Here’s how the recent Twitter attacks probably happened and why they’re becoming more common

Less obvious to his more than 4 million followers was how the attackers took control of the Twitter CEO’s account for almost 20 minutes. Twitter said hackers had gained access to Dorsey’s profile by effectively stealing his mobile phone number, which was compromised due to a “security oversight” by the carrier. While the company didn’t use the phrase “SIM swapping” in its statement, security experts attributed the attack to the increasingly popular tactic. Having taken control over the phone num


Less obvious to his more than 4 million followers was how the attackers took control of the Twitter CEO’s account for almost 20 minutes. Twitter said hackers had gained access to Dorsey’s profile by effectively stealing his mobile phone number, which was compromised due to a “security oversight” by the carrier. While the company didn’t use the phrase “SIM swapping” in its statement, security experts attributed the attack to the increasingly popular tactic. Having taken control over the phone num
Here’s how the recent Twitter attacks probably happened and why they’re becoming more common Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, sending, twitter, common, number, happened, user, security, sim, sms, moretz, heres, usability, probably, attacks, recent, theyre


Here's how the recent Twitter attacks probably happened and why they're becoming more common

When Jack Dorsey started sending out a string of bizarre tweets last week, it was clear that his account had been compromised. Less obvious to his more than 4 million followers was how the attackers took control of the Twitter CEO’s account for almost 20 minutes.

Twitter said hackers had gained access to Dorsey’s profile by effectively stealing his mobile phone number, which was compromised due to a “security oversight” by the carrier. While the company didn’t use the phrase “SIM swapping” in its statement, security experts attributed the attack to the increasingly popular tactic. Days later, the same thing happened to actress Chloe Moretz, who has over 3 million followers.

To carry out a SIM swap, a scammer who has obtained the phone number and other personal information of someone else calls a wireless carrier pretending to be the victim and requests that number be transferred to a new SIM card. If successful with the impersonation, which could include providing the birth date or the mother’s maiden name, the user can start logging into various services, like Twitter, and changing passwords.

Having taken control over the phone number, the attacker will receive messages with one-time passwords, negating the effectiveness of two-factor authentication. An entity that calls itself the Chuckling Squad claimed responsibility for the two attacks against Dorsey and Moretz along with other internet personalities like James Charles and Shane Dawson.

While Twitter has suffered the most high-profile attacks, Facebook, Snap, Microsoft’s LinkedIn and Pinterest rely on similar security measures, leaving their sites open to SIM hijackers who sometimes just want to wreak havoc but other times have more nefarious intentions, such as accessing a victim’s banking credentials.

For Twitter, SMS hijacking is uniquely problematic because it has a feature that allows users to tweet by sending a text to the service.

“Really anything is better than SMS,” said Will Strafach, CEO of mobile security company Guardian Firewall. “The companies want usability. They want user engagement. Companies’ motives aren’t in a place where they favor security over usability.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, sending, twitter, common, number, happened, user, security, sim, sms, moretz, heres, usability, probably, attacks, recent, theyre


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Facebook’s dating feature launches in the US, sending Match shares down 5%

Facebook said Thursday its “Facebook Dating” function is launching Thursday in the U.S. Shares of Match, which runs several popular dating services like Match.com, dipped more than 5% Thursday morning following Facebook’s announcement. “It takes the work out of creating a dating profile and gives you a more authentic look at who someone is,” the Facebook’s blog post says. Eventually, the site will offer the ability for users to add Facebook and Instagram Stories to a dating profile. Facebook sai


Facebook said Thursday its “Facebook Dating” function is launching Thursday in the U.S. Shares of Match, which runs several popular dating services like Match.com, dipped more than 5% Thursday morning following Facebook’s announcement. “It takes the work out of creating a dating profile and gives you a more authentic look at who someone is,” the Facebook’s blog post says. Eventually, the site will offer the ability for users to add Facebook and Instagram Stories to a dating profile. Facebook sai
Facebook’s dating feature launches in the US, sending Match shares down 5% Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, profile, ability, friends, feature, facebook, shares, launches, facebooks, theyre, sending, instagram, match, post, users, blog, dating


Facebook's dating feature launches in the US, sending Match shares down 5%

Facebook said Thursday its “Facebook Dating” function is launching Thursday in the U.S.

In a blog post, the company said it will be giving people the ability to “start meaningful relationships” through things in common, like interests, events and groups.

Shares of Match, which runs several popular dating services like Match.com, dipped more than 5% Thursday morning following Facebook’s announcement.

“It takes the work out of creating a dating profile and gives you a more authentic look at who someone is,” the Facebook’s blog post says.

Users of Instagram will also be able to integrate their posts directly into their “Facebook Dating” profile and give people the ability to add Instagram followers to “Secret Crush” lists. Eventually, the site will offer the ability for users to add Facebook and Instagram Stories to a dating profile.

Facebook said in its blog post the dating feature was designed to be “safe, inclusive and opt-in.” Users are able to report and block other users, and users are not allowed to send photos, links, payments or videos in messages. Users can also share details of an upcoming date or a live location with someone they trust on Facebook Messenger if they wish.

Facebook users can choose to opt into the dating feature and create a dating profile separate from their main profile if they’re 18 years or older and have the most recent version of the app downloaded. Then, they’ll receive suggestions for other users who have also opted in, whether they’re friends of friends, people not in their friend circle or both. The service won’t match users with their friends, unless they are using the “Secret Crush” function and both users are on one another’s list.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, profile, ability, friends, feature, facebook, shares, launches, facebooks, theyre, sending, instagram, match, post, users, blog, dating


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Millennials are drinking more because they’re having kids, Constellation Brands executive says

“When you said the millennials are drinking more, I’m like: That’s because they have kids,” Barclays analyst Lauren Lieberman said. “Well, I think that’s exactly the answer,” Klein responded. But it’s too early to tell, but we definitely have seen that with millennials,” Klein said. Klein added that Generation Z, ages 21 to 24, are consuming alcohol “slightly more slowly” than millennials did. “I think what we have is people saying that they’re drinking less or drinking better, but that’s really


“When you said the millennials are drinking more, I’m like: That’s because they have kids,” Barclays analyst Lauren Lieberman said. “Well, I think that’s exactly the answer,” Klein responded. But it’s too early to tell, but we definitely have seen that with millennials,” Klein said. Klein added that Generation Z, ages 21 to 24, are consuming alcohol “slightly more slowly” than millennials did. “I think what we have is people saying that they’re drinking less or drinking better, but that’s really
Millennials are drinking more because they’re having kids, Constellation Brands executive says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kids, constellation, klein, drinking, month, brands, alcohol, lieberman, theyre, millennials, thats, think, executive, having


Millennials are drinking more because they're having kids, Constellation Brands executive says

Beer and wine producer Constellation Brands is seeing an uptick in the millennial generation’s consumption of alcohol and, according to a company executive, that’s in part thanks to one specific reason.

“When you said the millennials are drinking more, I’m like: That’s because they have kids,” Barclays analyst Lauren Lieberman said.

Lieberman made the comment somewhat jokingly during a discussion with Constellation Brands CFO David Klein, who was speaking with Lieberman at the Barclays Global Consumer Staples Conference on Wednesday.

“Well, I think that’s exactly the answer,” Klein responded.

He cited Constellation’s research on millennials to back up his broader thesis: The company found that in 2013, millennials consumed about 24 alcoholic drinks per month. By this year, that number has climbed to about 29 per month – with about 77% of all millennials in the U.S. consuming alcohol, according to Klein.

“What we don’t know though is will we see that same thing with Gen Z as they age, will they — will life get more stressful for them and they drink a little more? But it’s too early to tell, but we definitely have seen that with millennials,” Klein said.

Klein added that Generation Z, ages 21 to 24, are consuming alcohol “slightly more slowly” than millennials did.

“I think what we have is people saying that they’re drinking less or drinking better, but that’s really driving people into trends like Corona Premier and seltzer and Mic Ultra, and brands like that,” Klein saId.

Twitter user @bluff_capital first noted the exchange on Thursday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kids, constellation, klein, drinking, month, brands, alcohol, lieberman, theyre, millennials, thats, think, executive, having


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Robots may take and serve your food order, but won’t make it anytime soon, ex-Domino’s CEO says

Self-ordering kiosks in restaurants are probably here to stay, but that doesn’t mean technology also will replace the workers who make your food, former Domino’s Pizza CEO Patrick Doyle told CNBC on Wednesday. “People want food to be handmade,” Doyle said on “Squawk on the Street, ” his first interview since departing Domino’s in June 2018. “Replacing people making food is the least interesting, but clearly how they’re ordering and how you’re getting the food to them, and how you’re marketing to


Self-ordering kiosks in restaurants are probably here to stay, but that doesn’t mean technology also will replace the workers who make your food, former Domino’s Pizza CEO Patrick Doyle told CNBC on Wednesday. “People want food to be handmade,” Doyle said on “Squawk on the Street, ” his first interview since departing Domino’s in June 2018. “Replacing people making food is the least interesting, but clearly how they’re ordering and how you’re getting the food to them, and how you’re marketing to
Robots may take and serve your food order, but won’t make it anytime soon, ex-Domino’s CEO says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, order, dominos, food, ceo, doyle, restaurant, youre, anytime, technology, soon, pizza, carlyle, theyre, robots, exdominos, serve


Robots may take and serve your food order, but won't make it anytime soon, ex-Domino's CEO says

Self-ordering kiosks in restaurants are probably here to stay, but that doesn’t mean technology also will replace the workers who make your food, former Domino’s Pizza CEO Patrick Doyle told CNBC on Wednesday.

“People want food to be handmade,” Doyle said on “Squawk on the Street, ” his first interview since departing Domino’s in June 2018. “Replacing people making food is the least interesting, but clearly how they’re ordering and how you’re getting the food to them, and how you’re marketing to them, are huge opportunities.”

Doyle’s interview comes on the same day the 56-year-old announced he was forming a partnership with The Carlyle Group, a global investment firm with $233 billion of assets under management. Doyle and Carlyle will look to acquire existing companies that have an opportunity to be transformed through technology.

The kinds of companies would need to have direct relationships with customers, possibly in the restaurant business, health care or hospitality, Doyle said, adding that acquisitions may reach up to $10 billion.

Doyle led Domino’s for nearly a decade, during which he oversaw a significant turnaround of the pizza chain through improving the food’s taste and heavily investing in technology. Domino’s shares traded below $8 in December 2009, just before Doyle became CEO. On Jan. 9, 2018, when Doyle’s departure was announced, Domino’s closed at $206.71.

The use of technology to upend the restaurant industry’s workforce in not new, but it continues to be an area of focus due to high turnover and the burdensome costs associated with it.

Doyle said that Domino’s is considering many ways technology could improve its business, but felt that automating the food-making process wasn’t appetizing to customers.

But, in addition to the continued adoption of online ordering and self-service kiosks in stores, Doyle said technology may still further upend the restaurant industry through changing how food is served to customers. While he was CEO, Domino’s delivered the world’s first pizza by drone and also partnered with Ford to deliver pizzas in self-driving cars.

The announcement of Doyle’s partnership with Carlyle ends speculation about where the well-respected executive would end up. He was, at one time, rumored to be under consideration to become Chipotle Mexican Grill’s next CEO.

On Wednesday, Doyle offered praise of Chipotle’s increasing focus in technology, but said he thought Starbuck’s was the industry leader in in-store technology.

“In terms of how they’re using technology, I think Chipotle is investing and they’re working to get caught up on that, but up until now, I’d give Starbucks the edge on that,” Doyle said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, order, dominos, food, ceo, doyle, restaurant, youre, anytime, technology, soon, pizza, carlyle, theyre, robots, exdominos, serve


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59% of millennials say they’d lie to their boss about not having Wi-Fi to avoid working on vacation

A recent survey found nearly half of workers would lie to their bosses about not having reception in order to avoid checking work email while away. The next generation most likely to lie are Gen Xers (49%), followed by boomers (32%). Despite their willingness to lie, millennials are also the most likely to actually fire up their work email while they’re supposed to be unplugging, with 74% saying they do so. Gen Xers are most likely to leave work entirely at the office, with 42% saying they don’t


A recent survey found nearly half of workers would lie to their bosses about not having reception in order to avoid checking work email while away. The next generation most likely to lie are Gen Xers (49%), followed by boomers (32%). Despite their willingness to lie, millennials are also the most likely to actually fire up their work email while they’re supposed to be unplugging, with 74% saying they do so. Gen Xers are most likely to leave work entirely at the office, with 42% saying they don’t
59% of millennials say they’d lie to their boss about not having Wi-Fi to avoid working on vacation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, office, working, lie, workers, vacation, avoid, email, boss, work, wifi, having, millennials, vacations, theyre, check, likely, theyd, say


59% of millennials say they'd lie to their boss about not having Wi-Fi to avoid working on vacation

“Apologies for my delayed response; I was out of office without Internet access.” For some workers, being out of office on vacation also means being out of range for Wi-Fi and cellphone service — or at least that’s what they want you to think.

A recent survey found nearly half of workers would lie to their bosses about not having reception in order to avoid checking work email while away.

According to the 2019 Vacation Confidence Index released by Allianz Global Assistance, millennials are most likely to use the excuse, with 59% saying they’d fib in order to temper the expectation of checking in while traveling. The next generation most likely to lie are Gen Xers (49%), followed by boomers (32%).

Despite their willingness to lie, millennials are also the most likely to actually fire up their work email while they’re supposed to be unplugging, with 74% saying they do so. But for the most part, it’s not because their bosses expect them to be online.

Instead, workers of all ages are most likely to check email while on vacation because it makes it easier to catch up on work when they’re back in the office. The pressure of falling behind is another major reason workers say they’d prefer taking a three-day weekend trip rather than a longer getaway to unwind.

Working vacations, on which travelers set boundaries around logging a few hours while at their destination, might be a compromise to ease the stress that can come with taking time off. Given the option, 54% of workers would prefer to go on more vacations but check in on work more often, rather than take less time off where they’re completely disconnected.

Gen Xers are most likely to leave work entirely at the office, with 42% saying they don’t check email at all.

Overall, two in three workers across generations say “email creep,” or the pressure to stay connected while on vacation, has impacted their personal time. And yet a quarter of working Americans surveyed say they avoid destinations where poor reception could disrupt their ability to check in at the office.

“Most working Americans feel pressured to spend their vacations attached to their work email, when they may just need a few days to unplug,” said Daniel Durazo, director of marketing and communications at Allianz, in a release. “Consequently, half of U.S. workers are willing to lie about lack of connectivity to set them free from work obligations.”

Whether or not you feel tempted to check in while doing it, the benefits of actually taking time off are proven, from a boost in creativity to higher productivity to improved health.

But if you’re spending more time on work email than relaxing during your last poolside lounge of the season? Here’s every excuse you’ve ever made for not unplugging on vacation — busted.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: The 10 best places to vacation across America


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, office, working, lie, workers, vacation, avoid, email, boss, work, wifi, having, millennials, vacations, theyre, check, likely, theyd, say


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UK opposition leader Corbyn writes to Queen over parliament suspension

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more


Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more
UK opposition leader Corbyn writes to Queen over parliament suspension Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, warren, tariffs, uk, corbyn, trumps, leader, queen, opposition, ticket, theyre, sanders, voters, white, support, suspension, parliament, say


UK opposition leader Corbyn writes to Queen over parliament suspension

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White House

There’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates…

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, warren, tariffs, uk, corbyn, trumps, leader, queen, opposition, ticket, theyre, sanders, voters, white, support, suspension, parliament, say


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American Airlines stock cratered this month but upside may follow, says JP Morgan

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more


Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more
American Airlines stock cratered this month but upside may follow, says JP Morgan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cratered, warren, morgan, tariffs, american, month, follow, stock, trumps, theyre, upside, jp, airlines, ticket, voters, white, support, sanders, say


American Airlines stock cratered this month but upside may follow, says JP Morgan

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White House

There’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates…

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cratered, warren, morgan, tariffs, american, month, follow, stock, trumps, theyre, upside, jp, airlines, ticket, voters, white, support, sanders, say


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The US-China trade war is making Ralph Lauren’s turnaround less likely, says Bank of America

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more


Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more
The US-China trade war is making Ralph Lauren’s turnaround less likely, says Bank of America Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-26  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, america, bank, tariffs, ralph, making, turnaround, war, trade, trumps, theyre, ticket, sanders, voters, white, likely, support, uschina, laurens, say


The US-China trade war is making Ralph Lauren's turnaround less likely, says Bank of America

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White House

There’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates…

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-26  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, america, bank, tariffs, ralph, making, turnaround, war, trade, trumps, theyre, ticket, sanders, voters, white, likely, support, uschina, laurens, say


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This shop in Seattle can fix the original Tesla Roadsters that Elon Musk left behind

Now, Roadster owners are turning to Carl Medlock, a former service manager at the company, and his Roadster rehab shop in Seattle, which he runs with two of his sons, Randy and Austin. Roadster drivers may be some of the earliest supporters of Tesla , but many feel neglected by Elon Musk’s car company. Although Tesla put the customer in a loaner Model S while he was waiting, he eventually took his Roadster to Medlock. Typically, people go to Medlock & Sons to fix their crashed Roadsters, or to h


Now, Roadster owners are turning to Carl Medlock, a former service manager at the company, and his Roadster rehab shop in Seattle, which he runs with two of his sons, Randy and Austin. Roadster drivers may be some of the earliest supporters of Tesla , but many feel neglected by Elon Musk’s car company. Although Tesla put the customer in a loaner Model S while he was waiting, he eventually took his Roadster to Medlock. Typically, people go to Medlock & Sons to fix their crashed Roadsters, or to h
This shop in Seattle can fix the original Tesla Roadsters that Elon Musk left behind Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-24  Authors: lora kolodny andrew evers, lora kolodny, andrew evers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, original, musk, model, service, fix, seattle, elon, medlock, sons, theyre, roadsters, left, shop, tesla, customer, roadster, owners


This shop in Seattle can fix the original Tesla Roadsters that Elon Musk left behind

Now, Roadster owners are turning to Carl Medlock, a former service manager at the company, and his Roadster rehab shop in Seattle, which he runs with two of his sons, Randy and Austin.

Roadster drivers may be some of the earliest supporters of Tesla , but many feel neglected by Elon Musk’s car company. Unlike owners of the newer Model S, X or 3, they can’t book a service appointment through the Tesla app, and the carmaker doesn’t manufacture spare parts for their vehicles even though they’re only about 11 years old.

Since 2014, the tucked-away repair shop Medlock & Sons has been one of the only places where Roadster owners can send their beloved electric cars for serious repairs, upgrades or maintenance if they’re not getting what they need from Tesla.

One customer had his Roadster waiting at a Tesla service center for over a year because the component it required, a 400-volt controller, wasn’t available according to records Medlock shared with CNBC. Although Tesla put the customer in a loaner Model S while he was waiting, he eventually took his Roadster to Medlock.

Typically, people go to Medlock & Sons to fix their crashed Roadsters, or to have their Roadster electronics rebuilt, ceramic coatings painted on, or to have sound reduction, custom audio or custom headlights installed. Many of the shop’s clients are leaders in the tech industry, or actors and other celebrities, who refer to Medlock as the “Roadster whisperer.”

David Vaskevitch, Microsoft’s former chief technology officer and CEO of Mylio, trusts Medlock with his car.

“He took my Roadster, installed sound installation, made a couple of other changes and it became like a different car,” Vaskevitch said in an interview. “And I just like the guy! He’s very honest, straightforward. I like people who love what they’re doing and that’s Carl to a t.”

Another longtime customer is writer James Whittaker, a distinguished engineer at Microsoft today and former Google engineering director.

“Carl tinkers,” said Whittaker. “Tech people appreciate it. We love people who can nerd out and build things.”

Whittaker called Medlock a hero to the Roadster community, which felt brushed aside when Tesla began to focus on the Model S and a new generation of customers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-24  Authors: lora kolodny andrew evers, lora kolodny, andrew evers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, original, musk, model, service, fix, seattle, elon, medlock, sons, theyre, roadsters, left, shop, tesla, customer, roadster, owners


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Hong Kong accountants join protests, but they’re ‘civilized and calm’

Accountants in Hong Kong took to the streets on Friday to call for the government to accept five demands of the people, including the complete withdrawal of a now-suspended extradition bill. “It’s time for us to stage a really civilized and calm march in the central business district to show that we’re still not happy with how the whole issue has been handled, and (the) government has to respond positively to the demands of the people,” Hong Kong legislator, Kenneth Leung, told CNBC on Friday, a


Accountants in Hong Kong took to the streets on Friday to call for the government to accept five demands of the people, including the complete withdrawal of a now-suspended extradition bill. “It’s time for us to stage a really civilized and calm march in the central business district to show that we’re still not happy with how the whole issue has been handled, and (the) government has to respond positively to the demands of the people,” Hong Kong legislator, Kenneth Leung, told CNBC on Friday, a
Hong Kong accountants join protests, but they’re ‘civilized and calm’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kong, central, civilized, protests, district, theyre, accountants, join, told, territory, demands, hong, withdrawal, took, calm, systems


Hong Kong accountants join protests, but they're 'civilized and calm'

Accountants in Hong Kong took to the streets on Friday to call for the government to accept five demands of the people, including the complete withdrawal of a now-suspended extradition bill.

“It’s time for us to stage a really civilized and calm march in the central business district to show that we’re still not happy with how the whole issue has been handled, and (the) government has to respond positively to the demands of the people,” Hong Kong legislator, Kenneth Leung, told CNBC on Friday, ahead of the march.

The march was set to take place from Chater Garden, in the central district of Hong Kong, to the central government office.

Hong Kong was a British colony until 1997, when it became a special administrative region of China under the “one country, two systems” framework which allows the territory a certain degree of legal and economic autonomy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kong, central, civilized, protests, district, theyre, accountants, join, told, territory, demands, hong, withdrawal, took, calm, systems


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