New York Times CEO Mark Thompson calls Trump’s attacks on the press ‘stupid’ and ‘dangerous’

New York Times CEO Mark Thompson on Wednesday called President Donald Trump’s attacks on journalists “hostile,” “stupid” and “dangerous.” “The president is entirely entitled to not like everything he reads in The New York Times, I get that,” said Thompson, who became president and CEO of The New York Times Company in 2012. The New York Times, the president’s hometown newspaper, has borne the brunt of those rhetorical attacks, as has CNN and The Washington Post. “We described the article to the g


New York Times CEO Mark Thompson on Wednesday called President Donald Trump’s attacks on journalists “hostile,” “stupid” and “dangerous.” “The president is entirely entitled to not like everything he reads in The New York Times, I get that,” said Thompson, who became president and CEO of The New York Times Company in 2012. The New York Times, the president’s hometown newspaper, has borne the brunt of those rhetorical attacks, as has CNN and The Washington Post. “We described the article to the g
New York Times CEO Mark Thompson calls Trump’s attacks on the press ‘stupid’ and ‘dangerous’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: tucker higgins, omar abbosh, paul nunes, larry downes, accenture executives, co-authors of, pivot to the future, discovering value, creating growth in a disrupted world
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stupid, mark, attacks, wrote, dangerous, post, press, ceo, trumps, times, trump, media, york, thompson, president, calls


New York Times CEO Mark Thompson calls Trump's attacks on the press 'stupid' and 'dangerous'

New York Times CEO Mark Thompson on Wednesday called President Donald Trump’s attacks on journalists “hostile,” “stupid” and “dangerous.”

Thompson’s comments at the CNBC Evolve forum Wednesday in New York came the day after Trump launched his 2020 reelection campaign at a raucous Orlando, Florida, rally in which he targeted the news media.

“The president is entirely entitled to not like everything he reads in The New York Times, I get that,” said Thompson, who became president and CEO of The New York Times Company in 2012. “He has every right to say he doesn’t like the way we cover him or cover anything else. So this is not saying we shouldn’t be criticized.”

“But actually isolating journalists, as a group, not just the Times, but the whole industry, is a really frankly hostile, stupid but also dangerous thing to do,” Thompson said.

Trump made attacks on the press a centerpiece of his 2016 campaign and has continued to criticize the media, as well as individual journalists, as president.

Those attacks have increased in frequency in recent weeks, with the president tweeting negatively about the media every day in June through Tuesday, marking the longest such stretch since he declared his candidacy for president, according to a tracker maintained by a consortium of news organizations and press freedom advocates.

On Wednesday, the president accused the “Fake News Media” of hurting him in the polls. A slew of recent surveys have shown the president trailing several top Democrats running to unseat him, including former vice president Joe Biden.

“If I didn’t have the Phony Witch Hunt going on for 3 years, and if the Fake News Media and their partner in Crime, the Democrats, would have played it straight, I would be way up in the Polls right now – with our Economy, winning by 20 points. But I’m winning anyway!” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter.

The New York Times, the president’s hometown newspaper, has borne the brunt of those rhetorical attacks, as has CNN and The Washington Post. Occasionally, those outlets have responded to the president’s remarks.

On Saturday, for instance, Trump tweeted that a story by the Times about the United States escalating its digital attacks on the Russian power grid was a “virtual act of Treason by a once great paper so desperate for a story, any story, even if bad for our Country.”

In response, the Times’ communications department wrote in a post on Twitter: “Accusing the press of treason is dangerous.”

“We described the article to the government before publication,” the Times wrote. “As our story notes, President Trump’s own national security officials said there were no concerns.”

The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

Shares of The New York Times Company have risen more than 200% since Trump was elected, far outperforming the broader market.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: tucker higgins, omar abbosh, paul nunes, larry downes, accenture executives, co-authors of, pivot to the future, discovering value, creating growth in a disrupted world
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stupid, mark, attacks, wrote, dangerous, post, press, ceo, trumps, times, trump, media, york, thompson, president, calls


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Trump is Wall Street’s favorite to win in 2020, but his reelection prospects look bad in state polls

Before that, statewide polls in North Carolina and Texas showed Biden ahead by 12 and four percentage points, respectively. Polls four years ago showed Trump way behind Hillary Clinton. That net-negative of 12 percentage points is 20 points worse than in January 2017. In Wisconsin, his net-disapproval stands at 13 percentage points – 19 points worse than the start of his term. Reagan’s net-disapproval was just two percentage points in mid-June 1983; Obama’s was six points in June 2011.


Before that, statewide polls in North Carolina and Texas showed Biden ahead by 12 and four percentage points, respectively. Polls four years ago showed Trump way behind Hillary Clinton. That net-negative of 12 percentage points is 20 points worse than in January 2017. In Wisconsin, his net-disapproval stands at 13 percentage points – 19 points worse than the start of his term. Reagan’s net-disapproval was just two percentage points in mid-June 1983; Obama’s was six points in June 2011.
Trump is Wall Street’s favorite to win in 2020, but his reelection prospects look bad in state polls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, win, prospects, trumps, polls, president, favorite, electoral, showed, reelection, streets, points, winning, states, approval, look, wall, percentage, trump


Trump is Wall Street's favorite to win in 2020, but his reelection prospects look bad in state polls

President Donald Trump waves as he boards Air Force One before departing from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on June 18, 2019.

Last week, a veteran Michigan pollster showed Trump trailing Biden by 11 points for that state’s 16 electoral votes. Before that, statewide polls in North Carolina and Texas showed Biden ahead by 12 and four percentage points, respectively.

A new Quinnipiac University poll of Florida showed the president trailing former Vice President Joe Biden by nine percentage points, 50%-41%, in their potential matchup for that state’s 29 electoral votes. Trump also trailed other possible Democratic nominees, including Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

But a look at state-by-state data clarifies the scale of Trump’s challenge. As the president tries to rally supporters at a 2020 kickoff rally in Orlando on Tuesday , he is fighting from behind.

Presidents who seek reelection usually win. So Las Vegas oddsmakers, despite President Donald Trump’s low-40s approval ratings , still rate him even money for another term. Wall Street expects him to win next year .

Trump carried all those states in 2016, and could do it again in 2020. Polls four years ago showed Trump way behind Hillary Clinton. Sixteen months of campaigning remain.

But the data show that Trump will have to climb out of the deep hole he has dug for himself in nearly two and one-half years in office. Americans know him much better than they did in 2015 – and not in a good way.

Despite a strong economy, this week’s NBC News/Wall Street Journal national survey shows that 62% of Americans report themselves uncomfortable or with reservations about a second Trump term; 52% called themselves “very uncomfortable.” A Fox News poll showed every major Democratic candidate ahead of Trump – Biden by 10 percentage points.

Of course, results in battleground states determine the Electoral College winner. That’s how Trump, while losing the popular vote to Clinton, reached the Oval Office in the first place.

Yet key battlegrounds have grown increasingly unhappy with him. This far from Election Day, with the Democratic nominee still unknown, the best measurement comes from his approval ratings in those places.

The polling firm Morning Consult continually measures state-level presidential approval. Its latest calculations show that Trump’s net approval has declined in all 50 of them.

That poses particular problems in the three battleground states where his narrow 2016 victories moved him past the 270 electoral votes needed to win: Michigan (16), Wisconsin (10) and Pennsylvania (20).

In Michigan, the firm shows Trump with approval of 42%, disapproval of 54%. That net-negative of 12 percentage points is 20 points worse than in January 2017.

In Wisconsin, his net-disapproval stands at 13 percentage points – 19 points worse than the start of his term. In Pennsylvania, he’s underwater by 7 points, an erosion of 17 points since the start of his presidency.

Indeed, Trump currently faces net-negative job approval rating in 27 states with 328 electoral votes. Add Florida, where he breaks even on job approval but trails in the Quinnipiac Poll, and the eventual Democratic nominee would hold a strong chance of winning 358 electoral votes.

At this point, there’s little reason to expect such a lopsided result. No Democrat can count on winning Arizona (where Trump’s net-disapproval is 6 percentage points), Ohio (-4 points), North Carolina (-4) or even Iowa (-12).

But winning will require Trump to make up ground across the electoral map at a time when signs point to slowing economic growth and, in personal terms, the public views him negatively.

Some of Trump’s predecessors have certainly won from behind. At similar points sixteen months before their reelection contests, Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama each struggled with 43% Gallup approval ratings and disapproval higher than that. Both ended up winning with more than 50% of the vote.

Voters held more favorable personal views of both, however. Reagan’s net-disapproval was just two percentage points in mid-June 1983; Obama’s was six points in June 2011.

Gallup’s most recent survey showed that just 40% of Americans approve of Trump’s job performance. A 55% majority disapprove.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, win, prospects, trumps, polls, president, favorite, electoral, showed, reelection, streets, points, winning, states, approval, look, wall, percentage, trump


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Pelosi doesn’t budge on impeachment after Trump’s ‘appalling’ claim he’d take 2020 campaign dirt from foreign powers

Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi speaks to the press on June 13, 2019, during her weekly press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. In an interview that aired in part Wednesday, Trump told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that he would accept information on his 2020 opponent if it was offered by foreign operatives and would not alert the FBI. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a major supporter of Trump’s, said his response to the question was “not the right answer … t


Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi speaks to the press on June 13, 2019, during her weekly press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. In an interview that aired in part Wednesday, Trump told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that he would accept information on his 2020 opponent if it was offered by foreign operatives and would not alert the FBI. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a major supporter of Trump’s, said his response to the question was “not the right answer … t
Pelosi doesn’t budge on impeachment after Trump’s ‘appalling’ claim he’d take 2020 campaign dirt from foreign powers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, powers, foreign, president, hed, pelosi, campaign, trumps, press, told, claim, trump, right, dirt, speaker, doesnt, impeachment


Pelosi doesn't budge on impeachment after Trump's 'appalling' claim he'd take 2020 campaign dirt from foreign powers

Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi speaks to the press on June 13, 2019, during her weekly press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., on Thursday repeatedly refused to say at what point she would support impeaching President Donald Trump, whose claim that he would possibly take foreign operatives’ dirt on a 2020 opponent was loudly condemned by her party a day earlier.

“Not any one issue is going to trigger, ‘Oh, now we’ll go do this,'” Pelosi told reporters when asked whether Trump’s remarks were enough to push the top House Democrat — who has strongly resisted an impeachment fight — over the edge.

In an interview that aired in part Wednesday, Trump told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that he would accept information on his 2020 opponent if it was offered by foreign operatives and would not alert the FBI.

“It’s not an interference. They have information. I think I’d take it,” Trump said.

The comments from a sitting president were immediately met with an outcry from Democrats and political organizations, as well as some Republicans.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a major supporter of Trump’s, said his response to the question was “not the right answer … the right answer is ‘no.'”

“Everybody in the country should be totally appalled by what the president said,” Pelosi said when asked if Trump inviting foreign help in an election was grounds for impeachment. “But he has a habit of making appalling statements,” she added.

Even if Trump was found to have accepted a foreign government’s help in the election, Pelosi avoided making any commitment to launching impeachment proceedings.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, powers, foreign, president, hed, pelosi, campaign, trumps, press, told, claim, trump, right, dirt, speaker, doesnt, impeachment


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Dow futures slightly higher despite Trump’s warning on China tariffs

U.S. stock index futures were slightly higher Tuesday morning despite comments from President Donald Trump on trade war with China. ET, Dow futures rose 45 points, indicating a positive open of more than 59 points. Futures of S&P and Nasdaq were also seen slightly higher. President Donald Trump told CNBC on Monday that if Chinese President Xi Jinping does not attend the G-20 meeting later this month, there will be additional duties on Chinese goods. This would take effect immediately.


U.S. stock index futures were slightly higher Tuesday morning despite comments from President Donald Trump on trade war with China. ET, Dow futures rose 45 points, indicating a positive open of more than 59 points. Futures of S&P and Nasdaq were also seen slightly higher. President Donald Trump told CNBC on Monday that if Chinese President Xi Jinping does not attend the G-20 meeting later this month, there will be additional duties on Chinese goods. This would take effect immediately.
Dow futures slightly higher despite Trump’s warning on China tariffs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, futures, donald, trumps, trump, chinese, china, xi, warning, war, higher, points, dow, despite, slightly, president, tariffs, trade


Dow futures slightly higher despite Trump's warning on China tariffs

U.S. stock index futures were slightly higher Tuesday morning despite comments from President Donald Trump on trade war with China.

At around 01:36 a.m. ET, Dow futures rose 45 points, indicating a positive open of more than 59 points. Futures of S&P and Nasdaq were also seen slightly higher.

President Donald Trump told CNBC on Monday that if Chinese President Xi Jinping does not attend the G-20 meeting later this month, there will be additional duties on Chinese goods. This would take effect immediately.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, futures, donald, trumps, trump, chinese, china, xi, warning, war, higher, points, dow, despite, slightly, president, tariffs, trade


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2020 Democrats embrace a $15 US minimum wage as they target Trump’s economy

Buoyed by activists who helped to push seven states to enact $15 wage floors, Democratic candidates have tossed aside caution about a sweeping nationwide minimum wage hike. State wages spike as U.S. minimum is stagnantThe last federal minimum wage hike took effect roughly a decade ago in July 2009. President Barack Obama first proposed a $9 per hour federal minimum wage in his 2013 State of the Union. By the time he launched his 2020 presidential campaign in late April, Biden argued “it’s way pa


Buoyed by activists who helped to push seven states to enact $15 wage floors, Democratic candidates have tossed aside caution about a sweeping nationwide minimum wage hike. State wages spike as U.S. minimum is stagnantThe last federal minimum wage hike took effect roughly a decade ago in July 2009. President Barack Obama first proposed a $9 per hour federal minimum wage in his 2013 State of the Union. By the time he launched his 2020 presidential campaign in late April, Biden argued “it’s way pa
2020 Democrats embrace a $15 US minimum wage as they target Trump’s economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-09  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, embrace, sanders, floor, democrats, pay, states, hour, 15, target, minimum, economy, trumps, federal, wages, 2020, wage


2020 Democrats embrace a $15 US minimum wage as they target Trump's economy

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during a rally in front of the Capitol April 26, 2017 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong | Getty Images

A 2016 debate question about Hillary Clinton’s support for a $15 per hour minimum wage sparked a spat between the former secretary of State and Sen. Bernie Sanders. “If you’re both screaming at each other, the viewers won’t be able to hear either of you,” CNN moderator Wolf Blitzer said after Sanders repeatedly jumped in to dispute how Clinton described her stance. Clinton had backed only a $12 per hour federal minimum wage, though the former senator from New York noted that she “supported the fight for $15” at the state and local level in high-cost areas. Sanders had a different goal: “$15 in minimum wage in 50 states in this country as soon as possible.” Only three years later, disagreements over hiking the $7.25 per hour U.S. wage floor have all but vanished in the 2020 Democratic primary. All of the leading contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination — from self-proclaimed democratic socialist Sanders to the more centrist former Vice President Joe Biden — have backed a $15 per hour federal minimum wage. Buoyed by activists who helped to push seven states to enact $15 wage floors, Democratic candidates have tossed aside caution about a sweeping nationwide minimum wage hike. As they vie with President Donald Trump for support from working-class voters, the party hopes a more direct action to boost pay will be more appealing than Trump’s approach: leaving minimum wage decisions to states and hoping economic growth will cause pay increases. In a race that will test whether a strong economy can save a president with a poor approval rating, Democrats see raising the pay floor as one way they can cast themselves as a better alternative to fatten workers’ wallets. Raising the minimum wage “speaks so clearly and directly to trying to resolve that problem, it is going to resonate even to folks who are going to be conservative on other issues,” said David Cooper, a senior economic analyst at the Economic Policy Institute, a left-leaning think tank that studies how policy affects low and middle-income people. A White House spokesman did not immediately respond to questions about the president’s stance on the U.S. minimum wage. But Trump has previously argued the federal government should let states decide the wage floor. Democrats will have to counter the narrative the Trump campaign has already tried to enforce: That the tax cuts and regulatory relief he championed have boosted economic growth and wages — without an increase in the federal pay floor. “Wages are rising at the fastest pace in decades and growing for blue collar workers, who I promised to fight for, they’re growing faster than anyone else thought possible,” Trump said during his State of the Union address in February. (Though wage growth adjusted for inflation picked up earlier this year, Trump’s claim that it was the highest in decades is unfounded, according to the Associated Press).

State wages spike as U.S. minimum is stagnant

The last federal minimum wage hike took effect roughly a decade ago in July 2009. Proponents of raising the pay floor to $15 an hour argue in part that paychecks have “barely budged” and that workers everywhere — “not just on the coasts” — need it to survive, said Paul Sonn, director of the National Employment Law Project Action Fund. But opponents worry $15 is too drastic an increase in parts of the country and would force employers to slash positions and hours. Cities and states, spurred in part by labor activists led by the Fight for $15 group, have changed the narrative on minimum wage hikes in recent years. Twenty-nine states and Washington D.C. have pay floors higher than $7.25 per hour. This year alone, New Jersey, Illinois, Maryland and Connecticut passed bills to gradually raise their minimum wages to $15 per hour, joining New York, California, Massachusetts and D.C. Experts on the minimum wage say the flurry of hikes at the state and local level helped to make a $15 per hour minimum wage more palatable for candidates beyond the liberals in Sanders’ mold. The views of Biden and the Obama administration largely reflect the mainstream Democratic thinking on the minimum wage in recent years. President Barack Obama first proposed a $9 per hour federal minimum wage in his 2013 State of the Union. His administration then backed congressional Democrats’ bill to raise the pay floor to $10.10 later that year. By 2015, the White House supported a Democratic proposal for a $12 minimum wage. In September 2015, Biden joined New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo as he made the case for a statewide $15 per hour minimum wage. By the time he launched his 2020 presidential campaign in late April, Biden argued “it’s way past time we make a $15 minimum wage the law of the land.” In the absence of federal action, activists have also pushed massive employers to hike their pay. Amazon and Target, for example, have taken steps to increase their minimum wages to $15 per hour. Amid pressure from Sanders — who appeared at Walmart’s annual meeting Wednesday and accused the retailer of paying “starvation wages” — Walmart CEO Doug McMillon called on Congress to hike the federal minimum wage, which he called “too low.”

Congress now sits closer to a minimum wage hike than it has in years. The Democratic-held House could vote as soon as this month on a bill that would gradually increase the U.S. pay floor to $15 per hour. Party leaders have to overcome skepticism within their own caucus first. Thirteen Democrats led by Rep. Terri Sewell of Alabama introduced a bill in April to set varied minimum wages based on regional cost of living, which would increase to $15 per hour at different paces. “The PHASE-in $15 Wage Act establishes a regional minimum wage structure that provides all minimum wage workers with a much-needed raise while protecting jobs, giving every community the flexibility to grow their economy and taking into account that the cost of living in Selma, Alabama, is very different than New York City,” Sewell said in a statement introducing the legislation. Even if Democrats can get a minimum wage hike through the House, any legislation will face a tough path to approval in the GOP-held Senate.

Wage hikes and the economy

The concerns Sewell and some Democrats have about a blanket $15 per hour minimum wage are common ones. Critics worry businesses in some areas that currently have relatively low pay or cost of living will struggle to take on the costs from the pay increases. A $15 wage “would be incredibly disruptive” in parts of the country, said Michael Strain, director of economic policy studies at the right-leaning American Enterprise Institute. So just how have the recent minimum wage increases affected workers and the economy?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-09  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, embrace, sanders, floor, democrats, pay, states, hour, 15, target, minimum, economy, trumps, federal, wages, 2020, wage


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Trump’s hard-line approach to Iran is a ‘strategic mistake,’ former US energy secretary says

The increasingly hard-line approach toward Iran taken by U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration is a “strategic mistake,” a former U.S. Energy Secretary said Thursday. At the Ecosperity Conference in Singapore, Ernest J. Moniz — who is currently the CEO of non-profit firms Energy Futures Initiative and Nuclear Threat Initiative — said Washington’s hardening approach risks provoking Iran not to comply with the 2015 nuclear agreement. Moniz, who was energy secretary from May 2013 to January


The increasingly hard-line approach toward Iran taken by U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration is a “strategic mistake,” a former U.S. Energy Secretary said Thursday. At the Ecosperity Conference in Singapore, Ernest J. Moniz — who is currently the CEO of non-profit firms Energy Futures Initiative and Nuclear Threat Initiative — said Washington’s hardening approach risks provoking Iran not to comply with the 2015 nuclear agreement. Moniz, who was energy secretary from May 2013 to January
Trump’s hard-line approach to Iran is a ‘strategic mistake,’ former US energy secretary says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, approach, energy, strategic, increasingly, initiative, washingtons, nuclear, washington, president, secretary, mistake, hardline, iran


Trump's hard-line approach to Iran is a 'strategic mistake,' former US energy secretary says

The increasingly hard-line approach toward Iran taken by U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration is a “strategic mistake,” a former U.S. Energy Secretary said Thursday.

At the Ecosperity Conference in Singapore, Ernest J. Moniz — who is currently the CEO of non-profit firms Energy Futures Initiative and Nuclear Threat Initiative — said Washington’s hardening approach risks provoking Iran not to comply with the 2015 nuclear agreement.

Moniz, who was energy secretary from May 2013 to January 2017 under former President Barack Obama, said he believed Iran was still adhering to the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). But he warned that the nuclear power could change its mind “within a month or so.”

Moniz’s comments came on the back of an increasingly provocative rhetoric between Washington and Tehran.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, approach, energy, strategic, increasingly, initiative, washingtons, nuclear, washington, president, secretary, mistake, hardline, iran


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Trump’s blacklisting of Huawei is hurting American chip firms

Components are displayed on a circuit board at the Qualcomm Inc. booth at the Mobile World Congress Shanghai in Shanghai, China, on Thursday, June 28, 2018. U.S. semiconductor stocks have been hit hard in the past month following President Donald Trump’s administration’s blacklisting of Huawei, which has raised the specter of wider restrictions to Chinese firms’ access to American technology. Semiconductors are one of America’s biggest tech exports and China is a crucial market because of the am


Components are displayed on a circuit board at the Qualcomm Inc. booth at the Mobile World Congress Shanghai in Shanghai, China, on Thursday, June 28, 2018. U.S. semiconductor stocks have been hit hard in the past month following President Donald Trump’s administration’s blacklisting of Huawei, which has raised the specter of wider restrictions to Chinese firms’ access to American technology. Semiconductors are one of America’s biggest tech exports and China is a crucial market because of the am
Trump’s blacklisting of Huawei is hurting American chip firms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, firms, blacklisting, shanghai, hit, american, trumps, china, month, world, hurting, huawei, permission, chip


Trump's blacklisting of Huawei is hurting American chip firms

Components are displayed on a circuit board at the Qualcomm Inc. booth at the Mobile World Congress Shanghai in Shanghai, China, on Thursday, June 28, 2018.

U.S. semiconductor stocks have been hit hard in the past month following President Donald Trump’s administration’s blacklisting of Huawei, which has raised the specter of wider restrictions to Chinese firms’ access to American technology.

Semiconductors are one of America’s biggest tech exports and China is a crucial market because of the amount of electronics manufacturers relying on U.S. chips.

Trump signed an executive order last month that gave permission to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to block transactions that involve information or communications technology that “poses an unacceptable risk” to U.S. national security. Huawei was then put on a blacklist that requires American firms to get permission to sell to the Chinese networking equipment and smartphone giant.

The move has hit the businesses and share prices of U.S. chip firms.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, firms, blacklisting, shanghai, hit, american, trumps, china, month, world, hurting, huawei, permission, chip


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Trump’s Mexico tariff threat worries US farmers already pummeled by China trade war

Daniel Acker | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump’s threatened 5% tariff on all Mexican imports could hit American farmers especially hard if Mexico retaliates with punitive duties on U.S. agricultural products. Farmers are already reeling from Trump’s drawn out trade war with China and fear further losses could be in their futures. Even so, that hasn’t stopped other countries from chipping away at American agricultural dominance when it comes to supplying its neighbor to the south w


Daniel Acker | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump’s threatened 5% tariff on all Mexican imports could hit American farmers especially hard if Mexico retaliates with punitive duties on U.S. agricultural products. Farmers are already reeling from Trump’s drawn out trade war with China and fear further losses could be in their futures. Even so, that hasn’t stopped other countries from chipping away at American agricultural dominance when it comes to supplying its neighbor to the south w
Trump’s Mexico tariff threat worries US farmers already pummeled by China trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mexico, worries, products, mexican, threat, trumps, farm, tariffs, china, agricultural, pummeled, farmers, american, trade, war, tariff, goods


Trump's Mexico tariff threat worries US farmers already pummeled by China trade war

A farmer fills seed boxes on a Case IH Agricultural Equipment planter while planting corn in Princeton, Illinois, April 24, 2018. Daniel Acker | Bloomberg | Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s threatened 5% tariff on all Mexican imports could hit American farmers especially hard if Mexico retaliates with punitive duties on U.S. agricultural products. Farmers are already reeling from Trump’s drawn out trade war with China and fear further losses could be in their futures. “When you look at all the different products that the U.S. exports to Mexico, all those folks are getting nervous that retaliatory tariffs could certainly find their way onto their products,” said Veronica Nigh, an economist with the American Farm Bureau Federation, the nation’s largest farm sector organization. Mexico is considered one of the most lucrative markets for American agriculture products given its easy access and close proximity to the U.S, whether via rail, ship or truck. Even so, that hasn’t stopped other countries from chipping away at American agricultural dominance when it comes to supplying its neighbor to the south with grains, meats and other farm products. The U.S. exported $19 billion in agricultural exports to Mexico last year, making it the second-largest purchaser after Canada, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Mexico is the top market for U.S. corn, rice, dairy products, poultry, eggs, pecans and also a major buyer of American beef, pork, soybeans and wheat.

Farmer walks through his soy fields in Harvard, Illinois. Nova Safo | AFP | Getty Images

Frustrated with Central American migration, the White House last Thursday announced the U.S. plans to slap 5% tariffs on Mexican goods, including cars, beer, tequila, as well as fruits and vegetables. The duties would start June 10 and gradually increase to 25% on Oct. 1 unless Mexico “substantially stops the illegal inflow of aliens coming through its territory.” “If you put a tariff on imported goods, usually that price gets passed to consumers,” said Luis Ribera, an agricultural economist at Texas A&M University. “And you can expect that Mexico will retaliate one way or another.” Mexican officials in Washington this week as part of a diplomatic push to avert new tariffs are warning the levies won’t stop the flow of migrants. Talks between U.S. and Mexican officials on Wednesday failed to produce a deal, a senior administration official told NBC News. Trump slapped tariffs last year on imported steel and aluminum, resulting in Mexico imposing levies on $3 billion of U.S. goods, including a variety of agricultural products. The U.S. last month lifted metals tariffs against Mexico and Canada as part of a push to get ratification of the pending United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. However, Trump’s threat to impose new tariffs against Mexico over immigration puts USMCA in jeopardy and raises the risk of additional financial fallout for American farmers already hurting from the escalating trade war with China. The new USMCA is designed to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, a 25-year-old pact between the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

“Amid a perfect storm of challenges in farm country, we cannot afford the uncertainty this action would bring.” Lynn Chrisp president, National Corn Growers Associatiop


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mexico, worries, products, mexican, threat, trumps, farm, tariffs, china, agricultural, pummeled, farmers, american, trade, war, tariff, goods


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Stanley Druckenmiller sold everything and bought Treasurys after Trump’s tweet threatening China

Stanley Druckenmiller, a billionaire hedge fund manager with a long track record of beating the market, said Monday that he sold nearly all of his investments and piled into Treasurys following President Donald Trump’s May tweet that escalated the U.S.-China trade dispute. “When the Trump tweet went out, I went from 93% invested to net flat and bought a bunch of Treasurys,” Druckenmiller said. Stocks have been hit and yields have dropped since Trump’s May 5th tweet escalated the trade battle wit


Stanley Druckenmiller, a billionaire hedge fund manager with a long track record of beating the market, said Monday that he sold nearly all of his investments and piled into Treasurys following President Donald Trump’s May tweet that escalated the U.S.-China trade dispute. “When the Trump tweet went out, I went from 93% invested to net flat and bought a bunch of Treasurys,” Druckenmiller said. Stocks have been hit and yields have dropped since Trump’s May 5th tweet escalated the trade battle wit
Stanley Druckenmiller sold everything and bought Treasurys after Trump’s tweet threatening China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threatening, trade, escalated, yields, uschina, stanley, druckenmiller, bought, went, president, china, york, trumps, treasurys, sold


Stanley Druckenmiller sold everything and bought Treasurys after Trump's tweet threatening China

Stanley Druckenmiller, a billionaire hedge fund manager with a long track record of beating the market, said Monday that he sold nearly all of his investments and piled into Treasurys following President Donald Trump’s May tweet that escalated the U.S.-China trade dispute.

“When the Trump tweet went out, I went from 93% invested to net flat and bought a bunch of Treasurys,” Druckenmiller said. “Not because I’m trying to make money, I just I don’t want to play in this environment.”

Stocks have been hit and yields have dropped since Trump’s May 5th tweet escalated the trade battle with China. The S&P 500 is down more than 6.5% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average has lost more than 1,600 points.

Druckenmiller, who was interviewed by Key Square Capital Management founder Scott Bessent at The Economic Club of New York, said that he’s concerned Trump’s aggressive trade policies may have damaged the U.S. economy and believes the president will be beat by Democrat opponents in 2020.

“I did not expect the lovely tweet that interrupted my golf game on Sunday afternoon about a month ago,” he joked.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threatening, trade, escalated, yields, uschina, stanley, druckenmiller, bought, went, president, china, york, trumps, treasurys, sold


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Farmer sentiment hits its lowest level since before Trump’s election as the China trade war drags on

Farmer sentiment plunged in May to its lowest level in nearly three years as the trade war with China escalated and concerns about economic conditions grew, according to a survey released Tuesday. Corn and soybean planting paces are the slowest on record since the mid-1990s, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Soybean farmers have been among the hardest hit in the China trade war in terms of dollar value. Before the trade war, China bought roughly half of the U.S. soybean exports. B


Farmer sentiment plunged in May to its lowest level in nearly three years as the trade war with China escalated and concerns about economic conditions grew, according to a survey released Tuesday. Corn and soybean planting paces are the slowest on record since the mid-1990s, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Soybean farmers have been among the hardest hit in the China trade war in terms of dollar value. Before the trade war, China bought roughly half of the U.S. soybean exports. B
Farmer sentiment hits its lowest level since before Trump’s election as the China trade war drags on Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lowest, agricultural, farmer, soybean, mintert, level, sentiment, hits, planting, economy, war, trumps, producers, drags, election, survey, trade, china


Farmer sentiment hits its lowest level since before Trump's election as the China trade war drags on

“Ag producers are telling us the agricultural economy weakened considerably this spring as the barometer has fallen 42 points (29%) since the start of this year,” said James Mintert, director of Purdue’s Center for Commercial Agriculture and the barometer’s principal investigator.

May’s Purdue University/CME Group Ag Economy Barometer declined 14 points from the prior month to a reading of 101, which is the lowest point since October 2016. It said the sentiment index is now at levels that have erased all gains recorded following President Donald Trump ‘s election.

Farmer sentiment plunged in May to its lowest level in nearly three years as the trade war with China escalated and concerns about economic conditions grew, according to a survey released Tuesday.

Farmers have been facing one of the wettest spring seasons in decades as a result of heavy rains and flooding in large sections of the Midwest and Eastern Plains region. Corn and soybean planting paces are the slowest on record since the mid-1990s, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The later planting means the crops are considered more susceptible to risk of injury and lower yields from summer heat and early fall frost damage. Also, some producers may switch to shorter season varieties of corn and soybeans, but that also comes at the risk of lower-yielding crops.

“Farmers are facing tough decisions in the midst of a wet planting season and a lot of uncertainty surrounding trade discussions,” Mintert said.

Soybean farmers have been among the hardest hit in the China trade war in terms of dollar value. Last year, China put retaliatory tariffs in place on a variety of U.S. agricultural and food products, from soybeans, corn and wheat to dairy and certain meat products.

Before the trade war, China bought roughly half of the U.S. soybean exports. But the value of soybean exports to China fell 74% to $3.1 billion in 2018 from about $12.2 billion the previous year, according to the USDA.

In addition, the U.S.-China trade fight has affected the Chinese buying of two corn-based products, U.S. dried distillers grains and ethanol.

On Monday, the Trump administration issued a statement accusing China of pursuing a “blame game” and “misrepresenting the nature and history of trade negotiations between the two countries.” It followed Beijing officials on Sunday accusing the U.S. of being responsible for the lack of progress in talks.

The Purdue ag barometer, a monthly survey of the health of the U.S. farm economy, is based on a poll of 400 U.S. agricultural products.

The May survey found only 20% of the respondents expected the trade dispute with China to be resolved by July 1. By comparison, 28% of those asked in April expected the resolution of the trade war by July 1 and 45% of those asked in March, when the question was first posed.

Even so, 65% of farmers polled in May remained confident the trade dispute will have a positive impact for American agriculture. That number stood at 77% in March and 71% in April.

“At this time, a majority of producers still expect a favorable outcome for agriculture to the trade dispute,” Mintert said. “But that majority appears to be shrinking.”

WATCH: Flooding disrupts midwest agricultural supply chain


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lowest, agricultural, farmer, soybean, mintert, level, sentiment, hits, planting, economy, war, trumps, producers, drags, election, survey, trade, china


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