More people are going to the mall to eat at the food court, not shop, UBS says

More and more people are going to the mall to eat at the food court, not to buy clothes, according to a survey from UBS. “Shoppers say they increasingly go to the mall to eat at the food court or just hangout instead of visiting a big box store,” analyst Jay Sole said. “Since the mall is no longer the place consumers discover fashion, it makes sense the reasons they visit the mall are changing. It said the percentage who go to the mall to eat rose to 7% from 4%. UBS said it found people between


More and more people are going to the mall to eat at the food court, not to buy clothes, according to a survey from UBS.
“Shoppers say they increasingly go to the mall to eat at the food court or just hangout instead of visiting a big box store,” analyst Jay Sole said.
“Since the mall is no longer the place consumers discover fashion, it makes sense the reasons they visit the mall are changing.
It said the percentage who go to the mall to eat rose to 7% from 4%.
UBS said it found people between
More people are going to the mall to eat at the food court, not shop, UBS says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, consumers, mall, apparel, fashion, shop, today, visit, eat, ubs, sole, online, court, going


More people are going to the mall to eat at the food court, not shop, UBS says

More and more people are going to the mall to eat at the food court, not to buy clothes, according to a survey from UBS.

The investment bank said apparel spending continues to move online, away from bricks-and-mortar stores, with about 25% of total apparel sales in the U.S. taking place on the internet today. It expects that to grow to 31% by 2023.

“Shoppers say they increasingly go to the mall to eat at the food court or just hangout instead of visiting a big box store,” analyst Jay Sole said. “Since the mall is no longer the place consumers discover fashion, it makes sense the reasons they visit the mall are changing. … For the sixth straight year, U.S. consumers say the availability of online shopping is causing them to visit large regional and outlet malls less.”

UBS expects the shift will hurt department store chains, such as Macy’s and J.C. Penney, more than anything else. It said “disruption” in the apparel industry will go on for “at least the next five years.”

In its survey of more than 2,500 consumers, UBS said the percentage of people who go to the mall to shop at department stores fell to 20% this year, from 25% a year ago. It said the percentage who go to the mall to eat rose to 7% from 4%.

Additionally, Sole explained younger shoppers are leading the changes.

UBS said it found people between the ages of 18 and 34 buy more clothes online than older generations. It said apparel shoppers ages 18 to 24, for example, are spending 38% of their apparel budgets online this year, up from 32% in 2014.

“The internet has fundamentally challenged malls’ value proposition,” Sole went on. “The mall, in the past, was a great aggregator. It was a one-stop-shop where consumers could see everything happening in the world of fashion. Today, the vast majority of fashion discovery happens online. … Consumers don’t need the mall to help them figure out what is cool.”

Mall owners are starting to realize this, however. They’re not ignorant to the shifting consumer preferences.

Some of the biggest mall owners in the U.S., such as Simon Property Group, Taubman and Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield, are investing in new food hall concepts, as they increasingly devote space at their properties to entertainment uses and dining.

The new American Dream mall in New Jersey, once it is complete, will be 45% retail shops and the rest of the square footage will be devoted to eateries, theme parks, a ski slope, miniature golf and an ice rink, among other things for visitors to do. Sole said in his Tuesday note that he thinks this particular Triple Five Group development can be a success.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, consumers, mall, apparel, fashion, shop, today, visit, eat, ubs, sole, online, court, going


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Here’s what every major Wall Street economist thinks the Federal Reserve will do today

Most major Wall Street economists expect the Federal Reserve to cut its key interest rate by a quarter point at the conclusion of its two-day meeting on Wednesday, but they differ on what the central bank will signal about its future policy. If the Fed does cut, it will be the third time this year following rate cuts in September and July. Economists, strategists, and Fed watchers alike will also be parsing the Fed’s statement and Chairman Jerome Powell’s subsequent press conference for comments


Most major Wall Street economists expect the Federal Reserve to cut its key interest rate by a quarter point at the conclusion of its two-day meeting on Wednesday, but they differ on what the central bank will signal about its future policy.
If the Fed does cut, it will be the third time this year following rate cuts in September and July.
Economists, strategists, and Fed watchers alike will also be parsing the Fed’s statement and Chairman Jerome Powell’s subsequent press conference for comments
Here’s what every major Wall Street economist thinks the Federal Reserve will do today Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, fed, street, major, meeting, reserve, thinks, today, wall, economists, expect, cut, heres, rate, federal


Here's what every major Wall Street economist thinks the Federal Reserve will do today

Most major Wall Street economists expect the Federal Reserve to cut its key interest rate by a quarter point at the conclusion of its two-day meeting on Wednesday, but they differ on what the central bank will signal about its future policy.

If the Fed does cut, it will be the third time this year following rate cuts in September and July.

Economists, strategists, and Fed watchers alike will also be parsing the Fed’s statement and Chairman Jerome Powell’s subsequent press conference for comments on what the Fed may do going forward.

Here’s what Wall Street economists expect from the Federal Reserve meeting:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, fed, street, major, meeting, reserve, thinks, today, wall, economists, expect, cut, heres, rate, federal


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Here’s what every major Wall Street economist thinks the Federal Reserve will do today

Most major Wall Street economists expect the Federal Reserve to cut its key interest rate by a quarter point at the conclusion of its two-day meeting on Wednesday, but they differ on what the central bank will signal about its future policy. If the Fed does cut, it will be the third time this year following rate cuts in September and July. Economists, strategists, and Fed watchers alike will also be parsing the Fed’s statement and Chairman Jerome Powell’s subsequent press conference for comments


Most major Wall Street economists expect the Federal Reserve to cut its key interest rate by a quarter point at the conclusion of its two-day meeting on Wednesday, but they differ on what the central bank will signal about its future policy.
If the Fed does cut, it will be the third time this year following rate cuts in September and July.
Economists, strategists, and Fed watchers alike will also be parsing the Fed’s statement and Chairman Jerome Powell’s subsequent press conference for comments
Here’s what every major Wall Street economist thinks the Federal Reserve will do today Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, fed, street, major, meeting, reserve, thinks, today, wall, economists, expect, cut, heres, rate, federal


Here's what every major Wall Street economist thinks the Federal Reserve will do today

Most major Wall Street economists expect the Federal Reserve to cut its key interest rate by a quarter point at the conclusion of its two-day meeting on Wednesday, but they differ on what the central bank will signal about its future policy.

If the Fed does cut, it will be the third time this year following rate cuts in September and July.

Economists, strategists, and Fed watchers alike will also be parsing the Fed’s statement and Chairman Jerome Powell’s subsequent press conference for comments on what the Fed may do going forward.

Here’s what Wall Street economists expect from the Federal Reserve meeting:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, fed, street, major, meeting, reserve, thinks, today, wall, economists, expect, cut, heres, rate, federal


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Today is historically the single best day for the stock market all year

Oct. 28 has been the single best day of the year for stocks going back to 1950 with an average return of 0.54% on the S&P 500, according to Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial. The S&P 500 hit a fresh all-time high at the open on Monday, lifted by solid earnings and progress on U.S.-China trade. Of the 202 S&P 500 companies that have reported, 78% have topped analyst expectations, according to FactSet. The second best day of the year has been Dec. 26 with the S&P 500 posting


Oct. 28 has been the single best day of the year for stocks going back to 1950 with an average return of 0.54% on the S&P 500, according to Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial.
The S&P 500 hit a fresh all-time high at the open on Monday, lifted by solid earnings and progress on U.S.-China trade.
Of the 202 S&P 500 companies that have reported, 78% have topped analyst expectations, according to FactSet.
The second best day of the year has been Dec. 26 with the S&P 500 posting
Today is historically the single best day for the stock market all year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, trade, single, today, stock, market, day, best, historically, rally, 500, according


Today is historically the single best day for the stock market all year

Seize the day, investors.

Oct. 28 has been the single best day of the year for stocks going back to 1950 with an average return of 0.54% on the S&P 500, according to Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial.

The S&P 500 hit a fresh all-time high at the open on Monday, lifted by solid earnings and progress on U.S.-China trade. Perhaps the seasonal pattern will get it some extra oomph on Monday.

This time of the year is also the period when investors following the sell-in-May-and-go-away strategy come back to the market, usually in November.

“It kicks off the best six months of the year (November-April) and says goodbye to the worst six months,” Detrick said in a note on Monday. “The last few days of October to the first few days of November is one of the strongest times of the year.

The market staged a relief rally last week after the U.S. and China said they were “close to finalizing” some parts of a trade agreement, paving way for a bigger deal. A strong earnings season also supported the rally. Of the 202 S&P 500 companies that have reported, 78% have topped analyst expectations, according to FactSet.

The second best day of the year has been Dec. 26 with the S&P 500 posting a 0.5% gain, according to LPL Financial.

With a 0.51% loss on average for the S&P 500, Oct. 19 has been the single worst day of the year, the firm noted.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, trade, single, today, stock, market, day, best, historically, rally, 500, according


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Nordstrom’s New York flagship opens today. Here’s a look inside

Nordstrom’s newest store, in Manhattan near Central Park and Columbus Circle, has been in the works for seven years. It also has two Nordstrom Rack locations, two Nordstrom Locals and a shop for its Trunk Club personal styling service in the city. Nordstrom is solidifying its presence in New York, which it says is already its largest market for online sales. Nordstrom has said that when it opens a bricks-and-mortar store in a market, online sales there tend to jump more than 20%. Here’s a look i


Nordstrom’s newest store, in Manhattan near Central Park and Columbus Circle, has been in the works for seven years.
It also has two Nordstrom Rack locations, two Nordstrom Locals and a shop for its Trunk Club personal styling service in the city.
Nordstrom is solidifying its presence in New York, which it says is already its largest market for online sales.
Nordstrom has said that when it opens a bricks-and-mortar store in a market, online sales there tend to jump more than 20%.
Here’s a look i
Nordstrom’s New York flagship opens today. Here’s a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, store, sales, today, market, manhattan, flagship, nordstroms, opens, nordstrom, service, square, seven, inside, york, heres, look


Nordstrom's New York flagship opens today. Here's a look inside

Nordstrom’s newest store, in Manhattan near Central Park and Columbus Circle, has been in the works for seven years.

It will be a place where women can discover new brands . It will feature Nordstrom’s full suite of services, like online order pickup (24/7), clothing alterations, shoe repairs, stroller cleaning and appointments with personal stylists in the styling lounge.

The retailer had previously opened a men’s location across the street roughly a year ago. It also has two Nordstrom Rack locations, two Nordstrom Locals and a shop for its Trunk Club personal styling service in the city. But Nordstrom thinks its newest full-line store, in the works for seven years, will tie all of those spaces together, and then some.

A new flagship store — seven floors and 320,000 square feet of shoes, handbags, designer dresses, make-up, jewelry and more — opens in Manhattan, just south of Central Park at the intersection of 57th Street and Broadway, on Thursday morning.

Nordstrom is solidifying its presence in New York, which it says is already its largest market for online sales.

Hungry for a bite to eat with all that shopping? The space has seven spots for that, including: A martini bar in the middle of the shoe floor, a gluten-free donut shop, a family friendly pizza and pasta option, a bar with a terrace overlooking Times Square and a finer-dining eatery, serving house-made gnocchi pasta, called “Wolf” that will stay open even after Nordstrom closes up for the night. And customer service reps will even deliver your meal to you, while you shop.

“As we’ve [opened] stores, each one made sense at the time,” co-president Pete Nordstrom said during a meeting with investors earlier this week. “New York was always out there,” he said, but Nordstrom was looking for the best “greenfield opportunity” as it scoured Manhattan commercial real estate.

He said Nordstrom considered taking the spot where Neiman Marcus now sits, atop Hudson Yards. But it settled on the bottom of the tallest residential building in the Western Hemisphere.

Nordstrom says its business is built on service, and so it had to offer plenty of those in the new store. On an offshoot of the second floor, it has an Anastasia Brow bar, a Drybar for blowouts, a Heyday for facials, Face Gym for facial massages, a waxing room, nail salon and more. You could spend a whole day there, hopping from one appointment to the next.

Nordstrom has said that when it opens a bricks-and-mortar store in a market, online sales there tend to jump more than 20%. It’s expecting a similar boost in Manhattan, even though the market is more crowded.

Barneys New York, with its future still in flux, is right down the block. Saks has its shrine on Fifth Avenue. Macy’s is a subway ride down in Herald Square. And Neiman Marcus just opened less than a year ago at the Hudson Yards mall on the West Side.

“We believe Nordstrom’s entry into the New York market should help drive a multi-year sales lift in the region … which the company has previously identified as a [more than] $700 million full-price opportunity,” Telsey Advisory Group analyst Dana Telsey said in a note to clients this week. “However, for the company overall, we continue to look for indications that marketing efforts and improvement in product assortments are helping to drive traffic/conversion following weak sales performance over the past three quarters.”

Nordstrom shares are down about 21% this year, while the S&P 500 Retail ETF is up 7%.

Here’s a look inside the new store, which opens Thursday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, store, sales, today, market, manhattan, flagship, nordstroms, opens, nordstrom, service, square, seven, inside, york, heres, look


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Alphabet exec blames media for overhyping self-driving cars, even though Google drove the hype

The comments come as the company has dialed back its enthusiastic tone about the promise of self-driving cars as it falls behind its original timeline for getting full self-driving cars on the road. In 2014, Google revealed a new prototype of its “fully self-driving car” with no steering wheel, gas pedal, or brake pedal. Krafcik then said Waymo would make fully self-driving cars available without test drivers in the Phoenix area within months. The self-driving car business often comes up during


The comments come as the company has dialed back its enthusiastic tone about the promise of self-driving cars as it falls behind its original timeline for getting full self-driving cars on the road.
In 2014, Google revealed a new prototype of its “fully self-driving car” with no steering wheel, gas pedal, or brake pedal.
Krafcik then said Waymo would make fully self-driving cars available without test drivers in the Phoenix area within months.
The self-driving car business often comes up during
Alphabet exec blames media for overhyping self-driving cars, even though Google drove the hype Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hype, media, alphabet, selfdriving, today, video, ride, cars, exec, drove, google, car, waymo, blames, company, overhyping


Alphabet exec blames media for overhyping self-driving cars, even though Google drove the hype

Waymo executives think people have taken its promises of self-driving cars too seriously.

The Alphabet company “went through a lot of hype that was sort of unmanageable,” said Tekedra N. Mawakana, Waymo’s chief external officer, at a Business Insider conference Tuesday. “Sometimes a lot of hype is so mismatched to what’s happening in the real world.”

Mawakana said the reporting has become a bit more “grounded” today, but went on to say that the hype had caused people to develop mistaken ideas like they would no longer be able to drive their own cars once self-driving cars became ubiquitous.

“We want the ride to be amazingly boring,” Mawakana continued. “We don’t want the ride to be exciting.”

The comments come as the company has dialed back its enthusiastic tone about the promise of self-driving cars as it falls behind its original timeline for getting full self-driving cars on the road. The company said back in 2017 that it wouldn’t need to wait until 2020 ⁠— when analysts expected self-driving cars to go fully autonomous ⁠— but that it would give riders the ability within “months.”

It also comes as Morgan Stanley cut its valuation on Waymo by 40% last month from $175 billion to $105 billion, concluding that the industry is moving toward commercialization slower than expected and that Waymo still relies on human safety drivers, which CNBC reported in August.

But no company has been more instrumental in driving the hype around self-driving than Google. Consumer and media expectations arose based on what Waymo had told the press and public, dating back as far as 2012, when it was still known as Google’s self-driving car project.

For instance:

In September 2012, then-California Governor Jerry Brown traveled to Google headquarters to sign a law legalizing self-driving cars, saying, “Today we’re looking at science fiction becoming tomorrow’s reality.” Google co-founder Sergey Brin touted the cars as someday being safer than human-driven cars.

In 2014, Google revealed a new prototype of its “fully self-driving car” with no steering wheel, gas pedal, or brake pedal. At the time, Google co-founder Sergey Brin said that the project was about “changing the world for people who are not well-served by transportation today.” The company pushed a promotional video on YouTube, which showed enamored kids, parents and senior citizens boarding the cars for rides, which it hoped to provide in San Francisco the following year. That video has received nearly 11 million views.

A blog post from the company told how a self-driving car drove an engineer’s blind friend down an Austin city street with “no police escort, no closed course, and most importantly, no test driver” in September 2015. “The wind from the open car windows was blowing through his hair, and he was chuckling as he relished the freedom and independence of being alone in a car for the first time in 12 years,” wrote Waymo’s principal engineer Nathaniel Fairfield.

CEO John Krafcik again referenced the ride in his opening keynote at NAIAS’s 2017 inaugural Automobili-D conference in Detroit. “That was the world’s first full self-driving ride,” he said. “We did it in Austin, Texas, in a vehicle without a steering wheel, without break pedal, without a driver.” A narrator in a video presented at the confernece intoned, “the team has been developing fully-self-driving cars and testing it on real city streets every single day” since 2009.

“Fully self-driving cars are here,” Krafcik said again at the 2017 Web Summit in Lisbon, where he presented a video of a man who fell asleep in one of the Waymo vehicles. “Nothing short of full autonomy will do,” he continued. “It’s not happening in 2020, it’s happening today.” Krafcik then said Waymo would make fully self-driving cars available without test drivers in the Phoenix area within months.

Two years later, the company is still singing that same tune. Earlier this month, the company reportedly sent notifications to Arizona residents who were part of Waymo’s commercial pilot, Waymo One, stating “Completely driverless Waymo cars are on the way.”

But, it still isn’t clear how many of the cars will no longer need a test driver.

Don’t expect that to stop Alphabet execs from referencing Waymo on the company’s earnings call later this month. The self-driving car business often comes up during calls, typically with the word “exciting” attached.

WATCH NOW: This Arizona town is overrun with self-driving cars


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hype, media, alphabet, selfdriving, today, video, ride, cars, exec, drove, google, car, waymo, blames, company, overhyping


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The No.1 piece of advice this Lyft executive wishes she received at the start of her career

Though she’s received a lot of great advice throughout her professional journey, she tells CNBC Make It that there is one critical piece of advice she wishes she received early on. Sverchek explains that “one of the reasons I’ve been at Lyft for so long is that I’ve been very long-term focused. “When I started at Lyft, there were a few dads who had gone out on parental leave, but there were no moms,” she says. That conversation, Svercheck says, led to Lyft implementing its first official parenta


Though she’s received a lot of great advice throughout her professional journey, she tells CNBC Make It that there is one critical piece of advice she wishes she received early on.
Sverchek explains that “one of the reasons I’ve been at Lyft for so long is that I’ve been very long-term focused.
“When I started at Lyft, there were a few dads who had gone out on parental leave, but there were no moms,” she says.
That conversation, Svercheck says, led to Lyft implementing its first official parenta
The No.1 piece of advice this Lyft executive wishes she received at the start of her career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, leave, sverchek, no1, ive, today, wishes, executive, received, career, advice, think, parental, sure, piece, advocate, shes, lyft


The No.1 piece of advice this Lyft executive wishes she received at the start of her career

But the one piece of advice she wishes she had gotten: how to know when to use that power to your maximum benefit, and for the most leverage, she says.

“I think every generation that goes by is getting better and better at advocating for themselves,” she says. “And I think that is a really positive thing.”

Though she’s received a lot of great advice throughout her professional journey, she tells CNBC Make It that there is one critical piece of advice she wishes she received early on.

As a corporate lawyer, Kristin Sverchek has spent the last seven years of her career working as a full-time general counsel for Lyft.

Sverchek explains that “one of the reasons I’ve been at Lyft for so long is that I’ve been very long-term focused. That means that when I’ve chosen to be vocal on my own behalf, it’s because I have an ultimate goal in mind for myself.”

Earlier in her career, Sverchek says she often failed to think long-term and would ask for a raise or promotion off impulse whenever she felt she was being overlooked. “Looking back, I wish someone had told me to be a little more selective,” she says. “Choose my battles, not be so short sighted, and make sure that I’ve always got an end goal in mind.”

For young people looking to advocate for themselves at work today, Sverchek suggests being “very intentional about realizing what it is that you want for yourself, and make sure that each time you decide to speak up, you’re taking a step toward that end goal.”

“Is it a promotion that you want? A raise? What is it that you really want,” she asks. “Be very intentional so that when it comes time to advocate for yourself, your case is all the more compelling.”

To prepare, Sverchek says young people should make sure they have all of the evidence needed to prove why they’re deserving of the raise or promotion they’re advocating for. “Provide a persuasive argument and anticipate every question or concern that could be raised, and then answer those before they are raised,” she says. “And don’t give up. Even if the answer is ‘no’ today, it might be ‘yes’ in six to 12 months.”

In her own career, Sverchek explains how advocating for herself when she felt she was prepared and had a long-term plan has paid off.

Since joining Lyft in 2012, Sverchek says she’s taken the platform’s legal department from a team of one (herself) to more than 130 people, and she’s used her position as a mom and a leader to advocate for a company-wide parental leave policy.

“When I started at Lyft, there were a few dads who had gone out on parental leave, but there were no moms,” she says. “So when I got pregnant, I immediately talked to our VP of HR at the time and explained to him that we need to develop [a policy] not just for me, but for all the other women and men who will look to take parental leave in the future.”

That conversation, Svercheck says, led to Lyft implementing its first official parental leave policy in the fall of 2014. Today, she says, the company’s policy has been updated to include 18 weeks of flexible paid time off for biological, adoptive and foster parents.

“As an attorney, it’s my job to advocate on a daily basis, whether it is for the company, for my team, or for myself,” she says. “I like to think I’ve gotten pretty good at it.”

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: This Lyft executive asks a go-to interview question about failure at work — how to answer it


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, leave, sverchek, no1, ive, today, wishes, executive, received, career, advice, think, parental, sure, piece, advocate, shes, lyft


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Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Bank of America, Apple, Electronic Arts & more

In this photo illustration Levi’s 501 blue jeans by U.S. clothing manufacturer Levi Strauss are seen on March 8, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. U.S. President Donald Trump has promised to sign into law tariffs on imported steel and aluminum today and the European Commission has vowed to retaliate with tariffs on Levi’s jeans, Kentucky bourbon and Harley-Davidson motorcycles. Sean Gallup | Getty Images


In this photo illustration Levi’s 501 blue jeans by U.S. clothing manufacturer Levi Strauss are seen on March 8, 2018 in Berlin, Germany.
U.S. President Donald Trump has promised to sign into law tariffs on imported steel and aluminum today and the European Commission has vowed to retaliate with tariffs on Levi’s jeans, Kentucky bourbon and Harley-Davidson motorcycles.
Sean Gallup | Getty Images
Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Bank of America, Apple, Electronic Arts & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strauss, bank, tariffs, vowed, today, apple, steel, levis, calls, seen, biggest, sign, day, analyst, trump, arts, electronic, america, jeans


Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Bank of America, Apple, Electronic Arts & more

In this photo illustration Levi’s 501 blue jeans by U.S. clothing manufacturer Levi Strauss are seen on March 8, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. U.S. President Donald Trump has promised to sign into law tariffs on imported steel and aluminum today and the European Commission has vowed to retaliate with tariffs on Levi’s jeans, Kentucky bourbon and Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

Sean Gallup | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strauss, bank, tariffs, vowed, today, apple, steel, levis, calls, seen, biggest, sign, day, analyst, trump, arts, electronic, america, jeans


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Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Bank of America, Apple, Electronic Arts & more

In this photo illustration Levi’s 501 blue jeans by U.S. clothing manufacturer Levi Strauss are seen on March 8, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. U.S. President Donald Trump has promised to sign into law tariffs on imported steel and aluminum today and the European Commission has vowed to retaliate with tariffs on Levi’s jeans, Kentucky bourbon and Harley-Davidson motorcycles. Sean Gallup | Getty Images


In this photo illustration Levi’s 501 blue jeans by U.S. clothing manufacturer Levi Strauss are seen on March 8, 2018 in Berlin, Germany.
U.S. President Donald Trump has promised to sign into law tariffs on imported steel and aluminum today and the European Commission has vowed to retaliate with tariffs on Levi’s jeans, Kentucky bourbon and Harley-Davidson motorcycles.
Sean Gallup | Getty Images
Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Bank of America, Apple, Electronic Arts & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strauss, bank, tariffs, vowed, today, apple, steel, levis, calls, seen, biggest, sign, day, analyst, trump, arts, electronic, america, jeans


Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Bank of America, Apple, Electronic Arts & more

In this photo illustration Levi’s 501 blue jeans by U.S. clothing manufacturer Levi Strauss are seen on March 8, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. U.S. President Donald Trump has promised to sign into law tariffs on imported steel and aluminum today and the European Commission has vowed to retaliate with tariffs on Levi’s jeans, Kentucky bourbon and Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: michael bloom
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Why Jack Ma says he’d never get a job at Alibaba today

Billionaire entrepreneur Jack Ma founded Alibaba — one of China’s most successful technology companies. But even he would have a tough time securing a job there today, he said. The e-commerce visionary said he and most of the other founders would struggle to pass the initial screening for many of the world’s most desirable companies. “People like me, today, if I tried to apply (for a) job in Alibaba, it’s almost impossible,” Ma said at the Forbes Global CEO Conference in Singapore. “They would t


Billionaire entrepreneur Jack Ma founded Alibaba — one of China’s most successful technology companies.
But even he would have a tough time securing a job there today, he said.
The e-commerce visionary said he and most of the other founders would struggle to pass the initial screening for many of the world’s most desirable companies.
“People like me, today, if I tried to apply (for a) job in Alibaba, it’s almost impossible,” Ma said at the Forbes Global CEO Conference in Singapore.
“They would t
Why Jack Ma says he’d never get a job at Alibaba today Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, alibaba, hed, job, traditional, worlds, weve, unfairly, visionary, tried, today


Why Jack Ma says he'd never get a job at Alibaba today

Billionaire entrepreneur Jack Ma founded Alibaba — one of China’s most successful technology companies.

But even he would have a tough time securing a job there today, he said.

And it’s not just Alibaba. The e-commerce visionary said he and most of the other founders would struggle to pass the initial screening for many of the world’s most desirable companies.

“People like me, today, if I tried to apply (for a) job in Alibaba, it’s almost impossible,” Ma said at the Forbes Global CEO Conference in Singapore.

That’s because of a flaw in the international employment system, which places too much emphasis on academic results and unfairly pits out-of-box thinkers against traditional ones, he said.

“People judge you by your diploma,” said Ma. “They would think ‘hey, we’re got a group of people from Harvard, we’ve got people from Stanford, and you are from nowhere.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, alibaba, hed, job, traditional, worlds, weve, unfairly, visionary, tried, today


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