Self-made millionaire: Don’t make these 5 mistakes when negotiating your salary

Don’t tell them your current salaryThe primary reason employers always ask for your current salary is simply so they can offer you just a little bit more than what you’re currently making. If you’re asked this question, say, “I’m sure we can find a number that’s fair for both of us.” (Also, in New York, asking for your current salary is actually against the law.) Don’t tell them if you have an offer from a ‘mediocre’ companyIf you’ve got another offer from a company that’s generally regarded to


Don’t tell them your current salaryThe primary reason employers always ask for your current salary is simply so they can offer you just a little bit more than what you’re currently making. If you’re asked this question, say, “I’m sure we can find a number that’s fair for both of us.” (Also, in New York, asking for your current salary is actually against the law.) Don’t tell them if you have an offer from a ‘mediocre’ companyIf you’ve got another offer from a company that’s generally regarded to
Self-made millionaire: Don’t make these 5 mistakes when negotiating your salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: ramit sethi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, current, mistakes, offer, ask, selfmade, negotiating, say, thats, salary, number, millionaire, dont, mediocre, company


Self-made millionaire: Don't make these 5 mistakes when negotiating your salary

1. Don’t tell them your current salary

The primary reason employers always ask for your current salary is simply so they can offer you just a little bit more than what you’re currently making. If you’re asked this question, say, “I’m sure we can find a number that’s fair for both of us.” If they press you, push back: “I’m not comfortable revealing my salary, so let’s move on. What else can I answer for you?” Keep in mind that it’s typically the first-line recruiters who ask this question first. If they won’t budge, ask to speak to the hiring manager. No recruiter wants to be responsible for losing a great candidate.

If the gatekeeper insists on knowing, consider playing hardball, because you can always jump back to negotiating later. (Also, in New York, asking for your current salary is actually against the law.)

2. Don’t make the first offer

Making the first offer is their job. It’s that simple. If they ask you to suggest a number, just smile and say, “Now come on, that’s your job. What’s a fair number that we can both work from?”

3. Don’t tell them if you have an offer from a ‘mediocre’ company

If you’ve got another offer from a company that’s generally regarded to be “mediocre,” don’t reveal the company’s name. You can still answer with something vague (but true), such as, “It’s another tech company that focuses on online consumer applications.”

…with just one conversation, you can boost your income for life. Ramit Sethi author, “I Will Teach You to Be Rich”

If you say the name of the mediocre company, the negotiator essentially has you in a corner, and instead of focusing on negotiating, they’ll just keep telling you why it’ll you’ll be happier at their company. So be smart and withhold this information.

4. Don’t ask ‘yes’ or ‘no’ questions

Avoid saying things like, “You offered me $50,000 dollars. Can you do $55,000?” Instead, say, “Your $50,000 offer is an excellent start. We’re in the same ballpark, but how can we get to $55,000?”

5. Don’t lie


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: ramit sethi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, current, mistakes, offer, ask, selfmade, negotiating, say, thats, salary, number, millionaire, dont, mediocre, company


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Living with your parents to save money might dim your chances of becoming a homeowner

Nearly 22% of them, or more than 14 million young adults, still live with one or both parents, according to real estate website Zillow. “When the housing market went bust and the economy unraveled into a recession, young adults increasingly returned to their childhood home.” Rents are very high right now, as well, so moving to a rental doesn’t help young people save to buy. Young adults who lived with their parents between the ages of 25 and 34 were actually less likely to become homeowners afte


Nearly 22% of them, or more than 14 million young adults, still live with one or both parents, according to real estate website Zillow. “When the housing market went bust and the economy unraveled into a recession, young adults increasingly returned to their childhood home.” Rents are very high right now, as well, so moving to a rental doesn’t help young people save to buy. Young adults who lived with their parents between the ages of 25 and 34 were actually less likely to become homeowners afte
Living with your parents to save money might dim your chances of becoming a homeowner Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: diana olick erica posse, diana olick, erica posse
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennials, money, chances, zillow, homeowner, living, thats, young, adults, save, mom, dim, payment, parents


Living with your parents to save money might dim your chances of becoming a homeowner

Millennials have been in no rush to move out on mom and dad. Nearly 22% of them, or more than 14 million young adults, still live with one or both parents, according to real estate website Zillow. That is the highest share for this age group since at least 2000. Millennials, especially older ones , have had a harder time moving out because they came of working age during the last recession and had difficulty finding well-paying jobs. They also have high levels of student loan debt . “While it might be tempting to stereotype these young adults as lazy millennials bumming off of Mom, the data paints a different picture, ” said Zillow senior economist Sarah Mikhitarian. “When the housing market went bust and the economy unraveled into a recession, young adults increasingly returned to their childhood home.” This doesn’t mean they don’t want to be homeowners. Various surveys show millennials do aspire to homeownership , just as previous generations did, but they have trouble saving for a down payment. Rents are very high right now, as well, so moving to a rental doesn’t help young people save to buy.

The pros and cons of living with parents

Housing expenses such as rent and insurance add nearly three years to the time it takes a typical renter to save up for a 20% down payment on a median-priced home. That’s according to home and apartment rental site Hotpads, which is owned by Zillow. That’s because the typical renter spends about 34% of his or her income on housing. It takes the typical renter about eight years to save for a down payment, if they are able to sock away about 16% of their income each year. And of course, in some locations that’s easier to do than in others.

If you live with mom and dad, and they don’t charge you rent, you can save for that same down payment in about five years. That’s the plus side.

More from Invest in You:

Gen Z or millennial and want to be rich? Here’s how

Do this once a year to ratchet up your financial security

What every women needs to know about investing

But it’s not all home-cooked meals and getting mom to do your laundry. Living in your parents’ home has consequences. Young adults who lived with their parents between the ages of 25 and 34 were actually less likely to become homeowners after 10 years than those who didn’t.

Even if they did buy a home, they didn’t carry any less mortgage debt than those who moved out earlier, all this according to a study by the Urban Institute, which concluded that living with your parents does not actually put you in a better financial position for homeownership.

Homeownership is a critical source of future wealth. Because homes generally gain value, living with your parents — and thereby reducing your odds of earlier homeownership — could actually hurt you in the end.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: diana olick erica posse, diana olick, erica posse
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennials, money, chances, zillow, homeowner, living, thats, young, adults, save, mom, dim, payment, parents


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Credit Suisse has a portfolio of takeover plays that’s beat the market the last 5 years

Windows 10 upgrade cycle driving growth — and it’s only halfway…Microsoft will stop supporting Windows 7 and Office 2010 in 2020. As customers move to newer products, Microsoft will be able to sell them additional tools, an executive said…Enterpriseread more


Windows 10 upgrade cycle driving growth — and it’s only halfway…Microsoft will stop supporting Windows 7 and Office 2010 in 2020. As customers move to newer products, Microsoft will be able to sell them additional tools, an executive said…Enterpriseread more
Credit Suisse has a portfolio of takeover plays that’s beat the market the last 5 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, portfolio, stop, office, takeover, thats, saidenterpriseread, products, market, windows, plays, upgrade, credit, supporting, sell, newer, beat, suisse, tools


Credit Suisse has a portfolio of takeover plays that's beat the market the last 5 years

Windows 10 upgrade cycle driving growth — and it’s only halfway…

Microsoft will stop supporting Windows 7 and Office 2010 in 2020. As customers move to newer products, Microsoft will be able to sell them additional tools, an executive said…

Enterprise

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, portfolio, stop, office, takeover, thats, saidenterpriseread, products, market, windows, plays, upgrade, credit, supporting, sell, newer, beat, suisse, tools


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InMobi 2019 Disruptor 50

InMobi, the adtech platform from India that is the country’s first unicorn, is now making it even easier for users to eye content. In August it launched Glance, bite-size content that shows up right on the lock screen of a mobile phone. Read More: FULL LIST 2019 DISRUPTOR 50InMobi co-founder and CEO Naveen Tewari calls Glance “micro-moments of consumption.” Once your phone is unlocked, that’s where inMobi really shines. If a mobile ad pops up when you’re using your favorite app, inMobi specializ


InMobi, the adtech platform from India that is the country’s first unicorn, is now making it even easier for users to eye content. In August it launched Glance, bite-size content that shows up right on the lock screen of a mobile phone. Read More: FULL LIST 2019 DISRUPTOR 50InMobi co-founder and CEO Naveen Tewari calls Glance “micro-moments of consumption.” Once your phone is unlocked, that’s where inMobi really shines. If a mobile ad pops up when you’re using your favorite app, inMobi specializ
InMobi 2019 Disruptor 50 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: cnbccom staff, george kavallines, source, indigo agriculture, prakash singh, afp, getty images, michael nagle, bloomberg, chesnot
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disruptor, glance, 2019, thats, million, company, screen, phone, 50, inmobi, mobile, users, india


InMobi 2019 Disruptor 50

InMobi, the adtech platform from India that is the country’s first unicorn, is now making it even easier for users to eye content. In August it launched Glance, bite-size content that shows up right on the lock screen of a mobile phone. No need to unlock the phone; just hit the button to bring the screen to life and that’s where news, videos and single-player games appear, lasting anywhere from 10 seconds to 2 minutes.

Read More: FULL LIST 2019 DISRUPTOR 50

InMobi co-founder and CEO Naveen Tewari calls Glance “micro-moments of consumption.” Glance comes pre-installed on some models of Samsung, Xiaomi, Gionee and Vivo phones, which together comprise 65% of all new smartphones sold in India. So far, the company says Glance has more than 26 million active users.

Once your phone is unlocked, that’s where inMobi really shines. If a mobile ad pops up when you’re using your favorite app, inMobi specializes in making them less intrusive and more user-friendly. It does this by taking information such as location and app interests to deliver ads that better align with a user’s interests.

The company was started in India in 2007 and today is one of the world’s largest independent mobile advertising platforms for mobile marketers. The company has partnerships with more than 30,000 apps and claims that is has reached more than 1.5 billion devices worldwide. Earlier this year, it teamed up with Microsoft and Sprint to launch TruFactor, a service that helps companies better understand the digital and physical environments of the consumer.

InMobi, which says it is profitable, has raised $320 million in funding from SoftBank Capital and Kleiner Perkins Caufield, among others, and is valued at $1 billion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: cnbccom staff, george kavallines, source, indigo agriculture, prakash singh, afp, getty images, michael nagle, bloomberg, chesnot
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disruptor, glance, 2019, thats, million, company, screen, phone, 50, inmobi, mobile, users, india


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Cohesity 2019 Disruptor 50

He took a job at Google when it was just starting out and sold the shares he was given for a sizeable sum. Rather than relax, he used the money to help co-found Nutanix, a cloud computing software company that went public in 2016. Read More: FULL LIST 2019 DISRUPTOR 50The San Jose-based firm empowers companies to back up, manage, store, and tease out insights from their data and apps. Like Nutanix, Cohesity is bringing the concept of hyperconvergence to the data center. It looks like Aron has hi


He took a job at Google when it was just starting out and sold the shares he was given for a sizeable sum. Rather than relax, he used the money to help co-found Nutanix, a cloud computing software company that went public in 2016. Read More: FULL LIST 2019 DISRUPTOR 50The San Jose-based firm empowers companies to back up, manage, store, and tease out insights from their data and apps. Like Nutanix, Cohesity is bringing the concept of hyperconvergence to the data center. It looks like Aron has hi
Cohesity 2019 Disruptor 50 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: cnbccom staff, george kavallines, source, indigo agriculture, leah millis, prakash singh, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disruptor, 2019, thats, nutanix, launched, company, google, data, 50, companies, aron, pioneer, cohesity


Cohesity 2019 Disruptor 50

There are entrepreneurs who struggle to start one successful company. Mohit Aron has launched two. He took a job at Google when it was just starting out and sold the shares he was given for a sizeable sum. Rather than relax, he used the money to help co-found Nutanix, a cloud computing software company that went public in 2016. That’s when he began working on his second startup—Cohesity.

Read More: FULL LIST 2019 DISRUPTOR 50

The San Jose-based firm empowers companies to back up, manage, store, and tease out insights from their data and apps. So far, it’s raised more than $400 million from investors such as Sequoia Capital, Cisco Investments, and SoftBank Vision Fund. The company is already valued at more than $1 billion.

Like Nutanix, Cohesity is bringing the concept of hyperconvergence to the data center. It’s just focusing on the part that’s known as secondary storage—the backups, analytics, and archival information. In January, it launched the Cohesity Anti-Ransomware Solution which offers a broad set of capabilities to prevent, detect, and respond to ransomware attacks, among the biggest security threats companies face today.

It looks like Aron has hit another start-up homerun with Cohesity. The company says it has quadrupled the size of its customer base and saw a 300% increase in revenues in fiscal year 2018. Last year it was also selected by the World Economic Forum as a Technology Pioneer for its ability to “transform society and industry” and “share the fourth industrial revolution.” Former Pioneer recipients include Google, Twitter, and Airbnb.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: cnbccom staff, george kavallines, source, indigo agriculture, leah millis, prakash singh, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disruptor, 2019, thats, nutanix, launched, company, google, data, 50, companies, aron, pioneer, cohesity


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NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp


The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp
NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


NBC's 2020 streaming service won't be very compelling for cord cutters — and that's by design

The streaming wars — the race to launch subscription video products — has been driven by an underlying concept: The traditional pay-TV bundle is dying as millions of U.S. households cut the cord each year and shift their video consumption to services like Netflix.

This has been a hard pill to swallow for legacy media companies, which derive billions of dollars from traditional pay TV. Yet, many of those media companies are coming to grips with reality and beginning to disrupt their own business models, headlined by Disney’s $6.99 Disney+ offering for this year.

That’s not the case for Comcast’s NBCUniversal (the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com).

NBC doesn’t want you to cut the cord. Maybe this isn’t too surprising since its owner is the largest U.S. cable company. But it’s unusual because it directly contradicts the disruption narrative. Instead of submissively accepting that the pay-TV world is ending, NBC is taking a stand and fighting back.

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring.

NBC’s ad-supported streaming service will be free to all customers who pay for traditional live television — whether through Comcast or any other provider, including virtual pay-TV bundles like Google’s YouTube TV or AT&T’s DirecTV Now, assuming partnership deals are struck, according to people familiar with the matter.

For those who have cut the cord, it will probably be about $10, said the people, who asked not to be named because the discussions on price are still ongoing.

CNBC has also learned that the free version of service for pay-TV subscribers will include live linear channels, same-season episodes and past-season episodes. Customers will be able to watch NBC programming anywhere, on any device, independent of their cable provider’s footprint. NBC will have nonexclusive access to all of the programming it sells to Hulu for the streaming service, as part of the deal with Disney the two companies announced on Tuesday.

But the $10 version for cord cutters won’t include live linear channels and won’t include same-season shows. You’ll get a bunch of reruns, most of which will also be available on Hulu if you already subscribe to that service. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined.

So what are you getting for your $10 a month? Not much at first. And that’s the point.

NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. The company is actively trying to make its cord-cutting streaming service inferior to its pay-TV version. The service is primarily meant as a nice additional benefit for customers who already pay for cable or satellite TV.

NBC’s decision isn’t totally motivated by supporting Comcast’s cable TV business. Now that Disney has full operational control of Hulu, Disney can bundle Hulu (or Hulu with Live TV) with Disney+ to make a compelling streaming offering that should further accelerate cord cutting. NBC is OK with this. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free.

NBC will certainly monitor the take rate of its streaming service among non pay-TV subscribers if cord cutting dramatically accelerates. If necessary, it can move content on and off its service thanks to Tuesday’s deal with Hulu, as well as the impending expiration of streaming-rights deals for popular shows it owns, such as “The Office.” And three years from now, when its content deal with Hulu ends, there’s an easy path for NBC to make its streaming service more compelling by making all its content exclusive to it.

But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a compelling addition for cord cutters. And that’s the point.

Disclosure: Comcast owns NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.

WATCH: Comcast will sell its Hulu stake to Disney, giving Disney full control


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


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Do this once a year to ratchet up your financial security

One Wall Street winner—Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase — emerged from the financial crisis whole. Some of the bank’s investors more than tripled their money in the wake of the financial crisis. Do your own financial stress test by creating a financial plan — that’s the foundation of your review. A financial plan doesn’t have to be complicated. Then, like the banks do, test different parts of your financial life to see how they’d perform in bad weather.


One Wall Street winner—Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase — emerged from the financial crisis whole. Some of the bank’s investors more than tripled their money in the wake of the financial crisis. Do your own financial stress test by creating a financial plan — that’s the foundation of your review. A financial plan doesn’t have to be complicated. Then, like the banks do, test different parts of your financial life to see how they’d perform in bad weather.
Do this once a year to ratchet up your financial security Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-13  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stress, test, theyd, thats, security, ratchet, insurance, financial, review, things, plan, dont


Do this once a year to ratchet up your financial security

On the face of it, comparing yourself to a large financial institution seems crazy. What could you possibly have in common?

You both have assets.

The only real difference is that many more people depend on a big bank than on you.

One Wall Street winner—Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase — emerged from the financial crisis whole. Some of the bank’s investors more than tripled their money in the wake of the financial crisis. Dimon’s strategy: preparing for the worst, not simply hoping things will turn out OK. The bank performs dozens of regular stress tests on a range of scenarios, including wars and recessions.

When you think about it, you already do that. What if you got sick? That’s why you have health insurance. What if something happened to your car? That’s why you have theft and liability insurance for your car.

Do your own financial stress test by creating a financial plan — that’s the foundation of your review. So if you don’t have one, put that on your to-do list. Don’t be intimidated. A financial plan doesn’t have to be complicated.

Then, like the banks do, test different parts of your financial life to see how they’d perform in bad weather.

Annually check these four key things recommended by Andrew Crowell, vice chairman of D.A. Davidson & Co. Wealth Management.

You want to review regularly to identify any vulnerable points. Crowell recommends testing your portfolio and general finances, and how they’d react if interest rates rise, the stock market drops or you needed to meet a sudden expense. He uses the acronym “MAID” to remember them easily: markets, accidents, income disruption and death.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-13  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stress, test, theyd, thats, security, ratchet, insurance, financial, review, things, plan, dont


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Billionaire Warren Buffett has a ‘simple’ test for making tough decisions—here’s how it works

Achieving success and making tough decisions go hand in hand. So what’s the best way to make ethical decisions during tough times? That’s a question one student asked Warren Buffett at a 2005 Q&A session with Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The ‘newspaper test’One would imagine that it’s no easy task managing Berkshire Hathaway’s 360,000 employees and making sure that all managers are making ethical decisions. And being the great leader that he is, Buffett


Achieving success and making tough decisions go hand in hand. So what’s the best way to make ethical decisions during tough times? That’s a question one student asked Warren Buffett at a 2005 Q&A session with Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The ‘newspaper test’One would imagine that it’s no easy task managing Berkshire Hathaway’s 360,000 employees and making sure that all managers are making ethical decisions. And being the great leader that he is, Buffett
Billionaire Warren Buffett has a ‘simple’ test for making tough decisions—here’s how it works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reputation, warren, test, thats, making, decisionsheres, newspaper, tough, written, managers, billionaire, buffett, works, decisions, simple


Billionaire Warren Buffett has a 'simple' test for making tough decisions—here's how it works

Achieving success and making tough decisions go hand in hand. So what’s the best way to make ethical decisions during tough times? That’s a question one student asked Warren Buffett at a 2005 Q&A session with Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. It all comes down to reputation, the billionaire told the audience. Integrity and ethics are essential for building a solid, positive reputation. They also indicate trust and adherence to high moral standards. “We have all the money we need,” Buffett said, referring to himself and Gates. “While we’d like to have more, we can afford to lose money. But we can’t afford to lose reputation. Not a shred.”

The ‘newspaper test’

One would imagine that it’s no easy task managing Berkshire Hathaway’s 360,000 employees and making sure that all managers are making ethical decisions. But Buffett has a smart strategy for this: “I ask the managers to judge every action they take — not just by legal standards, though obviously that’s the first test — but also by what I call the ‘newspaper test.'” If a manager expresses uncertainty, Buffett says he asks them how they “would feel about any given action if they know it was to be written up the next day in their local newspaper.” He tells them that the article would be “written by a smart but pretty unfriendly reporter” and read by their family, friends and neighbors. “It’s pretty simple,” he says. “If [the decision] passes that test, it’s okay. If anything is too close to the lines, it’s out.”

And being the great leader that he is, Buffett says his managers can call him if they want to check on something. “But if they do, there’s probably something wrong with them,” he jokes.

The ‘inner scorecard’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reputation, warren, test, thats, making, decisionsheres, newspaper, tough, written, managers, billionaire, buffett, works, decisions, simple


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Lesson ‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary learned from mom, gave to kids

“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college


“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college
Lesson ‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary learned from mom, gave to kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, tell, learned, tank, kids, thing, thats, lesson, kevin, mom, work, company, software, oleary, theyre, fly, gave, shark


Lesson 'Shark Tank' star Kevin O'Leary learned from mom, gave to kids

“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘What’s that mean, mom?’ She said, ‘It means no more checks.’

“I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ She said, ‘No, no, no, no. I’ve done my work. Now you do yours.’

“And that was very important to me.”

Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. He ultimately built that company into a huge business, later called The Learning Company, which he and his co-founders sold to the Mattel Toy Company for $4.2 billion in 1999.

The value of making it on your own is now something O’Leary now preaches too.

O’Leary recalls that after he became successful, he asked his mom if he could pay her back for the financial support she had given him throughout high school and college.

“She said, ‘No, I owed you that. And you should think about that for your children. Pass it on and pass it forward. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says.

“And that’s exactly what I told my kids.”

Indeed, O’Leary famously made his kids fly coach while he flew business class when they were growing up, and he cut them off financially after college.

“And [my kids] said the same thing to me: ‘That sucks,'” O’Leary says. “But now they’re off on their own, and they’re figuring it out. And I’m so proud of what my mother taught me.”

Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college admissions scandal: ‘I’ll tell you who you really screwed: Your kid’

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Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, tell, learned, tank, kids, thing, thats, lesson, kevin, mom, work, company, software, oleary, theyre, fly, gave, shark


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Prince Charles opened a royal bed and breakfast that’s just $200 a night — take a look

On the same day Prince Harry and Meghan Markle welcomed their baby boy, new grandpa Prince Charles opened a bed and breakfast in Scotland — and rooms start at just 160 pounds a night, or about $208. The Granary Lodge, a luxury bed and breakfast formally announced by Prince Charles on May 1 and accepting guests as of Monday, is on the grounds of The Castle of Mey in Caithness, the former retreat and residence for Prince Charles’ grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, who owned the property between 1952 an


On the same day Prince Harry and Meghan Markle welcomed their baby boy, new grandpa Prince Charles opened a bed and breakfast in Scotland — and rooms start at just 160 pounds a night, or about $208. The Granary Lodge, a luxury bed and breakfast formally announced by Prince Charles on May 1 and accepting guests as of Monday, is on the grounds of The Castle of Mey in Caithness, the former retreat and residence for Prince Charles’ grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, who owned the property between 1952 an
Prince Charles opened a royal bed and breakfast that’s just $200 a night — take a look Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: jimmy im, andrew milligan, getty images, the granary lodge, john baikie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, look, 200, elizabeth, opened, charles, prince, thats, queen, mey, welcomed, night, royal, bed, castle, breakfast, trust


Prince Charles opened a royal bed and breakfast that's just $200 a night — take a look

On the same day Prince Harry and Meghan Markle welcomed their baby boy, new grandpa Prince Charles opened a bed and breakfast in Scotland — and rooms start at just 160 pounds a night, or about $208.

The Granary Lodge, a luxury bed and breakfast formally announced by Prince Charles on May 1 and accepting guests as of Monday, is on the grounds of The Castle of Mey in Caithness, the former retreat and residence for Prince Charles’ grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, who owned the property between 1952 and 1996, according to a representative for The Queen Elizabeth Castle of Mey Trust.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: jimmy im, andrew milligan, getty images, the granary lodge, john baikie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, look, 200, elizabeth, opened, charles, prince, thats, queen, mey, welcomed, night, royal, bed, castle, breakfast, trust


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