Maryland’s top finance official calls for economic retaliation against Alabama after state passes near-total abortion ban

A protester holds a sign in opposition to HB314, which would ban abortions in all cases except the health of the mother outside the Alabama State House on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 in Montgomery, AL. Maryland’s chief financial officer on Thursday called for a number of retaliatory economic measures against Alabama in response to the state’s passage of the nation’s most restrictive abortion legislation. The bill was signed Wednesday by Republican Gov. First, he said, he will order his staff to prepar


A protester holds a sign in opposition to HB314, which would ban abortions in all cases except the health of the mother outside the Alabama State House on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 in Montgomery, AL. Maryland’s chief financial officer on Thursday called for a number of retaliatory economic measures against Alabama in response to the state’s passage of the nation’s most restrictive abortion legislation. The bill was signed Wednesday by Republican Gov. First, he said, he will order his staff to prepar
Maryland’s top finance official calls for economic retaliation against Alabama after state passes near-total abortion ban Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, staff, calls, official, ban, states, finance, passes, retaliation, state, alabama, marylands, economic, board, neartotal, retirement, republican, systems, order, gov, nations


Maryland's top finance official calls for economic retaliation against Alabama after state passes near-total abortion ban

A protester holds a sign in opposition to HB314, which would ban abortions in all cases except the health of the mother outside the Alabama State House on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 in Montgomery, AL.

Maryland’s chief financial officer on Thursday called for a number of retaliatory economic measures against Alabama in response to the state’s passage of the nation’s most restrictive abortion legislation. The bill was signed Wednesday by Republican Gov. Kay Ivey.

Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot, a Democrat who also serves as vice chair of the state’s retirement system, is seeking a full divestment of the $52 billion pension fund from Alabama businesses and will soon make the case to the system’s board of trustees, he said.

First, he said, he will order his staff to prepare a report on the retirement system’s exposure to Alabama to make sure that it can be done responsibly.

Read more: Alabama lawmakers, with eyes on overturning Roe v. Wade, pass nation’s strictest abortion ban

Franchot also said he will order his staff of 1,100 employees not to travel to Alabama on business and will use his seat on the three-member Board of Public Works to limit contracts given to Alabama companies. That board, which also includes Republican Gov. Larry Hogan, awards $11 billion in contracts annually, he noted.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: tucker higgins
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We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said

China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help


China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help
We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here's what they said

China’s President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Nicolas Asfouri | AFP | Getty Images

With trade negotiations between the U.S. and China stalled and an escalating trade war threatening global markets, President Donald Trump has said that the Chinese are “DREAMING” that he will be defeated by a Democrat in 2020. But Democrats have not said much about their own plans for negotiating with the Chinese. To learn more, CNBC asked the 21 top Democrats running for president about their views. We asked them what they believe is working under Trump — and what they would change. We also asked whether human rights issues in China, where the U.S. has said more than a million Muslims are held in concentration camps, should be part of any trade deal. Lastly, we asked about what they would do about China’s efforts to tighten its military grip on the South China Sea, where more than $3 trillion of trade passes annually. Below, unedited, are our questions and the answers we received from the seven Democrats who responded. Those Democrats are Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., Miramar, Florida, Mayor Wayne Messam and spiritual coach Marianne Williamson. Two other Democrats provided partial responses. A spokesperson for Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., provided an excerpt from the senator’s platform that is included as a response to the first question. An aide to Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke wrote in a statement: “Holding China accountable should not come at the expense of American workers. That is why we must not settle for any deal that does not respect intellectual property, level the playing field in the Chinese market, nor end unfair trade practices. We must advance progress based on shared interests and core democratic values.” Joe Biden, the Democratic front runner, did not respond to CNBC’s survey as of publication time but has dismissed China’s economic competitiveness while on the campaign trail, earning some criticism from his fellow contenders. “China is going to eat our lunch? Come on, man,” Biden told a crowd in Iowa earlier this month. He described himself as a “fair trader” and said he has been “arguing for a long time that we should treat other countries the way in which they treat us, which is, particularly as it relates to China: If they want to trade here, they’re going to be under the same rules.” CNBC provided the questions to each campaign on May 6. What do you think is the best approach to addressing China’s practices with regard to intellectual property theft, technology transfer, industrial subsidies and other matters in which the two countries are at odds. Is it through multinational organizations like the World Trade Organization and the United Nations? Will you take any action unilaterally? If so, what action? Sanders: It is in the interests of the United States to work to strengthen institutions like the WTO and the UN rather than trying to go it alone. American concerns about China’s technology practices are shared in Europe and across the Asia-Pacific. We can place far more pressure on China to change its policies if we work together with the broader international community and the other developed economies. International institutions also offer China a template for reforming its own internal intellectual property and industrial practices. Swalwell: I’m a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, as well as of the Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet, so I’ve seen first-hand the economic espionage that China commits and the adverse impact it has on American businesses. China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. Nor is China transparent on its industrial subsidies. Curbing China’s dishonest practices must be a part of any negotiation; as president, I would hold China accountable. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. In order to combat this we must take a multi-pronged approach — both defensive and offensive. We must have a strong enforcement mechanism with which to hold China accountable for their actions and continue to impose penalties when theft occurs. China has made promises to institute reforms of their policies governing IP rights, technology transfers and cyber-theft of trade secrets in the past but we know these are not being imposed. Read more: Eric Swalwell of California joins 2020 presidential race The legal and diplomatic approaches have not been completely effective, it is critical that we implement other actions such as developing early warning systems, particularly when it comes to the stealing of defense technology. This can be done through private-public partnerships. We must also be ready to take counter action when a theft is detected. It is vital that we continue to have a multinational approach to addressing these issues. We can’t go it alone; we must involve allies — and other victims of China’s practices — such as Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

While the U.S. does not have to go through the World Trade Organization and can invoke Section 301 if they are to impose tariffs against China (even though it still has to file a simultaneous complaint with the WTO), the WTO can still be a useful partner. In fact, the WTO has an obligation to enforce the rules they have set up, otherwise it is left to the United States to impose punishment. We should hold the WTO to its obligation. It is also important that U.S. companies acknowledge when theft is occurring by China. In the past, companies have not wanted to impinge on their business with China so they’ve turned a blind eye. I would ensure that reporting this theft it is a win-win for American companies through fair trade practices. Lastly, government departments must coordinate with each other and with U.S. companies. The departments of Commerce and the Treasury, the U.S. Trade Representative and the U.S. State Department must all be aligned to tackle the problem of IP property theft in coordination with the private sector. I would continue to make sure the Justice Department brings criminal cases against the companies that violate trade agreements and steal our trade secrets and intellectual property. I would boost our Trade Representative’s investigation of China’s activities by adding more staff and funding. Ryan: When it comes to China stealing intellectual property from the United States, there is no doubt that multinational organizations need to play a part in holding them accountable. These actions are a serious national security and economic risk for the United States. At the same time, I think our government must take further action when it comes to creating safeguards against China’s actions. That is why I have cosponsored legislation the Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act, which would hold China accountable and create necessary regulations when it comes to trade with China, including prohibiting the sale of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property to China. Read more: Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan — who once tried to take down Nancy Pelosi — is running for president Delaney: China has acted like pirates, stealing intellectual property, building illegal islands, and not playing by the rules. I will build a broad coalition of U.S. allies and have a unified front against China (this will involve working with multinational organizations but also doing a lot more), I will unify our business community against these practices by preventing them from depositing intellectual property funded by taxpayers into joint ventures with China, and I will re-enter the TPP to compete with China. We can hold China accountable and have a productive relationship with them. Read more: What being a successful businessman taught Rep. John Delaney about politics Moulton: These options aren’t mutually exclusive. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. Protecting our international property is a national security issue, and we need to build a cyberwall to protect against Chinese and Russian attacks. We should start by strengthening the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center created under President Obama and improve the information-sharing between the private sector and government on cyber threats. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help American workers. Donald Trump has shown he knows nothing about trade. An initial analysis of the net effect of the tariffs is that they are costing the United States economy $1.4 billion a month, and the cost of the tariffs is being passed on to U.S. farmers, companies, and consumers. Read more: Seth Moulton is the latest Democrat running for president. Here are his biggest policy priorities, from green jobs to a public option The United States led the 15 years of negotiations that enabled China to join the WTO and we should reap the benefits of that successful diplomatic effort. Our negotiators secured unprecedented changes to China’s economic and trade policies as conditions for membership, including requiring a dramatic opening of China’s telecom, banking, and insurance sectors, along with the lowering of tariffs on key agricultural products to almost zero. The point is: WTO leverage works. China’s membership in the WTO has been a huge boon to the United States, with U.S. exports to China increasing by 500 percent and agricultural exports increasing by 1000 percent since China joined the organization. Going forward, the WTO should absolutely be involved in establishing trust in trade negotiations and in providing the mechanisms for the enforcement of trade agreements. Bennet: Instead of slapping tariffs on our allies and perpetrating a trade war, Michael believes we need to do the hard work of building coalitions to counter Chinese predatory economic practices, like intellectual property theft and economic espionage, that harm American workers, businesses, farmers, and ranchers. In order to compete with and counter an increasingly authoritarian China, Michael believes we must reinvest in our alliances, champion democratic values like the rule of law and human rights, and sharpen our efforts to combat technology threats that undermine U.S. economic and national security.

Messam: The strained trade relations between the U.S. and China is a complex issue that should be confronted with a measured and sober disposition. The combined approach of multinational organizations and unilateral action should be leveraged to protect intellectual property, technology assets, and trade secrets. Before engaging trade wars that could have detrimental impacts to American businesses and our economy, we must seek to solve our trade differences diplomatically. Where multinational organization negotiations don’t work, I would seek specific and direct trade remedies not limited to: • tariffs • blockade on imports of stolen intellectual property Read more: Little-known Florida mayor becomes the latest Democrat vying to take on Trump in 2020 Williamson: The United States Intellectual Property is some of the most valued in the world. According to the USTR, by stealing our intellectual property, China costs American businesses between $225 billion and $600 billion annually. We must use all tools at our disposal to ensure China respects intellectual property law. This will include working with and leveraging the power of the international community to make certain that China engages in fair trade. The U.S. government must also enlist the help and cooperation from American businesses to help solve this problem. Increased internal controls, more robust screening and standardized best practices will make it more difficult for Chinese agents to operate. Many opportunities are a matter of simple theft. More diligence will help curb crimes of opportunity. Lastly, a firm no nonsense stance against China on every front will be necessary to send a clear message that these practices won’t be tolerated. Should a trade deal with China address human rights issues? If not, will your administration address human rights in China and, if so, how? Sanders: Yes. Labor protections are very weak in China, and the rights of workers are an essential component of human rights. The Trump administration has proven itself indifferent to labor rights, and apparently would prefer that American workers are reduced to the position of Chinese workers, rather than that labor everywhere enjoy basic protections and strong standard of living. The Trump administration has also done nothing to pressure China over its abhorrent treatment of the Uighur and Tibetan peoples. Future trade negotiations should, for example, target American corporations that contribute surveillance technologies that enable China’s authoritarian practices. Swalwell: Yes, a trade deal must have a component to address human rights activity. We must be a model for the world and call out countries such as China that violate human rights. Ryan: Yes. As the United States negotiates any future trade deal with China, we must address the human rights violations. The actions we have seen from the Chinese government when it comes to the inhumane treatment of the ethnic minorities is inexcusable. And no future trade agreement can ignore these violations. Delaney: Human rights are a priority to the Delaney Administration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


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Trump and Putin talked about Mueller report, Venezuela and North Korea during phone call

President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin from the Oval Office of the White House on January 28, 2017, in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and Russian leader Vladimir Putin discussed the Mueller report, Venezuela and North Korea during a lengthy phone call on Friday, the White House said. The two talked on the phone for more than an hour, according to White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. Trump also used the conversation to call on Puti


President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin from the Oval Office of the White House on January 28, 2017, in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and Russian leader Vladimir Putin discussed the Mueller report, Venezuela and North Korea during a lengthy phone call on Friday, the White House said. The two talked on the phone for more than an hour, according to White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. Trump also used the conversation to call on Puti
Trump and Putin talked about Mueller report, Venezuela and North Korea during phone call Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, venezuela, talked, house, report, white, russian, putin, mueller, recent, sanders, north, korea, president, trump


Trump and Putin talked about Mueller report, Venezuela and North Korea during phone call

President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin from the Oval Office of the White House on January 28, 2017, in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump and Russian leader Vladimir Putin discussed the Mueller report, Venezuela and North Korea during a lengthy phone call on Friday, the White House said.

The two talked on the phone for more than an hour, according to White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. The leaders also discussed trade and a potential nuclear agreement including China, Sanders said.

Regarding the investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller, which concluded in March, Sanders said “both leaders knew there was no collusion.” The discussion on the matter was brief, she said.

Trump also used the conversation to call on Putin to put pressure on North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to denuclearize, Sanders said. The president has made the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula a key foreign policy priority.

Trump and Putin have spoken on the phone more than half a dozen times since Trump became president, according to official readouts from the White House. Last year, Putin said the two spoke “regularly.”

The discussion between the two leaders comes amid tense relations between the two global powers, with a geopolitical standoff in Latin America threatening to break out into greater violence and intense domestic attention on Trump’s dealings with Russia.

In recent days, the two countries have warned each other against further intervention in Venezuela, where U.S.-backed opposition leader Juan Guaido is escalating calls for a mass uprising against Nicolas Maduro, who retains Russian support.

“This is our hemisphere,” Bolton said Wednesday. “It’s not where the Russians ought to be interfering.”

Meanwhile, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov warned in a phone call to Mike Pompeo, the American secretary of state, that U.S. intervention in the country violated international law and could lead to grave consequences, Reuters reported.

And, at home, Trump’s attorney general pick is facing is facing calls from a number of congressional Democrats to resign over what they say were misleading characterizations of concerns raised by Mueller’s prosecutors.

Mueller’s investigation into accusations that Trump colluded with Russia during the 2016 campaign dogged much of the first two years of his administration, and “placed a cloud over the Presidency that has only begun to lift in recent weeks,” White House lawyer Emmett Flood wrote in a recent letter to Attorney General William Barr that was made public Thursday.

Barr delivered his first public testimony to Congress following the Mueller report’s release on Wednesday. A day later, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused him of lying to Congress, a crime.

This is breaking news. Check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, venezuela, talked, house, report, white, russian, putin, mueller, recent, sanders, north, korea, president, trump


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Attorney General William Barr: ‘I don’t know’ if White House has suggested the Department of Justice open an investigation into anyone

Attorney General William Barr on Wednesday said he did not know whether President Donald Trump or any other White House official had ever suggested to him that the Department of Justice launch an investigation into someone. “Has the president or anyone at the White House ever asked or suggested that you open an investigation of anyone? Barr told Harris that he was trying to “grapple with the word ‘suggest.'” The White House, he said, had not asked him to open an investigation. Following her exch


Attorney General William Barr on Wednesday said he did not know whether President Donald Trump or any other White House official had ever suggested to him that the Department of Justice launch an investigation into someone. “Has the president or anyone at the White House ever asked or suggested that you open an investigation of anyone? Barr told Harris that he was trying to “grapple with the word ‘suggest.'” The White House, he said, had not asked him to open an investigation. Following her exch
Attorney General William Barr: ‘I don’t know’ if White House has suggested the Department of Justice open an investigation into anyone Cached Page below :
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Attorney General William Barr: 'I don't know' if White House has suggested the Department of Justice open an investigation into anyone

Attorney General William Barr on Wednesday said he did not know whether President Donald Trump or any other White House official had ever suggested to him that the Department of Justice launch an investigation into someone.

The comments came in a tense exchange with Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., who launched a bid for president earlier this year, during Barr’s testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“Has the president or anyone at the White House ever asked or suggested that you open an investigation of anyone? Yes or no, please, sir,” Harris, the former California attorney general, asked Barr.

“Seems you would remember something like that and be able to tell us,” Harris said.

Barr told Harris that he was trying to “grapple with the word ‘suggest.'” The White House, he said, had not asked him to open an investigation.

“Perhaps they have suggested?” Harris asked.

“I don’t know. I wouldn’t say ‘suggest,'” Barr said.

“Hinted?” Harris asked.

“I don’t know,” Barr said.

Last spring, Trump told then-White House counsel Don McGahn that he wanted to order the Justice Department to prosecute his 2016 electoral rival Hillary Clinton as well as former FBI Director James Comey, The New York Times reported last year.

But McGahn pushed back, the outlet reported, and had White House lawyers draft a memo outlining the possible consequences of such a move, which they wrote could include accusations of abuses of power, as well as impeachment.

The Times reported that it was not clear whether Trump kept pushing for the prosecutions but that he did continue to discuss the matter. McGahn left the Trump administration in October.

Barr was confirmed as attorney general in February. On Wednesday he took questions from lawmakers about special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the Justice Department’s investigation into Trump’s 2016 campaign.

Following her exchange with Barr, Harris told reporters that the attorney general “lacks all credibility.” She called on him to resign.

The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

WATCH: Barr cancels appearance in front of House Judiciary Committee


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: tucker higgins
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Trump says NRA is ‘under siege by Cuomo’ after New York AG opens investigation into gun group

US President Donald Trump speaks during the National Rifle Association Annual Meeting on April 26, 2019, at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana. President Donald Trump said Monday the National Rifle Association is “under siege by Cuomo,” days after New York’s attorney general opened an inquiry into the gun rights lobbying organization. The president’s comments follow the news that New York Attorney General Letitia James opened an investigation into the group, including ordering the preser


US President Donald Trump speaks during the National Rifle Association Annual Meeting on April 26, 2019, at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana. President Donald Trump said Monday the National Rifle Association is “under siege by Cuomo,” days after New York’s attorney general opened an inquiry into the gun rights lobbying organization. The president’s comments follow the news that New York Attorney General Letitia James opened an investigation into the group, including ordering the preser
Trump says NRA is ‘under siege by Cuomo’ after New York AG opens investigation into gun group Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: tucker higgins
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Trump says NRA is 'under siege by Cuomo' after New York AG opens investigation into gun group

US President Donald Trump speaks during the National Rifle Association Annual Meeting on April 26, 2019, at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana.

President Donald Trump said Monday the National Rifle Association is “under siege by Cuomo,” days after New York’s attorney general opened an inquiry into the gun rights lobbying organization.

The president also chided the group for a leadership fight that has played out in public in recent days, saying the NRA “must get its act together quickly, stop the internal fighting, & get back to GREATNESS – FAST!”

The president’s comments follow the news that New York Attorney General Letitia James opened an investigation into the group, including ordering the preservation of internal documents. James said during her campaign that she intended to look into the New York-chartered group’s nonprofit status.

“The NRA should leave and fight from the outside of this very difficult to deal with (unfair) State!” the president wrote in a subsequent tweet.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: tucker higgins
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Even with Biden in the race, former President Barack Obama will wait to endorse a 2020 Democrat

Former President Barack Obama is waiting to see how things play out before making any 2020 endorsement, including of Joe Biden, his two-time running mate. Obama delivered a supportive statement for his longtime friend Biden on Thursday after the former vice president made his entrance into the race official. Read more: Every Democrat wants Barack Obama’s 2020 endorsement – but Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are likely the top contenders to get it”We don’t need eight more years of Biden. Just ask Pr


Former President Barack Obama is waiting to see how things play out before making any 2020 endorsement, including of Joe Biden, his two-time running mate. Obama delivered a supportive statement for his longtime friend Biden on Thursday after the former vice president made his entrance into the race official. Read more: Every Democrat wants Barack Obama’s 2020 endorsement – but Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are likely the top contenders to get it”We don’t need eight more years of Biden. Just ask Pr
Even with Biden in the race, former President Barack Obama will wait to endorse a 2020 Democrat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: tucker higgins, cheriss may, nurphoto, getty images
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Even with Biden in the race, former President Barack Obama will wait to endorse a 2020 Democrat

Former President Barack Obama is waiting to see how things play out before making any 2020 endorsement, including of Joe Biden, his two-time running mate.

Obama delivered a supportive statement for his longtime friend Biden on Thursday after the former vice president made his entrance into the race official. But he is unlikely to endorse him or anyone else until the Democratic candidates have a chance to make their cases directly to the voters, a source familiar with the former president’s thinking told CNBC.

Though Obama’s reluctance is not wholly surprising, Republicans are already seizing on it as a talking point to use against the 76-year-old Pennsylvania native who is leading the race in early polling.

Read more: Every Democrat wants Barack Obama’s 2020 endorsement – but Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are likely the top contenders to get it

“We don’t need eight more years of Biden. Just ask President Obama, who isn’t even endorsing his right-hand man,” RNC Communications Director Michael Ahrens said in a statement.

Despite withholding an endorsement, Obama has said kind words about Biden. In a statement, Obama spokeswoman Katie Hill said that the former president “has long said that selecting Joe Biden as his running mate in 2008 was one of the best decisions he ever made.”

“He relied on the Vice President’s knowledge, insight, and judgment throughout both campaigns and the entire presidency. The two forged a special bond over the last 10 years and remain close today,” Hill said.

And Obama’s former advisor David Axelrod pushed back on those who expected an endorsement right out of the gate, telling Politico that the expectation was “baffling” and contrary to custom.

Biden, talking to reporters in Thursday, said he asked Obama not to endorse him.

“He wanted to make the case. He is running in this race because he believes we need to restore the soul of this nation, we need to rebuild the backbone of America, and that we need to unify and come together,” Biden’s communications director Kate Bedingfield said on MSNBC.

Still, there is some speculation that Obama could back a candidate whose campaign more closely resembles his own 2008 bid, which was at first seen as a long shot and was predicated on change.

In a 2016 interview with The New Yorker, Obama mentioned four up-and-coming Democrats that he suggested could appeal to the party’s changing demographics. Two of those Democrats, Sen. Kamala Harris of California and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, are running for president.

And Buttigieg, who is 37, has already drawn support from top Obama fundraisers, CNBC has reported.

Meanwhile, Obama’s former staffers have fanned out among the 20 Democrats running for president.

Former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke’s campaign is being run by Obama’s 2012 deputy campaign manager Jennifer O’Malley Dillon.

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s national deputy political director is a former Obama campaign advisor, as are officials working for Harris and Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. Meanwhile, Bill Burton, one of Obama’s first campaign advisors, has signed on to work for former Starbucks chief Howard Schultz, who has said he may run as an independent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: tucker higgins, cheriss may, nurphoto, getty images
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Trump: Mexican soldiers used confrontation with US troops as diversion

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that Mexican soldiers “recently pulled guns” on American troops near the southern border, and accused the soldiers of “probably” doing so as a diversionary tactic for drug smugglers. We are now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border,” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter. The confrontation between Mexican soldiers and U.S. troops happened April 13 on American territory. It was first made public by Newsweek, which reported that Mexican soldiers detained and sear


President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that Mexican soldiers “recently pulled guns” on American troops near the southern border, and accused the soldiers of “probably” doing so as a diversionary tactic for drug smugglers. We are now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border,” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter. The confrontation between Mexican soldiers and U.S. troops happened April 13 on American territory. It was first made public by Newsweek, which reported that Mexican soldiers detained and sear
Trump: Mexican soldiers used confrontation with US troops as diversion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: tucker higgins, hannah mckay
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Trump: Mexican soldiers used confrontation with US troops as diversion

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that Mexican soldiers “recently pulled guns” on American troops near the southern border, and accused the soldiers of “probably” doing so as a diversionary tactic for drug smugglers.

“Better not happen again! We are now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border,” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter. “Mexico is not doing nearly enough in apprehending & returning!”

The confrontation between Mexican soldiers and U.S. troops happened April 13 on American territory. It was first made public by Newsweek, which reported that Mexican soldiers detained and searched the Americans briefly at gunpoint, thinking they were still in Mexico after mistakenly crossing into the United States.

In a press release issued Wednesday, Mexico’s foreign affairs ministry wrote that the incident was not out of the ordinary. Both governments, it said, were in contact throughout the situation.

“After a brief discussion between the soldiers from the two nations, the Mexican military members departed the area,” a spokesperson for the Pentagon told the outlet. “The U.S. soldiers immediately contacted CBP, who responded quickly. Throughout the incident, the U.S. soldiers followed all established procedures and protocols.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: tucker higgins, hannah mckay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, american, doing, mexican, troops, wrote, border, used, diversion, mexico, soldiers, incident, confrontation


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SCOTUS conservatives limit class arbitration in divided decision

Roberts argued that under the court’s precedent arbitration is a matter of “consent,” and that consent cannot be inferred from an agreement that is ambiguous. “Today’s opinion is rooted instead in the majority’s belief that class arbitration ‘undermine[s] the central benefits of arbitration itself,’ she wrote. A federal court in California permitted Lamps Plus to force Varela into arbitration, but granted his request for class arbitration. Arbitration cases have taken on increased significance i


Roberts argued that under the court’s precedent arbitration is a matter of “consent,” and that consent cannot be inferred from an agreement that is ambiguous. “Today’s opinion is rooted instead in the majority’s belief that class arbitration ‘undermine[s] the central benefits of arbitration itself,’ she wrote. A federal court in California permitted Lamps Plus to force Varela into arbitration, but granted his request for class arbitration. Arbitration cases have taken on increased significance i
SCOTUS conservatives limit class arbitration in divided decision Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: tucker higgins, mark wilson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, divided, class, court, scotus, courts, consent, limit, law, conservatives, decision, opinion, arbitration, cases


SCOTUS conservatives limit class arbitration in divided decision

The Supreme Court on Wednesday handed a victory to business in a 5-4 ruling along ideological lines that held that workers are not entitled to resolve disputes through class arbitration in cases where their arbitration agreement is ambiguous.

The closely-watched case is the latest in a long string of rulings at the top court strengthening the power of firms to compel their employees to resolve disputes through individual arbitration, a practice that businesses argue is more efficient and worker advocates say enables abuse to go unchecked.

Arbitration is a dispute resolution mechanism that is less formal than the court system which generally favors employers.

The decision follows the court’s landmark ruling on the issue in the 2018 case Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, which held, also 5-4, that arbitration agreements requiring workers to submit to individual arbitration must be enforced.

The opinion drew a flurry of criticism from the court’s liberal wing, with each of the four Democratic appointees penning a dissent. But Chief Justice John Roberts, in his opinion for the court, downplayed the criticism, arguing that the “opinion today is far from the watershed” the dissenters claimed it to be.

Roberts argued that under the court’s precedent arbitration is a matter of “consent,” and that consent cannot be inferred from an agreement that is ambiguous. The decision overturned a ruling from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which held that, under state law, ambiguity in a contract should be resolved against the party that drafted the agreement.

Read more: The Supreme Court could make it harder for workers to sue over issues like sexual harassment and pay discrimination

Justice Elena Kagan said the 9th Circuit’s reasoning was based on “a plain-vanilla rule of contract interpretation.”

“Today’s opinion is rooted instead in the majority’s belief that class arbitration ‘undermine[s] the central benefits of arbitration itself,’ she wrote. “But that policy view—of a piece with the majority’s ideas about class litigation—cannot justify displacing generally applicable state law about how to interpret ambiguous contracts.”

The case involved Frank Varela, an employee at a lighting company, Lamps Plus. In 2016, Varela’s tax information was stolen by a hacker in a breach that affected hundreds of other employees.

Varela filed a lawsuit against the company on behalf of himself and others whose data was stolen. A federal court in California permitted Lamps Plus to force Varela into arbitration, but granted his request for class arbitration. That decision was affirmed by the Ninth Circuit.

“This is a win for employers,” said Lauren Novak, a partner at the law firm Schiff Hardin. “The decision provides clear guidance to the lower courts – the right to proceed as a class cannot be inferred, it will be permissible only if the employer expressly consented to it in the arbitration agreement.”

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in a dissent, said the court was straying “treacherously” from the court’s previous rulings on what was meant by consent in arbitration cases. She wrote that it was ironic to use the principle of consent “to justify imposing individual arbitration on employees who surely would not choose to proceed solo.”

“The widely experienced neglect [Varela] identified cries out for collective treatment,” Ginsburg wrote. “Shut from the Court’s sight is the ‘Hobson’s choice’ employees face: ‘accept arbitration on their employer’s terms or give up their jobs.'”

Arbitration cases have taken on increased significance in recent years because of added attention to worker disputes over sexual harassment in the workplace. A 2018 report by the Economic Policy Institute, a left-leaning think tank, found that the share of workers subject to forced arbitration agreements has doubled in recent decades and now includes more than half the country’s workforce.

Emily Martin, vice president for education and workplace justice at the National Women’s Law Center, told CNBC in the fall that workers are less likely to come forward with such complaints if they are forced to resolve them as individuals, rather than groups. Raising the funds, and gathering the necessary information, are among the hurdles.

“If you feel like you are the only one, you are much less likely to come forward and say, I deserve better, you can’t treat me like this,” she said.

A number of companies in recent years, including Google and Facebook, have sought to address the issue by ending forced arbitration in cases involving sexual harassment. Ginsburg said those efforts “ameliorate some of the harm” caused by the court’s arbitration decisions, but re-iterated her stance that congressional action is “urgently in order.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: tucker higgins, mark wilson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, divided, class, court, scotus, courts, consent, limit, law, conservatives, decision, opinion, arbitration, cases


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Benjamin Netanyahu wants new Golan Heights town named for Donald Trump

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, fresh off an election victory that will see him lead the country for a fifth term, said Tuesday he plans to push for a “new community” in the disputed Golan Heights to be named after President Donald Trump. “All Israelis were deeply moved when President Trump made his historic decision to recognize Israel’s sovereignty over the Golan Heights,” Netanyahu said in a video posted to YouTube. “Therefore, after the Passover holiday, I intend to bring to the g


Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, fresh off an election victory that will see him lead the country for a fifth term, said Tuesday he plans to push for a “new community” in the disputed Golan Heights to be named after President Donald Trump. “All Israelis were deeply moved when President Trump made his historic decision to recognize Israel’s sovereignty over the Golan Heights,” Netanyahu said in a video posted to YouTube. “Therefore, after the Passover holiday, I intend to bring to the g
Benjamin Netanyahu wants new Golan Heights town named for Donald Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: tucker higgins, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, benjamin, president, trump, wants, named, heights, united, sovereignty, states, town, donald, netanyahu, recognize, israeli, territory, golan


Benjamin Netanyahu wants new Golan Heights town named for Donald Trump

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, fresh off an election victory that will see him lead the country for a fifth term, said Tuesday he plans to push for a “new community” in the disputed Golan Heights to be named after President Donald Trump.

“All Israelis were deeply moved when President Trump made his historic decision to recognize Israel’s sovereignty over the Golan Heights,” Netanyahu said in a video posted to YouTube. “Therefore, after the Passover holiday, I intend to bring to the government a resolution calling for a new community on the Golan Heights named after President Donald J. Trump.”

Trump announced in a March 25 presidential proclamation that the United States recognized Israeli sovereignty over the strategic plateau that Israel captured from Syria during the 1967 Six-Day War and later annexed. The move marked a dramatic change in policy that helped Netanyahu win reelection.

After the president’s proclamation, the European Union’s 28 member states unanimously declared that they still did not recognize Israel’s sovereignty over the disputed territory, citing United Nations Security Council resolutions forbidding the acquisition of territory through the use of force.

Al-Marsad, a Golan Heights-based human rights group, has denounced U.S. recognition of Israeli control, declaring after Trump’s announcement that it would legitimize “illegal aggression and occupation.”

“Syrians in the occupied Golan face calculated Israeli efforts to restrict their building and land use, destroy their enterprises, cleanse their Arab culture, manipulate their Syrian identity, and suffocate their freedom of movement,” the group wrote at the time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: tucker higgins, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, benjamin, president, trump, wants, named, heights, united, sovereignty, states, town, donald, netanyahu, recognize, israeli, territory, golan


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South Bend poor say Democrat Pete Buttigieg left them behind

SOUTH BEND, Ind. His presidential campaign, however, cited South Bend polling data that shows the mayor has made inroads with minority communities. Indeed, Buttigieg was reelected in 2015 with 80% of the vote, winning every part of South Bend against his Republican competitor. His performance among poor and minority voters has weighed on him in some early national polls, too, particularly as his economic record in South Bend comes into greater focus. Buttigieg’s campaign declined on multiple occ


SOUTH BEND, Ind. His presidential campaign, however, cited South Bend polling data that shows the mayor has made inroads with minority communities. Indeed, Buttigieg was reelected in 2015 with 80% of the vote, winning every part of South Bend against his Republican competitor. His performance among poor and minority voters has weighed on him in some early national polls, too, particularly as his economic record in South Bend comes into greater focus. Buttigieg’s campaign declined on multiple occ
South Bend poor say Democrat Pete Buttigieg left them behind Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: tucker higgins, tucker higgins for cnbc, -shawn white, south bend, indiana
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, national, south, democrat, minority, buttigieg, poor, city, buttigiegs, left, campaign, say, bend, mayor, neely, pete


South Bend poor say Democrat Pete Buttigieg left them behind

SOUTH BEND, Ind. – C.J. Neely, a black 16-year-old who has lived here all his life, thinks it’s pretty cool that Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of this small city of about 100,000 people, is running for president.

“I never heard about anybody from Indiana running for president,” Neely said recently outside his childhood home in the city’s northwest.

Just a few days before, Buttigieg, a rising star of the Democratic Party, officially launched his bid for president at an abandoned Studebaker plant downtown that the city helped convert into a 800,000-square-foot tech hub, a symbol of the city pushing beyond its 20th century roots.

Neely, who lives just a few miles away, hadn’t heard about the announcement. And, he said, he hasn’t seen the progress.

“This s— looks the same, every time I walk through here,” Neely assessed somberly. Though he acknowledged that the mayor was “trying,” the teenager delivered a blunt conclusion: “He’s improved s—.”

At a time when economic inequality and racial justice are at the nation’s political forefront, Buttigieg’s candidacy could be hamstrung by the impression that he has not tried hard enough to improve the conditions of South Bend’s poor and minority communities.

Even as his national polling numbers rise, the mayor faces criticism about his record on race, including for his handling of a police controversy that continues to be a subject of conversation in the city. His presidential campaign, however, cited South Bend polling data that shows the mayor has made inroads with minority communities. Chris Meagher, Buttigieg’s national press secretary, said in a statement that a poll conducted by Buttigieg’s “Pete for South Bend” campaign last month showed 86% “of folks, with a heavy African-American sample, said that the city was on the right track.”

Indeed, Buttigieg was reelected in 2015 with 80% of the vote, winning every part of South Bend against his Republican competitor. Buttigieg also won 77% of the vote against a black Democratic primary challenger. In that primary race, though, the extent of his victory was uneven, picking up one predominantly black district by only 60 votes, or four percentage points, according to the South Bend Tribune.

The skepticism has dogged him on the campaign trail, too. Buttigieg has struggled to attract diverse audiences at rallies so far in his campaign. It is an issue Buttigieg has said he is “very intent” on fixing. His performance among poor and minority voters has weighed on him in some early national polls, too, particularly as his economic record in South Bend comes into greater focus.

Buttigieg’s campaign declined on multiple occasions to make him available for an interview.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: tucker higgins, tucker higgins for cnbc, -shawn white, south bend, indiana
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, national, south, democrat, minority, buttigieg, poor, city, buttigiegs, left, campaign, say, bend, mayor, neely, pete


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