks for a congressional hearing on Tuesday where he’ll likely face questions about a purported bias against conservative content on search and YouTube.

“Even as we expand into new markets we never forget our American roots,” he wrote.

Tuesday’s hearing will focus on potential political bias on Google’s platforms, as well as the company’s data filtering practices, with House Majority leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Ca.) highlighting claims that Google’s business practices “may have been affected by political bias” in a statement.

Google has staunchly denied these accusations when they’ve come up in the past, and did so again in Pichai’s remarks.

“I lead this company without political bias and work to ensure that our products continue to operate that way,” Pichai writes. “To do otherwise would go against our core principles and our business interests.”

By underscoring Google’s patriotism Pichai’s comments may also attempt to address criticism around the company’s decision earlier this year not to renew a Pentagon contract for analyzing drone videos using artificial intelligence. Critics have contrasted this move with how Google has worked with China on controversial plans to launch a censored search engine there.

After The Intercept first reported details about Google’s censored search plans, human rights groups, lawmakers, and Google’s own employees all blasted the company, arguing that by cooperating with the Chinese government, it would have violated principles of free expression and users’ privacy rights, among other issues.

The censored search app, which Google has said it is “not close” to launching, would have debatably violated a set of artificial intelligence ethics that the company posted following employee blowback to its dropped Department of Defense contract. The document stipulated that Google would work with the government and military on cybersecurity and training, but not on weapons or surveillance that violates “internationally accepted norms.”

Pichai never directly mentions either controversy, but his prepared comments dance around both.

“As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users,” he wrote. “I am proud to say we do work, and we will continue to work, with the government to keep our country safe and secure.”

Here are Pichai’s full remarks:

Chairman Goodlatte, Ranking Member Nadler, distinguished members of the Committee: Thank you for the opportunity to be here today. I joined Google 15 years ago and have been privileged to serve as CEO for the past three years—though my love for information and technology began long before that. It’s been 25 years since I made the US my home. Growing up in India, I have distinct memories of when my family got its first phone and our first television. Each new technology made a profound difference in our lives. Getting the phone meant that I could call ahead to the hospital to check that the blood results were in before I traveled 2 hours by bus to get them. The television, well, it only had one channel, but I couldn’t have been more thrilled by its arrival! Those experiences made me a technology optimist, and I remain one today. Not only because I believe in technology, but because I believe in people and their ability to use technology to improve their lives. I’m incredibly proud of what Google does to empower people around the world, especially here in the US. I’d like to take a moment to share a bit of background on that. 20 years ago, two students—one from Michigan and one from Maryland—came together at Stanford with a big idea: to provide users with access to the world’s information. That mission still drives everything we do, whether that’s saving you a few minutes on your morning commute or helping doctors detect disease and save lives. Today, Google is more than a search engine. We are a global company that is committed to 1 building products for everyone. That means working with many industries, from education and healthcare to manufacturing and entertainment. Even as we expand into new markets we never forget our American roots. It’s no coincidence that a company dedicated to the free flow of information was founded right here in the US. As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users. I am proud to say we do work, and we will continue to work, with the government to keep our country safe and secure. Over the years our footprint has expanded far beyond California to states such as Texas, Virginia, Oklahoma and Alabama. Today in the US, we’re growing faster outside of the Bay Area than within it. I’ve had the opportunity to travel across the country and see all the places that are powering our digital economy—from Clarksville, to Pittsburgh, to San Diego, where we recently launched a partnership with the USO to help veterans and military families. Along the way, I’ve met many people who depend on Google to learn new skills, find jobs, or build new businesses. Over the past year, we have supported more than 1.5 million American businesses. Over the past three, we have made direct contributions of $150 billion to the US economy, added more than 24,000 employees, and paid over $43 billion to US partners across Search, YouTube, and Android. These investments strengthen our communities and support thousands of American jobs. They also allow us to provide great services to our users to help them through the day. It’s an honor to play this role in people’s lives, and it’s one we know comes with great responsibility. Protecting the privacy and security of our users has long been an essential part of our mission. We have invested an enormous amount of work over the years to bring choice, transparency, and control to our users. These values are built into every product we make. We recognize the important role of governments, including this Committee, in setting rules for the development and use of technology. To that end, we support federal privacy legislation and proposed a legislative framework for privacy earlier this year. Users also look to us to provide accurate, trusted information. We work hard to ensure the integrity of our products, and we’ve put a number of checks and balances in place to ensure they continue to live up to our standards. I lead this company without political bias and work to ensure that our products continue to operate that way. To do otherwise would go against our core principles and our business interests. We are a company that provides platforms for diverse perspectives and opinions—and we have no shortage of them among our own employees. Some of our Googlers are former servicemen and women who have risked much in defense of our country. Some are civil libertarians who fiercely defend freedom of expression. Some are parents who worry about the role technology plays in our households. Some—like me—are immigrants to this country, profoundly grateful for the freedoms and opportunities it offers. Some of us are many of these things. Let me close by saying that leading Google has been the greatest professional honor of my life. It’s a challenging moment for our industry, but I’m privileged to be here today. I greatly appreciate you letting me share the story of Google and our work to build products worthy of the trust users place in us. Thank you for your attention. I look forward to answering your questions.

WATCH: Google’s Larry Page has backed two flying-car start-ups — here’s a look inside one of them


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, remarks, google, technology, search, american, today, congressional, work, hearing, company, patriotic, prepared, gears, users, googles


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Anti-election meddling group makes A.I.-powered Trump impersonator to warn about ‘deepfakes’

Artificial intelligence (AI) is getting frighteningly close to being able to mimic humans, and advances in the technology could be a major risk for democracies worldwide. That’s the worry held by the Transatlantic Commission on Election Integrity, a U.S.-European organization looking at combating interference in Western elections by hostile foreign actors. Members include former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and ex-Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves. ASI gained attention earlier this year f


Artificial intelligence (AI) is getting frighteningly close to being able to mimic humans, and advances in the technology could be a major risk for democracies worldwide. That’s the worry held by the Transatlantic Commission on Election Integrity, a U.S.-European organization looking at combating interference in Western elections by hostile foreign actors. Members include former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and ex-Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves. ASI gained attention earlier this year f
Anti-election meddling group makes A.I.-powered Trump impersonator to warn about ‘deepfakes’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aipowered, online, meddling, impersonator, group, asi, trump, commission, antielection, democracies, president, technology, developed, deepfakes, makes, attention, audio, warn


Anti-election meddling group makes A.I.-powered Trump impersonator to warn about 'deepfakes'

Artificial intelligence (AI) is getting frighteningly close to being able to mimic humans, and advances in the technology could be a major risk for democracies worldwide.

That’s the worry held by the Transatlantic Commission on Election Integrity, a U.S.-European organization looking at combating interference in Western elections by hostile foreign actors.

It was set up last year by Anders Fogh Rasmussen, Denmark’s former prime minister and ex-secretary general of NATO, and Michael Chertoff, former U.S. secretary of homeland security, and is part of Rasmussen’s political foundation, the Alliance of Democracies. Members include former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and ex-Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves.

Using technology developed by London-based AI firm ASI Data Science, the pro-democracy group focused its attention on a new phenomenon in online communities known as “deepfakes,” computer-generated video or audio made to look or sound as though someone is doing or saying something they have not. ASI gained attention earlier this year for its work with the British government on spotting and removing online Jihadist propaganda.

The commission and ASI recently developed an online quiz where users can listen to audio from human impersonators of President Donald Trump — including the voices of comedian Alec Baldwin on “Saturday Night Live” and award-winning Trump impersonator John Di Domenico — alongside algorithm-generated audio mimicking Trump’s voice repeating their lines.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aipowered, online, meddling, impersonator, group, asi, trump, commission, antielection, democracies, president, technology, developed, deepfakes, makes, attention, audio, warn


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Iddris Sandu – Bridging the gap between technology and minorities

Now 21, the self-made entrepreneur and California native has made quite a name for himself in the worlds of technology and entertainment. Private consultant, software engineer, and technologist are just a few hats Sandu wears – though, he prefers the title architect. According to Sandu, he was offered admissions to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology twice, but he declined in order to be a change agent for African-American culture. Back in 2009, a Steve Jobs podcast served as the spark for


Now 21, the self-made entrepreneur and California native has made quite a name for himself in the worlds of technology and entertainment. Private consultant, software engineer, and technologist are just a few hats Sandu wears – though, he prefers the title architect. According to Sandu, he was offered admissions to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology twice, but he declined in order to be a change agent for African-American culture. Back in 2009, a Steve Jobs podcast served as the spark for
Iddris Sandu – Bridging the gap between technology and minorities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: falyn page, source, justin wu, -iddris sandu, technology entrepreneur
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, wunderkind, iddris, tech, entrepreneur, worlds, minorities, library, designer, gap, sandu, bridging, young, written


Iddris Sandu - Bridging the gap between technology and minorities

While other kids were at home watching television, a 13-year-old named Iddris Sandu spent most of his childhood in the library, reading texts about the theory of relativity and studying the German industrial designer Dieter Rams.

Now 21, the self-made entrepreneur and California native has made quite a name for himself in the worlds of technology and entertainment.

With a passion for tech and culture, Sandu has written algorithms and code for tech giants like Uber, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat, received the Presidental Scholar Award from President Barack Obama.

His “wunderkind” reputation has allowed him to have boldface names like NBA star Steph Curry and Tesla CEO Elon Musk on speed dial.

Private consultant, software engineer, and technologist are just a few hats Sandu wears – though, he prefers the title architect. According to Sandu, he was offered admissions to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology twice, but he declined in order to be a change agent for African-American culture.

“Most people can see, but not everyone has vision,” Sandu told CNBC in a recent interview, summarizing his life’s philosophy and entrepreneurial drive.

Back in 2009, a Steve Jobs podcast served as the spark for Sandu’s desire to learn more about the technology world. As a teenager, the child of Ghanaian parents had a a fateful encounter in a library with a designer from Google. Shortly thereafter, he landed his first internship with the tech behemoth.

Since then, the young entrepreneur has been broadening his horizons by partnering with some very prominent entertainers. Sandu recently partnered with Kanye West and Jaden Smith on a few future businesses, clothing lines and disaster relief projects that are set to launch in 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: falyn page, source, justin wu, -iddris sandu, technology entrepreneur
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, wunderkind, iddris, tech, entrepreneur, worlds, minorities, library, designer, gap, sandu, bridging, young, written


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Huawei CFO arrest hits Asian tech stocks hard; broader markets sell-off as global rout continues

Technology stocks across the region were under pressure, including many Huawei partners and suppliers. Taiwan’s major tech names also struggled: Catcher Technology fell 9.89 percent, Taiwan Semiconductor was down 2.65 percent, Largan Precision lost 9.94 percent and iPhone assembler Hon Hai dropped 3.63 percent. “Huawei equipment is more widely used (than ZTE is) by carriers around the world, including in Europe and Africa,” they said. ZTE shares listed in Hong Kong were down 5.94 percent on the


Technology stocks across the region were under pressure, including many Huawei partners and suppliers. Taiwan’s major tech names also struggled: Catcher Technology fell 9.89 percent, Taiwan Semiconductor was down 2.65 percent, Largan Precision lost 9.94 percent and iPhone assembler Hon Hai dropped 3.63 percent. “Huawei equipment is more widely used (than ZTE is) by carriers around the world, including in Europe and Africa,” they said. ZTE shares listed in Hong Kong were down 5.94 percent on the
Huawei CFO arrest hits Asian tech stocks hard; broader markets sell-off as global rout continues Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, eustance huang, miguel candela, sopa images, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rout, continues, shares, stocks, fell, markets, hits, equipment, technology, major, tech, softbank, represents, selloff, hard, huawei, global, zte


Huawei CFO arrest hits Asian tech stocks hard; broader markets sell-off as global rout continues

Technology stocks across the region were under pressure, including many Huawei partners and suppliers.

Chipmaker Samsung tumbled 2.29 percent, Sunny Optical, which makes some of the lenses for Huawei phones, fell 5.47 percent and AAC Technologies declined 5.59 percent on the day. Chinasoft International, where Huawei is a strategic shareholder, dropped 11.71 percent.

Shares of Nikkei heavyweight SoftBank Group fell 4.93 percent. Last year, SoftBank and Huawei jointly demonstrated potential use of the next generation of high-speed mobile internet; SoftBank is taking its mobile unit public on Dec. 19.

The negative sentiment rippled through the broader Japanese tech sector, with shares of Tokyo Electron down 4.54 percent, Advantest falling 5.30 percent and TDK Corp dropping 6.64 percent.

Taiwan’s major tech names also struggled: Catcher Technology fell 9.89 percent, Taiwan Semiconductor was down 2.65 percent, Largan Precision lost 9.94 percent and iPhone assembler Hon Hai dropped 3.63 percent. Asia’s Apple suppliers, in general, saw Thursday declines.

Analysts at Jefferies pointed out that Huawei has a major global presence in various technology areas such as telecommunications equipment, semiconductors, smartphones and cloud computing. It also represents a major growth driver for many tech manufacturers.

Huawei’s Meng, who is the daughter of the company’s founder, faces extradition to the U.S., according to Canada’s Department of Justice.

While the arrest represents a new escalation in American efforts to hold Chinese companies accountable for violation of U.S. laws, it is likely to elicit an angry reaction from Beijing, according to Eurasia Group.

“The investigation of Huawei could be a prelude to further action against the firm and its senior officials,” the Eurasia Group analysts said, adding that if the U.S. places a sudden ban on Huawei equipment, like it did with ZTE, the impact would be much greater.

“Huawei equipment is more widely used (than ZTE is) by carriers around the world, including in Europe and Africa,” they said.

ZTE shares listed in Hong Kong were down 5.94 percent on the day.

Both Huawei and ZTE are restricted from selling telecoms equipment in the U.S. due to what the U.S. describes as national security concerns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, eustance huang, miguel candela, sopa images, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rout, continues, shares, stocks, fell, markets, hits, equipment, technology, major, tech, softbank, represents, selloff, hard, huawei, global, zte


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