Manufacturers to spend $26.2 billion on ‘upskilling’ in 2020 to attract and keep workers

Manufacturers are set to spend $26.2 billion on internal and external training initiatives for new and existing employees in 2020 to combat the shortage of available workers, according to the Manufacturing Institute. Nearly 70% of manufacturers said they are creating or expanding training programs for their workforce. Three-quarters of respondents said upskilling workers helped to improve productivity, promotion opportunities and morale. 1 challenge for manufacturers for the past nine quarters,


Manufacturers are set to spend $26.2 billion on internal and external training initiatives for new and existing employees in 2020 to combat the shortage of available workers, according to the Manufacturing Institute.
Nearly 70% of manufacturers said they are creating or expanding training programs for their workforce.
Three-quarters of respondents said upskilling workers helped to improve productivity, promotion opportunities and morale.
1 challenge for manufacturers for the past nine quarters,
Manufacturers to spend $26.2 billion on ‘upskilling’ in 2020 to attract and keep workers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: kate rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, training, sector, manufacturing, skills, past, 262, workforce, workers, 2020, lee, billion, attract, spend, upskilling, manufacturers


Manufacturers to spend $26.2 billion on 'upskilling' in 2020 to attract and keep workers

A worker fits wheel hub badges on the Ford Focus automobile assembly line inside the Ford Motor Co. factory in Saarlouis, Germany, on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Ford expects hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) to make up over 50% of its European passenger vehicle sales by year-end 2022.

With a skills gap plaguing manufacturing in a historically tight labor market, companies are spending big to “upskill” their current workforce and ensure a pipeline of talent.

Manufacturers are set to spend $26.2 billion on internal and external training initiatives for new and existing employees in 2020 to combat the shortage of available workers, according to the Manufacturing Institute.

Nearly 70% of manufacturers said they are creating or expanding training programs for their workforce. Three-quarters of respondents said upskilling workers helped to improve productivity, promotion opportunities and morale.

“In manufacturing, you are constantly learning and growing, and the technological change is enormous,” said Carolyn Lee, the institute’s executive director. “What you are going to be able to continue to do as you layer new skills, on top of those fundamental skills, will make for a very interesting and dynamic career.”

The skills gap has been the No. 1 challenge for manufacturers for the past nine quarters, according to the National Association of Manufacturers’ Outlook Survey, which found the inability to attract and retain workers has been a top concern.

In the third quarter, nearly 80% of respondents said they are struggling to fill open positions. The lack of available workers has even forced one-third of companies to turn down business opportunities.

Protolabs, a rapid prototyping manufacturer based in Maple Plain, Minnesota, is looking to add about 70 workers to its workforce of 2,800.

“We are a growth company, and employees are critical to everything that we do. We want to be sure we can keep talent with us,” said Robert Bodor, vice president and general manager for the Americas.

While the company has been fortunate in retaining its workers, Bodor said the goal is to maintain a “good culture of continuous improvement.” So Protolabs is investing in training its existing workforce, as well as new hires. To attract workers in this job market, Protolabs is offering new and flexible models with part-time labor, in addition to offering training and benefits such as a 401(k) plan with an employer match, employee stock-participation plans, and more.

“We do both upskill and bring in new people all the time — we are continually hiring so we have to train and onboard new employees — but we are reinvesting in our employees to create career paths and opportunities for personal growth,” Bodor said. “Our employees are critical to our success, so we want to be creating longevity with them.”

Securing the pipeline of future talent is a key to success for manufacturers. Data from Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute found that some 4.6 million workers will be needed in the sector by 2028, but that 2.4 million of those jobs could go unfilled if steps aren’t taken to ensure proper training. Lee calls recruitment a “full-court press.” The goal of the organization is to close the skills gap by 25% by 2025.

“We just need more people — period,” Lee said. “We have about 480,000 open jobs, and have been hovering around 500,000 openings in the past year after retirements and economic growth. We need to attract transitioning service members and veterans into the sector, and we need to bring the next generation of the workforce into the sector.”

Part of the recruitment efforts beyond training is showing potential hires the changes the sector has gone through — it’s not the manufacturing job of years past. Instead, its high-tech, clean, and can be lucrative for those who move up the ranks. Manufacturing Day, which was held in October, is part of that effort, where manufacturers across the country open their doors to students so they can see for themselves what a career in the sector is all about.

“You should know entering manufacturing that your employer is going invest in you, because you are their greatest resource,” Lee said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: kate rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, training, sector, manufacturing, skills, past, 262, workforce, workers, 2020, lee, billion, attract, spend, upskilling, manufacturers


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Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson says his dad taught him to give every ‘ounce of effort you can’

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson is one of the world’s biggest stars and Hollywood’s highest earner, raking in more than $89 million in 2019, according to Forbes. Over a decades-long career that’s seen him go from college athlete to professional wrestler to a global movie star, Johnson has said his success stems from a work ethic he picked up while training as a kid with his father, himself a former professional wrestler. “He’d say, ‘You didn’t get up early to come here and give half-ass effort. His fa


Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson is one of the world’s biggest stars and Hollywood’s highest earner, raking in more than $89 million in 2019, according to Forbes.
Over a decades-long career that’s seen him go from college athlete to professional wrestler to a global movie star, Johnson has said his success stems from a work ethic he picked up while training as a kid with his father, himself a former professional wrestler.
“He’d say, ‘You didn’t get up early to come here and give half-ass effort.
His fa
Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson says his dad taught him to give every ‘ounce of effort you can’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kid, dad, 2017, son, rock, dwayne, wrestling, father, ounce, taught, training, effort, wrestler, johnson, professional


Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson says his dad taught him to give every 'ounce of effort you can'

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson is one of the world’s biggest stars and Hollywood’s highest earner, raking in more than $89 million in 2019, according to Forbes.

Over a decades-long career that’s seen him go from college athlete to professional wrestler to a global movie star, Johnson has said his success stems from a work ethic he picked up while training as a kid with his father, himself a former professional wrestler.

“Back when I was a punk kid, my dad would take me to the gym on weekends and kick the s–t [out of] me in the weight room and on the wrestling mats,” Johnson wrote in a 2017 Instagram post. “He’d say, ‘You didn’t get up early to come here and give half-ass effort. Leave it all in the gym.”

His father, Rocky Johnson, died this week at the age of 75, as Worldwide Wrestling Entertainment announced on Wednesday. The elder Johnson, who became a famous wrestler in the 1980s and was later inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame, never took it easy on his son when working out and training him as a wrestler from a young age.

“‘I’m going to train you 150 percent,'” Johnson said he told his son, Dwayne, in a 2017 interview with thehannibaltv.com. “And I was hard on him. But he never gave up.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: tom huddleston jr
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American Airlines cuts Boeing 737 Max from schedules until June as more delays arise

American has taken the 737 Max off its schedules through June 3, more than a full year later than it expected. American Airlines on Tuesday said it is pulling the Boeing 737 Max from its schedules until early June as the date of the troubled plane’s return to service becomes more uncertain and the manufacturer calls for time-consuming simulator training for pilots before they can fly the plane again. Last week, Boeing about-faced on simulator training, saying pilots should undergo that time-cons


American has taken the 737 Max off its schedules through June 3, more than a full year later than it expected.
American Airlines on Tuesday said it is pulling the Boeing 737 Max from its schedules until early June as the date of the troubled plane’s return to service becomes more uncertain and the manufacturer calls for time-consuming simulator training for pilots before they can fly the plane again.
Last week, Boeing about-faced on simulator training, saying pilots should undergo that time-cons
American Airlines cuts Boeing 737 Max from schedules until June as more delays arise Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, return, delays, arise, american, training, grounding, planes, schedules, 737, later, max, simulator, boeing, pilots, cuts


American Airlines cuts Boeing 737 Max from schedules until June as more delays arise

United Airlines also doesn’t expect the Max to return until early June — a sign carriers, which have already lost more than $1 billion in revenue from the grounding, are expecting the problem to extend to the peak second- and third-quarter travel seasons.

American has taken the 737 Max off its schedules through June 3, more than a full year later than it expected. The planes have been grounded since mid-March after two fatal crashes over five months killed 346 people and sent Boeing into the biggest crisis in its more than 100-year history.

American Airlines on Tuesday said it is pulling the Boeing 737 Max from its schedules until early June as the date of the troubled plane’s return to service becomes more uncertain and the manufacturer calls for time-consuming simulator training for pilots before they can fly the plane again.

It has becoming increasingly less clear when the planes will be able to fly again. Boeing is planning to temporarily shut down production of the planes this month as it works to win over regulators on fixes prompted by the two crashes. Last week, Boeing about-faced on simulator training, saying pilots should undergo that time-consuming preparation before the planes return to commercial service.

A lack of simulator training was a key selling point to airlines and shocking emails recently revealed Boeing employees boasted about bullying regulators and airlines into accepting the jets without requiring pilots to undergo the additional training. That change promises to add to Boeing’s costs and possible revenue losses for airlines.

American estimates the grounding cost it $540 million in pretax income last year. Last week, the Fort Worth, Texas-based airline said it reached an initial compensation agreement with Boeing. It didn’t disclose the terms but said it would share $30 million with its employees. Pilots said they would seek additional compensation for lost income after the carrier had to slash its growth plans for the year. American had 24 of the planes in its fleet at the time of the grounding and expected to have 40 more by the end of 2019, and 10 additional in 2020.

The airline said that it will operate flights for American Airlines employees and “invited guests” before the planes return to commercial service. American reports earnings later this month.

Boeing took a $4.9 billion charge last July to compensate its 737 Max customers. As the grounding drags on, that amount may rise and the company is set to update investors on that cost later this month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, return, delays, arise, american, training, grounding, planes, schedules, 737, later, max, simulator, boeing, pilots, cuts


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US calls shooting by Saudi officer in Florida ‘act of terrorism,’ expels 21 Saudi students from training

A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida. The attack brought fresh complications to U.S.-Saudi relations at a time of heightened tensions between the United States and Iran, Saudi Arabia’s regional rival. Saudi Air Force Second Lieutenant Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, 21, was fatally shot by a deputy sheriff during the Dec. 6 incident at the facility in Pensacola, Florida. During a news conference, Barr – the


A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida.
The attack brought fresh complications to U.S.-Saudi relations at a time of heightened tensions between the United States and Iran, Saudi Arabia’s regional rival.
Saudi Air Force Second Lieutenant Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, 21, was fatally shot by a deputy sheriff during the Dec. 6 incident at the facility in Pensacola, Florida.
During a news conference, Barr – the
US calls shooting by Saudi officer in Florida ‘act of terrorism,’ expels 21 Saudi students from training Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13
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US calls shooting by Saudi officer in Florida 'act of terrorism,' expels 21 Saudi students from training

A general view of the atmosphere at the Pensacola Naval Air Station following a shooting on December 06, 2019 in Pensacola, Florida. The second shooting on a U.S. Naval Base in a week has left three dead plus the suspect and seven people wounded.

The fatal shooting of three Americans by a Saudi Air Force officer at a Florida naval base last month was “an act of terrorism,” U.S. Attorney General William Barr said on Monday, adding that 21 Saudi military trainees will be pulled out of the United States following an investigation into the incident.

The attack brought fresh complications to U.S.-Saudi relations at a time of heightened tensions between the United States and Iran, Saudi Arabia’s regional rival. Saudi Air Force Second Lieutenant Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, 21, was fatally shot by a deputy sheriff during the Dec. 6 incident at the facility in Pensacola, Florida.

During a news conference, Barr – the top U.S. law enforcement official – said there was no evidence of assistance by other Saudi trainees or that any of them had knowledge in advance of the attack.

“This was an act of terrorism,” Barr said. “The evidence showed that the shooter was motivated by jihadist ideology. During the course of the investigation, we learned that the shooter posted a message on Sept. 11 of this year stating, ‘The countdown has begun.”‘

Barr added that Alshamrani also visited the New York City memorial to the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States and posted anti-American, anti-Israeli and jihadi messages on social media, including two hours before the attack.

Saudi Arabia provided “complete and total support” to the American investigation of the incident, Barr said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expels, officer, act, students, barr, terrorism, air, investigation, trainees, calls, shooting, states, united, pensacola, saudi, florida, naval, training


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Running one marathon can make your arteries healthier, study says

New research suggests running a marathon for the first time could help people reduce their vascular age — the age of one’s arteries — by up to four years. “These benefits were observed in overall healthy individuals across a broad range and their marathon times are suggestive of achievable exercise training in novice participants.” For the study, researchers tracked 138 untrained and healthy first-time marathon runners over the course of a six-month period ahead of the 2016 and 2017 London marat


New research suggests running a marathon for the first time could help people reduce their vascular age — the age of one’s arteries — by up to four years.
“These benefits were observed in overall healthy individuals across a broad range and their marathon times are suggestive of achievable exercise training in novice participants.”
For the study, researchers tracked 138 untrained and healthy first-time marathon runners over the course of a six-month period ahead of the 2016 and 2017 London marat
Running one marathon can make your arteries healthier, study says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stiffening, blood, participants, running, study, arteries, hours, training, researchers, week, healthier, marathon


Running one marathon can make your arteries healthier, study says

New research suggests running a marathon for the first time could help people reduce their vascular age — the age of one’s arteries — by up to four years.

According to a new study published Monday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, researchers found that training for and completing a marathon, even at relatively low intensity levels, was associated with reversing age-related stiffening of the body’s main artery, the aorta, and helped to reduce blood pressure.

“Our study shows it is possible to reverse the consequences of aging on our blood vessels with real-world exercise in just six months,” Dr. Charlotte Manisty, the study’s senior author and cardiologist at University College London said in a statement. “These benefits were observed in overall healthy individuals across a broad range and their marathon times are suggestive of achievable exercise training in novice participants.”

For the study, researchers tracked 138 untrained and healthy first-time marathon runners over the course of a six-month period ahead of the 2016 and 2017 London marathons, including two weeks post-marathon. Participants had no significant past medical or cardiac history and were not running for more than two hours per week at baseline, according to the report. Average participants were 37 years old with ages ranging from 21 to 69 and 49% of them were male.

The results found that for first-time long distance runners, training and completion of the marathon was associated with reductions in their blood pressure and aortic stiffening — which is when the arterial wall begin to fray due to stress.

Older, slower male marathons saw the most improvement. Researchers noted that while they only recruited healthy participants for the study, “those with hypertension and stiffer arteries might be expected to have an even greater cardiovascular response to exercise training.”

While arterial stiffening is a normal part of aging, it makes it harder for the heart to pump blood throughout the body. This can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular and kidney disease, as well as dementia, researchers said.

All the participants were recommended to follow the 17-week “Beginner’s Training Plan” provided by the marathon’s website, which consisted of approximately three runs per week that increases in difficulty each week. However, researchers did not “discourage” those who wished to use other training program. The average running time for female marathoners was five hours and 40 minutes and four hours and 50 minutes for males.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stiffening, blood, participants, running, study, arteries, hours, training, researchers, week, healthier, marathon


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‘Damning’ Boeing messages reveal efforts to manipulate regulators of 737 Max

Boeing employees boasted about bullying regulators to approve the now-grounded 737 Max without requiring pilots to undergo simulator training while others raised safety concerns and complained about lax standards, according to a trove of internal documents the company released on Thursday. Boeing shared the messages with the Federal Aviation Administration and lawmakers, one of whom called them “damning.” Boeing said the messages “do not reflect the company we are and need to be, and they are co


Boeing employees boasted about bullying regulators to approve the now-grounded 737 Max without requiring pilots to undergo simulator training while others raised safety concerns and complained about lax standards, according to a trove of internal documents the company released on Thursday.
Boeing shared the messages with the Federal Aviation Administration and lawmakers, one of whom called them “damning.”
Boeing said the messages “do not reflect the company we are and need to be, and they are co
‘Damning’ Boeing messages reveal efforts to manipulate regulators of 737 Max Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, messages, training, 737, boeing, documents, max, manipulate, regulators, efforts, damning, safety, type, company, reveal, simulator


'Damning' Boeing messages reveal efforts to manipulate regulators of 737 Max

Boeing employees boasted about bullying regulators to approve the now-grounded 737 Max without requiring pilots to undergo simulator training while others raised safety concerns and complained about lax standards, according to a trove of internal documents the company released on Thursday.

The contents of the more than 100 pages of internal messages present a fresh crisis for Boeing, which is struggling to regain its reputation after two fatal crashes of the 737 Max that killed 346 people and months of revelations that showed how the company designed a flawed airliner and sold thousands of them around the world.

Boeing shared the messages with the Federal Aviation Administration and lawmakers, one of whom called them “damning.”

“I want to stress the importance of holding firm that there will not be any type of simulator training required to transition from the [the older model of the 737] to MAX,” read a message from Boeing’s 737 chief technical pilot in March 2017 to another employee. “Boeing will not allow that to happen. We’ll go face to face with any regulator who tries to make that a requirement.”

Another message from a Boeing employee later that year called an undisclosed party “morons” for ordering a type of cockpit display and said India’s aviation regulator “is apparently even stupider.”

Boeing said the messages “do not reflect the company we are and need to be, and they are completely unacceptable.”

Boeing had told regulators to remove simulator training from requirements before the FAA approved the jets, which became Boeing’s best-selling aircraft, in 2017. The names of the people in the messages were redacted, but included in copies sent to lawmakers.

Some of the documents showed concerns about flight simulators.

The FAA, for its part, said the documents don’t present any safety risks that it already knew about under its own review of the planes. It also backed the safety of the simulators mentioned in the documents.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, messages, training, 737, boeing, documents, max, manipulate, regulators, efforts, damning, safety, type, company, reveal, simulator


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Japan’s NHK apologizes for erroneous North Korean ‘Christmas gift’ news

The North Korean flag is seen at mast past the barbed wire fencing of the North Korean embassy in Malaysia on March 27, 2017. The NHK bulletin, sent out 22 minutes after midnight on its website, read: “North Korean missile seen as having fallen into seas about 2,000 km east of Hokkaido’s Cape Erimo”, suggesting a flight path over Japanese territory. NHK had also sent an erroneous news alert about a North Korean missile in error in January of last year. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had given t


The North Korean flag is seen at mast past the barbed wire fencing of the North Korean embassy in Malaysia on March 27, 2017.
The NHK bulletin, sent out 22 minutes after midnight on its website, read: “North Korean missile seen as having fallen into seas about 2,000 km east of Hokkaido’s Cape Erimo”, suggesting a flight path over Japanese territory.
NHK had also sent an erroneous news alert about a North Korean missile in error in January of last year.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had given t
Japan’s NHK apologizes for erroneous North Korean ‘Christmas gift’ news Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japans, states, north, korean, sent, east, training, apologizes, christmas, united, missile, erroneous, gift, website, nhk


Japan's NHK apologizes for erroneous North Korean 'Christmas gift' news

The North Korean flag is seen at mast past the barbed wire fencing of the North Korean embassy in Malaysia on March 27, 2017.

Japanese public broadcaster NHK on Friday sent a news bulletin that incorrectly reported had launched a missile that fell into waters east of the Japanese archipelago, issuing an apology hours later explaining it was a media training alert.

The news alert came as the United States and its East Asian allies have been on tenterhooks after Pyongyang’s warning this month of a possible in what experts took to mean a possible long-range missile test.

The NHK bulletin, sent out 22 minutes after midnight on its website, read: “North Korean missile seen as having fallen into seas about 2,000 km east of Hokkaido’s Cape Erimo”, suggesting a flight path over Japanese territory.

At 2:28 a.m., NHK issued an apology on its website, explaining that the text was meant for training purposes and was “not true”.

“We apologize to our viewers and the public,” NHK said.

Warning citizens about disasters and security threats is one of the mandates for the publicly funded broadcaster, whose news casters regularly and frequently hold drills for earthquakes and other disaster coverage.

When North Korea did launch missiles that flew over , warnings spread through sirens and government-issued “J-alerts” on millions of cell phones throughout Japan, jolting some out of sleep.

NHK had also sent an erroneous news alert about a North Korean missile in error in January of last year.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had given the United States until the end of the year to propose new concessions in talks over his country’s nuclear arsenal and reducing tensions between the adversaries.

Its last test of an intercontinental ballistic missile was in November 2017 when it fired a Hwasong-15, the largest missile it has ever tested. Pyongyang said the missile was capable of reaching all of the United States.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japans, states, north, korean, sent, east, training, apologizes, christmas, united, missile, erroneous, gift, website, nhk


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Russia’s most advanced fighter jet crashes, pilot survives

Sukhoi Su-57 multirole fifth-generation jet fighter takes part in a flight demonstration at the MAKS International Aviation and Space Salon at Zhukovskiy International Airport on August 27, 2019 in Zhukovskiy, Russia. Russian officials say a top-of-the-line fighter jet has crashed on a training mission but that its pilot bailed out safely. Russia’s United Aircraft Corporation said in a statement Tuesday that the Su-57 fighter came down during a training flight near Komsomolsk-on-Amur in the coun


Sukhoi Su-57 multirole fifth-generation jet fighter takes part in a flight demonstration at the MAKS International Aviation and Space Salon at Zhukovskiy International Airport on August 27, 2019 in Zhukovskiy, Russia.
Russian officials say a top-of-the-line fighter jet has crashed on a training mission but that its pilot bailed out safely.
Russia’s United Aircraft Corporation said in a statement Tuesday that the Su-57 fighter came down during a training flight near Komsomolsk-on-Amur in the coun
Russia’s most advanced fighter jet crashes, pilot survives Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24
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Russia's most advanced fighter jet crashes, pilot survives

Sukhoi Su-57 multirole fifth-generation jet fighter takes part in a flight demonstration at the MAKS International Aviation and Space Salon at Zhukovskiy International Airport on August 27, 2019 in Zhukovskiy, Russia.

Russian officials say a top-of-the-line fighter jet has crashed on a training mission but that its pilot bailed out safely.

Russia’s United Aircraft Corporation said in a statement Tuesday that the Su-57 fighter came down during a training flight near Komsomolsk-on-Amur in the country’s far east. It said the plane’s pilot safely ejected and there was no damage on the ground.

The cause of the crash wasn’t immediately known.

The Su-57, which made its maiden flight in 2010, is Russia’s most advanced fighter plane. It has stealth capability and carries sophisticated equipment and weapons. The twin-engine aircraft has been designed by the Sukhoi company to compete with the U.S. F-22 Raptor stealth fighter.

The crash marks the first loss of a Su-57, 10 of which have been built at Sukhoi’s plant in Komsomolsk-on-Amur for pre-production tests and combat evaluation. Some of them have been flown in combat during Russia’s military campaign in Syria.

The Russian air force has placed an order for 76 such aircraft to be delivered by 2028.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24
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Official: Base shooter watched shooting videos before attack

Two other Saudi students watched from a car, the official said. Ten Saudi students were being held on the base Saturday while several others were unaccounted for, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity after being briefed by federal authorities. The FBI identified the shooter in a statement Saturday night as Mohammed Alshamrani, 21. The Navy identified the third victim as Airman Apprentice Cameron Scott Walters, 21, of Richmond Hill, Georgia. The shooting is the second at a U.S.


Two other Saudi students watched from a car, the official said.
Ten Saudi students were being held on the base Saturday while several others were unaccounted for, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity after being briefed by federal authorities.
The FBI identified the shooter in a statement Saturday night as Mohammed Alshamrani, 21.
The Navy identified the third victim as Airman Apprentice Cameron Scott Walters, 21, of Richmond Hill, Georgia.
The shooting is the second at a U.S.
Official: Base shooter watched shooting videos before attack Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08
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Official: Base shooter watched shooting videos before attack

The Saudi student who fatally shot three sailors at a U.S. naval base in Florida hosted a dinner party earlier in the week where he and three others watched videos of mass shootings, a U.S. official told The Associated Press on Saturday.

Officials investigating the deadly attack were working Saturday to determine whether it was motivated by terrorism, while President Donald Trump indicated he would review policies governing foreign military training in the United States.

The Navy on Saturday identified the three victims and hailed them as heroes for trying to stop the shooter and flagging down first responders after being shot.

“The Sailors that lost their lives in the line of duty and showed exceptional heroism and bravery in the face of evil,” Capt. Tim Kinsella, the commanding officer of Naval Air Station Pensacola, said in a statement. “When confronted, they didn’t run from danger; they ran towards it and saved lives.”

The shooter opened fire inside a classroom at the naval base on Friday, killing three people and wounding two sheriff’s deputies, one in the arm and one in the knee, before one of the deputies killed him. Eight others were also hurt. Both deputies were expected to survive.

The official who spoke Saturday said one of the three students who attended the dinner party hosted by the attacker recorded video outside the classroom building while the shooting was taking place. Two other Saudi students watched from a car, the official said.

Ten Saudi students were being held on the base Saturday while several others were unaccounted for, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity after being briefed by federal authorities.

The FBI identified the shooter in a statement Saturday night as Mohammed Alshamrani, 21. Investigators said he was a 2nd Lt. in the Royal Saudi Air Force and was a student naval flight officer of Naval Aviation Schools Command. A U.S. official on Friday said the FBI was examining social media posts and investigating whether he acted alone or was connected to any broader group. The official wasn’t authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity.

Two U.S. officials said Friday that authorities were investigating whether the attack was terrorism-related. They spoke on condition of anonymity to disclose information that had not yet been made public.

In remarks at a gathering of top U.S. defense and military officials on Saturday, Defense Secretary Mark Esper was asked whether he could say definitively that the shooting was an act of terrorism.

“No, I can’t say it’s terrorism at this time,” he said, adding that the investigation needs to proceed. He declined to discuss details of the investigation so far.

President Trump also declined to say whether the shooting was terrorism-related. The president tweeted his condolences to the families of the victims on Friday and noted that Saudi King Salman had reassured him in a telephone call that the shooter “in no way shape or form represents the feelings of the Saudi people.”

But in comments echoing those made earlier by Esper, Trump said Saturday that he would review policies governing foreign military training in the U.S.

The U.S. has long had a robust training program for Saudis, providing assistance in the U.S. and in the kingdom. Currently, more than 850 Saudis are in the United States for various training activities. They are among more than 5,000 foreign students from 153 countries in the U.S. going through military training.

“This has been done for many decades,” Trump said. “I guess we’re going to have to look into the whole procedure. We’ll start that immediately.”

Speaking at the Ronald Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California, on Saturday, Esper and others downplayed any initial impact on U.S.-Saudi ties.

Asked whether he would now hesitate to send U.S. forces to Saudi Arabia, he said, “No, not at all.” He said the U.S. and Saudi Arabia have shared security interests, especially with regard to Iran.

The shooting has shined a light on the sometimes rocky relationship between the two countries, however.

The kingdom is still trying to recover from the killing last year of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul. Saudi intelligence officials and a forensic doctor killed and dismembered Khashoggi on Oct. 2, 2018, just as his fiancée waited outside the diplomatic mission.

Naval Air Station Pensacola is one of the Navy’s most historic and storied bases. It sprawls along the waterfront southwest of the city’s downtown and dominates the economy of the surrounding area.

Part of the base resembles a college campus, with buildings where, in addition to foreign students, 60,000 members of the U.S. Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard train each year in multiple fields of aviation.

Kinsella said the base would remain closed until further notice.

Residents of Pensacola mourned the attacks and offered their condolences to affected members of the community.

Family members on Saturday identified one of the victims as a 23-year-old recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy who alerted first responders to where the shooter was even after he had been shot several times.

“Joshua Kaleb Watson saved countless lives today with his own,” his older brother Adam Watson wrote on Facebook. “He died a hero and we are beyond proud.”

A second victim was identified as Airman Mohammed Sameh Haitham, 19, of St. Petersburg, Florida, who joined the Navy after graduating from high school last year, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

Haitham’s mother, Evelyn Brady, herself a Navy veteran, said the commander of her son’s school called her and told her Haitham had tried to stop the shooter.

The former track and field star had been assigned to flight crew training and was looking forward to graduating from the program later this month, Brady said.

“He said he was going to get his flight jacket for Christmas,” she said. “Now that’s not going to happen.”

The Navy identified the third victim as Airman Apprentice Cameron Scott Walters, 21, of Richmond Hill, Georgia. All three were students at Naval Aviation Schools Command.

The shooting is the second at a U.S. naval base in one week. A sailor whose submarine was docked at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, opened fire on three civilian employees Wednesday, killing two before taking his own life.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, naval, shooter, training, shooting, base, attack, students, navy, videos, identified, official, watched, saudi


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Saudi Air Force member who killed 3 at US Navy base had watched mass-shooting videos

The gunman, who was killed in the incident by responding sheriff’s deputies in the incident, was identified by several law enforcement sources as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani. In other news about the investigation into the shooting, a number of Saudi training students were led away by authorities after the incident, according to a source familiar with the matter. “There have always been international students training here because it’s a good place to train. One of the victims killed is being remem


The gunman, who was killed in the incident by responding sheriff’s deputies in the incident, was identified by several law enforcement sources as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani.
In other news about the investigation into the shooting, a number of Saudi training students were led away by authorities after the incident, according to a source familiar with the matter.
“There have always been international students training here because it’s a good place to train.
One of the victims killed is being remem
Saudi Air Force member who killed 3 at US Navy base had watched mass-shooting videos Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: minyvonne burke, pete williams
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shooter, massshooting, training, shooting, navy, base, member, students, videos, air, killed, force, watson, incident, shot, watched, saudi


Saudi Air Force member who killed 3 at US Navy base had watched mass-shooting videos

The Saudi Air Force member suspected of killing three people and wounding several others at a shooting Friday at a naval base in Pensacola, Florida, attended a dinner prior to the rampage at which mass shooting videos were shown, according to an official familiar with the investigation.

The official said it’s unclear what that means.

The gunman, who was killed in the incident by responding sheriff’s deputies in the incident, was identified by several law enforcement sources as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani. He was at Naval Air Station Pensacola as part of a training program.

In other news about the investigation into the shooting, a number of Saudi training students were led away by authorities after the incident, according to a source familiar with the matter.

Officials have not publicly confirmed the shooter’s name or discussed a possible motive.

“We are not prepared at this hour to confirm what may have motivated the shooter to commit this horrific act today,” said Rachel L. Rojas, FBI special agent in charge of the Jacksonville division, at a news conference Friday night.

The shooting happened at around 6:50 a.m. in a two-floor classroom building at the naval base, which is on the Florida Panhandle about 13 miles from the Alabama border.

Lt. Col. Dave Eastburn, a Pentagon spokesman, said the suspect had been scheduled to complete a three-year U.S. Air Force Foreign Military Sales training program, funded by Saudi Arabia, in August.

Foreign students from ally and “partner” nations of the U.S. have been coming to train at the base since at least World War II, Base commander Capt. Timothy Kinsella said Friday.

“There have always been international students training here because it’s a good place to train. It’s good-quality training,” he said.

Eastburn said 5,181 foreign students from 153 countries, including 852 Saudis, are in the U.S. for Department of Defense security cooperation-related training. According to a Pentagon policy, foreign nationals who want to participate in the program are vetted for terrorist activity, drug trafficking, corruption, and criminal conduct.

Three people were killed in the shooting and eight others, including two Escambia County sheriff’s deputies, were injured after an exchange with the shooter, who was armed with a handgun. Authorities said both deputies are expected to survive.

One of the victims killed is being remembered by his brother for saving the lives of others despite being shot multiple times.

In a gut-wrenching Facebook post, Adam Watson confirmed that Joshua Kaleb Watson was among those killed and said that his brother told first responders where the shooter was located inside the base.

“Today has been the worst day of my life,” Adam Watson wrote. “Joshua Kaleb Watson saved countless lives today with his own. After being shot multiple times he made it outside and told the first response team where the shooter was and those details were invaluable.”

Adam Watson said his brother “died a hero.”

“We are beyond proud but there is a hole in our hearts that can never be filled,” the Facebook post read.

Friday’s shooting is the second incident this week at a U.S. Navy facility. On Wednesday, a U.S. sailor shot and killed two civilian Defense Department employees and wounded a third at the Pearl Harbor Shipyard in Hawaii before killing himself.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: minyvonne burke, pete williams
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shooter, massshooting, training, shooting, navy, base, member, students, videos, air, killed, force, watson, incident, shot, watched, saudi


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