Teeming with engineers, Alabama’s Rocket City USA is luring hot new industries to town

NASA rockets including the V-2 rocket and Saturn I rocket are seen at Rocket Park on July 17, 2019, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. As the U.S. ratcheted up its space race with the Soviet Union, NASA established the Marshall Space Flight Center next door, developing the giant Saturn V rockets that would make Apollo moon missions possible. Huntsville has been “Rocket City” ever since. As a government town — Redstone Arsenal is its own Census-designated place — the h


NASA rockets including the V-2 rocket and Saturn I rocket are seen at Rocket Park on July 17, 2019, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.
As the U.S. ratcheted up its space race with the Soviet Union, NASA established the Marshall Space Flight Center next door, developing the giant Saturn V rockets that would make Apollo moon missions possible.
Huntsville has been “Rocket City” ever since.
As a government town — Redstone Arsenal is its own Census-designated place — the h
Teeming with engineers, Alabama’s Rocket City USA is luring hot new industries to town Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: morgan brennan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hot, rate, industries, teeming, space, huntsville, marshall, town, work, rocket, engineers, alabamas, company, flight, really, usa, luring, city, world


Teeming with engineers, Alabama's Rocket City USA is luring hot new industries to town

NASA rockets including the V-2 rocket and Saturn I rocket are seen at Rocket Park on July 17, 2019, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Loren Elliott | AFP | Getty Images

A new era for aerospace and defense has been emerging — and Huntsville is capitalizing on it. Before the late 1950s, the northern Alabama community’s claim to fame was as the “watercress capital of the world.” Then the Army’s nascent ballistic missile program moved to the shuttered World War II chemical weapons outpost that would become Redstone Arsenal. As the U.S. ratcheted up its space race with the Soviet Union, NASA established the Marshall Space Flight Center next door, developing the giant Saturn V rockets that would make Apollo moon missions possible. Huntsville has been “Rocket City” ever since. As a government town — Redstone Arsenal is its own Census-designated place — the high-tech hub has benefited from the recent resurgence in defense spending as well as new civil and commercial initiatives for human space flight. The highly educated and highly skilled workforce those roots have helped establish have also become a selling point to other industries. “We have legacy, so with our aerospace heritage, we work very hard on that to make sure that we maintain that,” says Chip Cherry, chief executive and president of the Huntsville/Madison Chamber of Commerce. “We have about 400 aerospace companies in our market, so a very rich concentration of them and a lot of expansion in that.” It’s paying off. Huntsville has one of the highest concentrations per capita of degreed engineers in the country. The unemployment rate is a staggeringly low 2.1% as of September — the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics data available — versus October’s national average of 3.6%, which is itself a near five-decade low. From 2000 to 2017, the Huntsville metro area grew employment by 32%, or twice the rate of the broader U.S., according to the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber. Wage growth has also kept pace, increasing at nearly twice the rate of the country over that same period, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. The area is home to nearly 455,500 residents, a number that also represents a growth rate that is more than double the national pace since 2000. Even the city’s credit rating is enviable: It has touted a AAA rating, the highest possible score, from both Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s for 11 consecutive years.

New space economy

Boeing, Aerojet Rocketdyne and Lockheed Martin have all been constructing or expanding space-related facilities within the past two years. Privately held Sierra Nevada Corporation is working with the city to begin landing its Dream Chaser space plane, which will carry cargo for NASA, at the Huntsville International Airport starting in 2023. Huntsville International will be the first — and only — commercial airport licensed by the FAA for a space plane landing. Blue Origin is spending $200 million to build its rocket engine factory, a 350,000-square-foot facility in Huntsville that will employ 300 people and is expected to open early next year. Jeff Bezos’ space company will produce up to 40 engines per year, supplying not only its orbital New Glenn rocket that’s under development but United Launch Alliance’s next-generation rocket, Vulcan Centaur, under development at ULA’s rocket factory 30 miles east of Huntsville in Decatur, Alabama. The company is also refurbishing Marshall’s historic Test Stand 4670 — once used for Saturn V rockets and space shuttle engines — where it is testing several engine variants. Huntsville “has this great receptacle of talent there that you can tap into, and it’s been decades in building. So we wanted to go to where the talent is,” says Blue Origin CEO Bob Smith. “You get great support from the government, so everyone from Gov. [Kay] Ivey to Sen. [Richard] Shelby all the way down to Mayor [Tommy] Battle … have been great supporters of actually developing the space economy there.” Smith adds, “It’s really going to anchor us into that space community, which is going to be really powerful for decades to come.” Blue Origin also recently teamed up with Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Draper to bid for NASA’s lunar lander competition, which will comprise part of the agency’s broader Artemis initiative to send an American man and woman to the moon in 2024. The lunar lander will be managed by Marshall. Already, the rocket currently tasked with the mission, the Space Launch System, or SLS, is under the center’s oversight. Parts of SLS are built all over the U.S., with the core stage, or backbone of the rocket, produced by Boeing. Elements of the rocket get shipped to Huntsville for testing. “Our top priority right now is focusing on the Space Launch System, which is the next heavy lift vehicle that is required to take the Orion capsule, that takes our astronauts into space to the moon, and be able to deliver the systems that are required to support them,” says Jody Singer, Marshall Space Flight Center director. But unlike Apollo or even the space shuttle program after it, Artemis increasingly represents the evolution of the business relationship between government and commercial space. “It’s no longer just the government saying, ‘This is what we want to build and the dollars that go with it,’ we have a true partnership that we work together to decide,” says Singer. Even on the military side, as the U.S. prioritizes space as a national security issue, Huntsville is in the running for the Department of Defense’s newly activated Space Command against a handful of sites around the U.S. SPACECOM is the military’s 11th warfighting command and seen as a precursor to President Donald Trump’s proposed Space Force.

From rocket science to genomic sequencing

It isn’t just aerospace, either. When the Apollo program ended in the 1970s, the area slipped into recession. It’s perhaps not surprising that officials focus closely on attracting investment from employers across a swath of sectors. When Polaris, a maker of off-road sports vehicles, snowmobiles and motorcycles, decided to expand capacity stateside, it vetted 100 sites across 14 states. It looked primarily in the southeastern part of the U.S., where a significant portion of its customer base is located. The company settled on Huntsville, spending $190 million to open an assembly plant in 2016 for Slingshot and Ranger vehicles. “I do think they have some natural advantages which they built over the years with railway infrastructure and with the highway system running right through there,” says Scott Wine, chief executive and chairman of Polaris, Inc. “But really I think the longstanding commitment to engineering that’s been in Huntsville for so many years — since World War II, really — there’s really just a good infrastructure of personnel there.” “And I cannot understate the importance, from the governor on down, of the entire state and city being committed to business and making it easy for us to do business there,” Wine said. Wine said roughly 1,300 employees work in Huntsville and the company plans to continue to add to that as it grows the business. Earlier this year Toyota announced a multimillion-dollar expansion of its engine factory. Its joint venture with Mazda is constructing a $1.6 billion plant that will employ 4,000 people and produce up to 300,000 autos annually when it opens in 2021. LG Electronics opened its new solar panel facility in February, and Facebook is building a data center. “I think one of the reasons we’ve been as successful … you can call it picky. We call it selective,” says the Chamber of Commerce’s Cherry. “There are certain types of companies we do not pursue, and we’re also looking for companies that have a track record of being good corporate citizens.” Huntsville is also home to one of the biggest research parks in the world. Cummings Research Park touts more than 300 companies, including a nonprofit collective called HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, which focuses on genomics research. Serina Therapeutics, an associate company of the institute, has developed a polymer technology that could cut daily doses of certain medications down to a single shot per week. The first drug, which Serina has taken through Phase I, is focused on Parkinson’s disease, but CEO Randall Moreadith says his company has a pipeline of five drug candidates. The technology could impact treatment of everything from epilepsy to opioid addiction. “I really love the fact that I have real rocket scientists working in my lab now, because they come from that industry to work here as well,” adds Richard Myers, HudsonAlpha Institute president and science director.

Missiles 2.0


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: morgan brennan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hot, rate, industries, teeming, space, huntsville, marshall, town, work, rocket, engineers, alabamas, company, flight, really, usa, luring, city, world


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This town in Italy is giving away free houses — but there’s a catch

It could cost between $133,000 and $2.8 million to purchase a home in Sicily, Italy, according to Realtor.com. But now, in Cammarata, an ancient town located in central Sicily, homes are being offered for free. However, there is a catch. In order for new residents to land a free home, they must present a clear renovation proposal for the property and renovate it within three years. In Cammarata, each homeowner must pay a deposit of about 5,000 euro ($5,500), which will be returned once the renov


It could cost between $133,000 and $2.8 million to purchase a home in Sicily, Italy, according to Realtor.com.
But now, in Cammarata, an ancient town located in central Sicily, homes are being offered for free.
However, there is a catch.
In order for new residents to land a free home, they must present a clear renovation proposal for the property and renovate it within three years.
In Cammarata, each homeowner must pay a deposit of about 5,000 euro ($5,500), which will be returned once the renov
This town in Italy is giving away free houses — but there’s a catch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, away, cammarata, cost, homes, theres, catch, giving, italy, euro, town, square, sicily, renovation, free, houses


This town in Italy is giving away free houses — but there's a catch

It could cost between $133,000 and $2.8 million to purchase a home in Sicily, Italy, according to Realtor.com. But now, in Cammarata, an ancient town located in central Sicily, homes are being offered for free.

However, there is a catch.

In order for new residents to land a free home, they must present a clear renovation proposal for the property and renovate it within three years. Though there is no information on how much a renovation in Cammarata might cost, in Mussomeli, a town about 11 miles away that gave away 1 euro homes in June, renovation costs were estimated to range from 100 to 700 euros per square meter ($110 to $773 per 10 square feet), according to Case 1 Euro.

In Cammarata, each homeowner must pay a deposit of about 5,000 euro ($5,500), which will be returned once the renovations are complete.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, away, cammarata, cost, homes, theres, catch, giving, italy, euro, town, square, sicily, renovation, free, houses


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The IMF thinks this small South American country will see economic growth of 86% next year

River taxis wait for customers at the dock in the town of Bartica, Guyana on June 6, 2016. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) believes one of South America’s smallest countries is likely to see a dramatic upswing in economic growth next year. Guyana, a country of about 780,000 which shares a border with Brazil, Suriname and Venezuela in the northeast of South America, will see economic growth of 86% in 2020, according to the IMF. Such an explosive expansion of annualized real GDP (gross domes


River taxis wait for customers at the dock in the town of Bartica, Guyana on June 6, 2016.
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) believes one of South America’s smallest countries is likely to see a dramatic upswing in economic growth next year.
Guyana, a country of about 780,000 which shares a border with Brazil, Suriname and Venezuela in the northeast of South America, will see economic growth of 86% in 2020, according to the IMF.
Such an explosive expansion of annualized real GDP (gross domes
The IMF thinks this small South American country will see economic growth of 86% next year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hidalgo, guyana, south, world, thinks, economic, likely, town, american, imf, growth, person, country, small


The IMF thinks this small South American country will see economic growth of 86% next year

River taxis wait for customers at the dock in the town of Bartica, Guyana on June 6, 2016. Bartica is a town at the confluence of two major rivers and is the launching point for people who work in the jungle regions, mining gold and diamonds.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) believes one of South America’s smallest countries is likely to see a dramatic upswing in economic growth next year.

Guyana, a country of about 780,000 which shares a border with Brazil, Suriname and Venezuela in the northeast of South America, will see economic growth of 86% in 2020, according to the IMF. That’s up from 4.4% in 2019.

Such an explosive expansion of annualized real GDP (gross domestic product) would likely see Guyana register the fastest economic growth in the world next year. To be sure, Guyana’s projected economic expansion would be 40 times that of what is expected from the U.S. — the world’s largest economy.

“The reason the IMF is projecting that is because Guyana has the highest amount of oil for each individual person of any country in the world,” Natalia Davies Hidalgo, a freelance Latin American analyst, told CNBC via telephone on Monday.

In comparison to OPEC kingpin Saudi Arabia, which has approximately 1,900 barrels of offshore reserves per person, Guyana has 3,900 barrels, Hidalgo said.

“And it could have more, as production hasn’t even started yet and new discoveries are still being made.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hidalgo, guyana, south, world, thinks, economic, likely, town, american, imf, growth, person, country, small


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This millennial spent nearly $2 million to turn a ‘haunted’ ghost town into a luxury travel destination

The purchase of the town of Cerro Gordo in California included more than 300 acres of land, 22 buildings and, according to legend, three ghosts. When Brent Underwood bought Cerro Gordo in 2018, he was told the property included a few ghoulish guests. The thin, bumpy dirt road leading to Cerro Gordo, located in California’s Inyo Mountains, is eight miles long and takes nearly 45 minutes to navigate. Except Underwood has a different vision: He wants to turn Cerro Gordo into a luxury travel destina


The purchase of the town of Cerro Gordo in California included more than 300 acres of land, 22 buildings and, according to legend, three ghosts.
When Brent Underwood bought Cerro Gordo in 2018, he was told the property included a few ghoulish guests.
The thin, bumpy dirt road leading to Cerro Gordo, located in California’s Inyo Mountains, is eight miles long and takes nearly 45 minutes to navigate.
Except Underwood has a different vision: He wants to turn Cerro Gordo into a luxury travel destina
This millennial spent nearly $2 million to turn a ‘haunted’ ghost town into a luxury travel destination Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: robert exley jr noah higgins-dunn, robert exley jr, noah higgins-dunn, crystal cox, student at the university of missouri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, haunted, wild, gordo, towns, spent, luxury, travel, miles, nearly, water, underwood, million, millennial, town, turn, ghost, cerro


This millennial spent nearly $2 million to turn a 'haunted' ghost town into a luxury travel destination

The purchase of the town of Cerro Gordo in California included more than 300 acres of land, 22 buildings and, according to legend, three ghosts.

When Brent Underwood bought Cerro Gordo in 2018, he was told the property included a few ghoulish guests. One was the town’s former brothel owner, another died in a card game gone wrong and the third still remains a mystery.

It was stories like these that originally made Underwood, a 31-year-old owner of a hostel, fall in love with the California ghost town. Now he plans to package the town’s history as an adventure that people from all over the world will travel to experience.

The thin, bumpy dirt road leading to Cerro Gordo, located in California’s Inyo Mountains, is eight miles long and takes nearly 45 minutes to navigate. The town is just over 200 miles north of Los Angeles and resembles a 300-acre playground for Wild West reenactments.

Except Underwood has a different vision: He wants to turn Cerro Gordo into a luxury travel destination. To make it happen, he and his business partner, Jon Bier, purchased the place for $1.4 million in 2018 with help from an eclectic group of investors, ranging from Netflix and Hulu executives to a UFC fighter. They bought the town with plans to spend an additional $1 million on construction and repairs.

Over $400,000 in renovations later, however, and the pair are now realizing why so many dreamers before them have failed to turn the town into a sustainable business.

It currently costs about $10,000 a month to run, including loan payments, utilities, satellite Wi-Fi and payroll.

The closest city, Lone Pine, is nearly 50 miles away, making even routine purchases an inconvenience. Only three of the 22 buildings have running water, sourced from a 2,500 gallon water tank. All of it has to be trucked from a town about an hour away. Replacing the broken water pump under the town would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and skyrocket their budget.

While restoring the town has its challenges, Underwood isn’t new to the real estate business. The Columbia graduate lived in and operated a small backpacking hostel in New York City after an abrupt career change, and he currently lives in Austin, Texas, where he operates HK Austin, a popular 19th-century Victorian mansion-turned-hostel.

That project led Underwood and Bier to think bigger — and to Cerro Gordo.

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The town’s name is Spanish for “Fat Hill” and was coined by the Mexican miners who first found silver there in 1865. The town quickly grew to house thousands of miners flocking to the area, but the boom was short-lived. Mining operations dried up by 1877. The town would see a few small-scale revivals during the early 1900s but has remained deserted for nearly 100 years.

The pair joined the newly launched Airbnb Adventures to offer guests the chance to book an exclusive weekend to relive the Wild West. The partnership could make for good timing as 74% of Americans report valuing experiences over products or things, according to research from Expedia.

The journey from deserted town to luxury resort may be just as long and rocky as the road to Cerro Gordo itself, but that’s not stopping Underwood — watch as he presents his vision for his $1.4 million ghost town.

Check out Don’t worry about getting a perfect credit score—This score is all you need via Grow with Acorns+CNBC.

Disclosure: NBCUniversal and Comcast Ventures are investors in Acorns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: robert exley jr noah higgins-dunn, robert exley jr, noah higgins-dunn, crystal cox, student at the university of missouri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, haunted, wild, gordo, towns, spent, luxury, travel, miles, nearly, water, underwood, million, millennial, town, turn, ghost, cerro


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5 things to know before the stock market opens Friday

Spencer Platt | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesU.S. stock futures were pointing to a mixed Friday open on Wall Street — with two Dow stocks, Coca-Cola and American Express, reporting earnings before the bell. Jean Catuffe | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesThe U.K. and European Union struck a long-awaited draft Brexit deal. Trump confirmed that Energy Secretary Rick Perry will step down at the end of the year. In recent weeks, the former governor of Texas became entangled in the Democratic-led i


Spencer Platt | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesU.S. stock futures were pointing to a mixed Friday open on Wall Street — with two Dow stocks, Coca-Cola and American Express, reporting earnings before the bell.
Jean Catuffe | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesThe U.K. and European Union struck a long-awaited draft Brexit deal.
Trump confirmed that Energy Secretary Rick Perry will step down at the end of the year.
In recent weeks, the former governor of Texas became entangled in the Democratic-led i
5 things to know before the stock market opens Friday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, trump, syrian, 2019, things, usbrokered, turkish, market, turkey, town, opens, getty, dow, stock


5 things to know before the stock market opens Friday

1. Dow to open slightly higher as Coca-Cola and American Express report earnings

People walking along Wall Street in the Financial District of Manhattan on September 03, 2019 in New York City. Spencer Platt | Getty Images News | Getty Images

U.S. stock futures were pointing to a mixed Friday open on Wall Street — with two Dow stocks, Coca-Cola and American Express, reporting earnings before the bell. Coca-Cola fiscal second-quarter profit matched estimates. Revenue beat. Several international factors were in play, including weak Chinese GDP growth, Saturday’s U.K. Parliament vote on Brexit and fighting between Turkish and Kurdish forces despite a U.S.-brokered cease-fire. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 were modestly higher Thursday, on track for a second straight positive week The S&P 500 just missed its first close over the 3,000 since Sept. 19, while the Dow just above 27,000.

2. China reports weakest GDP in decades as trade war takes its toll

Employees work on the production line of a robot vacuum cleaner factory of Matsutek in Shenzhen, China August 9, 2019. Jason Lee | Reuters

China’s latest reading on economic growth came in at its weakest level in 27½ years, as the trade war between Beijing and Washington continued to take its toll. China’s gross domestic product in the third quarter grew just 6% from a year ago. Apple CEO Tim Cook met the chief of China’s market regulator in Beijing, after the U.S. tech giant last week removed from its App Store an app that helped Hong Kong protesters track police movements.

3. EU strikes a Brexit deal, but also faces new tariffs from US

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (UK) Boris Johnson gives a press conference at European Parliament on October 17, 2019 in Brussels, Belgium. Jean Catuffe | Getty Images News | Getty Images

The U.K. and European Union struck a long-awaited draft Brexit deal. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson now must persuade U.K. lawmakers to back his agreement, ahead of what is expected to be a close vote on Saturday. At midnight, defying retaliation threats, the U.S. imposed $7.5 billion worth of tariffs on EU goods, including targeting Airbus, Italian cheeses, French wines, Spanish olives and Scotch whisky.

4. Democrats see Trump decision to hold G-7 at Doral as more impeachment fuel

View leading into Trump National Doral in Miami, Florida on April 3, 2018. Michele Eve Sandberg | AFP | Getty Images

President Donald Trump will host the 2020 G-7 summit of world leaders at the Trump National Doral Miami, a move Democrats leading the impeachment inquiry were quick to criticize as presidential self-dealing. Trump confirmed that Energy Secretary Rick Perry will step down at the end of the year. In recent weeks, the former governor of Texas became entangled in the Democratic-led impeachment probe into Trump’s actions involving Ukraine.

5. Fighting erupts in Kurdish-held Syrian town despite US-brokered cease-fire

A woman stands along the side of a road on the outskirts of the town of Tal Tamr near the Syrian Kurdish town of Ras al-Ain along the border with Turkey in the northeastern Hassakeh province on October 16, 2019, with the smoke plumes of tire fires billowing in the background to decrease visibility for Turkish warplanes that are part of operation “Peace Spring”. Delil Souleiman | AFP | Getty Images

Despite U.S.-brokered cease-fire that went into effect overnight, fighting continued Friday in a northeast Syrian border town at the center of the fight between Turkey and Kurdish forces. Trump framed the cease-fire deal with Turkey as “a great day for civilization.” Turkish troops and their allied Syrian fighters launched the offensive on Oct. 9, two days after Trump suddenly announced he was withdrawing American troops from the border area.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, trump, syrian, 2019, things, usbrokered, turkish, market, turkey, town, opens, getty, dow, stock


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Fighting in Kurdish-held Syrian town despite cease-fire

Associated Press journalists witnessed continued fighting Friday morning in a northeast Syrian town at the center of the fight between Turkey and Kurdish forces, despite a U.S.-brokered cease-fire that went into effect hours earlier. Shelling and billowing smoke could be seen around Ras al-Ayn accompanied by the sound of gunfire. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a war monitor, reported intermittent clashes in the Ras al-Ayn but relative calm elsewhere since Thursday night. But Kurdish fo


Associated Press journalists witnessed continued fighting Friday morning in a northeast Syrian town at the center of the fight between Turkey and Kurdish forces, despite a U.S.-brokered cease-fire that went into effect hours earlier.
Shelling and billowing smoke could be seen around Ras al-Ayn accompanied by the sound of gunfire.
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a war monitor, reported intermittent clashes in the Ras al-Ayn but relative calm elsewhere since Thursday night.
But Kurdish fo
Fighting in Kurdish-held Syrian town despite cease-fire Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kurdishheld, turkey, despite, fighting, syrian, alayn, ras, turkish, fighters, forces, town, kurdish, ceasefire


Fighting in Kurdish-held Syrian town despite cease-fire

This picture taken on October 14, 2019 shows smoke rises from the Syrian town of Ras al-Ain, from the Turkish side of the border at Ceylanpinar district in Sanliurfa, on the sixth day of Turkey’s military operation against Kurdish forces.

Associated Press journalists witnessed continued fighting Friday morning in a northeast Syrian town at the center of the fight between Turkey and Kurdish forces, despite a U.S.-brokered cease-fire that went into effect hours earlier.

Shelling and billowing smoke could be seen around Ras al-Ayn accompanied by the sound of gunfire. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a war monitor, reported intermittent clashes in the Ras al-Ayn but relative calm elsewhere since Thursday night. That’s when Turkey and the U.S. agreed to a five-day cease-fire to halt the Turkish offensive against Kurdish-led forces in the region. AP journalists also reported quiet in the town of Tal Abyad.

The agreement — reached after hours of negotiations in Turkey’s capital of Ankara between Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and U.S. Vice President Mike Pence — requires the Kurdish fighters to vacate a swath of territory in Syria along the Turkish border. That largely solidifies the position Turkey has reached in its offensive, now in its tenth day.

The fighting Friday came even after the commander of Kurdish-led forces in Syria, Mazloum Abdi, told Kurdish TV late on Thursday: “We will do whatever we can for the success of the cease-fire agreement.” But one Kurdish official, Razan Hiddo, declared that the Kurdish people would refuse to live under Turkish occupation.

Kurdish fighters have already been driven out of much — but not all — of a swath of territory that stretches about 100 kilometers (60 miles) along the middle of the Syrian-Turkish border, between Ras al-Ayn and Tal Abyad.

But Kurdish forces are still entrenched in Ras al-Ayn, where they were fiercely battling Turkish-backed Syrian fighters trying to take the town Thursday. Whether the Kurdish fighters pull out of Ras al-Ayn will likely be an early test of the accord.

Turkish troops and their allied Syrian fighters launched the offensive two days after U.S. President Donald Trump suddenly announced he was withdrawing American troops from the border area.

The Kurds were U.S. allies in the fight against the Islamic State but came under assault after Trump ordered U.S. troops to pull out.

Trump framed the U.S.-brokered cease-fire deal with Turkey as “a great day for civilization” but its effect was largely to mitigate a foreign policy crisis widely seen to be of his own making.

Turkey considers the Kurdish fighters terrorists because of their links to outlawed Kurdish rebels fighting inside Turkey.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kurdishheld, turkey, despite, fighting, syrian, alayn, ras, turkish, fighters, forces, town, kurdish, ceasefire


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London commuters seen dragging climate activists off underground trains

London commuters physically dragged Extinction Rebellion protesters off the top of a busy underground train on Thursday morning. A video shared widely on social media appeared to show a number of protesters on top of a Jubilee Line train at Canning Town station in East London. A busy platform of commuters were seen jeering at the activists before one protester is pulled down from the train. Climate activists had planned to target London’s underground network on Thursday, as part of their ongoing


London commuters physically dragged Extinction Rebellion protesters off the top of a busy underground train on Thursday morning.
A video shared widely on social media appeared to show a number of protesters on top of a Jubilee Line train at Canning Town station in East London.
A busy platform of commuters were seen jeering at the activists before one protester is pulled down from the train.
Climate activists had planned to target London’s underground network on Thursday, as part of their ongoing
London commuters seen dragging climate activists off underground trains Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, activists, trains, rebellion, town, extinction, commuters, transport, british, london, tube, dragging, station, seen, underground, climate, train


London commuters seen dragging climate activists off underground trains

London commuters physically dragged Extinction Rebellion protesters off the top of a busy underground train on Thursday morning.

A video shared widely on social media appeared to show a number of protesters on top of a Jubilee Line train at Canning Town station in East London.

A busy platform of commuters were seen jeering at the activists before one protester is pulled down from the train.

Climate activists had planned to target London’s underground network on Thursday, as part of their ongoing demonstration in the capital city.

Extinction Rebellion said the actions were “intended to bring economic disruption to the capital as part of the ongoing campaign to convince the Government to take meaningful action on the Climate and Ecological Emergency.”

At around 8:00 a.m., British Transport Police said via Twitter that it had made four arrests after obstruction incidents at Canning Town and Stratford.

The police said it would remain at Shadwell station, on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) metro system, where specialist teams were working to remove four other protesters.

In a statement published before the incident, the British Transport Police said senior officers had engaged with Extinction Rebellion to try to persuade them into stopping “highly disruptive and potentially criminal action.”

“The Tube and rail networks are one of the greenest transport methods in London, any action goes against what they campaign for and will only cause misery for London’s commuters,” Sean O’Callaghan, assistant chief constable of the British Transport Police, said in a statement on Wednesday.

“In addition to this, we’ve made it clear to Extinction Rebellion that disrupting Tube services could create a dangerous scenario where some trains are stuck within tunnels with hundreds of passengers on board.”

“Likewise, trespassing or obstructing Tube services could create a serious hazard to protestors,” O’Callaghan said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, activists, trains, rebellion, town, extinction, commuters, transport, british, london, tube, dragging, station, seen, underground, climate, train


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Turkish forces capture center of key Syrian border town

Turkish forces captured a key Syrian border town under heavy bombardment Saturday, the Turkish military and a Syrian war monitor said, as Turkey’s offensive against Syrian Kurdish fighters pressed into its fourth day with little sign of relenting despite mounting international criticism. Syrian Kurdish forces appeared to be holding out in some areas of the town. Earlier in the day, Turkish troops moved to seize control of key highways in northeastern Syria, the Turkish military and the Observato


Turkish forces captured a key Syrian border town under heavy bombardment Saturday, the Turkish military and a Syrian war monitor said, as Turkey’s offensive against Syrian Kurdish fighters pressed into its fourth day with little sign of relenting despite mounting international criticism. Syrian Kurdish forces appeared to be holding out in some areas of the town. Earlier in the day, Turkish troops moved to seize control of key highways in northeastern Syria, the Turkish military and the Observato
Turkish forces capture center of key Syrian border town Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saying, kurdish, turkeys, military, capture, fighters, key, syrian, border, troops, town, center, ras, turkish, forces


Turkish forces capture center of key Syrian border town

Smoke rises from the Syrian town of Ras al-Ain, in a picture taken from the Turkish side of the border in Ceylanpinar on October 11, 2019, on the third day of Turkey’s military operation against Kurdish forces.

Turkish forces captured a key Syrian border town under heavy bombardment Saturday, the Turkish military and a Syrian war monitor said, as Turkey’s offensive against Syrian Kurdish fighters pressed into its fourth day with little sign of relenting despite mounting international criticism.

Turkish troops entered central Ras al-Ayn according to Turkey’s Defense Ministry, marking the most significant gain since the invasion began Wednesday. The ministry tweeted: “Ras al-Ayn’s residential center has been taken under control through the successful operations in the east of Euphrates” river.

An Associated Press journalist across the border heard the sound of sporadic clashes as Turkish howitzers struck the town and Turkish jets screeched overhead.

Syrian Kurdish forces appeared to be holding out in some areas of the town.

The Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces released two videos said to be from inside Ras al-Ayn, showing fighters saying that it is Saturday and they are still there.

The fighting was ongoing as the Kurdish fighters sought to reverse the Turkish advance into Ras Al-Ayn, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

The push deeper into northern Syria by Turkish troops came days after U.S. President Donald Trump cleared the way for Turkey’s air and ground invasion, pulling back U.S. forces from the area and saying he wanted to stop getting involved with “endless wars.”

Trump’s decision drew swift bipartisan criticism that he was endangering regional stability and risking the lives of Syrian Kurdish allies who brought down the Islamic State group in Syria. The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces was the main U.S. ally in the fight against the Islamic State group and had lost 11,000 fighters in the nearly five-year battle against the extremists.

Earlier in the day, Turkish troops moved to seize control of key highways in northeastern Syria, the Turkish military and the Observatory said.

Turkey’s state-run Anadolu news agency said that Turkey-backed Syrian opposition forces had taken control of the M-4 highway that connects the towns of Manbij and Qamishli.

The SDF said that Turkish troops and their Syrian allies reached the highway briefly before being pushed back again.

Turkish troops also cut the route linking the northeastern city of Hassakeh with Aleppo, Syria’s largest city and once commercial center, according to the Observatory.

Since Wednesday, Turkish troops and Syrian opposition fighters backed by Ankara have been advancing under the cover of airstrikes and artillery shelling, reaching the Manbij-Qamishli road about 30 kilometers (19 miles) south of the Turkish border.

Turkey has said it aims to push back the Syrian Kurdish People’s Protection Units, or YPG, which it considers terrorists for its links to a decades-long Kurdish insurgency within its own borders. The YPG is a main component of the SDF.

The U.N. estimated the number of displaced at 100,000 since Wednesday, saying that markets, schools and clinics also were closed. Aid agencies have warned of a humanitarian crisis, with nearly a half-million people at risk in northeastern Syria.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Friday Turkey won’t stop until the Syrian Kurdish forces withdraw below a 32 kilometer (20 miles) deep line from the border.

The Turkish military aims to clear Syrian border towns of Kurdish fighters’ presence, saying they are a national security threat.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saying, kurdish, turkeys, military, capture, fighters, key, syrian, border, troops, town, center, ras, turkish, forces


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How a massive Amazon wind farm will change a rural town in America

In April, Amazon announced three new wind farm projects — two overseas, and one in the Tehachapi (teh-HATCH-ah-pee) Mountains, located in southern California. Farther north is the Altamont Pass wind farm, which helps power another tech giant: Alphabet’s Google. “The good news for us is obviously we have the economic impact,” said Tehachapi economic development coordinator Corey Costelloe. Keeping jobs localAccording to estimates from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the construction of


In April, Amazon announced three new wind farm projects — two overseas, and one in the Tehachapi (teh-HATCH-ah-pee) Mountains, located in southern California. Farther north is the Altamont Pass wind farm, which helps power another tech giant: Alphabet’s Google. “The good news for us is obviously we have the economic impact,” said Tehachapi economic development coordinator Corey Costelloe. Keeping jobs localAccording to estimates from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the construction of
How a massive Amazon wind farm will change a rural town in America Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: jacob douglas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, change, energy, turbines, massive, rural, america, economic, tehachapi, cummings, renewable, wind, company, solar, town, farm


How a massive Amazon wind farm will change a rural town in America

The Tehachapi Mountain Range is home to around 4,731 wind turbines that generate about 3,200 megawatts of energy. City of Tehachapi

Buried in the mountains of southern California lies a field of white. It’s not your typical farm: It produces renewable energy. The Tehachapi Pass is home to one of the largest wind farms in the world. Now a huge tech company is bringing more turbines to the area, and it is going to have an impact on a nearby community. In April, Amazon announced three new wind farm projects — two overseas, and one in the Tehachapi (teh-HATCH-ah-pee) Mountains, located in southern California. The farms will help contribute to Amazon’s goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2040 and 100% renewables by 2030. The mountain range is a hub for the wind industry, with around 4,731 turbines that produce about 3,200 megawatts of electricity along the mountain range, according to the Center for Land Use Interpretation, with private companies flocking to the area because of the high wind speeds. Farther north is the Altamont Pass wind farm, which helps power another tech giant: Alphabet’s Google. Located just northeast of the mountain range is the town of Tehachapi. With a population of about 12,000, Tehachapi Mayor Pro-Tem Phil Smith called it a nice little mountain town, and while the power being produced from wind only comes to the town indirectly through the grid, Tehachapi gets something else directly as a result of the big renewable energy investments. “The good news for us is obviously we have the economic impact,” said Tehachapi economic development coordinator Corey Costelloe. Outside contractors come in to work on the wind turbines, staying in the town’s hotels and eating at its restaurants, like Kohnen’s Country Bakery, one of the town’s more popular local eateries. Family owned by Colleen and Thomas Kohnen, the bakery has been around since 2004. Colleen says the bakery is growing, but it’s hard to tell how much of that is because of the wind industry. Though she says that she does get customers who come from out of the city to work on the windmills. “I had one guy come in last week, and I guess he was staying in a hotel during the week or something,” Khonen said. “And his wife and daughter came up to visit him. That just introduces people (to the bakery).” Stephen Abbott, city renewables accelerator manager at Rocky Mountain Institute, says that small businesses seeing an increase in revenue is part of the initial economic boom that follows a renewable energy farm.

Keeping jobs local

According to estimates from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the construction of a 47 megawatt (the size of Amazon’s new farm) renewable energy farm could produce around 50 new jobs. One company wants to keep those jobs in Tehachapi. World Wind and Solar is a renewable energy maintenance company that moved its headquarters to Tehachapi in 2019. WWS CEO Buddy Cummings has deep ties to Tehachapi. His father, Steve Cummings, installed some of the first wind turbines in the town. Cummings feels moving the company to Tehachapi is a homecoming of sorts. “The relationships that got us into the renewables market are the relationships we grew up with,” Cummings said. “Tehachapi just feels like home.” WWS has a goal of keeping their work local. Cummings says that he tries to hire Tehachapi residents, and use word of mouth marketing. “We grow by people telling their friends and family,” Cummings said. The company, which started in wind but has diversified into solar, requires workers to do general labor maintaining solar panels — cleaning and upkeep. The company hires workers to do that work for 60 to 90 days, and if they perform well, the company brings them back to Tehachapi for two to three weeks of training, teaching them how to do more technical maintenance on wind turbines and solar arrays. After the training they can become full-time technicians. “It’s a quick and healthy way to get people work,” Cummings said. “It has such an opportunity to grow a career so fast.” The workers coming in to train are spending their dollars at local businesses, like Kohnen’s Bakery, which cited the World Wind and Solar training period as a profitable time because the renewable energy company recommends it to trainees. “The wind farms have generated quite a number of very good technical, good-paying jobs that can sustain a family and the employers have benefits,” Mayor Pro-Tem Smith said. “So the people in the workforce can look forward to actually a career in the industry if they want, and the pay is good enough where they can afford a home and stay here.” Wind turbine technicians are making just over $54,000 a year ($26.14 per hour), according to The Bureau of Labor Statistics. It forecast employment growth of 57% for wind turbine technicians from 2018 to 2028. In 2018, there were 6,600 wind turbine technician jobs in the U.S., according to BLS data.

Tehachapi isn’t the only area that has seen an economic updraft from the wind industry. Benton County, Indiana (pop. 8,700) has multiple wind projects developed over the past decade, one operated by Pattern Energy which supports electricity needs for an Amazon Web Services data center. The AWS farm, its first major renewables project, went into operation in early 2016, and Paul Jackson, director of economic development for Benton County says the area has seen gradual growth after big, initial booms from its wind farm projects. “Everything kind of flattens out,” Jackson said. “The big boom is over, and you get into the reality of it.” The Amazon Wind Farm Fowler Ridge project is expected to make $5 million in economic development payments to Benton County over a period of 17 years. The project is entitled to 100% property tax abatements for a 10-year period, after which property tax revenue for the county will start being generated as well. “Once wind farms came off of abatement, we are getting tax dollars. The tax money is fantastic,” Jackson said. Between 2008 and 2018, taxes on Benton County wind farms have permitted the county to allocate an additional $3 million to schools, additional money to medical services, $35 million to new roads — upgraded roads were required to transport giant wind turbines to sites — and a total of $31 million in economic development payments to be made to the county through 2038. A September article from the Wall Street Journal highlighted that farmers in the U.S. are leasing land out for renewable energy farms to help themselves in a difficult financial time. “I think one thing we shouldn’t lose sight of is that a lot of farmers in the middle of the country are relatively strapped economically,” Abbott said. “Wind or solar can be a really useful additional revenue stream for people and those communities, particularly if it helps them get through a particular commodity down cycle.”

Facebook’s solar power projects


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: jacob douglas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, change, energy, turbines, massive, rural, america, economic, tehachapi, cummings, renewable, wind, company, solar, town, farm


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Sanders says he ‘misspoke’ about scaling back rallies after heart attack

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Wednesday tamped down on speculation that he would slow his presidential campaign after he suffered a heart attack last week, saying he plans to compete as vigorously as ever for the 2020 Democratic nomination. “I misspoke the other day, I said a word I should not have said and media drives me a little bit nuts to make a big deal about it,” Sanders said, who did the interview alongside his wife, Jane Sanders. “We’re going to get back into the groove of a very vigorous camp


Sen. Bernie Sanders on Wednesday tamped down on speculation that he would slow his presidential campaign after he suffered a heart attack last week, saying he plans to compete as vigorously as ever for the 2020 Democratic nomination. “I misspoke the other day, I said a word I should not have said and media drives me a little bit nuts to make a big deal about it,” Sanders said, who did the interview alongside his wife, Jane Sanders. “We’re going to get back into the groove of a very vigorous camp
Sanders says he ‘misspoke’ about scaling back rallies after heart attack Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rallies, misspoke, today, doing, reporters, build, heart, vermont, town, attack, think, sanders, scaling, campaign


Sanders says he 'misspoke' about scaling back rallies after heart attack

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Wednesday tamped down on speculation that he would slow his presidential campaign after he suffered a heart attack last week, saying he plans to compete as vigorously as ever for the 2020 Democratic nomination.

The Vermont independent told NBC in an exclusive interview airing tonight on “Nightly News” and tomorrow on the “Today” show that his health scare has only strengthened his resolve, despite telling reporters a day earlier he planned to curtail his normally packed schedule.

“I misspoke the other day, I said a word I should not have said and media drives me a little bit nuts to make a big deal about it,” Sanders said, who did the interview alongside his wife, Jane Sanders. “We’re going to get back into the groove of a very vigorous campaign, I love doing rallies and I love doing town meetings.”

He added, “I want to start off slower and build up and build up and build up.”

Speaking to reporters outside his home in Vermont Monday, Sanders said, “We were doing in some cases five or six meetings today, three or four rallies and town meetings and meeting with groups of people. I don’t think I’m going to do that. But I certainly intend to be actively campaigning. I think we can change the nature of the campaign a bit. Make sure that I have the strength to do what I have to do.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rallies, misspoke, today, doing, reporters, build, heart, vermont, town, attack, think, sanders, scaling, campaign


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