Roger Stone apologizes for Instagram post showing crosshairs near judge

Roger Stone, a longtime confidant and friend of President Donald Trump, apologized Monday for an Instagram post showing crosshairs near the federal judge presiding over the criminal case against him. The Republican operative’s Instagram account quickly posted and deleted the photo of District Judge Amy Berman Jackson on Monday. In an accompanying caption, Stone claimed he would only get a “show trial” from Jackson, according to photos of the post captured before its deletion. He called the her “


Roger Stone, a longtime confidant and friend of President Donald Trump, apologized Monday for an Instagram post showing crosshairs near the federal judge presiding over the criminal case against him. The Republican operative’s Instagram account quickly posted and deleted the photo of District Judge Amy Berman Jackson on Monday. In an accompanying caption, Stone claimed he would only get a “show trial” from Jackson, according to photos of the post captured before its deletion. He called the her “
Roger Stone apologizes for Instagram post showing crosshairs near judge Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: jacob pramuk, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roger, judge, near, case, posted, charges, apologizes, post, instagram, showing, crosshairs, jackson, court, trump, stone


Roger Stone apologizes for Instagram post showing crosshairs near judge

Roger Stone, a longtime confidant and friend of President Donald Trump, apologized Monday for an Instagram post showing crosshairs near the federal judge presiding over the criminal case against him.

The Republican operative’s Instagram account quickly posted and deleted the photo of District Judge Amy Berman Jackson on Monday. In an accompanying caption, Stone claimed he would only get a “show trial” from Jackson, according to photos of the post captured before its deletion. He called the her “an Obama appointed Judge who dismissed the Benghazi charges again (sic) Hillary Clinton.”

In a court filing Monday night, Stone — who has pleaded not guilty to charges of witness tampering, obstruction of justice and making false statements to Congress — apologized.

“Please inform the Court that the photograph and comment today was improper and should not have been posted,” a statement signed by Stone read. “I had no intention of disrespecting the court and humbly apologize to the court for this transgression.”

Last week, Jackson placed a partial gag order on Stone, preventing him from commenting to the media or in public so as not to risk prejudicing his case. Special counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating Russian efforts to interfere in the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with the Kremlin, brought the case against Stone in January.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: jacob pramuk, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roger, judge, near, case, posted, charges, apologizes, post, instagram, showing, crosshairs, jackson, court, trump, stone


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European markets open slightly lower amid US-China trade talks

Market focus is largely attuned to trade developments between the world’s two largest economies, with a new round of negotiations expected in Washington on Tuesday. A follow-up session of higher-level talks is expected later in the week, as both sides look to resolve their protracted dispute before a March 1 deadline. Danone, HSBC and BHP Billiton are all expected to publish quarterly results Tuesday morning. In the U.K., Japanese carmaker Honda is reportedly set to announce the closure of its S


Market focus is largely attuned to trade developments between the world’s two largest economies, with a new round of negotiations expected in Washington on Tuesday. A follow-up session of higher-level talks is expected later in the week, as both sides look to resolve their protracted dispute before a March 1 deadline. Danone, HSBC and BHP Billiton are all expected to publish quarterly results Tuesday morning. In the U.K., Japanese carmaker Honda is reportedly set to announce the closure of its S
European markets open slightly lower amid US-China trade talks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, week, open, worlds, worth, tuesdaya, european, expected, amid, trump, uschina, set, announce, lower, washington, slightly, uk, talks, markets


European markets open slightly lower amid US-China trade talks

Market focus is largely attuned to trade developments between the world’s two largest economies, with a new round of negotiations expected in Washington on Tuesday.

A follow-up session of higher-level talks is expected later in the week, as both sides look to resolve their protracted dispute before a March 1 deadline.

Last week, President Donald Trump suggested he might extend the deadline for a deal, which would stop an immediate increase in tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports to 25 percent from 10 percent.

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares, excluding Japan, edged down 0.1 percent.

Back in Europe, investors are likely to monitor a flurry of corporate earnings. Danone, HSBC and BHP Billiton are all expected to publish quarterly results Tuesday morning.

In the U.K., Japanese carmaker Honda is reportedly set to announce the closure of its Swindon car plant on Tuesday, risking the loss of 3,500 jobs.

The company is set to hold a news conference at 0800 GMT to announce further details.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, week, open, worlds, worth, tuesdaya, european, expected, amid, trump, uschina, set, announce, lower, washington, slightly, uk, talks, markets


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US Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein to step down in March, says official

Rod Rosenstein, the U.S. deputy attorney general who appointed special counsel Robert Mueller to investigate possible ties between Russia and President Donald Trump’scampaign, is expected to step down by mid March, a Justice Department official said on Monday. Rosenstein had been expected to depart shortly after new Attorney General William Barr assumed office. A registered Republican, Rosenstein made the decision because his then-boss, former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a Trump supporter du


Rod Rosenstein, the U.S. deputy attorney general who appointed special counsel Robert Mueller to investigate possible ties between Russia and President Donald Trump’scampaign, is expected to step down by mid March, a Justice Department official said on Monday. Rosenstein had been expected to depart shortly after new Attorney General William Barr assumed office. A registered Republican, Rosenstein made the decision because his then-boss, former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a Trump supporter du
US Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein to step down in March, says official Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: yuri gripas, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deputy, official, attorney, rosenstein, department, mueller, investigation, president, step, trump, general, justice


US Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein to step down in March, says official

Rod Rosenstein, the U.S. deputy attorney general who appointed special counsel Robert Mueller to investigate possible ties between Russia and President Donald Trump’scampaign, is expected to step down by mid March, a Justice Department official said on Monday.

Rosenstein had been expected to depart shortly after new Attorney General William Barr assumed office. Barr was confirmed for the role by the U.S. Senate last week.

The Justice official said Rosenstein’s departure was not related to renewed allegations that he considered wearing a wire in meetings with Trump and using the 25th amendment of the U.S. Constitution to remove the president from office.

Rosenstein, the No. 2 official at the Justice Department, in May 2017 named Special Counsel Robert Mueller to investigate ties between Trump’s 2016 presidential election campaign and Moscow. The investigation continues.

A registered Republican, Rosenstein made the decision because his then-boss, former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a Trump supporter during the 2016 campaign, had recused himself from the issue.

Last September, the New York Times reported Rosenstein in 2017 had suggested secretly recording Trump and recruiting Cabinet members to oust the president using the provisions of the Constitution’s 25th Amendment.

In an interview broadcast on Sunday with CBS News “60 Minutes,” former acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe confirmed the Times account that Rosenstein considered wearing a wire in meetings with Trump.

Rosenstein said both the Times story and McCabe’s account were “inaccurate and factually incorrect,” which a Justice Department spokeswoman reiterated after the “60 Minutes” interview.

Earlier on Monday Trump accused both McCabe and Rosenstein of planning a “very illegal act,” which he described in a tweet as “illegal and treasonous.”

Rosenstein ceased overseeing Mueller’s probe on Nov. 7 when Trump named Matt Whittaker acting attorney general. Barr now has oversight of the investigation.

Rosenstein had attracted far more attention than is typical for the No. 2 Justice Department official because of his decision to appoint Mueller to lead the investigation eight days after Trump fired James Comey as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Trump has frequently and publicly seethed about the Mueller probe, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Justice Department, which oversees them both.

The president has denied any collusion and Russia says there was no election meddling, despite findings to the contrary by U.S. intelligence agencies.

Mueller’s investigation, which the president has repeatedly called a “witch hunt,” has so far netted 34 individuals and three companies who have pleaded guilty, been indicted or been otherwise swept up in the inquiry.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: yuri gripas, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deputy, official, attorney, rosenstein, department, mueller, investigation, president, step, trump, general, justice


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Trump warns military members supporting Venezuela’s Maduro that they will ‘lose everything’

As the monthslong political crisis stretched on, Trump delivered a public plea to Venezuela’s military to support Guaido’s government. The Venezuelan military could play a decisive role in the stalemate but has largely remained loyal to Maduro. Trump issued a dire warning to Venezuela’s military that if they continue to stand with Maduro, “you will find no safe harbor, no easy exit and no way out. Trump urged the Venezuelan military to accept Guaido’s offer of amnesty and refrain from violence a


As the monthslong political crisis stretched on, Trump delivered a public plea to Venezuela’s military to support Guaido’s government. The Venezuelan military could play a decisive role in the stalemate but has largely remained loyal to Maduro. Trump issued a dire warning to Venezuela’s military that if they continue to stand with Maduro, “you will find no safe harbor, no easy exit and no way out. Trump urged the Venezuelan military to accept Guaido’s offer of amnesty and refrain from violence a
Trump warns military members supporting Venezuela’s Maduro that they will ‘lose everything’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-18  Authors: joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lose, members, venezuela, warns, opposition, venezuelas, supporting, venezuelan, president, military, maduro, support, trump, maduros


Trump warns military members supporting Venezuela's Maduro that they will 'lose everything'

President Donald Trump said Monday that “a new day is coming in Latin America,” as he sought to rally support among the largest Venezuelan community in the U.S. for opposition leader Juan Guaido.

Speaking at Florida International University in Miami before large American and Venezuelan flags, Trump said the U.S. stands behind Guaido, whom the U.S. recognizes as the country’s rightful president, and condemns President Nicolas Maduro’s government and its socialist policies.

As the monthslong political crisis stretched on, Trump delivered a public plea to Venezuela’s military to support Guaido’s government. The Venezuelan military could play a decisive role in the stalemate but has largely remained loyal to Maduro.

Trump issued a dire warning to Venezuela’s military that if they continue to stand with Maduro, “you will find no safe harbor, no easy exit and no way out. You will lose everything.”

Trump added: “We seek a peaceful transition of power, but all options are open.”

The military has blocked the U.S. from moving tons of humanitarian aid airlifted in recent days to the Colombian border with Venezuela. The aid shipments have been meant in part to dramatize the hyperinflation and shortages of food and medicine that are gripping Venezuela. Trump said of Maduro, “He would rather see his people starve than give them aid.”

Critics say Maduro’s re-election last year was fraudulent, making his second term illegal.

Trump urged the Venezuelan military to accept Guaido’s offer of amnesty and refrain from violence against those opposing Maduro’s government. And he praised the Venezuelan opposition, saying of the people of Venezuela, “They are turning the page on dictatorship and there will be no going back.”

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said earlier Monday that the U.S. “knows where military officials and their families have money hidden throughout the world.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-18  Authors: joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lose, members, venezuela, warns, opposition, venezuelas, supporting, venezuelan, president, military, maduro, support, trump, maduros


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California and 15 other states sue over Trump’s national emergency

California and 15 other states filed a lawsuit Monday challenging Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration. More from NBC News:Can Trump use a ‘national emergency’ to build a border wall? What is a national emergency? And then we’ll end up in the Supreme Court, and hopefully we’ll get a fair shake. “The only national emergency is the president’s trafficking in lies and deceit,” Connecticut Attorney General William Tong said in a statement.


California and 15 other states filed a lawsuit Monday challenging Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration. More from NBC News:Can Trump use a ‘national emergency’ to build a border wall? What is a national emergency? And then we’ll end up in the Supreme Court, and hopefully we’ll get a fair shake. “The only national emergency is the president’s trafficking in lies and deceit,” Connecticut Attorney General William Tong said in a statement.
California and 15 other states sue over Trump’s national emergency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-18  Authors: jane c timm, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supreme, states, california, congress, wall, sue, 15, national, president, emergency, border, court, trump, trumps


California and 15 other states sue over Trump's national emergency

California and 15 other states filed a lawsuit Monday challenging Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration.

“The president admitted that there’s not a basis for the declaration. He admitted there’s no crisis at the border. He’s now trying to rob funds that were allocated by Congress legally to the various states and people of our states,” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra told Andrea Mitchell on MSNBC Monday afternoon before the suit was filed.

“The separation of powers is being violated, we’re going to go out there and make sure that Donald Trump cannot steal money from the states and people who need them, since we paid the taxpayer dollars to Washington, D.C., to get those services,” he said.

Trump said on Friday that he would bypass Congress by declaring a national emergency to build a border wall along the nation’s southern border, after a protracted battle in which Congress has repeatedly declined to give the president billions to build border barriers.

More from NBC News:

Can Trump use a ‘national emergency’ to build a border wall? His own words offer clues.

What is a national emergency? Here are 8 things to know

In one news conference, Trump created several new minefields

A national emergency declaration gives the president special powers to take taxpayer dollars from other budgets to pay for border wall construction, but legal challenges to such an effort are inevitable. Before the emergency was declared, Becerra vowed “to reject this foolish proposal in court the moment it touches the ground.”

“The president does have broad authority. But he does not have authority to violate the Constitution,” Becerra said. “President Obama never did this. He never tried to raid accounts, funding accounts, that had been allocated by Congress. When a president tries to do that, the Supreme Court will typically step in and say, ‘Keep your hands out of the cookie jar.'”

Becerra has sued the president dozens of times already, and the president signaled that he expected this lawsuit during his Friday remarks.

“And I’ll sign the final papers as soon as I get into the Oval Office. And we will have a national emergency, and then we will then be sued, and they will sue us in the 9th Circuit, even though it shouldn’t be there,” Trump said, speaking of the largest circuit court, which includes California. “And we will possibly get a bad ruling, and then we’ll get another bad ruling. And then we’ll end up in the Supreme Court, and hopefully we’ll get a fair shake. And we’ll win in the Supreme Court, just like the ban.”

“The only national emergency is the president’s trafficking in lies and deceit,” Connecticut Attorney General William Tong said in a statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-18  Authors: jane c timm, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supreme, states, california, congress, wall, sue, 15, national, president, emergency, border, court, trump, trumps


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Trump urges European allies to take back hundreds of ISIS figthers captured in Syria

The United States is asking its European allies to “take back over 800” ISIS fighters that have been captured in Syria and put them on trial, President Donald Trump tweeted late on Saturday. Trump has sworn to pull U.S. forces from Syria after ISIS’s territorial defeat, raising questions over the fate of Washington’s Kurdish allies and Turkish involvement in northeast Syria. Trump said Saturday that the U.S. is asking Britain, France, Germany and other European allies to take back over 800 ISIS


The United States is asking its European allies to “take back over 800” ISIS fighters that have been captured in Syria and put them on trial, President Donald Trump tweeted late on Saturday. Trump has sworn to pull U.S. forces from Syria after ISIS’s territorial defeat, raising questions over the fate of Washington’s Kurdish allies and Turkish involvement in northeast Syria. Trump said Saturday that the U.S. is asking Britain, France, Germany and other European allies to take back over 800 ISIS
Trump urges European allies to take back hundreds of ISIS figthers captured in Syria Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: matt clinch, tj kirkpatrick, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, syria, captured, trump, european, urges, forces, fighters, isis, begum, figthers, allies, interview, hundreds, states


Trump urges European allies to take back hundreds of ISIS figthers captured in Syria

The United States is asking its European allies to “take back over 800” ISIS fighters that have been captured in Syria and put them on trial, President Donald Trump tweeted late on Saturday.

“The Caliphate is ready to fall,” he said on the social media site. “The alternative is not a good one in that we will be forced to release them…”

U.S.-backed fighters in Syria are poised to capture the so-called Islamic State’s last, tiny enclave on the Euphrates, Reuters reported Saturday citing the battle commander, bringing its self-declared caliphate to the brink of total defeat.

Jiya Furat, the commander of the assault by the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), said they had cornered the remaining militants in a neighborhood of Baghouz village near the Iraqi border. Trump has sworn to pull U.S. forces from Syria after ISIS’s territorial defeat, raising questions over the fate of Washington’s Kurdish allies and Turkish involvement in northeast Syria.

Trump said Saturday that the U.S. is asking Britain, France, Germany and other European allies to take back over 800 ISIS fighters that had been captured and put them on trial.

The issue has come to the fore in Britain, in particular, after a recent interview with Shamima Begum — a Briton who traveled to Syria when she was 15 has been found in a refugee camp in northern Syria.

Now 19, Begum is also heavily pregnant. In the interview carried out in the camp, Begum said she did not regret joining ISIS. The U.K. government has taken a hard line, with the interior minister saying he “will not hesitate” to prevent the return of Britons who join the terror group ISIS.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: matt clinch, tj kirkpatrick, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, syria, captured, trump, european, urges, forces, fighters, isis, begum, figthers, allies, interview, hundreds, states


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Trump’s message is having an impact on NATO, secretary general says

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC that President Donald Trump’s rhetoric on defense spending is having an “important” impact on the military alliance. “I’m saying that his message has been very clear and that his message is having an impact on defense spending. Trump has often criticized other NATO members for not respecting the spending rule. Speaking at a NATO summit in 2017, Trump said: “Over the last eight years, the United States spent more on defense than all NATO countries


NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC that President Donald Trump’s rhetoric on defense spending is having an “important” impact on the military alliance. “I’m saying that his message has been very clear and that his message is having an impact on defense spending. Trump has often criticized other NATO members for not respecting the spending rule. Speaking at a NATO summit in 2017, Trump said: “Over the last eight years, the United States spent more on defense than all NATO countries
Trump’s message is having an impact on NATO, secretary general says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: matt clinch, david reid, yves herman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spent, defense, members, trump, spending, having, told, trumps, important, nations, nato, impact, secretary, message, general


Trump's message is having an impact on NATO, secretary general says

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC that President Donald Trump’s rhetoric on defense spending is having an “important” impact on the military alliance.

“I’m saying that his message has been very clear and that his message is having an impact on defense spending. And this is important because we need fairer burden sharing in the NATO alliance,” he told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble at the Munich Security Conference on Saturday.

“We see more nations spending 2 percent of GDP (gross domestic product) on defense which is the NATO guideline and we see that all nations have stopped the cuts we saw for many years to their defense budgets. And all nations have started to increase,” he added.

Contributions to NATO are a highly sensitive topic. Trump has often criticized other NATO members for not respecting the spending rule. Speaking at a NATO summit in 2017, Trump said: “Over the last eight years, the United States spent more on defense than all NATO countries combined. If all NATO members had spent just 2 percent of GDP on defense last year, we would have had another $119 billion for our collective defense.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: matt clinch, david reid, yves herman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spent, defense, members, trump, spending, having, told, trumps, important, nations, nato, impact, secretary, message, general


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REM publisher asks Twitter to remove video tweeted by Trump over song use

The creator of the video that the president tweeted Friday, self-proclaimed Trump supporter @CarpeDonktum, accused Twitter of censorship after the clip became unplayable on the platform. Trump’s tweet with the video clip had been pinned to the top of his account’s page by Friday afternoon. In November, Trump tweeted an image of himself featuring the text overlay “Sanctions are coming,” which HBO took as a clear reference to its “Game of Thrones” series. bassist Mike Mills took notice of the use


The creator of the video that the president tweeted Friday, self-proclaimed Trump supporter @CarpeDonktum, accused Twitter of censorship after the clip became unplayable on the platform. Trump’s tweet with the video clip had been pinned to the top of his account’s page by Friday afternoon. In November, Trump tweeted an image of himself featuring the text overlay “Sanctions are coming,” which HBO took as a clear reference to its “Game of Thrones” series. bassist Mike Mills took notice of the use
REM publisher asks Twitter to remove video tweeted by Trump over song use Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: kevin breuninger, dave j hogan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, remove, rem, video, asks, music, twitter, tweeted, song, trump, publisher, clip, publishing, using, taken


REM publisher asks Twitter to remove video tweeted by Trump over song use

A satirical video using music from rock band R.E.M., which was shared by the Twitter account of President Donald Trump, has been removed from the social media site after the publisher of the band’s songs complained.

A lawyer for Universal Music Publishing Group had reached out to Twitter on Friday asking that the video, which was first posted by another user, be taken down from the platform, according to a source familiar with the situation, who asked to remain anonymous.

The clip, which runs more than two minutes in length, plays audio from R.E.M.’s early-’90s hit single “Everybody Hurts” over excerpts from Trump’s Feb. 5 State of the Union address.

But, as of the early hours Saturday ET, Twitter users could not play the video posted by Trump, and many saw a message that read, “This video has been removed in response to a report from the copyright holder.”

The creator of the video that the president tweeted Friday, self-proclaimed Trump supporter @CarpeDonktum, accused Twitter of censorship after the clip became unplayable on the platform.

The clip, clearly meant to mock a selection of lawmakers in Congress, cuts lines from Trump’s speech together with reaction shots of stern-looking politicians whom Trump has criticized in the past. They include Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah.

Trump’s tweet with the video clip had been pinned to the top of his account’s page by Friday afternoon. But it appeared to have been un-pinned by Saturday.

The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s questions about the president’s tweet. A spokesman for Twitter did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request to confirm the video’s removal.

Trump has drawn criticism for using copyrighted content before: The Rolling Stones’ “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” was often used at the end of Trump campaign rallies and has been used at Trump events since he became president. The band urged Trump to stop using the song, to no avail.

In November, Trump tweeted an image of himself featuring the text overlay “Sanctions are coming,” which HBO took as a clear reference to its “Game of Thrones” series. HBO said at the time that they “would prefer our trademark not be misappropriated for political purposes,” but the president’s tweet was not taken down.

R.E.M. bassist Mike Mills took notice of the use of his band’s song in the video that Trump tweeted Friday.

“Measures have been taken to stop it,” Mills tweeted, adding that Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey needs “to get on this.”

Mills said that the president had retweeted the video from Twitter account @CarpeDonktum, who is credited in the video. That account defended using potentially copyrighted material in its own content.

Mills, for his part, celebrated the removal of the video with a tweet calling back to a regular campaign promise from Trump.

R.E.M. reached a publishing agreement with Universal Music Publishing Group in March 2016.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: kevin breuninger, dave j hogan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, remove, rem, video, asks, music, twitter, tweeted, song, trump, publisher, clip, publishing, using, taken


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As Trump ponders auto tariffs, free-trade Republicans push back

Whether the Commerce Department took the president’s lead in recommending tariffs on all imported automobiles is unclear. “There’s not a whole lot of support for auto tariffs,” a senior administration official told CNBC. Pro-free-trade Republicans are building new tools to push back, in case the president implements new tariffs in the name of national security. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) introduced a bill last month that would give Congress sixty days to approve any proposed tariffs under section 23


Whether the Commerce Department took the president’s lead in recommending tariffs on all imported automobiles is unclear. “There’s not a whole lot of support for auto tariffs,” a senior administration official told CNBC. Pro-free-trade Republicans are building new tools to push back, in case the president implements new tariffs in the name of national security. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) introduced a bill last month that would give Congress sixty days to approve any proposed tariffs under section 23
As Trump ponders auto tariffs, free-trade Republicans push back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: stephanie dhue, kayla tausche, patrik stollarz, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, freetrade, trade, president, mexico, tariff, auto, push, proposal, republicans, trump, congress, steel, national, toomey, ponders


As Trump ponders auto tariffs, free-trade Republicans push back

Whether the Commerce Department took the president’s lead in recommending tariffs on all imported automobiles is unclear. But such a move would face resistance in the West Wing. “There’s not a whole lot of support for auto tariffs,” a senior administration official told CNBC. “But only one person’s opinion matters.”

In July 2018, President Trump called on Twitter for tariffs of 20 percent on foreign automobiles, and in November upped the suggestion to 25 percent following news of layoffs at General Motors.

Business groups are already warning of the economic impacts. A new study by the Center for Automotive Research found a 25 percent tariff on autos and parts would increase the price of a car by an average of $2,750 and as many as 366,900 U.S. jobs would be lost. Its analysis factors in exclusions for South Korea and assumes Canada and Mexico would also be exempt under the yet-to-be-passed U.S. Mexico Canada trade agreement.

Pro-free-trade Republicans are building new tools to push back, in case the president implements new tariffs in the name of national security.

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) introduced a bill last month that would give Congress sixty days to approve any proposed tariffs under section 232. It would also apply retroactively to steel and aluminium tariffs, giving Congress 75 days to pass a resolution to approve those tariffs.

Sen. Toomey says he has heard from dozens of Pennsylvania companies who use steel and aluminium products who have been hurt by the increased cost of materials. “We have seen this administration use this tool in a way that was never intended,” said Toomey.

Sen. Robert Portman (R-OH) also has a proposal to address what he sees as the misuse of national security in trade fights. Under his proposal, the Pentagon would make the primary determination that a tariff is needed, not the Commerce Department. And Congress would have the right to disapprove of those measures.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: stephanie dhue, kayla tausche, patrik stollarz, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, freetrade, trade, president, mexico, tariff, auto, push, proposal, republicans, trump, congress, steel, national, toomey, ponders


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California governor accuses Trump of keeping disaster money from wildfire survivors

Newsom said there are still survivors waiting for federal disaster recovery money and people are suffering. “You have a real disaster that needs to be cleaned up — $12 billion sitting there,” Newsom told reporters at a press conference in Sacramento. Newsom said California plans to join several other states in a lawsuit to challenge Trump’s national emergency declaration. “No other state will be more harmed than the state of California because of the magnitude of the money,” the governor said. N


Newsom said there are still survivors waiting for federal disaster recovery money and people are suffering. “You have a real disaster that needs to be cleaned up — $12 billion sitting there,” Newsom told reporters at a press conference in Sacramento. Newsom said California plans to join several other states in a lawsuit to challenge Trump’s national emergency declaration. “No other state will be more harmed than the state of California because of the magnitude of the money,” the governor said. N
California governor accuses Trump of keeping disaster money from wildfire survivors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: jeff daniels, kevork djansezian, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, keeping, disaster, trumps, accuses, money, emergency, real, border, governor, wildfire, survivors, trump, california, newsom, billion


California governor accuses Trump of keeping disaster money from wildfire survivors

California Gov. Gavin Newsom blasted President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency Friday and accused him of forgetting about the “real emergency” needs of survivors of the disastrous Camp Fire that destroyed most of the town of Paradise and killed 86 people.

Newsom said there are still survivors waiting for federal disaster recovery money and people are suffering. He said $12 billion in funds that Congress approved for disaster assistance for California, Texas, Georgia and elsewhere is “not moving” as needed to help out with relief efforts.

“You have a real disaster that needs to be cleaned up — $12 billion sitting there,” Newsom told reporters at a press conference in Sacramento. “And not even an utterance, not even a reference in today’s press conference [by Trump] of a real, pressing need and a real human crisis that’s manifesting in real time.”

Newsom, a Democrat, said he just returned Thursday from a visit to Paradise and saw firsthand the continued suffering of the survivors in Northern California’s Butte County. More than 10,000 homes were destroyed in the Camp Fire.

“These people are under enormous stress and anxiety,” Newsom said, adding that they include children who lost everything and are learning in makeshift classrooms. Survivors are “still waiting for FEMA support. Still waiting for disaster recovery money into their community.”

The White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Trump has previously threatened to cut off funding for wildfire relief.

As of Feb. 13, FEMA had provided over $69 million to survivors of the Camp Fire disaster as part of individual and household relief programs. The agency also has provided about $4.5 million to wildfire victims in Southern California, including the Woolsey Fire last November that destroyed 1,643 structures and killed three people.

Newsom slammed Trump for the national emergency declaration that the president is using to get billions of dollars to fund his southern border wall.

Newsom said California plans to join several other states in a lawsuit to challenge Trump’s national emergency declaration. California has already filed at least 45 lawsuits against the Trump administration on a variety of issues and secured 26 wins, although some cases are still ongoing, according to the office of state Attorney General Xavier Becerra.

“Donald Trump, we’ll see you in court,” Newsom said. “Fortunately, Donald is not the last word — the courts will be the last word.”

Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney disclosed Friday that Trump intends to put together $8 billion in funds for wall construction along the U.S.-Mexico border. Congress already set aside more than $1.3 billion for the Homeland Security Department in a funding bill, and other money is expected to come from the Pentagon, including $2.5 billion from the military’s fund for counter-narcotics activities. There’s also $3.6 billion expected to be taken from the military’s construction budget and $600 million in Treasury Department drug forfeiture funds.

“No other state will be more harmed than the state of California because of the magnitude of the money,” the governor said. He said there is a risk California could lose funds for counter-narcotics efforts at the border as well as for local task forces and other operations inland that target drugs.

Newsom last week said he plans to keep 100 of the 360 California National Guard troops at the border to combat drug trafficking, a deployment historically financed by the federal government. He said the emergency declaration could impact funding for the Guard deployment.

According to Newsom, the work that Guard troops and federal agencies have been doing to fight drug cartels and illicit drugs such as fentanyl, methamphetamine, heroin and cocaine within the state is now being put at risk for Trump’s “vanity project.”

The governor called Trump’s planned border wall “a monument to stupidity” and added that those who believe large amounts of drugs are being carried on backpacks across the border are “delusional.” Rather, he said drugs are coming through the ports of entry and vehicles, including tractor-trailers, drones, airplanes and boats.

Newsom said Trump’s border wall and the emergency action will make the drug problem worse, not better.

“The legitimate crisis with drugs in this nation can be addressed appropriately and thoughtfully,” Newsom said. “We want to work collaboratively, and we want to work in the spirit of partnership. I don’t want to be a sparring partner with President Trump.”

However, the California politician said, Trump has “made it all but impossible when he plays these games and manufactures a crisis and creates the conditions where we have no other choice than to sue the administration and join other states and join our partners in the federal government to do the same.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: jeff daniels, kevork djansezian, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, keeping, disaster, trumps, accuses, money, emergency, real, border, governor, wildfire, survivors, trump, california, newsom, billion


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