Cramer: ‘I don’t trust this market at all’ because it’s so dependent on Trump tweets

“I don’t trust this market at all,” Cramer warned on “Squawk on the Street” as stock futures pointed to a higher Wall Street open, which in fact came to pass through the morning. Cramer said he was troubled by Trump’s barrage of tweets Tuesday, calling them “a little erratic,” including the one about the Federal Reserve. Trump is “really disturbing the zeitgeist of the stock market,” Cramer said. However, in light of the uncertainty around Trump’s new tweets, Cramer on Tuesday advised investors


“I don’t trust this market at all,” Cramer warned on “Squawk on the Street” as stock futures pointed to a higher Wall Street open, which in fact came to pass through the morning. Cramer said he was troubled by Trump’s barrage of tweets Tuesday, calling them “a little erratic,” including the one about the Federal Reserve. Trump is “really disturbing the zeitgeist of the stock market,” Cramer said. However, in light of the uncertainty around Trump’s new tweets, Cramer on Tuesday advised investors
Cramer: ‘I don’t trust this market at all’ because it’s so dependent on Trump tweets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, stock, worth, sp, trump, trust, dependent, wall, tweets, cramer, street, dont, market, 500


Cramer: 'I don't trust this market at all' because it's so dependent on Trump tweets

CNBC’s Jim Cramer voiced concern about the staying power of the stock market’s bounce Tuesday following President Donald Trump’s latest tweetstorm on China trade and Monday’s sharp decline.

“I don’t trust this market at all,” Cramer warned on “Squawk on the Street” as stock futures pointed to a higher Wall Street open, which in fact came to pass through the morning. “[Trump] has made it so we got to wait to be able to buy.”

Cramer said he was troubled by Trump’s barrage of tweets Tuesday, calling them “a little erratic,” including the one about the Federal Reserve.

Trump is “really disturbing the zeitgeist of the stock market,” Cramer said. “He should knock the tweets off if he wants the Dow to start going up, at least today.”

On “Mad Money” on Monday evening — after the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 each lost about 2.4% on China’s tariff response to last week’s U.S. hike — Cramer said Wall Street is nearly oversold and investors should get ready to load up on names that can withstand higher tariffs.

However, in light of the uncertainty around Trump’s new tweets, Cramer on Tuesday advised investors to let things shake out, saying there may be a buying opportunity in stocks later in the session.

In late morning trading, the S&P 500 was making up about half of Monday’s losses, which had sent the index down for a total of nearly 5% from its May 1 intraday all-time high. So far in 2019, the S&P 500 has gained about 13% — and since the crushing Christmas Eve 2018 low, the index has soared more than 20%.

On Monday, China said it will raise tariffs, some to as high as 25%, on $60 billion in U.S. goods, in retaliation for the Trump administration’s decision last week to increase duties on $200 billion worth of Chinese products from 10% to 25%.

Meanwhile, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative is taking steps to prepare to slap tariffs on the remaining billions and billions of dollars worth of Chinese goods coming into the U.S.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, stock, worth, sp, trump, trust, dependent, wall, tweets, cramer, street, dont, market, 500


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Prince Charles opened a royal bed and breakfast that’s just $200 a night — take a look

On the same day Prince Harry and Meghan Markle welcomed their baby boy, new grandpa Prince Charles opened a bed and breakfast in Scotland — and rooms start at just 160 pounds a night, or about $208. The Granary Lodge, a luxury bed and breakfast formally announced by Prince Charles on May 1 and accepting guests as of Monday, is on the grounds of The Castle of Mey in Caithness, the former retreat and residence for Prince Charles’ grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, who owned the property between 1952 an


On the same day Prince Harry and Meghan Markle welcomed their baby boy, new grandpa Prince Charles opened a bed and breakfast in Scotland — and rooms start at just 160 pounds a night, or about $208. The Granary Lodge, a luxury bed and breakfast formally announced by Prince Charles on May 1 and accepting guests as of Monday, is on the grounds of The Castle of Mey in Caithness, the former retreat and residence for Prince Charles’ grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, who owned the property between 1952 an
Prince Charles opened a royal bed and breakfast that’s just $200 a night — take a look Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: jimmy im, andrew milligan, getty images, the granary lodge, john baikie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, look, 200, elizabeth, opened, charles, prince, thats, queen, mey, welcomed, night, royal, bed, castle, breakfast, trust


Prince Charles opened a royal bed and breakfast that's just $200 a night — take a look

On the same day Prince Harry and Meghan Markle welcomed their baby boy, new grandpa Prince Charles opened a bed and breakfast in Scotland — and rooms start at just 160 pounds a night, or about $208.

The Granary Lodge, a luxury bed and breakfast formally announced by Prince Charles on May 1 and accepting guests as of Monday, is on the grounds of The Castle of Mey in Caithness, the former retreat and residence for Prince Charles’ grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, who owned the property between 1952 and 1996, according to a representative for The Queen Elizabeth Castle of Mey Trust.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: jimmy im, andrew milligan, getty images, the granary lodge, john baikie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, look, 200, elizabeth, opened, charles, prince, thats, queen, mey, welcomed, night, royal, bed, castle, breakfast, trust


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Cramer: Apple proves that once it hooks customers into its ecosystem they spend, spend, spend

Apple’s better-than-expected earnings prove that the tech giant has successfully transitioned from being known mainly as an iPhone maker to being a services business as well, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Wednesday. “A lot of people gave up on the stock because they just viewed it as a handset company,” said Cramer, whose charitable trust owns shares of Apple. “Obviously what’s happened in the last 18 months … is it’s become much more of a subscription stock,” he added on “Squawk on the Street.” “Onc


Apple’s better-than-expected earnings prove that the tech giant has successfully transitioned from being known mainly as an iPhone maker to being a services business as well, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Wednesday. “A lot of people gave up on the stock because they just viewed it as a handset company,” said Cramer, whose charitable trust owns shares of Apple. “Obviously what’s happened in the last 18 months … is it’s become much more of a subscription stock,” he added on “Squawk on the Street.” “Onc
Cramer: Apple proves that once it hooks customers into its ecosystem they spend, spend, spend Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, hooks, stock, tech, spends, spend, whats, trust, ecosystem, person, wednesdaya, customers, cramer, transitioned, proves, viewed


Cramer: Apple proves that once it hooks customers into its ecosystem they spend, spend, spend

Apple’s better-than-expected earnings prove that the tech giant has successfully transitioned from being known mainly as an iPhone maker to being a services business as well, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Wednesday.

“A lot of people gave up on the stock because they just viewed it as a handset company,” said Cramer, whose charitable trust owns shares of Apple.

“Obviously what’s happened in the last 18 months … is it’s become much more of a subscription stock,” he added on “Squawk on the Street.” “Once you get a person in the Apple ecosystem, that person just spends, spends, spends.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, hooks, stock, tech, spends, spend, whats, trust, ecosystem, person, wednesdaya, customers, cramer, transitioned, proves, viewed


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It’s not ‘unreasonable’ for businesses to create and use their own cryptocurrencies, expert says

The possibility that multinational firms may create and transact in their own cryptocurrencies is not “unreasonable” in the medium term, according to one blockchain expert. “Within three hours, we could have it up and running, and when we transact with people, we could request that we do it using that particular coin.” The question that remains is: “Will people trust that coin?” “They will trust it if they trust your brand and if they trust your product,” Brown told CNBC’s Martin Soong on Tuesda


The possibility that multinational firms may create and transact in their own cryptocurrencies is not “unreasonable” in the medium term, according to one blockchain expert. “Within three hours, we could have it up and running, and when we transact with people, we could request that we do it using that particular coin.” The question that remains is: “Will people trust that coin?” “They will trust it if they trust your brand and if they trust your product,” Brown told CNBC’s Martin Soong on Tuesda
It’s not ‘unreasonable’ for businesses to create and use their own cryptocurrencies, expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, request, businesses, brown, know, multinational, transact, create, expert, prepaid, unreasonable, firms, cryptocurrencies, product, credit, trust


It's not 'unreasonable' for businesses to create and use their own cryptocurrencies, expert says

The possibility that multinational firms may create and transact in their own cryptocurrencies is not “unreasonable” in the medium term, according to one blockchain expert.

“What we’re seeing really is the democratization of money so you know, if you and I wanted to, we could create a CNBC coin,” said Gavin Brown, co-founder and director at venture capital firm, Blockchain Capital, at the Credit Suisse Global Supertrends Conference in Singapore. “Within three hours, we could have it up and running, and when we transact with people, we could request that we do it using that particular coin.”

The question that remains is: “Will people trust that coin?”

“They will trust it if they trust your brand and if they trust your product,” Brown told CNBC’s Martin Soong on Tuesday.

To illustrate his point, Brown used the example of Starbucks prepaid cards.

“They’ve got, you know, over a billion dollars of assets worth on their balance sheet of people who prepaid coffee on their charge cards in advance and that’s because they trust the brand, they like the product and they’re confident it will be there,” said Brown, who is also a lecturer in Financial Economics at the Manchester Metropolitan University.

In an era where companies such as McDonald’s have a higher credit rating than countries such as Ireland, he said, the notion that multinational firms may issue their own currencies and request that their customers purchase with them is “not that outlandish.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, request, businesses, brown, know, multinational, transact, create, expert, prepaid, unreasonable, firms, cryptocurrencies, product, credit, trust


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It’s not ‘unreasonable’ for businesses to create and use their own cryptocurrencies, expert says

The possibility that multinational firms may create and transact in their own cryptocurrencies is not “unreasonable” in the medium term, according to one blockchain expert. “Within three hours, we could have it up and running, and when we transact with people, we could request that we do it using that particular coin.” The question that remains is: “Will people trust that coin?” “They will trust it if they trust your brand and if they trust your product,” Brown told CNBC’s Martin Soong on Tuesda


The possibility that multinational firms may create and transact in their own cryptocurrencies is not “unreasonable” in the medium term, according to one blockchain expert. “Within three hours, we could have it up and running, and when we transact with people, we could request that we do it using that particular coin.” The question that remains is: “Will people trust that coin?” “They will trust it if they trust your brand and if they trust your product,” Brown told CNBC’s Martin Soong on Tuesda
It’s not ‘unreasonable’ for businesses to create and use their own cryptocurrencies, expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, request, businesses, brown, know, multinational, transact, create, expert, prepaid, unreasonable, firms, cryptocurrencies, product, credit, trust


It's not 'unreasonable' for businesses to create and use their own cryptocurrencies, expert says

The possibility that multinational firms may create and transact in their own cryptocurrencies is not “unreasonable” in the medium term, according to one blockchain expert.

“What we’re seeing really is the democratization of money so you know, if you and I wanted to, we could create a CNBC coin,” said Gavin Brown, co-founder and director at venture capital firm, Blockchain Capital, at the Credit Suisse Global Supertrends Conference in Singapore. “Within three hours, we could have it up and running, and when we transact with people, we could request that we do it using that particular coin.”

The question that remains is: “Will people trust that coin?”

“They will trust it if they trust your brand and if they trust your product,” Brown told CNBC’s Martin Soong on Tuesday.

To illustrate his point, Brown used the example of Starbucks prepaid cards.

“They’ve got, you know, over a billion dollars of assets worth on their balance sheet of people who prepaid coffee on their charge cards in advance and that’s because they trust the brand, they like the product and they’re confident it will be there,” said Brown, who is also a lecturer in Financial Economics at the Manchester Metropolitan University.

In an era where companies such as McDonald’s have a higher credit rating than countries such as Ireland, he said, the notion that multinational firms may issue their own currencies and request that their customers purchase with them is “not that outlandish.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, request, businesses, brown, know, multinational, transact, create, expert, prepaid, unreasonable, firms, cryptocurrencies, product, credit, trust


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Facebook’s evolving public response one year post-Zuckerberg testimony

A year later, Zuckerberg has laid out his own answer to that question before lawmakers could beat him to the punch. Facebook’s evolving response to regulators, lawmakers, users and advertisers in the year since Zuckerberg’s two-day testimony on Capitol Hill underscores the crisis of trust executives have tried to navigate while maintaining control of the business. The New York Times characterized Facebook’s initial approach to the onslaught of PR faux pas as “Delay, Deny and Deflect.” Over the p


A year later, Zuckerberg has laid out his own answer to that question before lawmakers could beat him to the punch. Facebook’s evolving response to regulators, lawmakers, users and advertisers in the year since Zuckerberg’s two-day testimony on Capitol Hill underscores the crisis of trust executives have tried to navigate while maintaining control of the business. The New York Times characterized Facebook’s initial approach to the onslaught of PR faux pas as “Delay, Deny and Deflect.” Over the p
Facebook’s evolving public response one year post-Zuckerberg testimony Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, lawmakers, advertisers, trust, stock, data, evolving, zuckerberg, postzuckerberg, testimony, response, facebooks, ways, facebook, public


Facebook's evolving public response one year post-Zuckerberg testimony

One year ago, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told Capitol Hill lawmakers grilling him over the company’s personal data fumbles that he believed regulation was “inevitable.”

“I think the real question, as the internet becomes more important in people’s lives, is what is the right regulation, not whether there should be or not,” Zuckerberg said at the time.

A year later, Zuckerberg has laid out his own answer to that question before lawmakers could beat him to the punch. On March 30, he published a call for governments to regulate the internet in ways that will limit harmful content, protect privacy, maintain the integrity of elections and ensure data portability.

Facebook’s evolving response to regulators, lawmakers, users and advertisers in the year since Zuckerberg’s two-day testimony on Capitol Hill underscores the crisis of trust executives have tried to navigate while maintaining control of the business. The New York Times characterized Facebook’s initial approach to the onslaught of PR faux pas as “Delay, Deny and Deflect.” Now, Facebook seems to favor getting out in front of news reports of data breaches or regulatory proposals to set the narrative boundaries itself.

By and large, while potentially hefty fines loom from the Federal Trade Commission and from regulators abroad, Facebook has proven it’s still able to keep users and advertisers on its platforms, if not win back their trust entirely. Over the past 12 months, Facebook’s stock has rallied about 11% as investors have gained back confidence on the heels of the company’s strong Q4 2018 earnings report in January. In 2019 alone, the stock has risen about 33%.

The earnings report showed that users and advertisers alike stuck with the platform despite privacy doubts. In its final quarter of 2018, Facebook met analysts’ expectations for daily and monthly active users, which measured 1.52 billion and 2.32 billion, respectively. Its average revenue per user came in at $7.37 for the quarter, beating analyst estimates of $7.11, as forecast by FactSet.

Facebook did not respond to a request for comment on this article.

Here are some of the ways Facebook’s messaging to various stakeholders have changed over the past year:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, lawmakers, advertisers, trust, stock, data, evolving, zuckerberg, postzuckerberg, testimony, response, facebooks, ways, facebook, public


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More lawsuits are hanging over the billionaire family that made its fortune in opioids

Several members of the Sackler family own and control Purdue Pharma, the pharmaceutical giant facing a string of lawsuits over its alleged role in the crisis. In some of the litigation, members of the family have been named alongside the company as defendants. The Sackler Trust, the family’s charitable organization, has donated millions of dollars to charities and institutions, but announced this week it was halting new donations in the U.K. “The Trustees of the Sackler Trust have taken the diff


Several members of the Sackler family own and control Purdue Pharma, the pharmaceutical giant facing a string of lawsuits over its alleged role in the crisis. In some of the litigation, members of the family have been named alongside the company as defendants. The Sackler Trust, the family’s charitable organization, has donated millions of dollars to charities and institutions, but announced this week it was halting new donations in the U.K. “The Trustees of the Sackler Trust have taken the diff
More lawsuits are hanging over the billionaire family that made its fortune in opioids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: chloe taylor, george frey, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, role, opioids, fortune, billionaire, family, lawsuits, press, hanging, theresa, members, statement, trust, institutions, purdue, sackler


More lawsuits are hanging over the billionaire family that made its fortune in opioids

The Sacklers — the billionaire family whose privately held company is accused of playing a central role in the U.S. opioid epidemic — are stepping away from philanthropy as negative press and legal action mount against them.

Several members of the Sackler family own and control Purdue Pharma, the pharmaceutical giant facing a string of lawsuits over its alleged role in the crisis. In some of the litigation, members of the family have been named alongside the company as defendants.

The Sackler Trust, the family’s charitable organization, has donated millions of dollars to charities and institutions, but announced this week it was halting new donations in the U.K.

In a statement emailed to CNBC Monday, Theresa Sackler, the chair of the trust, said she was “deeply saddened” by the addiction crisis in the U.S., adding that she continued to reject the “false allegations” made against Purdue and several members of the Sackler family.

“The current press attention that these legal cases in the United States is generating has created immense pressure on the scientific, medical, educational and arts institutions here in the U.K., large and small, that I am so proud to support. This attention is distracting them from the important work that they do,” she said.

“The Trustees of the Sackler Trust have taken the difficult decision to temporarily pause all new philanthropic giving, while still honoring existing commitments. I remain fully committed to all the causes the Sackler Trust supports, but at this moment it is the better course for the Trust to halt all new giving until we can be confident that it will not be a distraction for institutions that are applying for grants.”

Later on Monday, The Dr Mortimer and Theresa Sackler Foundation – the charity overseen by other members of the family – said in a statement that it would also suspend new donations in line with the Sackler Trust’s decision.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: chloe taylor, george frey, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, role, opioids, fortune, billionaire, family, lawsuits, press, hanging, theresa, members, statement, trust, institutions, purdue, sackler


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Boeing unveils 737 Max fixes, says planes are safer

Boeing previewed its software fix, cockpit alerts and additional pilot training for its 737 Max planes on Wednesday, saying the changes improve the safety of the aircraft which has been involved in two deadly crashes since October. Among the notable changes to the MAX flight controls:The plane’s Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, automated flight control system, will now receive data from both “angle of attack” sensors, instead of just one. If those disagree by more than 5


Boeing previewed its software fix, cockpit alerts and additional pilot training for its 737 Max planes on Wednesday, saying the changes improve the safety of the aircraft which has been involved in two deadly crashes since October. Among the notable changes to the MAX flight controls:The plane’s Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, automated flight control system, will now receive data from both “angle of attack” sensors, instead of just one. If those disagree by more than 5
Boeing unveils 737 Max fixes, says planes are safer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: phil lebeau, robert alexander, archive photos, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mcas, training, fixes, safer, max, planes, system, changes, boeing, 737, trust, unveils, pilots, working, flight


Boeing unveils 737 Max fixes, says planes are safer

Boeing previewed its software fix, cockpit alerts and additional pilot training for its 737 Max planes on Wednesday, saying the changes improve the safety of the aircraft which has been involved in two deadly crashes since October.

“We’re working with customers and regulators around the world to restore faith in our industry and also to reaffirm our commitment to safety and to earning the trust for the flying public,” Mike Sinnett, Boeing vice president, said in previewing the changes to pilots, reporters and regulators at its facilities in Renton, Washington.

The company’s shares jumped after releasing the fixes at 2 p.m. ET, rising by more than 1 percent in afternoon trading.

Many of the details behind Boeing’s plan to fix the Max have come out over the last two weeks.

Among the notable changes to the MAX flight controls:

The plane’s Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, automated flight control system, will now receive data from both “angle of attack” sensors, instead of just one.

If those disagree by more than 5.5 degrees, the MCAS system will be disabled and will not push the nose of the plane lower.

Boeing will be adding an indicator to the flight control display so pilots are aware of when the angle of attack sensors disagree.

There will also be enhanced training required for all 737 pilots so they are more fully aware of how the MCAS system works and how to disable it if they encounter an issue.

“We’re working with pilots and industry officials,” said Sinnett. “We have 200 of them today in our Renton facility and we’ll be spending time with them today to explain the updates we’re making to the 737 Max, to get their input and to earn their trust.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: phil lebeau, robert alexander, archive photos, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mcas, training, fixes, safer, max, planes, system, changes, boeing, 737, trust, unveils, pilots, working, flight


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Cramer Remix: Why I still have faith in Boeing

Financial news have been “correctly” dominated by the Federal Aviation Administration’s order that Boeing 737 Max jets be grounded in the United States after two of the planes were involved in fatal crashes in less than five months, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Wednesday. The “Mad Money” host addressed questions he has been asked about how the event could affect the stock. But Cramer isn’t giving up on the company. “I have total confidence in the Boeing company to get to the bottom of this and to rest


Financial news have been “correctly” dominated by the Federal Aviation Administration’s order that Boeing 737 Max jets be grounded in the United States after two of the planes were involved in fatal crashes in less than five months, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Wednesday. The “Mad Money” host addressed questions he has been asked about how the event could affect the stock. But Cramer isn’t giving up on the company. “I have total confidence in the Boeing company to get to the bottom of this and to rest
Cramer Remix: Why I still have faith in Boeing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: tyler clifford, scott olson, getty images, daniel acker, bloomberg, brendan mcdermid, erin scott, steve marcus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trust, remix, stock, faith, cramer, thats, united, boeing, total, company, woes, wednesdaythe


Cramer Remix: Why I still have faith in Boeing

Financial news have been “correctly” dominated by the Federal Aviation Administration’s order that Boeing 737 Max jets be grounded in the United States after two of the planes were involved in fatal crashes in less than five months, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Wednesday.

The “Mad Money” host addressed questions he has been asked about how the event could affect the stock. Shares of the airplane manufacturer saw a 0.46 percent bump during the session, but he said it’s “too soon” to assess the impact.

But Cramer isn’t giving up on the company.

“I have total confidence in the Boeing company to get to the bottom of this and to restore any trust lost in the company,” he said. “If that’s enough, you should buy it.”

Hear Cramer react to Boeing’s woes here


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: tyler clifford, scott olson, getty images, daniel acker, bloomberg, brendan mcdermid, erin scott, steve marcus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trust, remix, stock, faith, cramer, thats, united, boeing, total, company, woes, wednesdaythe


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The Points Guy has ‘a near perfect’ credit score—here are the 3 cards he can’t live without

Brian Kelly realized he had a knack for maximizing credit card rewards when he was working in HR at Morgan Stanley. Today, he remains the CEO of TPG and travels the world for next to nothing, thanks to the points he constantly racks up. “I’ve got 25 credit cards and a near perfect credit score,” Kelly tells Make It, “but that’s because I really manage them. … A key thing with earning points through credit cards is you must pay your bill off in full every month. Otherwise, the interest that you p


Brian Kelly realized he had a knack for maximizing credit card rewards when he was working in HR at Morgan Stanley. Today, he remains the CEO of TPG and travels the world for next to nothing, thanks to the points he constantly racks up. “I’ve got 25 credit cards and a near perfect credit score,” Kelly tells Make It, “but that’s because I really manage them. … A key thing with earning points through credit cards is you must pay your bill off in full every month. Otherwise, the interest that you p
The Points Guy has ‘a near perfect’ credit score—here are the 3 cards he can’t live without Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: kathleen elkins, gary gershoff, getty images entertainment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, near, started, cant, trust, perfect, cards, scorehere, tpg, tells, pay, points, credit, guy, traveling, world, live, kelly


The Points Guy has 'a near perfect' credit score—here are the 3 cards he can't live without

Brian Kelly realized he had a knack for maximizing credit card rewards when he was working in HR at Morgan Stanley.

“My job was to go to around to all the college campuses and recruit the top computer scientists to join the bank,” he tells CNBC Make It, “so I was traveling like crazy, racking up tons of points. … I was traveling around the world to places like the Seychelles for free and people were finally like, ‘What trust fund are you on Brian?’

“There was no trust fund — it was just my points.”

In 2010, he started a blog to share his best travel and points advice. What started as “just a fun little side gig,” says Kelly, evolved into a lifestyle media brand that reaches millions of people across social media platforms and the Points Guy (TPG) website. Kelly quit his corporate job a year after his first blog post and sold the company to Bankrate in 2012, but he remained CEO.

Today, he remains the CEO of TPG and travels the world for next to nothing, thanks to the points he constantly racks up.

“I’ve got 25 credit cards and a near perfect credit score,” Kelly tells Make It, “but that’s because I really manage them. … A key thing with earning points through credit cards is you must pay your bill off in full every month. Otherwise, the interest that you pay will negate the value of those miles and points.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: kathleen elkins, gary gershoff, getty images entertainment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, near, started, cant, trust, perfect, cards, scorehere, tpg, tells, pay, points, credit, guy, traveling, world, live, kelly


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