How 3 friends turned their unwanted items into a $550 million business

CarousellReturning to Singapore after their internship, they did just that, focusing initially on items like electronics before expanding to categories including clothing, property, autos and even jobs. Carousell works like other online classified platforms, and lets users buy and sell unwanted items online by uploading a photo and the relevant details. However, right from the start, Quek said the trio were determined to make their Southeast Asia-centric model a mobile-first solution. They belie


CarousellReturning to Singapore after their internship, they did just that, focusing initially on items like electronics before expanding to categories including clothing, property, autos and even jobs. Carousell works like other online classified platforms, and lets users buy and sell unwanted items online by uploading a photo and the relevant details. However, right from the start, Quek said the trio were determined to make their Southeast Asia-centric model a mobile-first solution. They belie
How 3 friends turned their unwanted items into a $550 million business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 550, singapore, start, unwanted, items, business, million, quek, users, suggested, selling, carousell, sell, turned, right, friends


How 3 friends turned their unwanted items into a $550 million business

Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. Carousell

Returning to Singapore after their internship, they did just that, focusing initially on items like electronics before expanding to categories including clothing, property, autos and even jobs. Carousell works like other online classified platforms, and lets users buy and sell unwanted items online by uploading a photo and the relevant details. In that way, it is similar to sites like eBay and Craigslist, which Quek cited as early inspirations. However, right from the start, Quek said the trio were determined to make their Southeast Asia-centric model a mobile-first solution. They believed it would simplify the process and better suit regional users, for whom smartphones had largely leapfrogged desktop computers. “We were really hooked to using the iPhone as our main computer,” said Quek. “I think we got spoilt by the simplicity of apps like Instagram. We wanted something that was familiar to us, something very mobile-first: Snap to sell, chat to buy, something very social.”

That simplistic approach proved popular with users. Within three days of launching in August 2012, the app was ranked second among the top free lifestyle apps in Singapore. It’s a strategy Quek said is fundamental to the company’s mission of inspiring “every person in the world to start selling and buying.” To help with that, Carousell now draws heavily on artificial intelligence (AI) to speed up the selling process. Image recognition, for instance, will automatically identify items and apply the appropriate categories and tags. Ultimately, Carousell wants to reduce listing times from 30 seconds to just three. “We’re doing a lot of things around AI,” said Quek. “We want to make selling even simpler, so today you can already take a photo, your category will be suggested, your title will be suggested, your price will be suggested.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 550, singapore, start, unwanted, items, business, million, quek, users, suggested, selling, carousell, sell, turned, right, friends


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Why this plant-based meat company turned down a $1 million from Mark Cuban on ‘Shark Tank’

For many entrepreneurs, a $1 million investment from Mark Cuban would be a dream come true — but two co-founders turned down just such an offer on Sunday’s “Shark Tank” on ABC. Jonathan and Deborah Torres, founders of plant-based meat company Atlas Monroe, believed their 100% vegan, plant-based twist on fried chicken made their business worth far more than the Sharks believed. We vowed to stay organic, plant-based and natural. We continued to experiment, and Atlas Monroe was born.” After trying


For many entrepreneurs, a $1 million investment from Mark Cuban would be a dream come true — but two co-founders turned down just such an offer on Sunday’s “Shark Tank” on ABC. Jonathan and Deborah Torres, founders of plant-based meat company Atlas Monroe, believed their 100% vegan, plant-based twist on fried chicken made their business worth far more than the Sharks believed. We vowed to stay organic, plant-based and natural. We continued to experiment, and Atlas Monroe was born.” After trying
Why this plant-based meat company turned down a $1 million from Mark Cuban on ‘Shark Tank’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cuban, atlas, family, diet, father, company, monroe, organic, million, fried, tank, mark, salads, vegan, turned, shark, plantbased, meat


Why this plant-based meat company turned down a $1 million from Mark Cuban on 'Shark Tank'

For many entrepreneurs, a $1 million investment from Mark Cuban would be a dream come true — but two co-founders turned down just such an offer on Sunday’s “Shark Tank” on ABC.

Jonathan and Deborah Torres, founders of plant-based meat company Atlas Monroe, believed their 100% vegan, plant-based twist on fried chicken made their business worth far more than the Sharks believed.

Deborah was inspired to try and develop better tasting plant-based food after her father was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Her family decided to adopt a healthier diet to support him.

“My whole family and I went on a raw, vegan and organic diet for 90 days. We grew really ‘hangry’ at each other from just eating salads and fruit salads,” Deborah said. “After the 90 days, [my father] was completely healed. We vowed to stay organic, plant-based and natural. We continued to experiment, and Atlas Monroe was born.”

After trying the Atlas Monroe plant-based “fried chicken,” the judges were shocked at how it tasted.

“The batter is extremely tasty,” Lori Greiner said during the episode. “It’s got some zip to it.”

Barbara Corcoran added, “You fooled me!”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cuban, atlas, family, diet, father, company, monroe, organic, million, fried, tank, mark, salads, vegan, turned, shark, plantbased, meat


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PG&E to cut off power to nearly 800,000 customers to reduce wildfire risk

Nearly 800,000 California homes and businesses can expect to lose electricity for up to several days from Wednesday, in a planned PG&E power shutdown of unprecedented scale due to heightened wildfire risks from high winds, the utility said. Once power is turned off, it cannot be restored until winds subside, allowing PG&E to inspect equipment for damage and make any repairs, it said. “We’re telling customers to be prepared for an outage that could last several days,” PG&E spokeswoman Tamar Sarki


Nearly 800,000 California homes and businesses can expect to lose electricity for up to several days from Wednesday, in a planned PG&E power shutdown of unprecedented scale due to heightened wildfire risks from high winds, the utility said. Once power is turned off, it cannot be restored until winds subside, allowing PG&E to inspect equipment for damage and make any repairs, it said. “We’re telling customers to be prepared for an outage that could last several days,” PG&E spokeswoman Tamar Sarki
PG&E to cut off power to nearly 800,000 customers to reduce wildfire risk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, risk, wildfire, gas, turned, 800000, california, pge, san, winds, customers, nearly, utility, transmission, cut, power, reduce


PG&E to cut off power to nearly 800,000 customers to reduce wildfire risk

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) workers remain at the scene of a three-alarm fire that started after a construction crew hit a gas line on February 7, 2019 in San Francisco, California.

Nearly 800,000 California homes and businesses can expect to lose electricity for up to several days from Wednesday, in a planned PG&E power shutdown of unprecedented scale due to heightened wildfire risks from high winds, the utility said.

Pacific Gas & Electric Co, a unit of PG&E, said on Tuesday it was extending a previously announced “public safety power shutoff” to 34 counties in northern and central California, marking the largest such precautionary outage the utility has undertaken to date.

Power will be turned off to communities in stages, starting in northern California, just after 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, depending on the timing of high-wind conditions locally, PG&E said in a statement.

Sustained gale-force winds were expected to last through midday Thursday, with isolated gusts of up to 70 miles per hour, the utility said. Once power is turned off, it cannot be restored until winds subside, allowing PG&E to inspect equipment for damage and make any repairs, it said.

“We’re telling customers to be prepared for an outage that could last several days,” PG&E spokeswoman Tamar Sarkissian told Reuters.

PG&E has come under increased scrutiny in recent years over maintenance of transmission wires and other equipment implicated in a number of major wildfires.

In May, state fire investigators determined that PG&E transmission lines caused the deadliest and most destructive wildfire on record in California, the wind-driven Camp Fire that killed 85 people in and around the town of Paradise last year.

Cal Fire likewise concluded that PG&E power lines had sparked a separate flurry of wildfires that swept California’s wine country north of San Francisco Bay in 2017.

PG&E filed for bankruptcy in January 2019, citing potential civil liabilities in excess of $30 billion from the North Bay and Camp Fires.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, risk, wildfire, gas, turned, 800000, california, pge, san, winds, customers, nearly, utility, transmission, cut, power, reduce


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How S’well turned water bottles into a fashion accessory and built an empire

Enter S’well, a company that makes reusable water bottles with a sleek design and countless color options at a premium price of $35 for a standard size. S’well says it has sold over 20 million S’well bottles worldwide, all while founder and CEO Sarah Kauss has retained 100% ownership of the company. S’well has set a goal to help eliminate 100 million plastic bottles by 2020, by convincing consumers to switch to its reusable bottles instead. S’well water bottles start at $35 and can go as high as


Enter S’well, a company that makes reusable water bottles with a sleek design and countless color options at a premium price of $35 for a standard size. S’well says it has sold over 20 million S’well bottles worldwide, all while founder and CEO Sarah Kauss has retained 100% ownership of the company. S’well has set a goal to help eliminate 100 million plastic bottles by 2020, by convincing consumers to switch to its reusable bottles instead. S’well water bottles start at $35 and can go as high as
How S’well turned water bottles into a fashion accessory and built an empire Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: carmin chappell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, brand, accessory, company, empire, fashion, water, start, turned, built, major, reusable, bottles, million, swell


How S'well turned water bottles into a fashion accessory and built an empire

When it comes to fashion, brands have always found an eager audience willing to pay for cache and quality. But one company has built its brand on the idea that the next big accessory is something completely different: a water bottle.

Enter S’well, a company that makes reusable water bottles with a sleek design and countless color options at a premium price of $35 for a standard size. S’well says it has sold over 20 million S’well bottles worldwide, all while founder and CEO Sarah Kauss has retained 100% ownership of the company.

Kauss, a former accountant, came up with the idea for S’well after becoming frustrated with the unpolished look of her own reusable water bottle in 2009. “It looked like a camping accessory,” she told CNBC Make It. “It didn’t look like something I would want to leave on the table.”

S’well launched in 2010 after Kauss invested $30,000 of her own money to start the company. She managed every part of the business herself, including going door-to-door to retailers to pitch them to carry her products.

The company’s big break came in 2011, when S’well was featured in O, The Oprah Magazine. After the magazine’s editors recommended that the company launch more color options, S’well expanded from one color to six; now the company’s dozens of designs are one of its major selling points. S’well has also found success not only on its online store, but through partnerships with major retailers like Starbucks, Target and Nordstrom.

Sustainability is also a major part of S’well’s brand. Single-use plastic bottles can take hundreds of years to decompose, posing a major threat to the environment. S’well has set a goal to help eliminate 100 million plastic bottles by 2020, by convincing consumers to switch to its reusable bottles instead.

Despite its noble goals, S’well has attracted critics for the high price of its products. S’well water bottles start at $35 and can go as high as $75 for larger sizes. A range of inexpensive S’well competitors have sprung up online for those who want a similar design at a lower price.

But Kauss embraces S’well’s luxury image. “When I hear that people are using swell as a status symbol … I really love that,” she said. The company says its insulated stainless steel bottles can keep drinks cold for 24 hours or hot for 12 hours, longer than cheaper alternatives.

Consumers’ changing tastes, combined with a growing environmental awareness, have positioned S’well to continue to grow as a brand. In 2016, bottled water surpassed soda as the No. 1 beverage in the U.S., according to industry research group Beverage Marketing Corporation. A report by Grand View Research valued the reusable water bottle market at $8.1 billion in 2018.

The company has also expanded its product line beyond bottles. In August, it launched its own line of reusable food containers called S’well Eats and S’nack by S’well that start at $20.

S’well reported $100 million in revenue in 2016, the most recent year it publicized the data. By branching out into new products, the company aims to capture an even wider market with its re-imagining of everyday products.

“If you can get the trifecta of the perfect timing, the right price point and finding that right customer, then you’re going to succeed,” Chris Black, partner at brand consultancy Public Announcement, told CNBC Make It. “That’s what they’ve done.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: carmin chappell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, brand, accessory, company, empire, fashion, water, start, turned, built, major, reusable, bottles, million, swell


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Charles Evans says Fed has turned dovish, but still might need to do more

Charles Evans, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, told CNBC Monday that he was “open-minded” when asked about the right level for interest rates in the U.S., but suggested more cuts could be needed if economic headwinds increase. Evans, noted for his dovish views at the central bank, was still upbeat on the fundamentals for the U.S. despite headwinds that the economy is facing. “We have reduced the federal funds target by 50 basis points and I think tha


Charles Evans, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, told CNBC Monday that he was “open-minded” when asked about the right level for interest rates in the U.S., but suggested more cuts could be needed if economic headwinds increase. Evans, noted for his dovish views at the central bank, was still upbeat on the fundamentals for the U.S. despite headwinds that the economy is facing. “We have reduced the federal funds target by 50 basis points and I think tha
Charles Evans says Fed has turned dovish, but still might need to do more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, level, told, openminded, evans, federal, rates, target, think, dovish, turned, charles, monetary, need, headwinds, right, fed


Charles Evans says Fed has turned dovish, but still might need to do more

Charles Evans, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, told CNBC Monday that he was “open-minded” when asked about the right level for interest rates in the U.S., but suggested more cuts could be needed if economic headwinds increase.

Evans, noted for his dovish views at the central bank, was still upbeat on the fundamentals for the U.S. despite headwinds that the economy is facing.

“We have reduced the federal funds target by 50 basis points and I think that’s helped move us into an accommodative stance, more than where we were for sure, but that could be a moving target if headwinds are increasing and we might need to do more,” he told CNBC’s Annette Weisbach in Frankfurt.

He said that he was “definitely open-minded” about what the right level would be for the federal funds rate target in order to have the “appropriate monetary policy.”

“At the moment I think appropriate monetary policy is somewhat under the neutral rates so that we are providing accommodation,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, level, told, openminded, evans, federal, rates, target, think, dovish, turned, charles, monetary, need, headwinds, right, fed


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Why this falafel business founder turned down $300,000 from Mark Cuban on ‘Shark Tank’

To be a startup founder in a make-or-break moment and turn down $300,000 from billionaire Mark Cuban means you are either deluded — or you have another, better offer. In the first episode of the show’s 11th season, the 43-year-old founder of TaDah Foods received investment offers from both Cuban and Daniel Lubetzky, founder the snack company Kind and a guest “shark” on the show. When Sorial entered the “tank,” he was looking for $300,000 in exchange for 10% ownership of his company. Lubetzky off


To be a startup founder in a make-or-break moment and turn down $300,000 from billionaire Mark Cuban means you are either deluded — or you have another, better offer. In the first episode of the show’s 11th season, the 43-year-old founder of TaDah Foods received investment offers from both Cuban and Daniel Lubetzky, founder the snack company Kind and a guest “shark” on the show. When Sorial entered the “tank,” he was looking for $300,000 in exchange for 10% ownership of his company. Lubetzky off
Why this falafel business founder turned down $300,000 from Mark Cuban on ‘Shark Tank’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hummus, mark, falafel, daniel, shark, business, tank, 300000, kind, million, think, sorial, tadah, founder, turned, cuban, lubetzky


Why this falafel business founder turned down $300,000 from Mark Cuban on 'Shark Tank'

To be a startup founder in a make-or-break moment and turn down $300,000 from billionaire Mark Cuban means you are either deluded — or you have another, better offer.

John Sorial found himself on the latter on Sunday’s episode of “Shark Tank.” In the first episode of the show’s 11th season, the 43-year-old founder of TaDah Foods received investment offers from both Cuban and Daniel Lubetzky, founder the snack company Kind and a guest “shark” on the show.

Sorial turned down Cuban and took Lubetzky’s offer instead.

“Choosing between Daniel and Mark was one of the most difficult decisions I’ve ever made, but Daniel is an icon in our industry,” Sorial said. “To have him in our corner — supporting us, not just financially, but working with us and helping us to grow TaDah — we hope to be a national brand. It’s just the best outcome I could have hoped for.”

TaDah makes and sells frozen falafel street wraps in four flavors — fresh lemon garlic hummus, sweet-spicy harissa and lebni, feta green pepper salsa and spicy brown sugar harissa hummus — and bite-size falafel poppers filled with either cucumber dill yogurt, lemony roasted garlic hummus or harissa hummus. The wraps retail for $3.99, and the poppers retail for $4.99.

Sorial, the son of Egyptian immigrants, was inspired by the food of his heritage. “The problem is my grandmother doesn’t ship nationwide,” he said on the show, which was taped in June.

With TaDah Foods, Sorial also hopes to help people around the world. According to the company website, more than 25% of profits go to organizations that are “actively engaged in social change.” One of those organizations is Meant 2 Live Foundation, which aims to fight poverty and homelessness.

Sorial graduated from Johns Hopkins University with a degree in chemical engineering in 1998, according to his LinkedIn profile. From there, he worked as a chemical engineer, and then as a marketing executive.

As of June, TaDah had done $8.2 million in sales. Annual sales had been as high as $2.3 million, but were down to $1 million in the 12 months prior to the June taping. That was because a partner in the production process “became financially insolvent,” Sorial explained to the judges.

During that time, they only had four people on the production floor; usually, the process requires “dozens of people,” according to Sorial. “I would stay all night with the staff. I would suit up and shovel the chickpeas myself,” he said.

At the same time, Sorial was “flying all over the country trying to source new co-packers.” The staff shortage problem has since been fixed, he said.

Lubetzky related to Sorial’s story. In his early years of building Kind, he also faced a production problem, and it almost forced the business to shut down.

“I lost about $1 million in sales because one of my manufacturers had changed the ingredient and we were this far away from closing,” Lubetzky said, using his finger and thumb to indicate how close Kind was to shutting down.

“It’s fascinating to me, when I think back — that we, Kind, grew out of one of the toughest years of my life, and out of that darkness came incredible light,” he continued. “Kind today sells in 300,000 stores, over $1 billion a year at retail.”

Sorial said he was deeply motivated by Lubetsky’s story. So much, in fact, that when describing his reason for working through trying times to keep the business alive, he began to cry.

“When you go to other parts of the world and see how people live, you realize that people are fighting for their lives,” Sorial said. “[Building TaDah] has been difficult, but I think about my family and the people who are struggling, and I want this to be a success because it will impact their lives.”

When Sorial entered the “tank,” he was looking for $300,000 in exchange for 10% ownership of his company. Lubetzky, inspired both by Sorial’s passion and product, said he was interested in investing, but didn’t think Sorial understood how much money he would need to get TaDah back on track.

Lubetzky offered Sorial $300,000 for a 20% stake, or $500,000 for 25%, and indicated that he would be open to extending Sorial a line of credit. Cuban jumped in and offered Sorial $300,000 for 20%, with another $500,000 line of credit.

In an effort to take both up on their offers, Sorial asked if “there is any way” to structure a deal with both Cuban and Lubetzky. But that wasn’t an option.

So Sorial, who said he felt “extremely blessed,” decided to take Lubetzky’s offer of $500,000 for 25% of the business.

In the months since the show was taped, Sorial said the partnership with Lubetzky has been beneficial for TaDah Foods.

“Daniel has been extremely hands-on in the best possible way, and the momentum has been building by leaps and bounds,” Sorial told CNBC Make It, through a Kind spokesperson.

“While I have a great deal of respect for Mark and think he would be a great partner, Daniel is a natural food icon, and he shares my passion for using business as an agent for change to improve people’s lives,” he added. “The fact that he’s also walked in my shoes and already experienced many similar challenges made it the right choice for me.”

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”

See also:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hummus, mark, falafel, daniel, shark, business, tank, 300000, kind, million, think, sorial, tadah, founder, turned, cuban, lubetzky


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Cramer: The new Wells Fargo CEO had turned down the job initially, but then reconsidered

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Friday called Wells Fargo’s selection of veteran banking leader Charles Scharf as its new CEO a “brilliant move.” Wells Fargo on Friday said Scharf will assume the CEO role at the bank, effective Oct. 21. Cramer congratulated Wells Fargo on finally filling the post. Scharf, 54, comes to Wells Fargo after serving as CEO of Bank of New York Mellon, a position he held since July 2017. The nation’s fourth largest bank had been without a permanent CEO since the abrupt resignation


CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Friday called Wells Fargo’s selection of veteran banking leader Charles Scharf as its new CEO a “brilliant move.” Wells Fargo on Friday said Scharf will assume the CEO role at the bank, effective Oct. 21. Cramer congratulated Wells Fargo on finally filling the post. Scharf, 54, comes to Wells Fargo after serving as CEO of Bank of New York Mellon, a position he held since July 2017. The nation’s fourth largest bank had been without a permanent CEO since the abrupt resignation
Cramer: The new Wells Fargo CEO had turned down the job initially, but then reconsidered Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, cramer, bank, reconsidered, think, fargo, charlie, scharf, sloan, wells, job, mellon, turned, initially


Cramer: The new Wells Fargo CEO had turned down the job initially, but then reconsidered

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Friday called Wells Fargo’s selection of veteran banking leader Charles Scharf as its new CEO a “brilliant move.”

“This was a job that was offered to Charlie a while ago. And Charlie didn’t want to take it,” Cramer said. “But I think the opportunity was just too great, was my understanding.”

Wells Fargo on Friday said Scharf will assume the CEO role at the bank, effective Oct. 21. The announcement ends a six-month search in which it seemed nobody wanted take on the challenges of the scandal-ridden bank.

Cramer congratulated Wells Fargo on finally filling the post. “As President Ford would say, ‘Their long national nightmare is now over,'” the “Mad Money” host said. “This is a good move.”

Scharf, 54, comes to Wells Fargo after serving as CEO of Bank of New York Mellon, a position he held since July 2017. He had become chairman at BNY Mellon in January 2018. He’s currently a Microsoft board member. Prior to BNY Mellon, he served four years as CEO of credit card giant Visa.

“I think the expenses are going to be really coming down. Charlie is a technology guy. It’s going to help there,” Cramer said.

Wells Fargo’s interim CEO Allen Parker, the bank’s general counsel, will continue to mind the shop until Scharf officially starts next month.

The nation’s fourth largest bank had been without a permanent CEO since the abrupt resignation of Tim Sloan in March. Sloan, who had spent more than three decades at Wells Fargo, failed to satisfy regulators’ demands to overhaul the sprawling institution after it was revealed that bank employees had created millions of fake accounts to meet sales quotas.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, cramer, bank, reconsidered, think, fargo, charlie, scharf, sloan, wells, job, mellon, turned, initially


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Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Target, Boston Beer, Square & more

BMO said the beer maker could see “80% growth” in 2020. “We are upgrading SAM shares to Outperform as the main pushback against SAM – its high P/E multiple (2020E: 33x) – can be turned around on its head with a better assessment of SAM’s earnings potential. In fact, we believe that 2020 EPS could approach $13, which implies that SAM’s currently trading at a 2020E P/E of 26x-27x, highly attractive given its 20% and 30% sales and EPS growth outlook over the next three years.”


BMO said the beer maker could see “80% growth” in 2020. “We are upgrading SAM shares to Outperform as the main pushback against SAM – its high P/E multiple (2020E: 33x) – can be turned around on its head with a better assessment of SAM’s earnings potential. In fact, we believe that 2020 EPS could approach $13, which implies that SAM’s currently trading at a 2020E P/E of 26x-27x, highly attractive given its 20% and 30% sales and EPS growth outlook over the next three years.”
Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Target, Boston Beer, Square & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boston, shares, calls, analyst, trading, sam, sams, growth, eps, biggest, 2020e, day, target, beer, upgrading, square, turned


Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Target, Boston Beer, Square & more

BMO said the beer maker could see “80% growth” in 2020.

“We are upgrading SAM shares to Outperform as the main pushback against SAM – its high P/E multiple (2020E: 33x) – can be turned around on its head with a better assessment of SAM’s earnings potential. In fact, we believe that 2020 EPS could approach $13, which implies that SAM’s currently trading at a 2020E P/E of 26x-27x, highly attractive given its 20% and 30% sales and EPS growth outlook over the next three years.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boston, shares, calls, analyst, trading, sam, sams, growth, eps, biggest, 2020e, day, target, beer, upgrading, square, turned


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I’m an ex-con artist turned fraud expert—here are the 9 biggest password mistakes I see people making

“A closer examination of major breaches reveals a common theme: in every ‘major headline’ breach, the attack vector has been the common password,” he told CNBC. Biggest password mistakes people make todayChertoff is right, and I agree that the next step is to rid ourselves of passwords. Below are some of the biggest password mistakes people make, and you should avoid them at all costs: 1. Frequent password changes are counterproductive, as people tend to swap out one password for another frequen


“A closer examination of major breaches reveals a common theme: in every ‘major headline’ breach, the attack vector has been the common password,” he told CNBC. Biggest password mistakes people make todayChertoff is right, and I agree that the next step is to rid ourselves of passwords. Below are some of the biggest password mistakes people make, and you should avoid them at all costs: 1. Frequent password changes are counterproductive, as people tend to swap out one password for another frequen
I’m an ex-con artist turned fraud expert—here are the 9 biggest password mistakes I see people making Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: frank abagnale
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, experthere, making, passwords, used, smart, biggest, stolen, artist, websites, computer, mistakes, fraud, ones, excon, device, common, password, turned


I'm an ex-con artist turned fraud expert—here are the 9 biggest password mistakes I see people making

For more than 45 years, I’ve worked with, advised and consulted with the FBI and hundreds of financial institutions, corporations and government agencies around the world to help them in their fight against fraud. But my expertise began more than 50 years ago, in an unusual way: I was one of the world’s most famous con artists. While I’m ashamed of what I did as a young man — cheating, stealing and, along the way, deceiving and hurting people — I was grateful for the opportunity to turn myself around. My story, which is depicted in my 1980 memoir, “Catch Me If You Can,” gave me a wider audience to talk about identity theft protection — and one of the most important topics in fraud protection, which I discuss in my new book, “Scam Me If You Can,” is about passwords.

We need to get rid of passwords

We think our passwords keep us safe, but that’s just a fantasy. They don’t protect us from hackers or maintain the privacy of our online information. Look around at the technology that surrounds you today — iPhones, online banking and shopping, Google, smart TVs — none of them were invented in the 1960s. Yet usernames and passwords, the most prevalent security mechanisms still used, were invented in 1963, more than half a century ago. The inventor of the computer password, Fernando Corbató (who passed away this year at 93), said himself that “passwords have become kind of a nightmare with the World Wide Web.” In 2016, Michael Chertoff, who served as secretary of Homeland Security from 2005 to 2009, echoed Corbató’s views. “A closer examination of major breaches reveals a common theme: in every ‘major headline’ breach, the attack vector has been the common password,” he told CNBC. “The reason is simple,” Chertoff continued. “The password is by far the weakest link in cybersecurity. By making their replacement a national priority, the government can really rally both industry and agencies to adopt stronger solutions that make password-driven breaches a thing of the past.”

Biggest password mistakes people make today

Chertoff is right, and I agree that the next step is to rid ourselves of passwords. In the meantime, there are ways to prevent your account information from getting stolen. Below are some of the biggest password mistakes people make, and you should avoid them at all costs: 1. Changing them too often. Frequent password changes are counterproductive, as people tend to swap out one password for another frequently used one. Changed passwords may also be forgotten, and they can be stolen just as easily as passwords that are changed infrequently. 2. Making them too complex. Keep your passwords simple, but be smart about it. Studies that look at arbitrary password complexity requirements (e.g., ones that call for symbols and uppercase and lowercase letters) repeatedly find that these kinds of restrictions result in less secure passwords. 3. Not screening them. The National Institute of Standards and Technology highly recommends comparing your password against lists of commonly used or known compromised ones. Enzoic.com and Passwordrandom.com are two examples of websites that offer these password screening tools. 4. Recycling the same ones. Reusing the same password across multiple websites is especially dangerous for email, banking and social media accounts. Even if you haven’t used them in years, once they get stolen, they can be used to access many different websites. 5. Being too familiar. Don’t use the following in passwords or answers to website security questions: loved ones’ names (pets included), maiden names, hometowns, birthdays, wedding dates or anything else that can be gleaned with some online research. 6. “Remembering” them on a device. Never use the “save” or “remember me” options on a public computer. The next user could easily access your account. 7. Using common, easily hacked characters. Stay away from these, especially: “123456,” “qwerty” or “password.” Many hackers set on stealing your information still use the “guessing” strategy as a point of entry. Instead, think of something complex, yet memorable and personal to you. For example, “70YrS@n%styll%LUVN^life!” could mean “70 years and still loving life!” 8. Not password-protecting your mobile device. Believe it or not, 52% of people are guilty of this. When setting your device password, it’s smart to avoid common choices like “1234,” 0000,” “2580” (a top-to-bottom sequence) or “5683” (which spells “love”). 9. Storing a password list on your computer. A password cheat sheet is fine, as long as it’s not stored on your computer or smartphone; if you do that and your device is infected with malware, you’re doomed. A pen-and-paper reminder, kept in a safe place, is better. Ideally, it will consist of hints rather than actual passwords.

The cost of doing nothing


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: frank abagnale
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, experthere, making, passwords, used, smart, biggest, stolen, artist, websites, computer, mistakes, fraud, ones, excon, device, common, password, turned


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Legal pot efforts have turned states from narcs to pushers

Tourists Laura Torgerson and Ryan Sheehan, visiting from Arizona, smell cannabis buds at the Green Pearl Organics dispensary on the first day of legal recreational marijuana sales in California, January 1, 2018 in Desert Hot Springs, California. Pot is now legal for recreational use in 11 states with three more states expected to join them in 2019 or 2020 . In many cases, states aren’t just agreeing to look the other way or even just reap the tax benefits of legal marijuana sales. In fact, an As


Tourists Laura Torgerson and Ryan Sheehan, visiting from Arizona, smell cannabis buds at the Green Pearl Organics dispensary on the first day of legal recreational marijuana sales in California, January 1, 2018 in Desert Hot Springs, California. Pot is now legal for recreational use in 11 states with three more states expected to join them in 2019 or 2020 . In many cases, states aren’t just agreeing to look the other way or even just reap the tax benefits of legal marijuana sales. In fact, an As
Legal pot efforts have turned states from narcs to pushers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legal, drug, narcs, recreational, efforts, youre, marijuana, states, law, way, pot, pushers, turned


Legal pot efforts have turned states from narcs to pushers

Tourists Laura Torgerson and Ryan Sheehan, visiting from Arizona, smell cannabis buds at the Green Pearl Organics dispensary on the first day of legal recreational marijuana sales in California, January 1, 2018 in Desert Hot Springs, California.

Of course legalization, especially in the case of marijuana, has been in the spotlight for the past decade. Pot is now legal for recreational use in 11 states with three more states expected to join them in 2019 or 2020 . Meanwhile, it’s legal to use marijuana for medicinal purposes in 33 states. Canada has legalized recreational use nationwide.

None of this is anything new to the large number of Americans who have long supported new strategies to combat drug use. They have often emphasized treatment over interdiction and various levels of decriminalization or even legalization.

All of the above mentioned results of the drug wars have long given even more conservative Americans pause when it comes to drug laws. That’s especially true based on the fact that incarcerations and arrests for drug possession, have been rising at a much faster pace than arrests and incarcerations for drug trafficking and more violent drug crimes.

But for all of that cost, there is no solid evidence that demand for narcotics has dropped discernibly over the decades. New drugs from crack to meth to opioids have come in and out of vogue, proving the “whack-a-mole” aspect of how new demands keep forcing law enforcement to readjust for different threats.

Increased law enforcement, using violent methods, has produced a corresponding increase in violent criminals dominating much of the drug trade.

It forces more than one million drug arrests per year, leaving more than half a million people currently in prison for drug crimes.

If you’re thinking that the emphasis has gone from zero tolerance for marijuna all the way to, “if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em,” without taking any intermediate steps, you’re right on the money.

But legalization is hardly where it stops. In many cases, states aren’t just agreeing to look the other way or even just reap the tax benefits of legal marijuana sales. Instead, they’re actively encouraging the industry. Former House Speaker John Boehner has become a prominent spokesperson for the marijuana industry.

Some states, like Michigan, are even trying to help African Americans and other minorities get into the pot business as a form of some kind of “social justice” or payback for years of their communities being adversely targeted by drug law enforcement.

There’s just one question: what happened to just trying the decriminalization part? If you’re thinking that the emphasis has gone from zero tolerance for marijuna all the way to, “if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em,” without taking any intermediate steps, you’re right on the money.

Having states or eventually the federal government promoting the marijuana industry is problematic for a number of reasons. The biggest problem is the threat marijuana poses to teeenagers and their cognitive development. A new warning on marijuna use for adolescents and pregnant women was issued just this summer by the U.S. surgeon general.

And make no mistake, much of the legal pot industry is marketing products to teens in the same way vaping companies and the makers of the hard lemonade and spiked seltzer have been accused of doing for years.

In fact, an Aspen Institute report issued just after recreational pot became legal in Colorado noted the many products and strategies local businesses were using to lure younger users. In states where governments spend money to encourage certain forms of marijuana entrepreneurship, it’s hardly a stretch to say that parents are seeing their tax dollars being used to at least indirectly market marijiuana to their children.

We’re a long way from trying to simply right a wrong about over-incarceration for drug crimes now, aren’t we?

Speaking of the health risks, the same state of Michigan that’s pushing marijuana sales has also just imposed a ban on some of the most popular forms of vaping. It’s easy to get confused about government health priorities with that kind of mixed messaging.

Then there’s the question of just how effective legalization is at cutting down on the illegal drug trade. The Los Angeles Times reported last month that despite having the largest legal pot market in the country, California’s black market for marijuana is still growing.

Inevitably when anyone brings up these health concerns or any misgivings about the states promoting an intoxicating drug, that person is hit with a litany of arguments about how marijuana is no more harmful than alcohol and it’s not worth continuing to make it illegal.

But that’s not the argument here. Lifting blanket bans on pot and ending unfair and costly law enforcement efforts to arrest people for marijuana possession is something a majority of Americans seem to support and rightfully so. The issue here is whether it’s wise, safe, or even fiscally responsible for the government to get into the marijuana business.

The answer to those questions aren’t clear, but they should give more of us serious pause. One thing that is clear is that it’s disingenuous to use strong arguments for decriminalization as an excuse for aggressive state supported drug use.

It’s even more dubious for our government to go from blacklisting marijuana as a total evil to promoting it as an economic and social panacea.

Jake Novak is a political and economic analyst at Jake Novak News and former CNBC TV producer. You can follow him on Twitter @jakejakeny.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legal, drug, narcs, recreational, efforts, youre, marijuana, states, law, way, pot, pushers, turned


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