Microsoft joins hospital chain Providence to build ‘hospital of the future’

Microsoft is working with Providence St. Joseph Health, a U.S. hospital chain, on building a new high-tech hospital. Providence St. Joseph CEO Rod Hochman said the chain would adapt an existing facility in the Seattle area, near Microsoft’s headquarters. The two companies have discussed their vision for a “hospital of the future” for months, Hochman said, including during several one-on-ones with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Another focus is on improving health care and lowering costs by working


Microsoft is working with Providence St. Joseph Health, a U.S. hospital chain, on building a new high-tech hospital. Providence St. Joseph CEO Rod Hochman said the chain would adapt an existing facility in the Seattle area, near Microsoft’s headquarters. The two companies have discussed their vision for a “hospital of the future” for months, Hochman said, including during several one-on-ones with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Another focus is on improving health care and lowering costs by working
Microsoft joins hospital chain Providence to build ‘hospital of the future’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chain, working, joins, trying, companies, health, amazon, build, microsoft, hochman, hospital, providence, healthcare, care, future


Microsoft joins hospital chain Providence to build 'hospital of the future'

Microsoft is working with Providence St. Joseph Health, a U.S. hospital chain, on building a new high-tech hospital.

Providence St. Joseph CEO Rod Hochman said the chain would adapt an existing facility in the Seattle area, near Microsoft’s headquarters.

The two companies have discussed their vision for a “hospital of the future” for months, Hochman said, including during several one-on-ones with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.

The move is part of Microsoft’s latest run at the health-care business after previous efforts, including hospital IT software called Amalga, failed to gain much traction. Meanwhile Apple, Amazon and Alphabet are also looking into the $3.5 trillion sector, but with different areas of focus, ranging from clinical trials to medical devices.

The strategic priorities for the new effort involve improving the electronic medical record so that it’s easier for doctors, nurses and other health providers to find and share information. The companies also plan to use technology like natural language processing and machine learning to help clinicians diagnose and treat patients.

Another focus is on improving health care and lowering costs by working closely with Seattle’s largest employers. Amazon, another Seattle company, is also looking to focus on the employer experience through its partnership with J.P. Morgan and Berkshire Hathaway. That effort was recently dubbed “Haven.”

The project is still in an early phase, with many details undecided, said Hochman, declining to share details on the exact size on the number of beds or scale of the operation. But he insisted that both companies are putting significant “human capital and dollars” into the effort.

“We decided to go big with this partnership,” he said. “This isn’t about just buying software from them.”

Hochman said he decided to team up with Microsoft because it has positioned itself as a partner, rather than a potential competitor.

“Between Apple, Google and Amazon, they all have their strengths,” he said. “And it’s not to say that there won’t be projects with all three, but I’d make the distinction with Microsoft that they’re not trying to do health care themselves. They aren’t trying to be in the health-care business, but are trying to make it better.”

Providence, which owns hospitals in Washington and six other states, has been working for years to position itself as a digitally savvy health system. In recent years, it has snapped up senior leaders from nearby technology companies, including from Microsoft and Amazon. Its chief digital officer, Aaron Martin, previously worked on Amazon’s Kindle service, and its chief information officer, B.J. Moore, worked at Microsoft for more than two decades.

Providence and other health systems are increasingly under pressure to monitor for patients once they’re discharged, as well as to improve how both patients and health providers are treated.

“We can’t be a box that takes care of patients with emergency rooms attached,” said Hochman. “We have to evolve to become information centers, with sophisticated outpatient and inpatient care. It’ll be interesting to see how many (health systems) make it through that transition.”

Microsoft has made other runs at the health-care space, but has not had much success to date. In 2006, it acquired health-care intelligence software called Azyxxi, originally developed by Washington Hospital, and in 2007 it acquired additional tools from a privately held hospital system in Thailand. But these tools, sold under the umbrella name Amalga, never really took off and Microsoft ultimately shut down some of the projects and merged others into a joint venture with GE, before eventually divesting.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chain, working, joins, trying, companies, health, amazon, build, microsoft, hochman, hospital, providence, healthcare, care, future


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Facebook is trying to woo YouTube stars with new ways to make money

For many online video stars, YouTube is top of mind when it comes to the best place to post a video. Facebook is sweetening its offerings for video creators, whether they’re viral video stars or media companies, luring them to its platform with new tools to help them make money through advertising and direct payments from Facebook users. Facebook Watch, the platform’s video offering that includes original programming and uploaded video from creators, launched globally last year after being intro


For many online video stars, YouTube is top of mind when it comes to the best place to post a video. Facebook is sweetening its offerings for video creators, whether they’re viral video stars or media companies, luring them to its platform with new tools to help them make money through advertising and direct payments from Facebook users. Facebook Watch, the platform’s video offering that includes original programming and uploaded video from creators, launched globally last year after being intro
Facebook is trying to woo YouTube stars with new ways to make money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youtube, trying, woo, facebook, stars, subscriptions, cut, platforms, users, creators, video, money, ways, platform


Facebook is trying to woo YouTube stars with new ways to make money

For many online video stars, YouTube is top of mind when it comes to the best place to post a video. Facebook is trying to change that.

Facebook is sweetening its offerings for video creators, whether they’re viral video stars or media companies, luring them to its platform with new tools to help them make money through advertising and direct payments from Facebook users.

The new or updated offerings are similar to some already offered on YouTube and start-ups such as Patreon. The changes were announced at its “Facebook Creator Day” in Malibu, California, on Tuesday, held ahead of VidCon, a conference for the online video industry that starts Wednesday in Anaheim.

Facebook Watch, the platform’s video offering that includes original programming and uploaded video from creators, launched globally last year after being introduced in 2017. In June, Facebook said it had reached more than 720 million users monthly and 140 million users daily who spend at least one minute on Watch. In comparison, Google-owned YouTube says more than 1.9 billion logged-in users watch video on the platform every month.

Some advertisers said that even though Facebook’s numbers were up, they wanted more specifics on the data, as well as better functionality for users to discover videos.

YouTube has spawned a class of superstar creators, some of whom rake in millions of dollars every month. Instagram has been a boon for influencers, but IGTV, Instagram’s answer to YouTube, has struggled to find the same kind of success. Creators have also complained about finding their revenue footing on Facebook Watch.

“A lot of creators are focusing almost all of their attention on YouTube, Instagram and emerging platforms,” said Joe Gagliese, co-founder and managing partner of influencer marketing agency Viral Nation.

Gagliese said part of the difficulty in implementing new features is that people aren’t used to seeing certain types of ads or subscriptions on Facebook. YouTube, on the other hand, has been more focused on monetization for creators since the beginning, he said.

“Changing a human’s opinion on anything can be difficult,” he said. Facebook’s algorithm changes have also affected the reach of content, which has been a turnoff for creators, he said.

Facebook’s slew of updates include new ad options — for instance, letting creators show only ad formats that don’t interrupt the video, such as a pre-roll ad. That feature is available now, the company said.

Facebook will also update its “Brand Collabs Manager,” which lets advertisers find creators for branded content partnerships. For instance, creators can share their own audience for ads targeting. It’s similar to YouTube’s lucrative Preferred product, which connects big-name advertisers with YouTube’s hottest creators.

Facebook is also tweaking how much creators earn from their fans through more direct payments. The company’s “Fan subscriptions” program lets viewers pay creators each month for exclusive content and other rewards. It’s similar to the start-up Patreon, which lets an individual collect payments from fans.

But while Patreon takes up to a 12% cut, Facebook starting next year will take a 30% cut from these subscriptions on its web platform. Facebook won’t take a further cut where mobile platforms are already taking a 30% transaction fee from creators. Currently, Facebook doesn’t take a revenue share for fan subscriptions, so creators keep 100% of their earnings on the web platform and 70% on mobile platforms. Going forward, creators will keep a 70% cut of the revenue from fan subscriptions regardless of whether it’s on web or mobile platforms.

Facebook is also testing an expansion of Facebook Stars, a program it already has for creators who stream video games. Stars lets users buy packs of virtual stars that can be given to creators. Facebook takes a cut of each Star pack purchase. For example, if a Facebook user buys a pack of 100 stars for $1.40, Facebook keeps 28.6%, leaving the user $1 to gift to creators. The more a Facebook user spends on Stars, the less share Facebook will take. Creators get 1 cent per Star sent by a fan.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youtube, trying, woo, facebook, stars, subscriptions, cut, platforms, users, creators, video, money, ways, platform


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Michigan Rep. Amash says he’s quitting Republican Party

Kamala Harris says busing should be considered, not mandatedSen. Kamala Harris said that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support… Politicsread more


Kamala Harris says busing should be considered, not mandatedSen. Kamala Harris said that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support… Politicsread more
Michigan Rep. Amash says he’s quitting Republican Party Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mandatedsen, kamala, students, party, michigan, harris, supportpoliticsread, amash, trying, considered, school, hes, mandate, busing, rep, republican, quitting


Michigan Rep. Amash says he's quitting Republican Party

Kamala Harris says busing should be considered, not mandated

Sen. Kamala Harris said that busing students should be considered by school districts trying to desegregate their locations — not the federal mandate she appeared to support…

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mandatedsen, kamala, students, party, michigan, harris, supportpoliticsread, amash, trying, considered, school, hes, mandate, busing, rep, republican, quitting


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Tesla has a secret lab trying to build its own battery cells to reduce dependence on Panasonic

The battery pack and battery cells are the main cost component in an electric vehicle, according to research by IHS Markit. Tesla has posted job listings in the last month for various engineers involved in battery cell design, equipment for producing battery cells and manufacturing processes to make batteries. Even if Tesla’s effort to start making battery cells is successful, the company is not likely to cut ties with Panasonic and other battery suppliers any time soon. Executives’ comments on


The battery pack and battery cells are the main cost component in an electric vehicle, according to research by IHS Markit. Tesla has posted job listings in the last month for various engineers involved in battery cell design, equipment for producing battery cells and manufacturing processes to make batteries. Even if Tesla’s effort to start making battery cells is successful, the company is not likely to cut ties with Panasonic and other battery suppliers any time soon. Executives’ comments on
Tesla has a secret lab trying to build its own battery cells to reduce dependence on Panasonic Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, musk, model, build, battery, manufacturing, cell, dependence, employees, reduce, cells, trying, production, panasonic, secret, lab, tesla


Tesla has a secret lab trying to build its own battery cells to reduce dependence on Panasonic

SpaceX owner and Tesla CEO Elon Musk gestures during a conversation at the E3 gaming convention in Los Angeles, June 13, 2019. Mike Blake | Reuters

Tesla is developing the means to manufacture its own battery cells, according to five current and recent employees, something that the electric vehicle maker has relied on Panasonic to do since the companies signed an extensive partnership deal in 2014. The move could help Tesla offer cheaper, higher performance electric-vehicles than it does today, without having to pay or share data and resources with outside vendors or partners. The battery pack and battery cells are the main cost component in an electric vehicle, according to research by IHS Markit. The company has been “battery-constrained” in the past, CEO Elon Musk acknowledged at the company’s annual shareholders meeting earlier in June. That means a lack of batteries limited Tesla’s production and sales of electric vehicles and energy storage systems (Powerwalls and Powerpacks). Making its own battery cells would also fit with Musk’s general ambition to make Tesla as “vertically integrated” as possible, which means developing, manufacturing and selling everything it can — even its own enterprise software. But manufacturing cells at high volume would be another challenge for a company that recently implemented cost-cutting measures and is still struggling to perfect its high-volume vehicle production. Tesla and Panasonic did not respond to requests for comment.

Skunkworks lab on Kato road

Tesla employees conduct some of their battery cell manufacturing research at a “skunkworks lab” at the company’s Kato Road facility, a few minutes from its car plant in Fremont, California. That plant is where Tesla makes its Model 3, Model S and Model X vehicles today, while its batteries are made at the Gigafactory in Sparks, Nevada, a factory jointly owned and operated with Panasonic. Employees in Tesla’s battery R&D teams are now focused on designing and prototyping advanced lithium ion battery cells, as well as new equipment and processes that could allow Tesla to produce cells in high volumes, employees and former employees said. Tesla has posted job listings in the last month for various engineers involved in battery cell design, equipment for producing battery cells and manufacturing processes to make batteries. Even if Tesla’s effort to start making battery cells is successful, the company is not likely to cut ties with Panasonic and other battery suppliers any time soon. Tesla employees familiar with cell supplier negotiations said the company is most likely to work with Panasonic and LG to provide the cells that go into the initial Model 3 vehicles produced in its Shanghai factory. That factory could start production by the end of 2019, with mass production beginning in 2020.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks at the ground breaking for the automaker’s new factory in Shanghai. Eunice Yoon | CNBC

The ambition to bring at least some battery cell manufacturing in house has been broadly discussed within Tesla and among its followers. At the company’s annual shareholder meeting in June, Musk invited CTO JB Straubel and vice president of technology vice president Drew Baglino on-stage to tell shareholders about battery-related initiatives at Tesla. Musk encouraged outside investors to focus on two strategic matters at Tesla: How quickly the company can offer completely self-driving vehicles, and its plan to “scale battery production and get the cost per kilowatt hour lower.” He said said Tesla wasn’t ready to let the “cat out of the bag” yet, and would reveal further details — including about the company’s acquisition of Maxwell Technologies, completed in May this year — at an investor battery and power train day before the end of 2019.

JB Straubel, Tesla Motors chief technical officer. Getty Images

CTO JB Straubel said: “It’s more obvious now than I think it ever was, we need a large-scale solution to cell production.” Baglino added, “We’re not sitting idly by. We’re taking all the moves required to be masters of our own destiny here, technologically and otherwise. I think through all the experience we’ve developed with partners and otherwise, we will have solutions for this.” Executives’ comments on Tesla battery tech follow reports bout tension between the two companies. In January, Panasonic struck a deal with Toyota to build car batteries together through a joint venture majority-owned by Toyota. In early April, Panasonic said it would temporarily freeze its investments in Tesla Gigafactories. A few days later, Musk blamed Panasonic for dragging down the pace of Model 3 production, saying its cell lines were operating at only two-thirds of their capacity, or 24 GWh, at their shared Gigafactory. “Tesla won’t spend money on more capacity until existing lines get closer to 35GWh theoretical,” Musk tweeted. In recent weeks, following layoffs and other cost-cutting efforts by Tesla, Panasonic has hired a number of former Tesla employees at the Gigafactory in Nevada, including technicians, supervisors, process and systems engineers, according to LinkedIn profiles and current and recent Tesla employees. Hopping from Tesla to Panasonic at the Gigafactory wasn’t as common just a couple of years ago, according to a former Tesla human resources employee who asked to remain unnamed. Compensation, training and a clearer policy around schedules, especially how to earn and get time off, help draw Tesla employees over to their Japanese partner, this person said. WATCH: Inside Tesla’s Nevada Gigafactory


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, musk, model, build, battery, manufacturing, cell, dependence, employees, reduce, cells, trying, production, panasonic, secret, lab, tesla


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Major companies are ringing alarm bells, trying to warn Washington about more tariffs

More than 300 companies are talking to government officials in Washington this month about how detrimental the trade war between the U.S. and China has been and will be to their business. Testifying in front of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, major U.S. companies including Best Buy, HP and Hallmark Cards are voicing concerns about how the additional tariffs that President Donald Trump threatened to slap on China would impact their businesses and cause them to lose business to foreig


More than 300 companies are talking to government officials in Washington this month about how detrimental the trade war between the U.S. and China has been and will be to their business. Testifying in front of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, major U.S. companies including Best Buy, HP and Hallmark Cards are voicing concerns about how the additional tariffs that President Donald Trump threatened to slap on China would impact their businesses and cause them to lose business to foreig
Major companies are ringing alarm bells, trying to warn Washington about more tariffs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: yun li maggie fitzgerald, yun li, maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talking, war, warn, alarm, tariffs, ringing, china, voicing, threatened, trump, trying, washington, major, bells, trade, companies


Major companies are ringing alarm bells, trying to warn Washington about more tariffs

More than 300 companies are talking to government officials in Washington this month about how detrimental the trade war between the U.S. and China has been and will be to their business.

Testifying in front of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, major U.S. companies including Best Buy, HP and Hallmark Cards are voicing concerns about how the additional tariffs that President Donald Trump threatened to slap on China would impact their businesses and cause them to lose business to foreign competitors.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: yun li maggie fitzgerald, yun li, maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talking, war, warn, alarm, tariffs, ringing, china, voicing, threatened, trump, trying, washington, major, bells, trade, companies


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Ron Insana: Trump needs to stop fighting central banks, who are trying to keep the economy afloat

Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, right, walks with Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank (ECB), during the spring meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, April 20, 2018. It’s quite ironic that President Donald Trump is criticizing the outgoing head of the European Central Bank for “currency manipulation” when he’s counting on his own central bank head, Jerome Powell, to do the exact same thing. Desp


Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, right, walks with Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank (ECB), during the spring meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, April 20, 2018. It’s quite ironic that President Donald Trump is criticizing the outgoing head of the European Central Bank for “currency manipulation” when he’s counting on his own central bank head, Jerome Powell, to do the exact same thing. Desp
Ron Insana: Trump needs to stop fighting central banks, who are trying to keep the economy afloat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: ron insana
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, insana, ecb, trump, world, bank, economy, cut, european, central, rates, needs, treasury, negative, stop, banks, trying, interest, fighting, ron


Ron Insana: Trump needs to stop fighting central banks, who are trying to keep the economy afloat

Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, right, walks with Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank (ECB), during the spring meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, April 20, 2018.

It’s quite ironic that President Donald Trump is criticizing the outgoing head of the European Central Bank for “currency manipulation” when he’s counting on his own central bank head, Jerome Powell, to do the exact same thing.

Mario Draghi indicated the ECB could add fresh stimulus to a struggling eurozone economy, a comment that has pushed German interest rates deeper into negative territory and has driven the euro down to $1.11.

Draghi, as the Federal Reserve does, has every reason and right to contemplate further stimulus, whether it’s some kind of rate cut, more quantitative easing or other measures that would keep the entire continent from sliding into recession.

Despite Trump’s constant calls for the Fed to cut rates, in the absence of any looming inflationary threat, the ECB has a much stronger argument for making a move. Unlike the U.S., the eurozone is tilting toward recession. German manufacturing, the engine of European growth, has stalled. France, Italy and Spain have seen recession-like conditions, while Italy’s heavy debt burden has complicated the outlook across the pond. Also, with the prospects of a so-called No Deal Brexit looming, if the U.K crashes out of the EU, economic troubles could spread from Britain to Berlin.

The biggest reason the euro is weakening is not currency manipulation but the fact that the U.S. is still better off than the rest of the world. Positive interest rates in the U.S., in contrast to $12 trillion in negative yielding sovereign debt around the world, is drawing investors into U.S. Treasury bonds, pushing up the value of the dollar. Rates in Germany and Japan aren’t necessarily negative because of central bank intervention — that would be confusing cause and effect. Real rates are negative around the world because the world is not growing.

Contrast that to the U.S., where there has been an obvious slowing of economic activity, but the outlook has yet to indicate recession on the immediate horizon. True, with interest rates in the U.S. plunging, a good portion of the Treasury yield curve inverting, consumer spending decelerating for three straight quarters and no end to the trade war with China in sight, it may well be advisable for the Fed to “take back” its December rate cut as early as Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: ron insana
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, insana, ecb, trump, world, bank, economy, cut, european, central, rates, needs, treasury, negative, stop, banks, trying, interest, fighting, ron


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Facebook just announced plans for its cryptocurrency, Libra—Five experts on what to watch

Facebook just announced plans for its cryptocurrency, Libra—Five experts on what to watch5 Hours AgoFacebook unveiled its plans for its cryptocurrency, Libra. Facebook has said that Libra will be backed by stable government-backed currency and will be run by a nonprofit. The move comes at a time when the company is trying to build user morale after data scandals.


Facebook just announced plans for its cryptocurrency, Libra—Five experts on what to watch5 Hours AgoFacebook unveiled its plans for its cryptocurrency, Libra. Facebook has said that Libra will be backed by stable government-backed currency and will be run by a nonprofit. The move comes at a time when the company is trying to build user morale after data scandals.
Facebook just announced plans for its cryptocurrency, Libra—Five experts on what to watch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: chesnot, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch5, user, scandals, cryptocurrency, announced, plans, libra, experts, librafive, unveiled, stable, trying, watch, facebook


Facebook just announced plans for its cryptocurrency, Libra—Five experts on what to watch

Facebook just announced plans for its cryptocurrency, Libra—Five experts on what to watch

5 Hours Ago

Facebook unveiled its plans for its cryptocurrency, Libra. Facebook has said that Libra will be backed by stable government-backed currency and will be run by a nonprofit. The move comes at a time when the company is trying to build user morale after data scandals.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: chesnot, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch5, user, scandals, cryptocurrency, announced, plans, libra, experts, librafive, unveiled, stable, trying, watch, facebook


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How an island in the Baltic Sea is trying to make renewables a reliable part of its energy mix

Around the world, a host of governments and businesses are looking to reduce their environmental impact by embracing renewable sources of energy. While this may be beneficial to the planet, it does pose some challenges, not least when it comes to energy storage. This is because while sources such as solar and wind are renewable, they do not promise a constant stream of power. “To integrate large amounts of renewable energy into the power system two issues need to be solved,” Ilka Jahn, a PhD can


Around the world, a host of governments and businesses are looking to reduce their environmental impact by embracing renewable sources of energy. While this may be beneficial to the planet, it does pose some challenges, not least when it comes to energy storage. This is because while sources such as solar and wind are renewable, they do not promise a constant stream of power. “To integrate large amounts of renewable energy into the power system two issues need to be solved,” Ilka Jahn, a PhD can
How an island in the Baltic Sea is trying to make renewables a reliable part of its energy mix Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wind, island, baltic, smart, swedish, project, grid, storage, gotland, sea, mix, reliable, renewables, trying, energy, renewable, technology


How an island in the Baltic Sea is trying to make renewables a reliable part of its energy mix

Around the world, a host of governments and businesses are looking to reduce their environmental impact by embracing renewable sources of energy.

In the U.S., for instance, the Energy Information Administration expects non-hydroelectric renewables — think wind and solar — will be the “fastest growing source of U.S. electricity generation for at least the next two years.”

While this may be beneficial to the planet, it does pose some challenges, not least when it comes to energy storage. This is because while sources such as solar and wind are renewable, they do not promise a constant stream of power.

It’s within this context that storage systems are seen as being so important to renewables, as they enable the storage of energy when it’s available and then its usage when required.

“To integrate large amounts of renewable energy into the power system two issues need to be solved,” Ilka Jahn, a PhD candidate at Stockholm’s KTH Royal Institute of Technology, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.”

“One is that, usually, the energy is not produced where it’s needed, so that’s a location problem,” she explained. “And the second one is that the energy is being produced at a time when it’s not needed, so that’s a timing problem.”

Jahn added that, to overcome this, two things could be done. “One is to build more transmission capacity, so new power lines.” The second solution Jahn proposed was the building of more energy storage. “How you actually do that depends on the specific project and the specific requirements.”

On the Swedish island of Gotland, which is home to dozens of wind turbines, researchers from several organizations — including major Swedish utility Vattenfall, Schneider Electric and the KTH Royal Institute of Technology — have worked on a project called Smart Grid Gotland, which wrapped up in 2017.

Among other things, the project aimed to integrate wind and other renewable sources into the network while still ensuring reliability.

To give one example of how innovation was used during the project, households on the island were able to monitor their energy usage 24 hours per day. Using technology, they could adjust their heater’s settings so that it switched on when cheap, renewable electricity was available and turned off when prices went up.

“The Gotland project was a very interesting project in that it looked at how to repurpose an existing distribution grid into a smarter grid,” Daniel Mansson, an associate professor at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, told CNBC.

According to the ETIP Smart Networks for Energy Transition, which was set up by the European Commission, one result of the Smart Grid Gotland project was that it showed how it was “possible to make better use of renewable energy by incentivizing consumers to lower their energy consumption at times of limited renewable production.”

Given that Swedish authorities want 100% renewable electricity production by the year 2040, the results of projects such as Smart Grid Gotland will be watched with a great deal of interest.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wind, island, baltic, smart, swedish, project, grid, storage, gotland, sea, mix, reliable, renewables, trying, energy, renewable, technology


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Discussing the preliminary results of the European elections

Discussing the preliminary results of the European elections11 Hours AgoDavid Kuo, CEO of The Motley Fool Singapore, says voters are trying to tell the European Union that “we’re not happy with how things are going.”


Discussing the preliminary results of the European elections11 Hours AgoDavid Kuo, CEO of The Motley Fool Singapore, says voters are trying to tell the European Union that “we’re not happy with how things are going.”
Discussing the preliminary results of the European elections Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, results, preliminary, singapore, voters, things, motley, trying, union, discussing, tell, elections, european


Discussing the preliminary results of the European elections

Discussing the preliminary results of the European elections

11 Hours Ago

David Kuo, CEO of The Motley Fool Singapore, says voters are trying to tell the European Union that “we’re not happy with how things are going.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, results, preliminary, singapore, voters, things, motley, trying, union, discussing, tell, elections, european


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Amazon shares will reach $3,000 in 2 years without the company really trying, Piper Jaffray says

Robert Mueller wants to testify in private before Congress,…Special counsel Robert Mueller wants to talk to Congress about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, but he wants to do it… Politicsread more


Robert Mueller wants to testify in private before Congress,…Special counsel Robert Mueller wants to talk to Congress about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, but he wants to do it… Politicsread more
Amazon shares will reach $3,000 in 2 years without the company really trying, Piper Jaffray says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: john melloy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, itpoliticsread, reach, trump, 3000, amazon, testify, private, investigation, mueller, trying, shares, piper, jaffray, company, wants, robert, talk, russian


Amazon shares will reach $3,000 in 2 years without the company really trying, Piper Jaffray says

Robert Mueller wants to testify in private before Congress,…

Special counsel Robert Mueller wants to talk to Congress about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, but he wants to do it…

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: john melloy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, itpoliticsread, reach, trump, 3000, amazon, testify, private, investigation, mueller, trying, shares, piper, jaffray, company, wants, robert, talk, russian


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