RNC hires little-known intel firm Outliers Group for opposition research on Dems

The company, called the Outliers Group, received $10,000 from the RNC in March for research and consulting services, according to the RNC’s latest Federal Election Commission filing. It marks the first time Outliers has been paid by any political entity since its founding, FEC records show. Outliers is run by Rob Berra, a former U.S. Army infantry officer and managing director of Clerestory Research, which also isn’t known as a go-to firm for the GOP. “This was for Democrat oppo research service


The company, called the Outliers Group, received $10,000 from the RNC in March for research and consulting services, according to the RNC’s latest Federal Election Commission filing. It marks the first time Outliers has been paid by any political entity since its founding, FEC records show. Outliers is run by Rob Berra, a former U.S. Army infantry officer and managing director of Clerestory Research, which also isn’t known as a go-to firm for the GOP. “This was for Democrat oppo research service
RNC hires little-known intel firm Outliers Group for opposition research on Dems Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: brian schwartz, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, intel, hires, dems, unknown, littleknown, services, records, group, rnc, research, run, heard, rncs, told, firm, opposition, outliers


RNC hires little-known intel firm Outliers Group for opposition research on Dems

The Republican National Committee has hired a tiny, unknown company, which is run by an Army veteran who leads a private intelligence firm, to dig up opposition research on Democrats for the 2020 campaign.

The company, called the Outliers Group, received $10,000 from the RNC in March for research and consulting services, according to the RNC’s latest Federal Election Commission filing. It marks the first time Outliers has been paid by any political entity since its founding, FEC records show.

Outliers is run by Rob Berra, a former U.S. Army infantry officer and managing director of Clerestory Research, which also isn’t known as a go-to firm for the GOP.

“This was for Democrat oppo research services. Searching for and analyzing public records,” Mike Reed, the RNC’s deputy chief of staff of communications, told CNBC in an email describing Outliers’ role. “We partner with a variety of firms to assist us with this type of work — as we are doing research on dozens of Democrat candidates in preparation for 2020.”

Outliers is such an unknown entity that leaders of President Donald Trump’s campaign hadn’t heard of it. “Not heard of either” Outliers or Clerestory, a senior Trump campaign advisor told CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: brian schwartz, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, intel, hires, dems, unknown, littleknown, services, records, group, rnc, research, run, heard, rncs, told, firm, opposition, outliers


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Warren Buffett: This is how to be successful

At 88, billionaire investing guru Warren Buffett is often considered the Yoda of the investing world. “By far the best investment you can make is in yourself,” Buffett recently told Yahoo Finance editor-in-chief Andy Serwer. Nothing happens,” Buffett told Serwer. Second, start taking care of your body and your mind when you are still young, Buffett said. “Well, I’ve said many times that If you get to be 65 or 70 and later and the people that you want to have love you actually do love you, you’re


At 88, billionaire investing guru Warren Buffett is often considered the Yoda of the investing world. “By far the best investment you can make is in yourself,” Buffett recently told Yahoo Finance editor-in-chief Andy Serwer. Nothing happens,” Buffett told Serwer. Second, start taking care of your body and your mind when you are still young, Buffett said. “Well, I’ve said many times that If you get to be 65 or 70 and later and the people that you want to have love you actually do love you, you’re
Warren Buffett: This is how to be successful Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: catherine clifford, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cant, success, taking, youd, warren, buffett, youre, business, told, world, successful, care


Warren Buffett: This is how to be successful

At 88, billionaire investing guru Warren Buffett is often considered the Yoda of the investing world. He’s the chairman of Berkshire Hathaway and is currently worth $86 billion, according to Forbes.

But his best wisdom on how to achieve success in business has nothing to do with profit and loss statements or stock portfolios.

“By far the best investment you can make is in yourself,” Buffett recently told Yahoo Finance editor-in-chief Andy Serwer.

First, “learn to communicate better both in writing and in person, they increase their value at least 50 percent. If you can’t communicate to somebody, it’s like winking at a girl in the dark. Nothing happens,” Buffett told Serwer. “You have to be able to get forth your ideas.”

Second, start taking care of your body and your mind when you are still young, Buffett said.

“If I gave you a car, and it’d be the only car you get the rest of your life, you would take care of it like you can’t believe. Any scratch, you’d fix that moment, you’d read the owner’s manual, you’d keep a garage and do all these things,” he said.

“You get exactly one mind and one body in this world, and you can’t start taking care of it when you’re 50. By that time, you’ll rust it out, if you haven’t done anything. So it’s just hugely important. And if you invest in yourself, nobody can take it away from you.”

Of course, Buffett is famous for his diet of Coke and McDonald’s, so he admitted people should do what he says, not what he does: “I’ll get a certain criticism for not living it,” he said.

Finally, Buffett’s definition of “true success” doesn’t have anything to do with money.

“Well, I’ve said many times that If you get to be 65 or 70 and later and the people that you want to have love you actually do love you, you’re a success,” Buffett told Serwer.

See also:

Billionaire ‘Shark Tank’ star Mark Cuban: This is how to know if a business will be successful

Google execs reveal secrets to success they got from Silicon Valley’s ‘trillion dollar’ business coach

Amazon’s Jeff Bezos: Why success depends on not being efficient sometimes

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: catherine clifford, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cant, success, taking, youd, warren, buffett, youre, business, told, world, successful, care


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Here’s why special counsel Robert Mueller did not say whether Trump obstructed justice

The detailed report goes through each of the actions Mueller investigated for potential obstruction, laying out the evidence and analyzing the president’s possible intent. In many cases, the special counsel says the motives behind the president’s actions are inconclusive. Mueller’s team says “the evidence shows that the President was focused on the Russia investigation’s implications for his presidency.” Other evidence indicates that the President was concerned about the impact of the Russia inv


The detailed report goes through each of the actions Mueller investigated for potential obstruction, laying out the evidence and analyzing the president’s possible intent. In many cases, the special counsel says the motives behind the president’s actions are inconclusive. Mueller’s team says “the evidence shows that the President was focused on the Russia investigation’s implications for his presidency.” Other evidence indicates that the President was concerned about the impact of the Russia inv
Here’s why special counsel Robert Mueller did not say whether Trump obstructed justice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, obstruction, counsel, special, told, mueller, ability, robert, obstructed, investigation, justice, trump, evidence, russia, president, say, heres, report


Here's why special counsel Robert Mueller did not say whether Trump obstructed justice

The detailed report goes through each of the actions Mueller investigated for potential obstruction, laying out the evidence and analyzing the president’s possible intent. In many cases, the special counsel says the motives behind the president’s actions are inconclusive.

Here’s one example in how Mueller’s team viewed Trump’s intent in firing Comey:

The evidence does not establish that the termination of Comey was designed to cover up a conspiracy between the Trump Campaign and Russia: As described in Volume I, the evidence uncovered in the investigation did not establish that the President or those close to him were involved in the charged Russian computer-hacking or active-measure conspiracies, or that the President otherwise had an unlawful relationship with any Russian official. But the evidence does indicate that a thorough FBI investigation would uncover facts about the campaign and the President personally that the President could have understood to be crimes or that would give rise to personal and political concerns.

Several parts of the Mueller report reference the apparent anger and frustration Trump felt about the investigation — which Barr referenced earlier Thursday in outlining the decision not to charge the president with obstruction. Mueller’s team says “the evidence shows that the President was focused on the Russia investigation’s implications for his presidency.”

One section of the report explains how evidence shows Trump thought the probe would hinder his ability to conduct foreign policy:

Evidence indicates that the President was angered by both the existence of the Russia investigation and the public reporting that he was under investigation, which he knew was not true based on Comey’s representations. The President complained to advisors that if people thought Russia helped him with the election, it would detract from what he had accomplished. Other evidence indicates that the President was concerned about the impact of the Russia investigation on his ability to govern. The President complained that the perception that he was under investigation was hurting his ability to conduct foreign relations, particularly with Russia. The President told Coats he “can’t do anything with Russia,” he told Rogers that “the thing with the Russians” was interfering with his ability to conduct foreign affairs, and he told Comey that “he was trying to run the country and the cloud of this Russia business was making that difficult.”

In the report, Mueller’s team concluded that it did not think investigating the president for obstruction affects his ability to carry out his constitutional duties — specifically in the context of his authority to oversee investigations.

Read the full report below.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, obstruction, counsel, special, told, mueller, ability, robert, obstructed, investigation, justice, trump, evidence, russia, president, say, heres, report


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Economy could be ‘a lot of power’ for GOP heading into 2020 elections, says strategist Jim Paulsen

The Republicans may have some good news heading into the 2020 presidential election season, noted market strategist Jim Paulsen told CNBC on Thursday. But before that happens, he thinks it’s even possible for an unexpected surge in the stock market. While many on Wall Street think the market will go higher this year, there are few who think it will go a lot higher, Paulsen said. “Maybe the surprise is not that it is going to fall or go a little higher, maybe it blows a lot higher than it even sh


The Republicans may have some good news heading into the 2020 presidential election season, noted market strategist Jim Paulsen told CNBC on Thursday. But before that happens, he thinks it’s even possible for an unexpected surge in the stock market. While many on Wall Street think the market will go higher this year, there are few who think it will go a lot higher, Paulsen said. “Maybe the surprise is not that it is going to fall or go a little higher, maybe it blows a lot higher than it even sh
Economy could be ‘a lot of power’ for GOP heading into 2020 elections, says strategist Jim Paulsen Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gop, higher, jim, economy, told, growth, 2020, strategist, stock, market, think, heading, lot, elections, thats, power, paulsen


Economy could be 'a lot of power' for GOP heading into 2020 elections, says strategist Jim Paulsen

The Republicans may have some good news heading into the 2020 presidential election season, noted market strategist Jim Paulsen told CNBC on Thursday.

That’s because he sees the timing of economic growth and the character of the economy as the most important issues for the election.

“In some sense, we may look back on this and say that the slowdown, if there was one here in 2019, might have been great timing for the Republican Party,” the chief investment strategist at The Leuthold Group said on “Power Lunch.”

In other words, if the economy slows down and the Trump administration and other global officials bring on the “full policy cavalry,” it will probably end up reviving economic growth both in the U.S. and abroad, Paulsen said.

“If that is the case going into voting season next year — where the economy is continuing to do not just OK but accelerating, and the unemployment rate is heading to 3% and wages continue to rise — I think that’s a lot of power for the Republican Party.”

While there was concern about a weak economy late last year, things are looking better. Retail sales soared in March, rising 1.6%, and weekly jobless claims came in at the lowest level since 1969 for the week ended April 13. Initial claims for state unemployment benefits dropped 5,000 to a seasonally adjusted 192,000.

Forecasts have also come up for first-quarter gross domestic product. Next week, the government releases its advanced estimate of Q1 GDP. According to the CNBC Rapid Update, which measures how much new data changes the average tracking forecast among a select group of Wall Street economists, the median GDP forecast is now at 2.4%. That’s up from as low as 1% in March.

All that is good news for the stock market — for now, said Paulsen. He still thinks that at some point the Federal Reserve, in raising interest rates, will kill the economic recovery.

“It almost did last year. We were close to killing it off. But we hit the pause button,” he said, referring to the Fed’s decision earlier this year to hold off on raising interest rates after there were concerns about the economy dramatically slowing.

“Now we are just entering a period where we are going to have revival in growth without Fed tightening. That’s pretty good,” Paulsen said.

He sees a case where the yield on the 10-year Treasury can jump back above 3% and still not really hurt stocks.

However, at some point the Fed will be tightening again.

“Then it becomes a mixed bag and ultimately the Fed overdoes it,” he said. “That’s probably sometime off.”

But before that happens, he thinks it’s even possible for an unexpected surge in the stock market.

While many on Wall Street think the market will go higher this year, there are few who think it will go a lot higher, Paulsen said.

“Maybe the surprise is not that it is going to fall or go a little higher, maybe it blows a lot higher than it even should.”

Paulsen’s comments echo those of BlackRock CEO Larry Fink, who told CNBC on Tuesday that the market could have a quick rally from here.

“We have a risk of a melt-up, not a meltdown here. Despite where the markets are in equities, we have not seen money being put to work,” the head of the world’s largest asset manager told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “We have record amounts of money in cash. We still see outflows in retail in equities and in institutions.”

In stock market terms, a melt-up is considered a big move in the markets that comes from investors trying to get in on a momentum shift. It also can be a sign of a late-stage bull market.

— CNBC’s Fred Imbert and Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gop, higher, jim, economy, told, growth, 2020, strategist, stock, market, think, heading, lot, elections, thats, power, paulsen


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5 things you didn’t realize you could ask for that can save you lots of money

Just 37% of workers have asked for a raise, according to a 2018 survey of over 160,000 people by career site PayScale. But 70% of those who did ask for more money got it, while just one in three people reported receiving a raise without asking for one. “They need you to show what impact your work has had on the business,” Lydia Frank, vice president of PayScale, told CNBC Make It. Your preparation should also include knowing comparable salary ranges in your company and the broader field, bestsel


Just 37% of workers have asked for a raise, according to a 2018 survey of over 160,000 people by career site PayScale. But 70% of those who did ask for more money got it, while just one in three people reported receiving a raise without asking for one. “They need you to show what impact your work has had on the business,” Lydia Frank, vice president of PayScale, told CNBC Make It. Your preparation should also include knowing comparable salary ranges in your company and the broader field, bestsel
5 things you didn’t realize you could ask for that can save you lots of money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, things, save, didnt, company, worked, payscale, ask, money, raise, workers, realize, lots, told, need


5 things you didn't realize you could ask for that can save you lots of money

Just 37% of workers have asked for a raise, according to a 2018 survey of over 160,000 people by career site PayScale. But 70% of those who did ask for more money got it, while just one in three people reported receiving a raise without asking for one. That means that most people could be leaving money on the table.

Those who have worked at a company for at least five years are most likely to receive a raise, Payscale found, though that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t ask for one otherwise. Just be sure to come prepared to demonstrate the value you add to the business.

“They need you to show what impact your work has had on the business,” Lydia Frank, vice president of PayScale, told CNBC Make It.

Your preparation should also include knowing comparable salary ranges in your company and the broader field, bestselling author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch told CNBC Make It. And if you need a raise because of external pressures — say, to save for your kid’s school — leave that out of the conversation.

“People often bring up their mortgage, their new car payment,” she says. “Focus on why you deserve a raise — not why you need it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, things, save, didnt, company, worked, payscale, ask, money, raise, workers, realize, lots, told, need


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Weed giant Canopy Growth closing in on deal to buy Acreage Holdings

Canadian cannabis giant Canopy Growth is close to a deal to purchase Acreage Holdings — the latest in a string of deals in the fast-growing industry. Sources also told CNBC that Canopy had been looking at deals with other U.S.-based operators, in addition to Acreage. For its part, Canopy Growth remains one of the largest players in the burgeoning cannabis industry. In its most recent earnings report, Canopy said it sold 10,102 kilograms of pot and equivalents in the three months ended December 2


Canadian cannabis giant Canopy Growth is close to a deal to purchase Acreage Holdings — the latest in a string of deals in the fast-growing industry. Sources also told CNBC that Canopy had been looking at deals with other U.S.-based operators, in addition to Acreage. For its part, Canopy Growth remains one of the largest players in the burgeoning cannabis industry. In its most recent earnings report, Canopy said it sold 10,102 kilograms of pot and equivalents in the three months ended December 2
Weed giant Canopy Growth closing in on deal to buy Acreage Holdings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: thomas franck, tom franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, largest, growth, closing, giant, industry, acreage, canopy, sources, weed, operators, deal, told, million, cannabis, recent, buy, holdings


Weed giant Canopy Growth closing in on deal to buy Acreage Holdings

Canadian cannabis giant Canopy Growth is close to a deal to purchase Acreage Holdings — the latest in a string of deals in the fast-growing industry.

The two companies have been in talks for about two weeks and were scheduled to speak on the phone Wednesday evening to finalize the agreement, sources familiar with the matter told CNBC’s Melissa Lee. Sources also told CNBC that Canopy had been looking at deals with other U.S.-based operators, in addition to Acreage.

Shares of Canopy rallied more than 10% in after hours trading Wednesday following the news. Neither company was immediately available to comment.

Acreage Holdings, one of the largest vertically integrated, multistate cannabis operators in the U.S., has attracted attention on Wall Street in part thanks to John Boehner, former speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and a director at the company.

For its part, Canopy Growth remains one of the largest players in the burgeoning cannabis industry. With a market cap of about $14 billion, Canopy has drawn attention for its partnership with Corona beer maker Constellation Brands. It’s also announced plans to locate a hemp operations in New York State with the help of a recent acquisition of cannabis research company, Ebbu.

In its most recent earnings report, Canopy said it sold 10,102 kilograms of pot and equivalents in the three months ended December 2018. It’s also introduced new products such as oral sprays and pre-rolled joints made by its custom-built, proprietary automated cannabis rolling machines.

As of September, Canopy had 4.3 million square feet of licensed capacity in Canada, which it is expanding to 5.6 million. That represents about 35% of industry capacity, according to industry analysts.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: thomas franck, tom franck
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Herman Cain says he will not drop out of Fed Board consideration

Herman Cain will not drop out of consideration for the Federal Reserve Board even though he does not appear to have enough votes to get confirmed in the Senate, he told The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday. Trump picked Cain, a 2012 presidential candidate, for one of two vacant Fed Board seats but has not formally nominated him. Four Republicans — enough to sink Cain in the Senate — expect not to support his confirmation to the central bank board if Trump nominates him. He said it will “probably


Herman Cain will not drop out of consideration for the Federal Reserve Board even though he does not appear to have enough votes to get confirmed in the Senate, he told The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday. Trump picked Cain, a 2012 presidential candidate, for one of two vacant Fed Board seats but has not formally nominated him. Four Republicans — enough to sink Cain in the Senate — expect not to support his confirmation to the central bank board if Trump nominates him. He said it will “probably
Herman Cain says he will not drop out of Fed Board consideration Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: jacob pramuk, jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, fed, consideration, senate, process, cain, board, presidential, told, kudlow, journal, drop, herman


Herman Cain says he will not drop out of Fed Board consideration

Herman Cain will not drop out of consideration for the Federal Reserve Board even though he does not appear to have enough votes to get confirmed in the Senate, he told The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday.

The former Godfather’s Pizza CEO and Kansas City Fed Board president said he is “very committed” to the process, according to the newspaper. Trump picked Cain, a 2012 presidential candidate, for one of two vacant Fed Board seats but has not formally nominated him.

Four Republicans — enough to sink Cain in the Senate — expect not to support his confirmation to the central bank board if Trump nominates him. On Tuesday, Trump’s top economic advisor Larry Kudlow said the White House is “talking to a number of candidates” for the seat. He said it will “probably be up to Herman Cain if he wants to stay in the process or not.”

Cain told the Journal that Kudlow was “giving [him] an out.”

“I don’t want an out,” he said.

Critics of Cain’s potential appointment have raised concerns about him politicizing the independent board because he would likely be loyal to Trump. Sexual misconduct accusations that surfaced during the 2012 presidential elections have also sparked resistance to his possible nomination.

Cain has denied the allegations against him.

Read the full Journal story here.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: jacob pramuk, jonathan ernst
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Is education the key to the kingdom?

In New York City, home to our nation’s financial markets, a staggering 74 percent of its students are considered economically disadvantaged. They are parallel worlds, a few miles apart and largely invisible to one another. This is an increasing challenge across our country: How do we build a path to economic mobility for more of our kids? Now, I understand how to make more thoughtful decisions about my life. It’s a new way to think.”


In New York City, home to our nation’s financial markets, a staggering 74 percent of its students are considered economically disadvantaged. They are parallel worlds, a few miles apart and largely invisible to one another. This is an increasing challenge across our country: How do we build a path to economic mobility for more of our kids? Now, I understand how to make more thoughtful decisions about my life. It’s a new way to think.”
Is education the key to the kingdom? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: nan morrison, -nan morrison, president, ceo the council for economic education
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrote, way, york, financial, understand, told, economic, youthis, key, worlds, education, students, kingdom


Is education the key to the kingdom?

In New York City, home to our nation’s financial markets, a staggering 74 percent of its students are considered economically disadvantaged.

They are parallel worlds, a few miles apart and largely invisible to one another. This is an increasing challenge across our country: How do we build a path to economic mobility for more of our kids? That is the Council for Economic Education’s mission.

More from Invest in You:

This tax mistake in college left me owing the IRS

Here’s what we need to do to improve financial literacy

America’s juiciest money secrets, as told to CNBC

One of our students wrote the following about the courses that CEE helps provide in economics and personal finance:

“At first, it felt like a foreign language. Now, I understand how to make more thoughtful decisions about my life. It’s a new way to think.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: nan morrison, -nan morrison, president, ceo the council for economic education
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The EU is not ready to deal with Russian influence in its elections. Here’s why

The European Union is having a hard job building a sufficient firewall when it comes to election interference, experts have told CNBC. The European Parliament — the EU’s legislative arm — has launched a campaign to tackle online disinformation ahead of its elections in May. But there are certain loopholes that mean there could still be outside influence in the vote. He added that there are a number of steps that European institutions should take to prevent such influence. The Russian government


The European Union is having a hard job building a sufficient firewall when it comes to election interference, experts have told CNBC. The European Parliament — the EU’s legislative arm — has launched a campaign to tackle online disinformation ahead of its elections in May. But there are certain loopholes that mean there could still be outside influence in the vote. He added that there are a number of steps that European institutions should take to prevent such influence. The Russian government
The EU is not ready to deal with Russian influence in its elections. Here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: silvia amaro, thomas trutschel, photothek, getty images, -andrew foxall, director at the henry jackson society, -donald tusk, european council president
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eu, russian, deal, european, information, disinformation, told, campaign, elections, russia, influence, heres, foxall, ready


The EU is not ready to deal with Russian influence in its elections. Here's why

The European Union is having a hard job building a sufficient firewall when it comes to election interference, experts have told CNBC.

The European Parliament — the EU’s legislative arm — has launched a campaign to tackle online disinformation ahead of its elections in May. But there are certain loopholes that mean there could still be outside influence in the vote.

“Russia will attempt to influence the parliamentary elections using its usual tool kit, including targeted propaganda, and the stealing and leaking of information,” Andrew Foxall, director of the Russia and Eurasia studies at the Henry Jackson Society, told CNBC via email.

He added that there are a number of steps that European institutions should take to prevent such influence. EU countries could share information with each other on “fake news” stories or disinformation; make public any influence attempts — whether from Russia or elsewhere; pledge not to use stolen data in their campaigns and make campaign financing more transparent, Foxall said.

The Russian government was not immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: silvia amaro, thomas trutschel, photothek, getty images, -andrew foxall, director at the henry jackson society, -donald tusk, european council president
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eu, russian, deal, european, information, disinformation, told, campaign, elections, russia, influence, heres, foxall, ready


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Trump Fed pick Stephen Moore writing features Clinton, AIDS jokes

In 2004, Moore wrote another National Review Online column, a “Happy Christmas” letter that likewise was clearly intended to be humorous. “He might as well have told us that [the boy] has AIDS,” Moore wrote. A spokeswoman for Moore told CNBC that he had no comment on either Kudlow’s remarks, or on his columns. In her 2010 divorce complaint, Allison Moore said she was the “primary caretaker and role model for the parties’ children.” “And then [one son], with a puzzled look on his face says, ‘but


In 2004, Moore wrote another National Review Online column, a “Happy Christmas” letter that likewise was clearly intended to be humorous. “He might as well have told us that [the boy] has AIDS,” Moore wrote. A spokeswoman for Moore told CNBC that he had no comment on either Kudlow’s remarks, or on his columns. In her 2010 divorce complaint, Allison Moore said she was the “primary caretaker and role model for the parties’ children.” “And then [one son], with a puzzled look on his face says, ‘but
Trump Fed pick Stephen Moore writing features Clinton, AIDS jokes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: dan mangan, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steve, jokes, told, writing, allison, clinton, review, features, aids, stephen, column, son, moores, moore, pick, wrote, fed, national, trump


Trump Fed pick Stephen Moore writing features Clinton, AIDS jokes

Stephen Moore, the conservative pundit who has been tapped by President Donald Trump for an open seat on the Federal Reserve board, cracked wise in columns about his jobless wife, using Hillary Clinton’s photo to potty train one son, and flirting with a “gorgeous 20-something blonde” with his other son in the car.

In a 2003 National Review Online column, Moore joked that he had deployed an “ingenious child rearing technique” of taping “gruesome pictures” of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein’s dead, mangled sons on the family refrigerator with the written message: “THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS TO KIDS THAT GROW UP TO BE DEMOCRATS!”

In 2004, Moore wrote another National Review Online column, a “Happy Christmas” letter that likewise was clearly intended to be humorous. In the piece, Moore griped about his young sons’ poor athletic performance and his then-3-year-old boy being diagnosed with “low-muscle tone” by a pediatrician.

“He might as well have told us that [the boy] has AIDS,” Moore wrote.

The columns have come to light on the heels of exposure of Moore’s divorce records, which show how his ex-wife Allison had accused him of adultery, of subjecting her to “emotional and psychological abuse,” and of shorting her on more than $300,000 he had agreed to pay her in a divorce settlement, alimony and child support until a judge held him in contempt of court. The IRS has a $75,000 tax lien on Moore for unpaid income taxes from his 2014 tax return. Moore is contesting that amount.

On Tuesday, Trump’s top economics advisor, Larry Kudlow, a key backer of Moore’s nomination, told reporters that the White House is speaking with “a number of” other potential “candidates” for the Fed’s two open board seats besides Moore and former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain, whose selection by the president likewise has faced criticism.

Kudlow also said that Moore and Cain are both still in the vetting process, and that “we support” both men’s candidacies for the central bank posts.

A spokeswoman for Moore told CNBC that he had no comment on either Kudlow’s remarks, or on his columns.

In her 2010 divorce complaint, Allison Moore said she was the “primary caretaker and role model for the parties’ children.”

“She quit her job to devote her time to raising their children,” the complaint said.

But Allison Moore’s lack of a job was a subject of jabs by her husband in the joke-laden National Review Online columns – which appear to be written as parodies of annual family Christmas letters. In the essays, he routinely referred to himself in the third person.

“Allison consumes, but she still doesn’t produce,” Moore wrote of his then-wife in a December 2003 column in the National Review. “She now falls into the category of what economists call ‘long-term unemployed.’ Steve describes her as the family’s ‘loss leader’.”

“She manages to keep busy though, what with her anger-management class in the morning, Weight Watchers in the afternoon, and then Tuesday and Thursday evenings when she and Steve attend couple’s therapy,” he wrote.

A year later, Moore wrote in a column, “No, Allison STILL doesn’t have a job, but thanks SO much for asking.”

In his 2003 column, Moore wrote that “one highlight” of that year was getting his 2-year-old son potty trained” by Moore’s “brilliant idea of pasting a photo of Hillary Clinton with a bullseye target on the bottom of the potty.”

“And ever since then, it’s been like Niagara Falls — and with perfect accuracy — every time nature calls.”

In her divorce filing, Allison said Moore in 2010 had created two Match.com accounts with the aim of connecting “romantically with other women.” The filing said Moore began what was “by his own admission … a romantic adulterous relationship” with a woman, and that he once said to the Moore’s children in front of Allison: “I have two women, and what’s really bad is when they fight over you.”

Nine years earlier, in a National Review end-of-year column entitled “Some Christmas Jeer,” Moore wrote: “Will someone out there please help us get Allison a job? It’s not so much that we need her income, but that when she sits at home idly day after day she becomes a compulsive shopper.”

But Moore also noted in the same column “that Steve, too, has done his part to nudge the economy along. A few months ago he bought a cherry red Camaro convertible,” which his “22-year-old college intern” told him “”screams midlife crisis!'”

“On more than one occasion Steve has been cruising around town with the top down and a gorgeous 20-something blond has pulled up beside him: he looks longingly at her, she gives him a ‘come hither look,’ and then the mood is spoiled when she sees [one son] drooling in the baby seat and then [the older sons] start making weird faces at her,” Moore wrote.

“She sticks her finger in her mouth and zooms off and Steve is left screaming at the kids: ‘How many times do I have to tell you tyrants to stay out of sight when I’m hitting on girls?'”

“And then [one son], with a puzzled look on his face says, ‘but daddy, we already have a mommy,'” Moore wrote. “And then Steve says, ‘Yes, but imagine, just for a moment, how nice it would be if you had a much younger mommy.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: dan mangan, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steve, jokes, told, writing, allison, clinton, review, features, aids, stephen, column, son, moores, moore, pick, wrote, fed, national, trump


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