The biggest threat to the economy is Trump’s trade policy, says veteran US diplomat

At the same time, the longtime diplomat warned that the single biggest threat to the economic progress of recent years is Trump himself. “The biggest threat to the economy, ironically enough, is the President’s own trade policy. Just last week, the International Monetary Fund warned that the U.S.-China trade war could cost the global economy $700 billion by 2020. But what Trump’s seeming stranglehold on global trade suggests, Haass said, is that “If (Trump) ever wanted, he could pull back. He co


At the same time, the longtime diplomat warned that the single biggest threat to the economic progress of recent years is Trump himself.
“The biggest threat to the economy, ironically enough, is the President’s own trade policy.
Just last week, the International Monetary Fund warned that the U.S.-China trade war could cost the global economy $700 billion by 2020.
But what Trump’s seeming stranglehold on global trade suggests, Haass said, is that “If (Trump) ever wanted, he could pull back.
He co
The biggest threat to the economy is Trump’s trade policy, says veteran US diplomat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, tariffs, economy, american, warned, trump, global, threat, veteran, biggest, trade, policy, diplomat


The biggest threat to the economy is Trump's trade policy, says veteran US diplomat

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates ⁠— With just under a year to go until the 2020 U.S. election, President Donald Trump “has the wind in his sails” thanks to the state of the U.S. economy, veteran political analyst Richard Haass said on Tuesday. At the same time, the longtime diplomat warned that the single biggest threat to the economic progress of recent years is Trump himself.

“The recent job numbers and unemployment numbers were extremely good,” the Council on Foreign Relations president told CNBC’s Dan Murphy at the SALT conference in Abu Dhabi.

“The biggest threat to the economy, ironically enough, is the President’s own trade policy. It’s the tariffs he’s putting on, his attack on the World Trade Organization, and this is probably taking half a point or more off of America’s GDP (gross domestic product) and off of global GDP.”

A CNBC analysis from last May looking at data from the Treasury Department equates the combined $72 billion in revenue from all the president’s tariffs up till that point to one of the biggest tax increases since 1993.

Just last week, the International Monetary Fund warned that the U.S.-China trade war could cost the global economy $700 billion by 2020.

But what Trump’s seeming stranglehold on global trade suggests, Haass said, is that “If (Trump) ever wanted, he could pull back. He could ease up on some of the tariffs and that in and of itself would give a little boost to the American and global economy.”

The world’s two largest economies have been embroiled in a trade conflict for more than a year, with each country applying tariffs to billions of dollars’ worth of goods from the other.

Both sides remain far from an agreement on a number of key issues, with trade negotiations in stop-start mode for the better part of the last 18 months.

The Chinese and American delegations decided in October to work toward a “phase-one” agreement. Official Commerce Ministry statements indicate that reaching such a deal involves agreeing on greater Chinese purchases of U.S. agricultural products, and a rollback of retaliatory tariffs.

Trump has also angered European allies with tariffs on foreign steel and other products, and is now threatening a 100% tariff on French luxury handbags, cheese and champagne in retaliation for France’s 3% tax on major digital services companies ⁠— many of which are American ⁠— operating in the country. France and other EU companies have said they’re ready to hit back, and promise to take Trump’s tariff threats to the WTO.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, tariffs, economy, american, warned, trump, global, threat, veteran, biggest, trade, policy, diplomat


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The biggest threat to the economy is Trump’s trade policy, says veteran US diplomat

At the same time, the longtime diplomat warned that the single biggest threat to the economic progress of recent years is Trump himself. “The biggest threat to the economy, ironically enough, is the President’s own trade policy. Just last week, the International Monetary Fund warned that the U.S.-China trade war could cost the global economy $700 billion by 2020. But what Trump’s seeming stranglehold on global trade suggests, Haass said, is that “If (Trump) ever wanted, he could pull back. He co


At the same time, the longtime diplomat warned that the single biggest threat to the economic progress of recent years is Trump himself.
“The biggest threat to the economy, ironically enough, is the President’s own trade policy.
Just last week, the International Monetary Fund warned that the U.S.-China trade war could cost the global economy $700 billion by 2020.
But what Trump’s seeming stranglehold on global trade suggests, Haass said, is that “If (Trump) ever wanted, he could pull back.
He co
The biggest threat to the economy is Trump’s trade policy, says veteran US diplomat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economy, warned, american, trade, tariffs, trump, global, diplomat, veteran, biggest, threat, policy, trumps


The biggest threat to the economy is Trump's trade policy, says veteran US diplomat

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates ⁠— With just under a year to go until the 2020 U.S. election, President Donald Trump “has the wind in his sails” thanks to the state of the U.S. economy, veteran political analyst Richard Haass said on Tuesday. At the same time, the longtime diplomat warned that the single biggest threat to the economic progress of recent years is Trump himself.

“The recent job numbers and unemployment numbers were extremely good,” the Council on Foreign Relations president told CNBC’s Dan Murphy at the SALT conference in Abu Dhabi.

“The biggest threat to the economy, ironically enough, is the President’s own trade policy. It’s the tariffs he’s putting on, his attack on the World Trade Organization, and this is probably taking half a point or more off of America’s GDP (gross domestic product) and off of global GDP.”

A CNBC analysis from last May looking at data from the Treasury Department equates the combined $72 billion in revenue from all the president’s tariffs up till that point to one of the biggest tax increases since 1993.

Just last week, the International Monetary Fund warned that the U.S.-China trade war could cost the global economy $700 billion by 2020.

But what Trump’s seeming stranglehold on global trade suggests, Haass said, is that “If (Trump) ever wanted, he could pull back. He could ease up on some of the tariffs and that in and of itself would give a little boost to the American and global economy.”

The world’s two largest economies have been embroiled in a trade conflict for more than a year, with each country applying tariffs to billions of dollars’ worth of goods from the other.

Both sides remain far from an agreement on a number of key issues, with trade negotiations in stop-start mode for the better part of the last 18 months.

The Chinese and American delegations decided in October to work toward a “phase-one” agreement. Official Commerce Ministry statements indicate that reaching such a deal involves agreeing on greater Chinese purchases of U.S. agricultural products, and a rollback of retaliatory tariffs.

Trump has also angered European allies with tariffs on foreign steel and other products, and is now threatening a 100% tariff on French luxury handbags, cheese and champagne in retaliation for France’s 3% tax on major digital services companies ⁠— many of which are American ⁠— operating in the country. France and other EU companies have said they’re ready to hit back, and promise to take Trump’s tariff threats to the WTO.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economy, warned, american, trade, tariffs, trump, global, diplomat, veteran, biggest, threat, policy, trumps


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Cowen names Target a ‘best idea’ for 2020, says digital business overcoming Amazon threat

A cashier places a bag of items in a customer’s shopping cart at a Target Corp. store in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019. As retail continues to evolve thanks to e-commerce, big box retailer Target is finally keeping up, according to Cowen. The firm named the retailer as a “best idea” for 2020, as Target is both “profitable” and “innovative.” “We continue to foresee an environment of accelerating bifurcation in retail, with TGT well positioned as a long-term winner,” said Cow


A cashier places a bag of items in a customer’s shopping cart at a Target Corp. store in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019.
As retail continues to evolve thanks to e-commerce, big box retailer Target is finally keeping up, according to Cowen.
The firm named the retailer as a “best idea” for 2020, as Target is both “profitable” and “innovative.”
“We continue to foresee an environment of accelerating bifurcation in retail, with TGT well positioned as a long-term winner,” said Cow
Cowen names Target a ‘best idea’ for 2020, says digital business overcoming Amazon threat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, names, shopping, cowen, overcoming, threat, amazon, retail, retailer, thanks, store, positioned, best, digital, winner, tgt, target, business, idea, profitable


Cowen names Target a 'best idea' for 2020, says digital business overcoming Amazon threat

A cashier places a bag of items in a customer’s shopping cart at a Target Corp. store in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019.

As retail continues to evolve thanks to e-commerce, big box retailer Target is finally keeping up, according to Cowen.

The firm named the retailer as a “best idea” for 2020, as Target is both “profitable” and “innovative.”

“We continue to foresee an environment of accelerating bifurcation in retail, with TGT well positioned as a long-term winner,” said Cowen retail analyst Oliver Chen in a note to clients on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, names, shopping, cowen, overcoming, threat, amazon, retail, retailer, thanks, store, positioned, best, digital, winner, tgt, target, business, idea, profitable


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Cowen names Target a ‘best idea’ for 2020, says digital business overcoming Amazon threat

A cashier places a bag of items in a customer’s shopping cart at a Target Corp. store in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019. As retail continues to evolve thanks to e-commerce, big box retailer Target is finally keeping up, according to Cowen. The firm named the retailer as a “best idea” for 2020, as Target is both “profitable” and “innovative.” “We continue to foresee an environment of accelerating bifurcation in retail, with TGT well positioned as a long-term winner,” said Cow


A cashier places a bag of items in a customer’s shopping cart at a Target Corp. store in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019.
As retail continues to evolve thanks to e-commerce, big box retailer Target is finally keeping up, according to Cowen.
The firm named the retailer as a “best idea” for 2020, as Target is both “profitable” and “innovative.”
“We continue to foresee an environment of accelerating bifurcation in retail, with TGT well positioned as a long-term winner,” said Cow
Cowen names Target a ‘best idea’ for 2020, says digital business overcoming Amazon threat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, names, shopping, cowen, overcoming, threat, amazon, retail, retailer, thanks, store, positioned, best, digital, winner, tgt, target, business, idea, profitable


Cowen names Target a 'best idea' for 2020, says digital business overcoming Amazon threat

A cashier places a bag of items in a customer’s shopping cart at a Target Corp. store in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019.

As retail continues to evolve thanks to e-commerce, big box retailer Target is finally keeping up, according to Cowen.

The firm named the retailer as a “best idea” for 2020, as Target is both “profitable” and “innovative.”

“We continue to foresee an environment of accelerating bifurcation in retail, with TGT well positioned as a long-term winner,” said Cowen retail analyst Oliver Chen in a note to clients on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, names, shopping, cowen, overcoming, threat, amazon, retail, retailer, thanks, store, positioned, best, digital, winner, tgt, target, business, idea, profitable


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump to meet the queen and NATO allies after tariff threat to France

LONDON — President Donald Trump touched down in the U.K. on Monday night ahead of a highly-anticipated NATO meeting, marking 70 years since the alliance’s creation. The gathering comes amid overt tensions between some leaders regarding spending pledges, how to tackle the challenges posed by Russia and China, and the relevance of NATO itself. The two-day meeting is taking place just outside of London, in Watford, with high-profile delegates then heading to Buckingham Palace in the evening where Q


LONDON — President Donald Trump touched down in the U.K. on Monday night ahead of a highly-anticipated NATO meeting, marking 70 years since the alliance’s creation.
The gathering comes amid overt tensions between some leaders regarding spending pledges, how to tackle the challenges posed by Russia and China, and the relevance of NATO itself.
The two-day meeting is taking place just outside of London, in Watford, with high-profile delegates then heading to Buckingham Palace in the evening where Q
Trump to meet the queen and NATO allies after tariff threat to France Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allies, france, meeting, queen, president, place, french, threat, macron, tariff, night, meet, nato, trump


Trump to meet the queen and NATO allies after tariff threat to France

LONDON — President Donald Trump touched down in the U.K. on Monday night ahead of a highly-anticipated NATO meeting, marking 70 years since the alliance’s creation. The gathering comes amid overt tensions between some leaders regarding spending pledges, how to tackle the challenges posed by Russia and China, and the relevance of NATO itself. The two-day meeting is taking place just outside of London, in Watford, with high-profile delegates then heading to Buckingham Palace in the evening where Queen Elizabeth II will host NATO heads of state and government for dinner. Trump is scheduled to have talks with French President Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg; he is due to meet German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Wednesday. It’s unclear if the U.S. president will meet with Prime Minister Boris Johnson with the U.K. leader apparently keen for Trump not to involve himself in Britain’s domestic politics ahead of an upcoming election on December 12.

Trump’s meeting with his French counterpart Macron — due to take place at the U.S. ambassador to the U.K.’s residence where Trump and first lady Melania Trump stayed Monday night — could be an awkward affair given the U.S. administration’s threats to impose import tariffs of up to 100% on $2.4 billion worth of French imports. The U.S. trade representative has identified several goods, including Champagne, handbags and Gruyere cheese that could be targeted.The U.S. said Monday that the move is a response to a French digital services tax that it believes “unfairly targeted” American tech companies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allies, france, meeting, queen, president, place, french, threat, macron, tariff, night, meet, nato, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

NATO meets as relations with old foe Russia remain frosty

The reason for the foundation of NATO — to counter a perceived or real threat from Russia — remains as relevant as ever. And one of those ever-present and unpredictable security challenges is Russia. Seventy years on, the USSR has long-since collapsed and the Cold War is over, yet the West’s relations with Moscow remain as tense and complex as ever. Sarah Raine, consulting senior fellow for geopolitics and strategy at the the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), told CNBC that R


The reason for the foundation of NATO — to counter a perceived or real threat from Russia — remains as relevant as ever.
And one of those ever-present and unpredictable security challenges is Russia.
Seventy years on, the USSR has long-since collapsed and the Cold War is over, yet the West’s relations with Moscow remain as tense and complex as ever.
Sarah Raine, consulting senior fellow for geopolitics and strategy at the the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), told CNBC that R
NATO meets as relations with old foe Russia remain frosty Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ukraine, remain, russia, military, frosty, remains, meets, threat, old, unpredictable, foe, security, relations, nato, terms


NATO meets as relations with old foe Russia remain frosty

The reason for the foundation of NATO — to counter a perceived or real threat from Russia — remains as relevant as ever.

When heads of state and government, and military leaders, of the 29 countries that belong to NATO gather just outside of London Tuesday, discussions will focus on current and emerging security challenges. And one of those ever-present and unpredictable security challenges is Russia.

NATO was set up in 1949 as a military alliance between 10 European countries, the U.S. and Canada “to promote cooperation among its members and to guard their freedom,” the alliance says, “within the context of countering the threat posed at the time by the Soviet Union.”

Seventy years on, the USSR has long-since collapsed and the Cold War is over, yet the West’s relations with Moscow remain as tense and complex as ever. Civilian and military cooperation between Russia and NATO are still suspended following the annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in early 2014 and the backing of a separatist uprising in east Ukraine — a move that prompted a military conflict that is still unresolved.

Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. election and the nerve agent poisoning of a former Russian spy in the U.K., Sergei Skripal, have also put western nations on guard when it comes to an unpredictable nation under President Vladimir Putin. This year, the breakdown of Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty between the U.S. and Russia also prompted fears of a potential arms race between the old foes.

Sarah Raine, consulting senior fellow for geopolitics and strategy at the the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), told CNBC that Russia is still a threat to NATO.

“Russia remains a threat both in conventional terms — as evidenced by its annexation of Crimea and its persistent probing of European air space — as well as in more hybrid terms, through, for example, its use of cyber proxies. But threats can and should be handled through a range of policy responses,” she said Friday.

“It should be possible to remain clear about the threat Russia poses whilst also considering ways for NATO to engage with Russia on concerns of arms control.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ukraine, remain, russia, military, frosty, remains, meets, threat, old, unpredictable, foe, security, relations, nato, terms


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Target and Walmart are a threat to Amazon this Cyber Monday

Amazon has become a huge threat to big-box stores in recent years, but those retailers may be making a comeback this Cyber Monday. Walmart and Target had bigger jumps than Amazon in online customer spending during the first two weeks of November compared with the same period last year, according research firm Edison Trends, which looked at more than 1.2 million transactions. Walmart took in 51% more than last year, while Target followed close behind with a 47% increase. “Retailers have gone from


Amazon has become a huge threat to big-box stores in recent years, but those retailers may be making a comeback this Cyber Monday.
Walmart and Target had bigger jumps than Amazon in online customer spending during the first two weeks of November compared with the same period last year, according research firm Edison Trends, which looked at more than 1.2 million transactions.
Walmart took in 51% more than last year, while Target followed close behind with a 47% increase.
“Retailers have gone from
Target and Walmart are a threat to Amazon this Cyber Monday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: mallika mitra, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, stores, investing, according, site, walmart, cyber, amazon, ecommerce, spending, threat, target


Target and Walmart are a threat to Amazon this Cyber Monday

Amazon has become a huge threat to big-box stores in recent years, but those retailers may be making a comeback this Cyber Monday.

Walmart and Target had bigger jumps than Amazon in online customer spending during the first two weeks of November compared with the same period last year, according research firm Edison Trends, which looked at more than 1.2 million transactions.

Walmart took in 51% more than last year, while Target followed close behind with a 47% increase. Amazon’s customer spending grew just 32%.

As retailers battle for market share, they are investing in their e-commerce options, and integrating them with brick-and-mortar stores. This includes adding more products to their online shops, offering in-store pick up for items purchased online and direct shipping from stores to customers’ houses, according to Nomura Instinet analyst Michael Baker. These companies are also investing in the infrastructure of their websites to allow them to handle big shopping days like Cyber Monday.

“Retailers have gone from being in denial about the potential threat of e-commerce to accepting that e-commerce is a real threat and investing to take advantage of the omnichannel asset,” Baker said.

They’re realizing that they can compete with Amazon to win back market share, he added.

There is a lot of competing to be done. Amazon sees more users start with its site when online shopping than on any other site, including Google, according to a recent report by Bain & Co.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: mallika mitra, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, stores, investing, according, site, walmart, cyber, amazon, ecommerce, spending, threat, target


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

5G broadband is an existential threat to the cable industry, but executives and investors aren’t worried

Goei says both plans are “deeply flawed” as cable broadband alternatives. “In the big cities — New York, Boston, San Francisco — I think 5G broadband will be a threat in a couple of years,” said Kanitkar. In the U.S., “you can have all the spectrum in the world but you’re going to need the help and cooperation of cable companies to roll out the small cells, because it’s the cable companies that have the neighborhood relationships.” “We see partnerships between the mobile and cable companies cont


Goei says both plans are “deeply flawed” as cable broadband alternatives.
“In the big cities — New York, Boston, San Francisco — I think 5G broadband will be a threat in a couple of years,” said Kanitkar.
In the U.S., “you can have all the spectrum in the world but you’re going to need the help and cooperation of cable companies to roll out the small cells, because it’s the cable companies that have the neighborhood relationships.”
“We see partnerships between the mobile and cable companies cont
5G broadband is an existential threat to the cable industry, but executives and investors aren’t worried Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-01  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wireless, arent, investors, cable, threat, verizon, companies, tmobile, product, executives, network, fiber, industry, worried, broadband, existential


5G broadband is an existential threat to the cable industry, but executives and investors aren't worried

T-Mobile US CEO John Legere testifies before a House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee hearing in Washington, February 13, 2019. Erin Scott | Reuters

For about the last two decades, the cable industry has been fueled by three revenue streams: cable television, landline phones and high-speed broadband. Recently, though, cable’s prized triple play has started to erode. Fewer households need a landline. Millions of Americans are canceling cable TV, a trend poised to accelerate as new streaming products such as Disney+, Apple TV+ and HBO Max hit the market. Add it all up and cable companies are left with only one reliable product — high-speed Internet. Investors don’t appear concerned. Cable internet has high profit margins and growth has been so strong that the two largest U.S. cable companies, Comcast and Charter, are both trading near record highs even as their business is fragmenting. Comcast added 379,000 residential high-speed broadband customers last quarter, its strongest third quarter in a decade. Still, there’s a potential existential threat on the horizon: home broadband from wireless carriers Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile/Sprint, who are all touting the power of 5G. Those companies are offering lower-priced plans that could save Americans billions of dollars and leave cable providers with nothing. “The cableopoly is scared!” Legere wrote in a T-Mobile blog in February. “They’re scared about 5G, and the New T-Mobile, and finally having to compete.” But talk to cable executives and you’ll find that, like their shareholders, they’re decidedly not scared. While 5G is generating a ton of buzz for its ability to supposedly handle the massive amounts of data coming from artificial intelligence workloads and self-driving cars, the technology has limitations when it comes to replacing cable infrastructure. “As cable operators, we agree 5G technology works, but we don’t believe it’s a real threat to our business,” said Dexter Goei, CEO of cable provider Altice USA, in an interview.

Understanding 5G: Two plans

There are two different 5G-based plans intended to compete with cable for home broadband. One is being championed by Verizon and AT&T and the other by T-Mobile, assuming it’s allowed to merge with Sprint. The important difference between the plans is Verizon and AT&T will sell a separate fixed home broadband service that the companies will likely bundle with their 5G wireless product. T-Mobile’s 5G plan is to promote its wireless service as a home broadband replacement, using the same network of previous unused lowband and midband spectrum. Goei says both plans are “deeply flawed” as cable broadband alternatives. The Verizon/AT&T plan Verizon has already launched its 5G home broadband product in limited areas of Chicago, Los Angeles, Houston, Indianapolis and Sacramento, California, for $50 a month. The service provides speeds between 300 and 840 megabits per second. By comparison, Cox, the third-largest U.S. cable provider, sells its residential 300 Mbps product for $79.99 per month. To get such high speeds, Verizon is using millimeter wave technology that connects with fiber close to the home. While Verizon has some fiber already in the ground, the largest U.S. wireless carrier will have to spend billions of dollars in the coming decade to lay more fiber to offer a competitive 5G home broadband product throughout the country — an endeavor that will be both expensive and time consuming. But Verizon has a market capitalization of $250 billion, giving it plenty of borrowing capacity and a potentially long leash from shareholders. A $50-per-month home broadband product will be a competitive service in urban areas, because Verizon will be able to hit many potential consumers once it lays down fiber, said Vinay Kanitkar, chief technology officer of global carrier strategy at Akamai. He said that Verizon’s offering makes sense in densely populated cities but less so in suburbs and rural areas because millimiter wave technology is not effective at going through thick walls or trees. “In the big cities — New York, Boston, San Francisco — I think 5G broadband will be a threat in a couple of years,” said Kanitkar. “It will be cost effective once Verizon lays fiber.”

But Goei says Verizon and AT&T have a long slog ahead if they want to create a nationwide network that would mimic their mobile footprint. “It would take a decade for a wireless carrier like Verizon to build fiber throughout the country if it had unlimited money,” Goei said. “And it doesn’t have unlimited money.” For Altice, the process of getting up and running in the New York region is indicative of the bureaucratic and political challenges that carriers face that go beyond just the technical limitations. Here’s how Goei describes the struggle: “We are building fiber to home in the New York tri-state area now, in a region where we already have permits and local relationships. From when we announced we were doing that in 2017, it has taken us two years to get up and running before we could connect a single home. That’s purely the permitting process in our backyard. But we were haggling with these communities one by one to lay more fiber. If it takes us two years to get up and running, imagine trying to hit the 50 top markets in the U.S. coming in without the relationships. It’s impossible.” The T-Mobile/Sprint plan T-Mobile hopes its new 5G mobile network can translate into a home broadband replacement product on its own. Legere has promised that if T-Mobile is allowed to merge with Sprint, the combined company will offer average speeds with lowband and midband wireless spectrum of more than 100 Mbps to 66% of American households by 2021 and 90% of Americans by 2024. If it works, Legere estimates the new T-Mobile will save American consumers up to $13 billion a year on home broadband, as one network could be sold for both mobile and in-home use. Legere notes that almost half of American households have no competitive choice for high-speed in-home broadband with speeds of 100 Mbps. In rural areas, more than 75% have no high-speed broadband service or only one option available. Executives from Comcast, Charter, Altice and Cox — the four largest U.S. cable providers — unanimously see Verizon and AT&T’s plan as a more serious long-term threat than T-Mobile’s, according to people familiar with the matter who asked not to be named because they’re not approved to speak on behalf of the companies. Legere’s proposal has technical obstacles, said Kevin Hart, Cox’s chief product and technology officer. A wireless network alone won’t be able to handle the bandwidth demands that come from the use of dozens of connected devices and games like “Fortnite,” he said. “Only a wireline network is going to be able to handle the massive capacity that comes with home broadband,” said Hart. “We view a purely wireless network as complimentary to cable, not as a replacement.” A T-Mobile spokesperson said the company’s 5G network will have “the massive capacity gains and dramatic increases in speed to bring real competition and real choice for in-home broadband to Americans who have been at the mercy of the cable companies for too long.” T-Mobile’s plan isn’t without precedent. European carriers have successfully deployed the same midband/lowband strategy to roll out 5G. But those companies also own a suite of deep fiber because cable and wireless companies have merged in Europe. That type of combination hasn’t happened in the U.S. but it could, said Goei, particularly with a company like T-Mobile, which needs cable expertise. “In the European context, you’re not seeing a wireless vs. fixed competition because the companies are the same,” said Goei. In the U.S., “you can have all the spectrum in the world but you’re going to need the help and cooperation of cable companies to roll out the small cells, because it’s the cable companies that have the neighborhood relationships.” John Chapman, chief technical officer of Cisco’s cable business, said Legere’s claim that T-Mobile will be a true replacement for cable is just “rhetoric.” Instead, it’s more likely that cable companies will continue to push into the mobile market through existing mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) agreements, which allow the operators to offer wireless service to customers and offload some of the data to cable WiFi. Comcast, for example, has about 1.8 million wireless customers today. “The cable guys have landed with a pretty good answer right now because they’re becoming mobile companies,” Chapman said. “We see partnerships between the mobile and cable companies continuing, whether they become part of the same company or not. The cable companies aren’t scared from a competitive point of view.”

Cable’s advantage


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-01  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wireless, arent, investors, cable, threat, verizon, companies, tmobile, product, executives, network, fiber, industry, worried, broadband, existential


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Hong Kong is the biggest geopolitical threat to markets, economist warns

Pro-democracy protesters march on a street as they take part in a demonstration in Causeway Bay district on November 2, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. “Hong Kong at the moment is the biggest geopolitical risk out there for markets,” Schmieding told CNBC. Anti-government protests have engulfed Hong Kong, a semi-autonomous territory that operates under Chinese rule, for several months. Trump’s bills would require an annual certification of Hong Kong’s autonomy, and bar the sale of ammunition including


Pro-democracy protesters march on a street as they take part in a demonstration in Causeway Bay district on November 2, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.
“Hong Kong at the moment is the biggest geopolitical risk out there for markets,” Schmieding told CNBC.
Anti-government protests have engulfed Hong Kong, a semi-autonomous territory that operates under Chinese rule, for several months.
Trump’s bills would require an annual certification of Hong Kong’s autonomy, and bar the sale of ammunition including
Hong Kong is the biggest geopolitical threat to markets, economist warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-28  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, military, told, warns, schmieding, markets, china, geopolitical, deal, kong, economist, biggest, hong, chinese, threat, trade, street


Hong Kong is the biggest geopolitical threat to markets, economist warns

Pro-democracy protesters march on a street as they take part in a demonstration in Causeway Bay district on November 2, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.

“If the situation in Hong Kong escalates badly, if we get a Chinese heavy-handed military intervention, then it would be nearly impossible for the U.S. to conclude a trade deal with China — even a stage one deal — it would be nearly impossible for the EU to do that, so that would prolong the global industrial downturn which is caused by trade tensions.”

“Hong Kong at the moment is the biggest geopolitical risk out there for markets,” Schmieding told CNBC.

The move reignited tensions between Washington and Beijing, with China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs accusing the U.S. on Thursday of having “sinister intentions.”

Speaking to CNBC’s “Street Signs Europe,” Holger Schmieding, chief economist at Berenberg, said the worst-case scenario was “pretty clear” after President Donald Trump signed two bills backing protesters in Hong Kong.

The U.S. and China have been negotiating a “phase one” trade deal since October, which is intended to be a pathway to a more comprehensive agreement that would end the months-long trade war between the world’s two largest economies. Markets have experienced months of volatility amid mixed signals around tariff escalations and positive Sino-U.S. trade talks.

Although Schmieding warned about the dangers of the situation in Hong Kong impacting the phase one deal, he said it was unlikely that the worst-case scenario would materialize.

“So far the behavior of China in Hong Kong suggests that Beijing is clearly aware of the risk, and judging by events so far, Beijing still has the priority of safeguarding its own economy from the fallout of a prolonged trade war,” he explained.

“I do not think President Trump signing this bill really should have a significant effect,” Schmieding added. “We know the U.S. and China, China and the Western world, are different when it comes to human rights, when it comes to democracy, and this difference will not go away — we just have to reassert that occasionally, and China knows probably it has to live with it. In my view, this is hopefully just a modest spat, nothing that will take China away from the big picture — safeguard its own economy by finding a deal with the U.S. on trade.”

Anti-government protests have engulfed Hong Kong, a semi-autonomous territory that operates under Chinese rule, for several months. The demonstrations, which have turned violent and had an economic cost, have led to an increasing presence of Chinese troops in Hong Kong, according to Reuters.

Trump’s bills would require an annual certification of Hong Kong’s autonomy, and bar the sale of ammunition including tear gas and rubber bullets to Hong Kong police.

Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia” on Thursday, Ben Emons of Medley Global Advisors said he didn’t believe the bills would affect U.S.-China trade talks.

Meanwhile, some analysts have told CNBC they don’t see Chinese military intervention as a likely response from Beijing.

Power for Democracy’s Joseph Cheng told “Street Signs Asia” last month that military intervention in Hong Kong would be “far too costly” for China. Meanwhile, Fraser Howie, an independent analyst, told CNBC military action would be “tremendously destructive to China” and “the end of Hong Kong as we know it.”

Hong Kong’s bechmark stock index, the Hang Seng Index is up more than 4% year-to-date.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-28  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, military, told, warns, schmieding, markets, china, geopolitical, deal, kong, economist, biggest, hong, chinese, threat, trade, street


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Why Ford and General Motors are really worried about Ram trucks

The rise of the Ram pickup truckAmerican automakers take their trucks extremely seriously. And the ongoing battles for dominance among the Detroit Three are often called the “truck wars”. Third place challenger Ram has made waves in recent years, snagging major industry awards and stealing market share from rivals. The upstart Ram is now posing a more serious threat to rivals than ever before.


The rise of the Ram pickup truckAmerican automakers take their trucks extremely seriously.
And the ongoing battles for dominance among the Detroit Three are often called the “truck wars”.
Third place challenger Ram has made waves in recent years, snagging major industry awards and stealing market share from rivals.
The upstart Ram is now posing a more serious threat to rivals than ever before.
Why Ford and General Motors are really worried about Ram trucks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ford, really, waves, trucks, motors, rivals, truck, upstart, truckamerican, stealing, ram, threat, wars, general, worried


Why Ford and General Motors are really worried about Ram trucks

The rise of the Ram pickup truck

American automakers take their trucks extremely seriously. And the ongoing battles for dominance among the Detroit Three are often called the “truck wars”. Third place challenger Ram has made waves in recent years, snagging major industry awards and stealing market share from rivals. The upstart Ram is now posing a more serious threat to rivals than ever before.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ford, really, waves, trucks, motors, rivals, truck, upstart, truckamerican, stealing, ram, threat, wars, general, worried


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post