Pence puts off China speech ahead of Trump-Xi talks

Trump says ‘we were cocked & loaded’ but ‘in no hurry’ to attack…President Trump says he called off the strike 10 minutes before it was scheduled to happen after a general told him it could result in 150 deaths. Politicsread more


Trump says ‘we were cocked & loaded’ but ‘in no hurry’ to attack…President Trump says he called off the strike 10 minutes before it was scheduled to happen after a general told him it could result in 150 deaths. Politicsread more
Pence puts off China speech ahead of Trump-Xi talks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, result, strike, scheduled, ahead, hurry, speech, trump, minutes, talks, china, general, puts, trumpxi, happen, pence, told, loaded


Pence puts off China speech ahead of Trump-Xi talks

Trump says ‘we were cocked & loaded’ but ‘in no hurry’ to attack…

President Trump says he called off the strike 10 minutes before it was scheduled to happen after a general told him it could result in 150 deaths.

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21
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What to watch in the market in the week ahead: Stocks on track for best first half in 22 years

The S&P 500 was on track, as of Friday, to score a more than 17.6% gain for the first half, which ends Friday. The big event in the coming week has been as anticipated for weeks, and it could sway sentiment for weeks to come. At the end of the week, the G-20 meets in Osaka Japan for meetings Friday and Saturday. “Everybody knows the Trump, Xi meeting could go either way,” said Marc Chandler, chief market strategist at Bannockburn Global Forex. “I think there’s been this broad increased awareness


The S&P 500 was on track, as of Friday, to score a more than 17.6% gain for the first half, which ends Friday. The big event in the coming week has been as anticipated for weeks, and it could sway sentiment for weeks to come. At the end of the week, the G-20 meets in Osaka Japan for meetings Friday and Saturday. “Everybody knows the Trump, Xi meeting could go either way,” said Marc Chandler, chief market strategist at Bannockburn Global Forex. “I think there’s been this broad increased awareness
What to watch in the market in the week ahead: Stocks on track for best first half in 22 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, xi, theres, ahead, 22, trump, think, best, fed, meeting, tariffs, trade, watch, g20, week, track, market, half, stocks


What to watch in the market in the week ahead: Stocks on track for best first half in 22 years

The fate of U.S.-China trade talks could play out in the week ahead, and that could set the tone for markets and the economy in the second half of the year. Stocks set new highs in the past week, after the Federal Reserve signaled it was ready to cut interest rates if necessary, and Fed Chair Jerome Powell said trade and the global economy are two factors the Fed is watching. The S&P 500 was on track, as of Friday, to score a more than 17.6% gain for the first half, which ends Friday. If it stays at that level that would be the best first half performance since 1997, when the S&P was up 19.4% in the first six months. The big event in the coming week has been as anticipated for weeks, and it could sway sentiment for weeks to come. At the end of the week, the G-20 meets in Osaka Japan for meetings Friday and Saturday.

‘Could go either way’

President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are expected to have their own dinner meeting at the G-20 next weekend, following discussions between their trade representatives. That meeting could decide how trade negotiations go forward, and whether the U.S. proceeds with another round of tariffs, this time on $300 billion in goods. “Everybody knows the Trump, Xi meeting could go either way,” said Marc Chandler, chief market strategist at Bannockburn Global Forex. “I think everyone expects a new tariff freeze. That the $300 billion won’t go into effect. The most you can hope for out of G-20 meeting is the tariffs are where they are right now, and there’s no more escalation.That also means China will not release the list of companies they won’t do business with.” Chandler said he will be looking for signaling from Trump and Xi on whether they are working on a deal that would be just on the trade topics, or bigger issues like North Korea and differences on the South China Sea. “I do think the G-20 is quite important in that there’s not question in recent months, the trade war started to really move into measures of confidence and measures of manufacturing activity,” said Ethan Harris, head of global economics at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Harris said he expects a positive message with an agreement of no further escalation, but probably not signs of significant progress. “I think the vibes coming out of it will be modestly positive,” he said. “Whether there’s an escalation to the next round of China tariffs is going to set the theme for the rest of the year. Even if tariffs on China are reversed, or partly reversed, at some point, every time there’s an escalation or temporary escalation, it’s another kind of blow to confidence,” he said. Harris said there’s the same risk as after the Trump, Xi meeting at the last G-20, where it was a positive tone but there was little progress afterwards and the markets then reacted negatively. “I think there’s been this broad increased awareness from every economist that the trade war is starting to have noticeable impact. Further escalation with China would be quite a big signal. If the Trump administration puts tariffs on all the Chinese products it roughly doubles the size of the trade war and it sends a very strong message that there are very few constraints on where [Trump] goes next,” he said.

Powell and data

Besides the meeting between Trump and Xi, the market focus will be on anything that could provide clues on what the Fed or even the European Central Bank will do, after ECB President Mario Draghi last week basically promised a new era of easing. Consumer price inflation data is expected for the euro zone, and on Friday, the U.S. personal consumption expenditure data is released, including the PCE deflator, a major inflation indicator for the Fed. There are also a few Fed speakers, including Powell who speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations Tuesday. “It’s probably going to be a big picture kind of talk about the broader challenges of the Fed,” said Ethan Harris, head of global economics at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “They’re certainly going to ask questions about political influence at the Fed, and he’s going to dodge those. I think what I’m waiting for him to comment on is what it is they’re looking for to determine whether they’re going to cut in July or not.” Harris said Powell is not likely to say anything he did not reveal at his press briefing in the past week, and the big focus will be on the lead up to the weekend G-20. Falling interest rates and rising oil prices were two big factors in the market int he past week. The 10-year Treasury yield dipped briefly below 2%, a near 3-year low, as the Fed signaled its willingness to cut interest rates. “Should we get some sort of trade agreement that would be a nice pop to the [stock] market, but that could take the rate cut off the table,” said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at CFRA. Stovall said the stock market will also be watching oil after its rapid run higher, and the events in the Middle East surrounding Iran. West Texas Intermediate futures were up more than 9% in the past week, to $57.43. “The old adage is every $10 increase in the price of oil takes off 20 to 25 basis points off of real GDP growth,” he said. Stovall said stocks have had a solid run so far this year, but they may face some rocky times between now and the end of the summer. “For the rest of this ‘sell in May’ period we could be facing some challenges, headwinds. I think we’ will still end higher on the year. I think the seasonally optimistic September to November period will kick in but there will be a lot of challenges…will the Fed be cutting rates? what are the growth prospects?” he said.

What to watch


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, xi, theres, ahead, 22, trump, think, best, fed, meeting, tariffs, trade, watch, g20, week, track, market, half, stocks


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Trump reportedly approves military strikes on Iran — then abruptly pulls back

As tensions between the U.S. and Iran escalate, President Donald Trump approved military strikes on several Iranian targets — but abruptly pulled back from launching them on Thursday night, The New York Times reported. The Times report, published late Thursday, cited multiple senior administration officials involved in or briefed on the deliberations of the strikes. The White House and the U.S. Department of Defense did not return CNBC’s requests for comment sent outside business hours. Tensions


As tensions between the U.S. and Iran escalate, President Donald Trump approved military strikes on several Iranian targets — but abruptly pulled back from launching them on Thursday night, The New York Times reported. The Times report, published late Thursday, cited multiple senior administration officials involved in or briefed on the deliberations of the strikes. The White House and the U.S. Department of Defense did not return CNBC’s requests for comment sent outside business hours. Tensions
Trump reportedly approves military strikes on Iran — then abruptly pulls back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, approves, iran, pulls, strikes, drone, reportedly, house, attacks, mistake, trump, officials, times, white, abruptly, military


Trump reportedly approves military strikes on Iran — then abruptly pulls back

As tensions between the U.S. and Iran escalate, President Donald Trump approved military strikes on several Iranian targets — but abruptly pulled back from launching them on Thursday night, The New York Times reported.

The Times report, published late Thursday, cited multiple senior administration officials involved in or briefed on the deliberations of the strikes. It said Trump had earlier approved the attacks in retaliation to Iran shooting down an unmanned American spy drone, and officials were still expecting the operation to go ahead as late as 7 p.m. ET.

Military planes and ships were getting ready to attack Iranian targets — such as radar and missile batteries — when the attack was called off, according to the Times. No missiles had been fired, said the report.

The Times said it wasn’t clear whether Trump had simply changed his mind about attacking Iran, or the administration switched course due to logistics and strategic considerations. It also wasn’t clear if the attacks would still go ahead, according to the report.

The White House and the U.S. Department of Defense did not return CNBC’s requests for comment sent outside business hours. The Times said that the White House and Pentagon officials declined to comment. No government officials asked the Times to withhold the article, the report said.

Earlier on Thursday, Trump said on Twitter that “Iran made a very big mistake!” by shooting down the U.S. spy drone. Iran claimed that the aircraft was over its territory, but the U.S. Central Command said it was flying in international airspace.

On the same day, Trump also said at the White House: “I think they made a mistake, and I’m not just talking the country made a mistake. I think that someone under the command of that country made a big mistake.”

Tensions between Washington and Tehran have been rising since the Trump administration’s decision to withdraw from the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement.

Before the confrontation over the American drone, the U.S. accused Iran of recent attacks on oil tankers in the Persian Gulf region.

— CNBC’s Amanda Macias contributed to this report.

For the full story on Trump pulling back military strikes on Iran, read The New York Times.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, approves, iran, pulls, strikes, drone, reportedly, house, attacks, mistake, trump, officials, times, white, abruptly, military


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Donald Trump sexually assaulted E. Jean Carroll in the mid-1990s, writer says in new book

The writer E. Jean Carroll says in a new book that President Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in a dressing room of the Bergdorf Goodman department store in New York City in the mid-1990s. The article is entitled: “Hideous Men: Donald Trump assaulted me in a Bergdorf Goodman dressing room 23 years ago. The article details several other alleged sexual assaults and unwanted advances that Carroll says she has suffered since she was a child. Moonves stepped down from the media giant in September


The writer E. Jean Carroll says in a new book that President Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in a dressing room of the Bergdorf Goodman department store in New York City in the mid-1990s. The article is entitled: “Hideous Men: Donald Trump assaulted me in a Bergdorf Goodman dressing room 23 years ago. The article details several other alleged sexual assaults and unwanted advances that Carroll says she has suffered since she was a child. Moonves stepped down from the media giant in September
Donald Trump sexually assaulted E. Jean Carroll in the mid-1990s, writer says in new book Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, room, writer, mid1990s, jean, book, dressing, trump, article, sexually, men, york, sexual, donald, misconduct, carroll, alleged, assaulted


Donald Trump sexually assaulted E. Jean Carroll in the mid-1990s, writer says in new book

The writer E. Jean Carroll says in a new book that President Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in a dressing room of the Bergdorf Goodman department store in New York City in the mid-1990s.

A description of the alleged attack was excerpted by New York magazine in an article published Friday.

The White House did not return CNBC’s request for comment, but strongly denied Carroll’s claims to New York. A senior White House official told the magazine, “This is a completely false and unrealistic story surfacing 25 years after allegedly taking place and was created simply to make the President look bad.”

Trump issued a statement later Friday saying he had “never met this person” and claiming the account was an attempt “to get publicity” and “sell a book.”

The alleged attack occurred “in the fall of 1995 or the spring of 1996,” according to Carroll. At the time, Trump was married to his second wife, Marla Maples.

“I try to push him off with my one free hand — for some reason, I keep holding my purse with the other — and I finally get a knee up high enough to push him out and off and I turn, open the door, and run out of the dressing room,” Carroll writes.

The article is entitled: “Hideous Men: Donald Trump assaulted me in a Bergdorf Goodman dressing room 23 years ago. But he’s not alone on the list of awful men in my life.”

The article details several other alleged sexual assaults and unwanted advances that Carroll says she has suffered since she was a child.

It includes an account of former CBS CEO Les Moonves, after an interview with Carroll, aggressively groping her in an elevator before she is able to get away from him. Moonves stepped down from the media giant in September after several women accused him of sexual misconduct, which he denied.

Moonves “emphatically denies” Carroll’s claims, according to New York magazine.

The publication noted that Caroll, 75, is at least the 16th woman to accuse Trump of sexual misconduct. Her forthcoming book is entitled “What Do We Need Men For? A Modest Proposal.”

Trump has denied engaging in sexual misconduct with anyone.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, room, writer, mid1990s, jean, book, dressing, trump, article, sexually, men, york, sexual, donald, misconduct, carroll, alleged, assaulted


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Chip stocks fall after Commerce Dept bars 5 more Chinese companies from buying US parts

Trump says ‘we were cocked & loaded’ but ‘in no hurry’ to attack…President Trump says he called off the strike 10 minutes before it was scheduled to happen after a general told him it could result in 150 deaths. Politicsread more


Trump says ‘we were cocked & loaded’ but ‘in no hurry’ to attack…President Trump says he called off the strike 10 minutes before it was scheduled to happen after a general told him it could result in 150 deaths. Politicsread more
Chip stocks fall after Commerce Dept bars 5 more Chinese companies from buying US parts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buying, strike, scheduled, hurry, trump, parts, companies, commerce, chip, minutes, chinese, general, fall, happen, told, dept, result, bars, stocks, loaded


Chip stocks fall after Commerce Dept bars 5 more Chinese companies from buying US parts

Trump says ‘we were cocked & loaded’ but ‘in no hurry’ to attack…

President Trump says he called off the strike 10 minutes before it was scheduled to happen after a general told him it could result in 150 deaths.

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: yun li
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Cramer: Between G-20, jobs report and Fed forecasts, ‘I am taking a cautious stand next week’

It also forecast at least one rate cut, but not until 2020. However, Fed Chair Jerome Powell left open the possibility of a rate cut this year in a post-meeting press conference with reporters. The Fed wants to see “the employment numbers for June and whatever the president does next on trade at the G-20 meeting next week.” President Donald Trump is expected to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at next week’s G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan. That’s why I’m taking a cautious stand on next week,


It also forecast at least one rate cut, but not until 2020. However, Fed Chair Jerome Powell left open the possibility of a rate cut this year in a post-meeting press conference with reporters. The Fed wants to see “the employment numbers for June and whatever the president does next on trade at the G-20 meeting next week.” President Donald Trump is expected to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at next week’s G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan. That’s why I’m taking a cautious stand on next week,
Cramer: Between G-20, jobs report and Fed forecasts, ‘I am taking a cautious stand next week’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stand, jobs, xi, cramer, forecasts, trump, meeting, cut, cautious, trade, rate, taking, rates, g20, week, fed, report


Cramer: Between G-20, jobs report and Fed forecasts, 'I am taking a cautious stand next week'

The Federal Reserve likely wants to see June’s nonfarm payrolls report and any U.S.-China trade developments from this month’s G-20 meeting before making a commitment on cutting interest rates, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Friday.

The central bank voted Wednesday to keep its benchmark interest rate unchanged. It also forecast at least one rate cut, but not until 2020. However, Fed Chair Jerome Powell left open the possibility of a rate cut this year in a post-meeting press conference with reporters.

The Fed’s decision comes after the world’s two largest economies increased tariffs on one another last month. The U.S. increased duties on $200 billion worth of Chinese products from 10% to 25%. China announced plans to raise tariff rates on $60 billion in U.S. goods. The trade dispute has threatened to drag down the global economy and sparked calls on the Fed for a rate cut or even multiple cuts in 2019.

“Remember, [Powell] didn’t commit to cutting rates next month, he just said he’s monitoring the situation,” the “Mad Money” host said. The Fed wants to see “the employment numbers for June and whatever the president does next on trade at the G-20 meeting next week.”

The Labor Department will release its closely watched monthly employment report on July 5.

President Donald Trump is expected to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at next week’s G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan. China had kept silent about whether Xi would agree to a face-to-face meeting. Trump, however, hinted at additional tariffs on Chinese goods if Xi did not sign on for a sit-down.

Cramer said he expects to see Monday “some preview of the talks with China.” But Cramer also said he’s not optimistic that Trump and Xi will be able to come to a trade agreement at the meeting.

“We had a great run this week, but the market’s now in overbought territory and there are a bunch of potentially negative catalysts. That’s why I’m taking a cautious stand on next week, and I suggest you do the same,” Cramer said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
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Hedge fund manager Kyle Bass says the US has more leverage over China than ever before

Hedge fund manager Kyle Bass believes the United States now has more leverage over China in trade negotiations than ever before and encouraged President Donald Trump to follow his hard-line tactics to force concessions from Beijing. Bass — a known China bear — has previously admonished American corporations for pushing Trump to strike a deal with China too quickly and out of their own self-interest. And it is the corporate American chieftains that have their biggest businesses, let’s say most gr


Hedge fund manager Kyle Bass believes the United States now has more leverage over China in trade negotiations than ever before and encouraged President Donald Trump to follow his hard-line tactics to force concessions from Beijing. Bass — a known China bear — has previously admonished American corporations for pushing Trump to strike a deal with China too quickly and out of their own self-interest. And it is the corporate American chieftains that have their biggest businesses, let’s say most gr
Hedge fund manager Kyle Bass says the US has more leverage over China than ever before Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, manager, trump, think, leverage, bass, fund, kyle, china, deal, yesterday, world, trade, hedge, going


Hedge fund manager Kyle Bass says the US has more leverage over China than ever before

Hedge fund manager Kyle Bass believes the United States now has more leverage over China in trade negotiations than ever before and encouraged President Donald Trump to follow his hard-line tactics to force concessions from Beijing.

In an interview with CNBC’s David Faber, Bass said the strength of U.S. business affords Trump the ability to press China’s Xi Jinping for a better deal during their planned meeting at the G-20 summit in Japan next week.

“We have the most leverage that we’ve ever had right now, and I think that our financial system is more solid than it’s been in the last 10 years. And theirs is as weak as it’s ever been,” Bass said Friday morning. “President Trump should hold the line here and get a deal done. If he is going to get a deal done, he should force something that’s both measurable and enforceable.”

Bass, founder and chief investment officer of Hayman Capital Management, is known for profiting and betting against subprime mortgages during the financial crisis in 2008. Bass — a known China bear — has previously admonished American corporations for pushing Trump to strike a deal with China too quickly and out of their own self-interest.

“If you look behind the scenes, it is corporate America pushing Trump to do a deal. And it is the corporate American chieftains that have their biggest businesses, let’s say most growth, coming out of China. And China plays that card. They play it better than anybody else,” Bass told CNBC in April.

The world two largest economies have slapped tariffs on each others’ imports over the past year in an ongoing trade dispute, with the U.S. accusing China of failing to enforce intellectual property protections. Though Wall Street thought the two sides were nearing a deal earlier this year, Trump’s May tweet that the U.S. would introduce more duties dashed those hopes.

“I think the chasm is too far across for us to come to a deal. But what does that mean?” Bass added Friday.

“As Trump tweeted yesterday, the stock market opened at a new high and close at a new high yesterday. I think the fact that talks are ongoing, the U.S. economy is doing better than most of the others in the world,” he said. “I actually think that’s the path that we’re going to see going into the election year.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: thomas franck
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‘They want to hit where it hurts’: Here’s why Iran could want to attack foreign tankers

So why would elements within Iran risk blowing up foreign merchant tankers in their own backyard? It’s crucial to note that the culprit behind attacks on two commercial tankers last week has not been conclusively proven. The U.S. and the Saudis say Iran is behind the attacks, while the U.K. says they’re “almost certain” of the same; Iran vociferously denies it. Here’s a look at what might’ve driven elements within Iran, particularly its Revolutionary Guard Corps, to carry out the tanker attacks.


So why would elements within Iran risk blowing up foreign merchant tankers in their own backyard? It’s crucial to note that the culprit behind attacks on two commercial tankers last week has not been conclusively proven. The U.S. and the Saudis say Iran is behind the attacks, while the U.K. says they’re “almost certain” of the same; Iran vociferously denies it. Here’s a look at what might’ve driven elements within Iran, particularly its Revolutionary Guard Corps, to carry out the tanker attacks.
‘They want to hit where it hurts’: Here’s why Iran could want to attack foreign tankers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iranians, hit, foreign, theyre, hurts, iran, sanctions, war, attack, told, oil, trump, attacks, tankers, heres


'They want to hit where it hurts': Here's why Iran could want to attack foreign tankers

Undated handout archive photo by the Norwegian shipowner Frontline of the crude oil tanker Front Altair, released June 13, 2019. NTB Scanpix | Reuters

DUBAI — Iran’s economy is crumbling. It’s in a region bristling with U.S. military hardware, and it’s staring down an American administration that has made clear all military options are on the table. So why would elements within Iran risk blowing up foreign merchant tankers in their own backyard? It’s a question many people were asking even before the Pentagon reported Thursday that an American drone was shot down over the Strait of Hormuz. Iran claimed responsibility for that strike. It’s crucial to note that the culprit behind attacks on two commercial tankers last week has not been conclusively proven. On June 13, explosions crippled the Japanese Kokuka Courageous and the Norwegian Front Altair, forcing their crews to abandon ship. The U.S. and the Saudis say Iran is behind the attacks, while the U.K. says they’re “almost certain” of the same; Iran vociferously denies it. But video footage and photographs from U.S. CENTCOM provides what a range of security experts say is credible evidence of Iranian responsibility. Here’s a look at what might’ve driven elements within Iran, particularly its Revolutionary Guard Corps, to carry out the tanker attacks.

1. Iran ‘has nothing to lose’

“Iran has probably arrived at the conclusion that it has less to lose from acting this way than from doing nothing,” Aniseh Tabrizi, a research fellow and Iran expert at London’s Royal United Services Institute, told CNBC via phone Tuesday. “There is a gamble behind it that wasn’t there before, which is: ‘If other countries retaliate, we are willing to take the risk because we have really nothing to lose at this point’,” Tabrizi described. “And that is a dangerous way to feel.” Iran’s economy is expected to shrink by 6% this year, after having contracted 3.9% last year, the International Monetary Fund says. By contrast, it clocked 3.8% growth in 2017, before the Trump administration re-imposed economic sanctions after withdrawing from the 2015 nuclear deal that offered the Islamic Republic relief from prior sanctions. The combination of hard-hitting sanctions, particularly on the country’s oil exports, and years of economic mismanagement have led to skyrocketing unemployment and inflation headed toward 40%. “The more the U.S. maximum pressure policy succeeds in driving the Iranian economy into the ground,” Ali Vaez, Iran Project Director at Crisis Group, told CNBC, “the less risk averse the Iranians will become and the more aggressive they’re likely to be.”

2. Calling Trump’s ‘bluff’

“It’s all about careful calibration and plausible deniability,” Hussein Ibish, a senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington, told CNBC. Iran’s tactics, experts say, are designed to disrupt but not provoke a military response. So far, attacks have specifically avoided civilian deaths and environmental damage like an oil spill. Instead, the Revolutionary Guard or its naval equivalent may be sending the message that it’s capable of undermining U.S. and Arab Gulf states’ interests in the region. And if they feel they can get away with it, it’s because they’re banking on President Donald Trump not wanting to actually start a war. “Ultimately, Iran’s intention is to call President Trump’s bluff,” says Ibish.

Imagery taken from a U.S. Navy MH-60R helicopter that allegedly shows Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy after removing an unexploded limpet mine from the M/T Kokuka Courageous. US Navy

And indeed, Trump told Time Magazine in an interview this week that he views the tanker incidents as “very minor,” suggesting that attacks of this nature are not worth going to war over. The administration has already gone almost all out on economic sanctions, “So the repercussions are virtually nil,” says Ibish. “That’s one reason why Iran is taking these actions: they have nothing to lose except getting into a war they don’t want, but which Trump does not want either. And that’s what they’re testing right now,” he said.

3. ‘Hit them where it hurts’ — oil and shipping security

Iranian leaders have often threatened that if they can’t export their oil, neither will anyone else. And last week’s suspected attacks took place near the Strait of Hormuz, the narrow waterway for 30% of the world’s seaborne oil traffic. Combined with the four tankers allegedly sabotaged off the United Arab Emirates’ coast of Fujairah on May 12, last week’s attacks “appear to be part of a systematic Iranian effort to demonstrate that peace and security in the Gulf is contingent on its own economic stability,” political consultancy Eurasia Group said in a June 13 briefing.

They do not seek a war, exactly, but they are obviously willing to risk one in order to get out of an impossible conundrum. Hussein Ibish senior resident scholar, Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei “has made threats to the Americans saying we’re going to hit where it hurts — and the hydrocarbon lifeline of the Strait of Hormuz is what hurts,” Andreas Krieg, a lecturer at the School of Security Studies at King’s College London, told CNBC. Targeting commercial tankers and oil traffic hurts Iran as well, Krieg says — “but the Iranians have their backs against the wall, and there’s very little they can lose because they’re already in a state of absolute loss after the imposition of the maximum pressure sanctions regime.”

4. Deterrence and leverage

“If the Iranians were indeed behind this then I think the main motive is to deter the U.S. from further ratcheting up pressure on Iranian oil exports,” says Crisis Group’s Vaez. “But this also has the added benefit of ransoming the oil market which will jack up the price on shipping insurance premiums, and this will allow the Iranians to compensate to a certain extent for the loss of their oil exports as a result of U.S. sanctions.”

And for Iran, this type of unconventional warfare also demonstrates that it can wreak significant damage on Western interests at a fairly low financial cost, something that can’t be said for the U.S. military. “The Iranians have a lot more flexibility and political will to operate in this area than the Americans,” says Krieg. “The problem with the Americans is there is no political will, there’s limited capability to strike back, and the costs are exponentially higher.”

5. History


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iranians, hit, foreign, theyre, hurts, iran, sanctions, war, attack, told, oil, trump, attacks, tankers, heres


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Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Beyond Meat, PayPal, Slack and more

The Trump economy is starting to look more and more like the… It wasn’t supposed to be this way: The 2017 tax cut and aggressive moves toward deregulation were supposed to pull the U.S. economy out of its glacial move higher. Economyread more


The Trump economy is starting to look more and more like the… It wasn’t supposed to be this way: The 2017 tax cut and aggressive moves toward deregulation were supposed to pull the U.S. economy out of its glacial move higher. Economyread more
Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Beyond Meat, PayPal, Slack and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: jesse pound, ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, paypal, moves, meat, biggest, pull, wasnt, tax, trump, starting, hours, stocks, supposed, slack, making, way, economy, theit


Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Beyond Meat, PayPal, Slack and more

The Trump economy is starting to look more and more like the…

It wasn’t supposed to be this way: The 2017 tax cut and aggressive moves toward deregulation were supposed to pull the U.S. economy out of its glacial move higher.

Economy

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: jesse pound, ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, paypal, moves, meat, biggest, pull, wasnt, tax, trump, starting, hours, stocks, supposed, slack, making, way, economy, theit


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Oracle closes at record high after earnings beat

The Trump economy is starting to look more and more like the… It wasn’t supposed to be this way: The 2017 tax cut and aggressive moves toward deregulation were supposed to pull the U.S. economy out of its glacial move higher. Economyread more


The Trump economy is starting to look more and more like the… It wasn’t supposed to be this way: The 2017 tax cut and aggressive moves toward deregulation were supposed to pull the U.S. economy out of its glacial move higher. Economyread more
Oracle closes at record high after earnings beat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, moves, pull, high, beat, wasnt, tax, trump, starting, oracle, supposed, closes, record, earnings, way, economy, theit


Oracle closes at record high after earnings beat

The Trump economy is starting to look more and more like the…

It wasn’t supposed to be this way: The 2017 tax cut and aggressive moves toward deregulation were supposed to pull the U.S. economy out of its glacial move higher.

Economy

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, moves, pull, high, beat, wasnt, tax, trump, starting, oracle, supposed, closes, record, earnings, way, economy, theit


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