A ‘CEO whisperer’ who charges 5 figures a month shares the 2 most common problems he sees

“They look at me like I’m a spaceship because they don’t feel like they deserve to be having fun,” he says. In fact, it’s one of the most common problems he needs to fix among executives and CEOs: They no longer like their job. So Weiss helped him create an environment that encouraged risk-taking ­— even if it resulted in failure. This small change helped to not only to inspire his team to be more creative but helped the executive reignite his passion for the job. However, around 50% of executiv


“They look at me like I’m a spaceship because they don’t feel like they deserve to be having fun,” he says. In fact, it’s one of the most common problems he needs to fix among executives and CEOs: They no longer like their job. So Weiss helped him create an environment that encouraged risk-taking ­— even if it resulted in failure. This small change helped to not only to inspire his team to be more creative but helped the executive reignite his passion for the job. However, around 50% of executiv
A ‘CEO whisperer’ who charges 5 figures a month shares the 2 most common problems he sees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, dont, shares, month, helped, weiss, team, charges, sees, work, things, executives, figures, coaching, whisperer, change, problems, ceos, common


A 'CEO whisperer' who charges 5 figures a month shares the 2 most common problems he sees

Alan Weiss — who calls himself the “million dollar” coach for his expertise in helping people and businesses bring in big profits — says it takes a lot of “tough love” for him to fix a CEO’s professional problems. Weiss, CEO and founder of Summit Consulting Group, has coached more than 340 executives and CEOs from Fortune 500 corporations such as Merck, Hewlett-Packard, GE and the Federal Reserve over the last 30-plus years. He says he now typically charges companies and executives $35,000 to $40,000 a month for one-on-one coaching, as well as $15,000 to $25,000 per person to participate in his two- to three-day small group boot camps. Weiss says while he has been called in to help with every workplace issue under the sun, the two most common problems he sees among CEOs are some of the same issues most workers deal with.

‘They’re not having fun anymore’

The 73-year-old consultant, who is currently coaching six executives from various industries including tech, pharma and media, says the first thing he does with executives is have them “metaphorically clean off their desktop” so they can focus on coaching and diagnose the problem at hand. Then he asks what is usually his first coaching question: Are you having fun? “They look at me like I’m a spaceship because they don’t feel like they deserve to be having fun,” he says. In fact, it’s one of the most common problems he needs to fix among executives and CEOs: They no longer like their job. The solution, says Weiss, is to find and focus on what still “jazzes” someone about their work. For example, one leader at a large company thrived off innovation and creativity, but his team wasn’t delivering in that area. So Weiss helped him create an environment that encouraged risk-taking ­— even if it resulted in failure. “What he did was at the end of the year when they had their annual awards ceremony to reward those who had high sales or the best service, he started giving out an award for ‘the best idea that didn’t work’,” says Weiss, who wrote the book “Million Dollar Consulting. This small change helped to not only to inspire his team to be more creative but helped the executive reignite his passion for the job. Weiss also often encourages his clients “to go see their customers or go walk around and talk to their employees,” he says, and since most people get excited to show off their skills and teach others what they know, Weiss encourages mentorship.

They believe ‘nobody can do things as well I can’

Weiss says he once worked with a newbie CEO of a billion-dollar organization who was putting in about 80 hours a week because he was convinced that to get things done right, he had to do everything himself; it made his employees feel micromanaged and his wife unhappy. While it’s important to work hard, working hard on the wrong things or things that don’t matter can lead down a dark and unsuccessful road, says Weiss. And that feeling of “nobody can do things as well or as fast as I can,” is the other big issue he sees in leaders. The key to effective delegating is to help people understand that “there’s no such thing as perfection. It doesn’t exist, and perfection always kills excellence,” Weiss says. With the 80-hour executive, Weiss says he helped him understand that when an employee is performing tasks that are “good enough,” leave it at that and move on. With that understanding, Weiss helped the executive identify the high-level tasks he absolutely had to do due to his level of expertise, but he also helped him figure out who on his team could best handle the rest of the work. After learning to delegate, his client eventually reduced his hours to around 60 a week, making both his employees happier and his wife “ecstatic.”

How to make a change

Despite the hefty retainer, Weiss says about 25% of his clients will likely never change. “They are scared because they don’t want to admit that they’ve been doing something wrong all this time and now if they change, they’ve wasted all those years,” he says. However, around 50% of executives are willing and seeking change, he says, but making that happen requires an open mind. “If you look at the most successful athletes or entertainers or business people, they all have coaches,” Weiss says. “You need somebody outside of yourself who can look at you objectively and whom you trust.” But that person doesn’t have to be a professional coach. Joining a professional group in your field or getting a mentor can be a way to learn and seek advice from similar-minded colleagues, Weiss says. Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook. Don’t miss: Google execs reveal secrets to success they got from Silicon Valley’s ‘trillion dollar’ business coach


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, dont, shares, month, helped, weiss, team, charges, sees, work, things, executives, figures, coaching, whisperer, change, problems, ceos, common


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Investing in bonds: Rick Santelli’s 5 things you need to know

If the thought of investing in bonds overwhelms you, you aren’t alone. Between the different types of securities and the varying yields available in the $43.1 trillion dollar bond market, investors may have a hard time sorting it all out. That’s because stocks tend to be riskier, while bonds are considered a safer investment. In fact, the age-old rule of thumb is the “60-40” rule — which means 60% of your portfolio should be in stocks and 40% in fixed-income. So, what do you need to know when it


If the thought of investing in bonds overwhelms you, you aren’t alone. Between the different types of securities and the varying yields available in the $43.1 trillion dollar bond market, investors may have a hard time sorting it all out. That’s because stocks tend to be riskier, while bonds are considered a safer investment. In fact, the age-old rule of thumb is the “60-40” rule — which means 60% of your portfolio should be in stocks and 40% in fixed-income. So, what do you need to know when it
Investing in bonds: Rick Santelli’s 5 things you need to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, investing, bonds, portfolio, yields, rick, need, stocks, things, thumb, thought, types, santellis, rule, varying, trillion


Investing in bonds: Rick Santelli's 5 things you need to know

If the thought of investing in bonds overwhelms you, you aren’t alone.

Between the different types of securities and the varying yields available in the $43.1 trillion dollar bond market, investors may have a hard time sorting it all out.

Yet if you want a balanced portfolio, experts say it’s important to include fixed-income assets. That’s because stocks tend to be riskier, while bonds are considered a safer investment. In fact, the age-old rule of thumb is the “60-40” rule — which means 60% of your portfolio should be in stocks and 40% in fixed-income.

So, what do you need to know when it comes to bonds?

CNBC on-air editor Rick Santelli has the answers to five key questions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, investing, bonds, portfolio, yields, rick, need, stocks, things, thumb, thought, types, santellis, rule, varying, trillion


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Want your resume to sail to the top of the pile? Make sure you do all these things

But armed with that knowledge, you can now tailor your resume so it uses AI to your advantage. Given all these behind-the-scenes algorithms, job hunters need to know how their resume looks to computer “eyes” rather than human ones. “The algorithms are really good at deducing these are the key skills for a job,” Siegel said. Have an up-to-date formatAlgorithms try to turn the information on your resume into usable data, said Siegel, so make sure you use a traditional, text-based format. The magic


But armed with that knowledge, you can now tailor your resume so it uses AI to your advantage. Given all these behind-the-scenes algorithms, job hunters need to know how their resume looks to computer “eyes” rather than human ones. “The algorithms are really good at deducing these are the key skills for a job,” Siegel said. Have an up-to-date formatAlgorithms try to turn the information on your resume into usable data, said Siegel, so make sure you use a traditional, text-based format. The magic
Want your resume to sail to the top of the pile? Make sure you do all these things Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skills, meier, sure, experience, algorithms, siegel, resumes, match, pile, resume, sail, job, ai, things


Want your resume to sail to the top of the pile? Make sure you do all these things

You use Siri and Alexa, aka artificial intelligence, to find pizza or get the forecast. Now, AI is a deep but unseen part of your job hunt. Companies increasingly use AI to cut down on guesswork. Instead of sorting through thousands of resumes, they can instantly seek out those with the resumes that match what employers are looking for. That’s great for them, but how does that help you? It doesn’t. But armed with that knowledge, you can now tailor your resume so it uses AI to your advantage. You do that by knowing how the algorithms work.

Pixsooz | Getty Images

Just as spellcheck alerts you to a typo, other algorithms pore over your electronically submitted resume for misspellings, grammar and information about your work history. With thousands of previous versions of a job that can be scanned, the algorithm uses the available data on resumes to find the best candidates for a talent recruiter, according to Ian Siegel, CEO of ZipRecruiter, an online job marketplace. “Machine learning can cherry pick and rapidly learn from the employer how to do a lookalike search,” Siegel said. “That turns out to be by far the best method you can use to match.” More from Invest in You:

What hiring managers want to see in your social profile

You didn’t get that job. Was it because of your thank you note?

These people in their 30s are doing a simple thing to get rich On the other side of the job hunt, AI can match a person to a pool of applicants who have experience or skills in common with the job seeker and show the jobs they’ve applied to. “AI is the new version of keyword algorithms,” which have been around since the 1990s, said Robert Meier, a job transition expert and CEO of JobMarketExperts, which deals with a range of employment issues. What they look for: continuity of work history, job title progression and education. “Specific companies may have different metrics they look for, such as software experience or credentials,” Meier said. What has changed is the number of applicants. Digital applications are easy and free, Meier says, and any job opening now has so many more candidates for a company to screen. But most are eliminated almost immediately, and only the top 2% of candidates make it to the interview, according to Meier. Given all these behind-the-scenes algorithms, job hunters need to know how their resume looks to computer “eyes” rather than human ones. Here are five things to consider with resumes you will submit electronically.

1. Be straightforward

“Put things in the simplest, most straightforward language possible,” Siegel said. Clearly list your skills and the years of experience you have with each one. Instead of “professional sound engineer with varied experience in wide variety of software,” check the job description for specifics. Better to say you’re a sound engineer with four years’ experience using Avid Pro Tools. “The algorithms are really good at deducing these are the key skills for a job,” Siegel said.

2. Spelling counts

It’s critical to remember that algorithms on job sites scan for a range of signals. “You might be cavalier about spelling and grammar,” Siegel said. “That’s an easy signal.” For most companies, that means your resume is automatically discarded.

3. Have an up-to-date format

Algorithms try to turn the information on your resume into usable data, said Siegel, so make sure you use a traditional, text-based format. Don’t use Photoshop on your resume: The algorithm can’t derive data from a picture. “Use a modern text editor,” Siegel said. “WordPerfect will make for a challenging document.”

4. The magic of ‘results’

A resume filled with results — not duties and responsibilities — attracts employers like moths to a flame, JobMarketExperts’ Meier said. Phrase your accomplishments as revenue, income or money saved. Perhaps you made some aspect of a company function more efficient or found a way to cut costs. A resume that includes specific numbers, percentages and quantities will get a closer look.

5. Have a mobile-ready resume


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skills, meier, sure, experience, algorithms, siegel, resumes, match, pile, resume, sail, job, ai, things


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5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments


An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments
5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


5G rollout will 'make things better' for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019.

The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon.

“I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.

“I think there is a lot of research and development that we’ve done and I know others have done as well to make sure that 5G doesn’t just bring speed and reliability, but also that it’s done in a secure manner and addresses any of those kinds of concerns,” Novak said.

Novak’s comments come amid increasing scrutiny on companies seeking to win contracts to develop 5G capabilities for national networks. Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is chief among the firms under the spotlight as the U.S. seeks to dissuade America’s allies from purchasing its equipment, with claims that the firm is “too close to the government. ”

Recent moves by the U.S. have reportedly resulted in major tech companies limiting their employees’ access to Huawei. On May 16, the U.S. Department of Commerce put Huawei on a blacklist, barring it from doing business with American companies without government approval, then a few days later it authorized firms to interact with Huawei in standards bodies through August “as necessary for the development of 5G standards.”

For its part, U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration appears to have a conflicting stance on Huawei.

Trump told CNBC on Monday that Huawei could be part of the U.S. trade negotiation with China, contradicting remarks by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told CNBC on Sunday that Washington’s concerns surrounding the telecommunications behemoth are “national security” issues separate from trade.

On the subject of whether banning perceived bad actors from developing 5G networks would reduce the likelihood of data breaches, Novak said: “To be honest, it’s not even just the espionage element. In reality, the bigger percentage of that pie is actually financially motivated breaches.”

“If you actually roll back and look at the last decade, we’ve got almost about a half million security incidents that we’ve looked at over the course of that research,” he said. “While espionage plays a role in things and I think that’s kind of fired up a lot of the conversation here, I think ultimately there’s a lot of other facets to what we see happening in the cybersecurity and data breach landscape.”

— Reuters and CNBC’s Kate Fazzini contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


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Amazon will be ‘left alone’ by regulators while other big tech companies suffer, Stifel says

Trump wants NASA to go to Mars, not the moon like he declared…”NASA should NOT be talking about going to the Moon,” Trump tweeted. “We did that 50 years ago. They should be focused on the much bigger things we are doing, including Mars… Politicsread more


Trump wants NASA to go to Mars, not the moon like he declared…”NASA should NOT be talking about going to the Moon,” Trump tweeted. “We did that 50 years ago. They should be focused on the much bigger things we are doing, including Mars… Politicsread more
Amazon will be ‘left alone’ by regulators while other big tech companies suffer, Stifel says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, suffer, amazon, talking, left, stifel, wants, marspoliticsread, mars, tech, companies, tweeted, nasa, things, moon, including, trump, regulators


Amazon will be 'left alone' by regulators while other big tech companies suffer, Stifel says

Trump wants NASA to go to Mars, not the moon like he declared…

“NASA should NOT be talking about going to the Moon,” Trump tweeted. “We did that 50 years ago. They should be focused on the much bigger things we are doing, including Mars…

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
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Need to switch careers? These 5 things can get you there without spending a dime

You’re ready for a job change, but you’re concerned about the cost of retraining. Wilding says she likes thinking of a career change as an opportunity to reset and be intentional about crafting your career to fit who you are. In fact, Wilding said, just knowing she had a parachute made her determined to try to make things work at her current job. “You never want to make a career change from a place of desperation,” Wilding said. Be willing to talk to anyone and everyone in the industry you’re in


You’re ready for a job change, but you’re concerned about the cost of retraining. Wilding says she likes thinking of a career change as an opportunity to reset and be intentional about crafting your career to fit who you are. In fact, Wilding said, just knowing she had a parachute made her determined to try to make things work at her current job. “You never want to make a career change from a place of desperation,” Wilding said. Be willing to talk to anyone and everyone in the industry you’re in
Need to switch careers? These 5 things can get you there without spending a dime Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jill cornfield, megan rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, youd, dime, switch, contact, things, need, job, spending, start, dont, careers, wilding, change, youre, work


Need to switch careers? These 5 things can get you there without spending a dime

You’re ready for a job change, but you’re concerned about the cost of retraining. Switching careers doesn’t have to mean a new degree and a lot of debt. Depending on your goal, you might be able to train for a new industry and save a bundle. “There’s so much to tackle, and so many options,” said Melody Wilding, a licensed social worker whose New York practice is career and executive coaching. Wilding is the author of an upcoming book on high-achieving, highly perceptive individuals in the workplace. Wilding says she likes thinking of a career change as an opportunity to reset and be intentional about crafting your career to fit who you are. Start creating a plan. Sketch out a calendar of how many people you will reach out to each week. How many people will you ask for coffee? Start with LinkedIn messages asking how people are and what they are up to. Instead of going in and asking immediately for a direct introduction, start with some relationship building. Be sure to get your finances in order. Pay down debt and build up an emergency cushion. When a client of Wilding’s saw she had a solid six months of financial room, it gave her tremendous peace of mind. In fact, Wilding said, just knowing she had a parachute made her determined to try to make things work at her current job. “You never want to make a career change from a place of desperation,” Wilding said.

1. Look inward

A good place to start is with a thorough self-assessment. “Get clear on what you want,” Wilding said. Here’s some good news. That inner assessment can be free. No need to pay for therapy or coaching, Wilding says. Do a mental run-through of your current job as well as some previous positions. Take stock of what you enjoyed most — and definitely pay attention to what you hope never to do again. Go through your perfect work day step by step, and add plenty of detail. “Most of us never take that time,” Wilding said. “Instead, we react to a career we fall into.”

2. It’s who you know

Start with a list of people you know from college, past jobs, networking events and family friends and relatives. “Don’t be afraid to contact someone you don’t know well,” Wilding said. Be willing to talk to anyone and everyone in the industry you’re interested in, says Win Sheffield, a New York work coach who specializes in career change. An easy way to find people: Check your own college’s LinkedIn page. On the left is a link to alumni, which lets you search by title, keyword or name of company.

Don’t be afraid to contact someone you don’t know well. Melody Wilding Careers coach

“It’s sometimes better to contact people from out of town,” Sheffield said, “so they don’t assume you are just asking them for a job or a referral.” Simply tell them you’d like to find out what it’s like to be a whatever, and ask for some pointers. Read blogs by people in the field to see what excites them, what’s new and trending, what frustrates them. Before you commit to joining a professional organization, see if you can attend one of the meetings, says Sheffield. It’s a good way to make contacts and learn something about the industry.

3. Take a test drive

Find out if the vision in your head matches the reality, Wilding says. It’s a great idea to shadow someone throughout their work day. You may already have someone in your circle, either a direct or indirect contact, who can introduce you to a person who holds the role you’d like to be in. Hanging out with this person for a work day or even the morning can give you a taste of the company or of a specific job. You might want to offer to pick up their lunch tab as a thank-you. More from Invest in You:

The magic strategy that can save retirement for people in their 40s

Here’s what it takes to become a 401(k) millionaire at any age

Do these five things to get to your first $10,000 even if you’re broke

4. Find a guiding light

It may not be easy to find a mentor, but give it a shot. “The best mentors are invested in your growth,” Wilding said. You want someone you can meet with regularly. Make it clear you’re going to put as little work as possible on their plate.

One of Wilding’s clients regularly brought a deck of design work, so all the mentor had to do was show up and give a critique. Try expanding your skills in your current job. Wilding recommends initiating new ideas for stretch projects and new challenges you’d like to take on with your supervisor. These can be tailored to the job and industry you’d like to work in. “A new initiative, a new client project, new skills, such as coding,” she said. “Come to them with a proposal and make it an easy yes or no.” Be specific. Say something along the lines of, “I’ve got this idea for XYZ. How can we make it work?” Make sure you ask for feedback. What areas need improvement, and what areas showed the most growth? “It’s so valuable,” Wilding said. “We can’t see everything ourselves.”

5. Say yes to free classes


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jill cornfield, megan rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, youd, dime, switch, contact, things, need, job, spending, start, dont, careers, wilding, change, youre, work


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Here are all the cool new things you’ll be able to do with Siri soon

Control music beyond Apple Music and iTunesA phone with a Spotify music application is seen in this photo illustration. Jaap Arriens | NurPhoto | Getty ImagesRight now, Siri will play music only from Apple services like Apple Music and iTunes — and nothing else. Soon, you’ll be able to say “Siri, play rock from Pandora,” and she’ll queue that app up. Soon, you’ll be able to say “Siri, navigate to 30 Rock with Waze” or “Siri, navigate to Yankee Stadium with Google Maps” and Siri will do that. So


Control music beyond Apple Music and iTunesA phone with a Spotify music application is seen in this photo illustration. Jaap Arriens | NurPhoto | Getty ImagesRight now, Siri will play music only from Apple services like Apple Music and iTunes — and nothing else. Soon, you’ll be able to say “Siri, play rock from Pandora,” and she’ll queue that app up. Soon, you’ll be able to say “Siri, navigate to 30 Rock with Waze” or “Siri, navigate to Yankee Stadium with Google Maps” and Siri will do that. So
Here are all the cool new things you’ll be able to do with Siri soon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youll, soon, things, right, able, cool, siri, apple, google, music, play, assistant


Here are all the cool new things you'll be able to do with Siri soon

Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of Software Engineering, speaks at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, Calif., Monday, June 3, 2019. Jeff Chiu | AP

Apple talked about a lot during its annual developer conference keynote on Monday, but it didn’t spend a ton of time going over the changes coming to its Siri voice assistant. That’s surprising, as Siri is ubiquitous in Apple products — from the iPhone to CarPlay to Apple TV. It also lags behind competitors like Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant in certain areas, which has to be a sore spot for Apple, since Siri predates these other personal assistants by several years. But Apple is making some notable improvements to Siri this fall, and I got to check a few of them out during WWDC 2019. You’ll start to see them this fall when Apple rolls out new software, including iOS 13 for the iPhone and iPad. Here’s a rundown:

A less robotic voice

Craig Federighi, Apple Senior Vice President Software Engineering Stephen Lam | Reuters

If you’ve used Google Assistant and then gone back to Siri, you’ve probably noticed Siri sounds pretty robotic. That’s because Siri’s voice was really just a bunch of spliced audio clips, so sometimes the cadence of a word didn’t quite fit a sentence. Apple said Siri will soon have a new voice that’s entirely generated by software, which will allow it to sound more accurate. I heard it and I thought it sounded better, but still not quite as good as John Legend’s voice on Google Assistant. I’m sure it’ll continue to improve in the months before the new model launches.

Control music beyond Apple Music and iTunes

A phone with a Spotify music application is seen in this photo illustration. Jaap Arriens | NurPhoto | Getty Images

Right now, Siri will play music only from Apple services like Apple Music and iTunes — and nothing else. It’s a bad look, since Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant let you play music from any other service. But Apple is opening Siri to outside servcies with a new SiriKit Audio tool for app developers. Soon, you’ll be able to say “Siri, play rock from Pandora,” and she’ll queue that app up. It supports audiobooks and podcasts as well. Spotify has not announced support for it yet, but the tool is open to any app developer, so it would make sense for Spotify to add it in order to be more integrated with Apple’s platforms. Siri will also play more than 100,000 live radio stations, with no other app required. All you’ll have to do is ask Siri to play the station you want, like “Hey Siri, play 99.9 The Hawk,” and Siri will pull up the live station right through Apple Music. I haven’t spent much time listening to old favorite stations — like The Hawk — but maybe I will now that it’ll be easier to call them up.

Navigate with Waze or Google Maps

Check your commute. Todd Haselton | CNBC

As is the case with music, Siri can only navigate using Apple services, like Apple Maps. But that changes with the update this fall. Soon, you’ll be able to say “Siri, navigate to 30 Rock with Waze” or “Siri, navigate to Yankee Stadium with Google Maps” and Siri will do that.

Works better with AirPods

Second-generation Apple AirPods Todd Haselton | CNBC

Siri will soon be able to read a message right into your AirPods while you’re walking, and it will use the AirPods’ microphones to understand if you’re talking and avoid interrupting you — even if you’re talking to somebody in front of you, rather than through your phone. You’ll also be able to respond right away without having to tap a button or say “Hey Siri” first. So, if your spouse texts you, Siri will read the message to you through your AirPods and you’ll be able to dictate your response right back.

Recognizes different people talking to HomePod

CNBC

One of my biggest complaints with Apple’s home speaker, the HomePod, is that it doesn’t have multi-user support. So, while Siri can read out my messages or send them, or play some of my favorite music, it doesn’t recognize my wife as a separate person and account when she speaks. That will change this fall when HomePod will get support for multiple users, which means Siri will respond appropriately when my wife asks what’s on her calendar and when I ask what’s on mine.

Identify songs from your Apple Watch

Apple Watch Series 4 Todd Haselton | CNBC

Apple is putting its acquisition of music-identifying app Shazam to better use. Right now, you can ask Siri on your iPhone to identify a song. Soon, you’ll also be able to ask Siri to identify what song is playing right from your wrist. Just raise your Apple Watch and ask Siri to identify the tune. I wish Apple had followed in Google’s footsteps, though, by letting you run this feature in the background at all times — you can set the Google Pixel to identify whatever music is playing around you, without having to give it a command each time.

Simpler Shortcuts

Choose from a bunch of Siri shortcuts in the gallery. Todd Haselton | CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youll, soon, things, right, able, cool, siri, apple, google, music, play, assistant


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Need a summer reading list? Stanford professors say these 5 books will boost your success and value in life

But at the end of the day, it all comes down to how much value you bring to the world. Georgia Hunter says it took her nearly a decade of research to write “We Were the Lucky Ones.” She recorded family narratives, translated old letters and documents and reached out to a number of people, museums and organizations. This truly moving novel shows that even in the toughest battles, empathy and love can be our strongest weapons. “Swimming With Sharks: My Journey Into the World of Bankers,” by Joris


But at the end of the day, it all comes down to how much value you bring to the world. Georgia Hunter says it took her nearly a decade of research to write “We Were the Lucky Ones.” She recorded family narratives, translated old letters and documents and reached out to a number of people, museums and organizations. This truly moving novel shows that even in the toughest battles, empathy and love can be our strongest weapons. “Swimming With Sharks: My Journey Into the World of Bankers,” by Joris
Need a summer reading list? Stanford professors say these 5 books will boost your success and value in life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: john hall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, list, swimming, ones, need, sector, novel, lucky, reading, things, professor, life, stanford, success, summer, world, sharks, say, value, professors


Need a summer reading list? Stanford professors say these 5 books will boost your success and value in life

Success can mean different things to different people. For some, it’s fame and fortune. For others, it’s a prestigious job. But at the end of the day, it all comes down to how much value you bring to the world.

As Bill Gates once said, “When a country has the skill and self-confidence to take action against its biggest problems, it makes outsiders eager to be a part of it.”

Recently, Stanford Business magazine asked faculty members from the Stanford Graduate School of Business to recommend books that inspired them to place the common good above their own personal interests:

1. “We Were the Lucky Ones, ” by Georgia Hunter

Recommended by Szu-chi Huang, Associate Professor of Marketing

Inspired by the true story of a Jewish family who was separated at the start of World War II, this novel demonstrates the resolve and power of the human spirit. Georgia Hunter says it took her nearly a decade of research to write “We Were the Lucky Ones.” She recorded family narratives, translated old letters and documents and reached out to a number of people, museums and organizations. This truly moving novel shows that even in the toughest battles, empathy and love can be our strongest weapons.

2. “Swimming With Sharks: My Journey Into the World of Bankers,” by Joris Luyendijk

Recommended by Peter A.E. Koudijs, Associate Professor of Finance

It’s interesting to get a behind-the-scenes look at the ugly underbelly of the financial sector: A brewing pot of toxic culture, burnout, backstabbing and bonus-obsessed co-workers — especially through the lens of Joris Luyendijk, an investigative journalist who knew very little about banking prior to writing the book. While “Swimming with Sharks” is a tale of greed and dishonesty, it does offer plenty of insight into what future leaders in the sector can do to implement a culture driven by positive values.

3. “No Longer at Ease,” by Chinua Achebe

Recommended by Scotty McLennan, Lecturer in Political Economy

From the author of the best-selling book “Things Fall Apart,” this novel tells the story of a young and educated man who returns home from university abroad full of high hopes and new principles.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: john hall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, list, swimming, ones, need, sector, novel, lucky, reading, things, professor, life, stanford, success, summer, world, sharks, say, value, professors


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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan won’t challenge Trump for 2020 GOP presidential nomination

“I’m not going to be a candidate for president in 2020,” Hogan told the Post. “I have a commitment to the 6 million people of Maryland and a lot of work to do, things we haven’t completed,” the governor told the Post. “There are more things I want to get done, and I also don’t want to go on some fool’s errand,” Hogan said. Though Hogan has bowed out, Trump will face a challenge from at least one other candidate. William Weld, former Republican governor of Massachusetts, announced in April that h


“I’m not going to be a candidate for president in 2020,” Hogan told the Post. “I have a commitment to the 6 million people of Maryland and a lot of work to do, things we haven’t completed,” the governor told the Post. “There are more things I want to get done, and I also don’t want to go on some fool’s errand,” Hogan said. Though Hogan has bowed out, Trump will face a challenge from at least one other candidate. William Weld, former Republican governor of Massachusetts, announced in April that h
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan won’t challenge Trump for 2020 GOP presidential nomination Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-01  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, larry, trump, washington, things, wont, maryland, challenge, told, president, presidential, republican, nomination, governor, gop, state, hogan, gov


Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan won't challenge Trump for 2020 GOP presidential nomination

Maryland Gov. Larry Logan told The Washington Post that he will not challenge President Donald Trump for the 2020 GOP nomination, ending his flirtation with a possible insurgent campaign that would have offered an alternative to moderate Republicans who are dissatisfied with Trump’s tenure in office.

“I’m not going to be a candidate for president in 2020,” Hogan told the Post.

The popular, centrist governor said he did not want to be pulled away from his duties in Annapolis by a long-shot campaign against an incumbent president who remains popular with the party base.

“I have a commitment to the 6 million people of Maryland and a lot of work to do, things we haven’t completed,” the governor told the Post.

A Republican governing in a largely Democratic state, Hogan managed to win a second term in 2018 despite the blue wave that gave Democrats control of the House of Representatives in Washington.

Hogan has a very high approval rating in Maryland. Eighty percent of Marylanders approved of his handling of state government in a February poll. But 55% said he should not run for president.

In an interview with CNBC in March, Hogan said he would consider challenging Trump “if the president weakened and I really thought it was important to the country,” but even at that time he suggested that scenario was unlikely.

“There are more things I want to get done, and I also don’t want to go on some fool’s errand,” Hogan said. “Nobody’s successfully challenged a sitting president in their primary since 1884, and I don’t want to just run around the country and put my family and everybody through that kind of an effort for no reason.”

Hogan is the son of the only Republican in Congress to vote for all three articles of impeachment against President Richard Nixon during the Watergate crisis.

Trump said he would formally announce his re-election bid on June 18 at a rally in Orlando, Florida.

Though Hogan has bowed out, Trump will face a challenge from at least one other candidate. William Weld, former Republican governor of Massachusetts, announced in April that he would challenged the president for the nomination.

Read the full story in The Washington Post.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-01  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, larry, trump, washington, things, wont, maryland, challenge, told, president, presidential, republican, nomination, governor, gop, state, hogan, gov


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Costco sold someone a $400,000 diamond ring

Did you know you can buy diamond rings at Costco? It didn’t say which ring, exactly, but a search on Costco’s website reveals only one ring priced in the $400,000 range: A “Round Brilliant 10.03 carat VS1 Clarity, I Color Diamond Platinum Solitaire Ring.” Costco’s website shows 500 different rings for sale, many costing more than $50,000. Costco said same-store sales were up 5.6% in the latest quarter, excluding any effects from gasoline prices and currency fluctuations. In selling diamond jewel


Did you know you can buy diamond rings at Costco? It didn’t say which ring, exactly, but a search on Costco’s website reveals only one ring priced in the $400,000 range: A “Round Brilliant 10.03 carat VS1 Clarity, I Color Diamond Platinum Solitaire Ring.” Costco’s website shows 500 different rings for sale, many costing more than $50,000. Costco said same-store sales were up 5.6% in the latest quarter, excluding any effects from gasoline prices and currency fluctuations. In selling diamond jewel
Costco sold someone a $400,000 diamond ring Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ring, costco, things, prices, rings, website, shoppers, 400000, buy, costcos, diamond, sold


Costco sold someone a $400,000 diamond ring

Did you know you can buy diamond rings at Costco? And expensive ones, at that.

The warehouse retailer said during its latest quarter ended May 12 it got a sales boost thanks to a customer purchasing one of its rings for more than $400,000. It didn’t say which ring, exactly, but a search on Costco’s website reveals only one ring priced in the $400,000 range: A “Round Brilliant 10.03 carat VS1 Clarity, I Color Diamond Platinum Solitaire Ring.” Costco’s website shows 500 different rings for sale, many costing more than $50,000.

Costco said same-store sales were up 5.6% in the latest quarter, excluding any effects from gasoline prices and currency fluctuations. That was better than the 5.48% growth analysts were expecting, based on Refinitiv data.

Total revenue rose 7.4% to $34.74 billion, topping estimates for $34.71 billion.

But Costco shares were falling about 2% Friday morning, despite the upbeat earnings report, as investors fear the impact additional tariffs might have on its business.

“At the end of the day, prices will go up on things,” CFO Richard Galanti told analysts on a post-earnings conference call. “We want to be the last to raise them. And when prices are going down, we want to be the first to lower them.”

While people may associate Costco with selling things like bundles of toilet paper and giant boxes of cereal in bulk, its members also have access to other services to book vacations and buy cars. Many shoppers enjoy the treasure hunt experience Costco’s stores offer, as eagle-eyed shoppers can often spot miscellaneous items there, which is one way the retailer makes it worth shoppers’ while to trek to stores.

In selling diamond jewelry, Costco has promoted its wedding business for several years. Brides on a budget can buy everything from flowers to sheet cakes and invitations there.

Costco declined to comment any further on the ring sale.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ring, costco, things, prices, rings, website, shoppers, 400000, buy, costcos, diamond, sold


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