AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls

AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers. Correction: A previous vers


AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers. Correction: A previous vers
AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, att, customers, calls, soon, annoying, scam, users, automatically, suspected, spam, robocalls, turned, unwanted, block


AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls

AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The blocking will first activate for new lines and will then be applied to all existing accounts, the carrier said on Tuesday.

The feature will be on by default but can be turned off by users who don’t want it, per rules set by the Federal Communications Commission that require carriers to let customers opt out.

The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. Hiya, a spam-blocking app, estimates that 25.3 billion unwanted robocalls were received by U.S. wireless customers in the first half of this year alone, even to people who are registered on the Do Not Call list.

AT&T’s service is the first that will be on by default, instead of requiring users to opt in or download a separate app.

T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. Sprint charges a $2.99 fee for Premium Caller ID, and Verizon alerts customers if a call is from a suspected spammer. Google and Apple have worked to add spam blocking into Android and iOS too.

The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers.

Correction: A previous version of this story included an incorrect number of unwanted robocalls.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, att, customers, calls, soon, annoying, scam, users, automatically, suspected, spam, robocalls, turned, unwanted, block


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Tony Hawk turned down a $500,000 royalty check in his 20s — here’s why

When professional skateboarder Tony Hawk was approached by video gaming company Activision in the late 1990s, he was offered a $500,000 buy-out to put his name to one of its games. “As Activision started getting closer to release, they felt like they had a hit on their hands just in terms of the feedback they were getting from game magazines, ” Hawk told “The Brave Ones. ” “And so they offered me a flat buy-out of $500,000 for future royalties … I had never heard anyone speak the words ‘Half a m


When professional skateboarder Tony Hawk was approached by video gaming company Activision in the late 1990s, he was offered a $500,000 buy-out to put his name to one of its games. “As Activision started getting closer to release, they felt like they had a hit on their hands just in terms of the feedback they were getting from game magazines, ” Hawk told “The Brave Ones. ” “And so they offered me a flat buy-out of $500,000 for future royalties … I had never heard anyone speak the words ‘Half a m
Tony Hawk turned down a $500,000 royalty check in his 20s — here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 20s, 500000, offered, check, getting, felt, activision, future, royalty, hawk, heres, tony, told, turned, buyout, words


Tony Hawk turned down a $500,000 royalty check in his 20s — here's why

When professional skateboarder Tony Hawk was approached by video gaming company Activision in the late 1990s, he was offered a $500,000 buy-out to put his name to one of its games.

But he turned it down.

“As Activision started getting closer to release, they felt like they had a hit on their hands just in terms of the feedback they were getting from game magazines, ” Hawk told “The Brave Ones. ” “And so they offered me a flat buy-out of $500,000 for future royalties … I had never heard anyone speak the words ‘Half a million dollars’ to me.”

Hawk’s instinct told him not to take the pay out. “It seemed unreal that anyone would offer that for the future of something that they don’t even know how it’s going to turn out,” he said.

“I think my saving grace of that was I had just bought a new house and it was almost paid for and I felt pretty comfortable with all my other income and other endorsements happening, that I thought, I could take a gamble on this piece.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 20s, 500000, offered, check, getting, felt, activision, future, royalty, hawk, heres, tony, told, turned, buyout, words


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Former Apple CEO John Sculley reveals the skill that made Steve Jobs a ‘brilliant’ leader

As he’s the co-founder of Apple and the visionary behind some of the world’s leading personal computing innovations, few would question the late Steve Jobs’ expertise. But it was a rather more common interpersonal skill that turned him into a “brilliant” business leader, according to former Apple CEO John Sculley. Rather, it took 12 years and a contentious departure from Apple to hone it. Jobs famously resigned from Apple in 1985, aged 27, following a clash with Sculley (a former ally) and Apple


As he’s the co-founder of Apple and the visionary behind some of the world’s leading personal computing innovations, few would question the late Steve Jobs’ expertise. But it was a rather more common interpersonal skill that turned him into a “brilliant” business leader, according to former Apple CEO John Sculley. Rather, it took 12 years and a contentious departure from Apple to hone it. Jobs famously resigned from Apple in 1985, aged 27, following a clash with Sculley (a former ally) and Apple
Former Apple CEO John Sculley reveals the skill that made Steve Jobs a ‘brilliant’ leader Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-27  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sculley, leader, steve, john, skill, brilliant, took, jobs, 12, turned, apple, visionary, reveals, ceo, ability


Former Apple CEO John Sculley reveals the skill that made Steve Jobs a 'brilliant' leader

As he’s the co-founder of Apple and the visionary behind some of the world’s leading personal computing innovations, few would question the late Steve Jobs’ expertise.

But it was a rather more common interpersonal skill that turned him into a “brilliant” business leader, according to former Apple CEO John Sculley.

That skill? The ability to listen.

Sculley, who served as Apple’s CEO for a decade from 1983 to 1993, told CNBC Make It that ability did not come naturally to Jobs. Rather, it took 12 years and a contentious departure from Apple to hone it.

Jobs famously resigned from Apple in 1985, aged 27, following a clash with Sculley (a former ally) and Apple board members over the strategic direction of the company.

In the 12 years that followed, Jobs founded another computer software company, NeXT, before returning to Apple in 1997.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-27  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sculley, leader, steve, john, skill, brilliant, took, jobs, 12, turned, apple, visionary, reveals, ceo, ability


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A restaurant mistakenly served up a $5,700 bottle of wine. But turned it into a social media win

Media experts have lauded a restaurant’s very public response to an expensive mistake made by one of its staff members. A diner at the big-budget Hawksmoor restaurant in Manchester, U.K., was accidentally served up an extremely expensive bottle of Chateau le Pin Pomerol 2001. The bottle of wine was worth £4,500 ($5,700) but the customer had ordered one worth a fraction of the price. Jennifer Glass, CEO at consultancy Business Growth Strategies told CNBC Friday that the restaurant may have genera


Media experts have lauded a restaurant’s very public response to an expensive mistake made by one of its staff members. A diner at the big-budget Hawksmoor restaurant in Manchester, U.K., was accidentally served up an extremely expensive bottle of Chateau le Pin Pomerol 2001. The bottle of wine was worth £4,500 ($5,700) but the customer had ordered one worth a fraction of the price. Jennifer Glass, CEO at consultancy Business Growth Strategies told CNBC Friday that the restaurant may have genera
A restaurant mistakenly served up a $5,700 bottle of wine. But turned it into a social media win Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turned, restaurant, social, media, mistakenly, 5700, expensive, staff, accidentally, uk, win, worth, twitter, told, served, bottle, wine


A restaurant mistakenly served up a $5,700 bottle of wine. But turned it into a social media win

Media experts have lauded a restaurant’s very public response to an expensive mistake made by one of its staff members.

A diner at the big-budget Hawksmoor restaurant in Manchester, U.K., was accidentally served up an extremely expensive bottle of Chateau le Pin Pomerol 2001. The bottle of wine was worth £4,500 ($5,700) but the customer had ordered one worth a fraction of the price.

The restaurant then tweeted about the incident.

“To the customer who accidentally got given a bottle of Chateau le Pin Pomerol 2001, which is £4,500 on our menu, last night — hope you enjoyed your evening!” the tweet said. “To the member of staff who accidentally gave it away, chin up! One-off mistakes happen and we love you anyway.”

The tweet quickly went viral and has been discussed and reported by media outlets all around the world.

The story was helped in no small measure by U.K. broadcaster Piers Morgan, who has more than 6 million followers on his Twitter account.

Morgan asked if he could reserve a table with the same waiter although it should be noted it was the restaurant manager who made the error.

The restaurant’s upbeat response to the bad news coupled with the crucial retweet has helped turn an apparent financial loss into something of a marketing coup.

Jennifer Glass, CEO at consultancy Business Growth Strategies told CNBC Friday that the restaurant may have generated “millions” in media worth for just £4,500.

“What happened here is another example of creating more visibility for a business,” she said, adding that the misplaced coffee cup in a recent “Game of Thrones” episode may have given Starbucks as much as $2 billion in free advertising.

April Rudin, the founder & CEO at marketing firm The Rudin Group, told CNBC Friday that the restaurant had enjoyed a “one-two punch when the social media stars had aligned,” and the firm had leveraged the power of Twitter in real time.

On Twitter, the manager of a rival hotel also congratulated Hawksmoor’s deft handling of the situation.

While social media consultant Rob Knowles wondered aloud if the original story might have even been made up.

Whatever the origin, it appears the staff member’s job is not at risk. In an interview with The Washington Post, co-owner Will Beckett said that it was the kind of “expensive mistake” that he could see himself doing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turned, restaurant, social, media, mistakenly, 5700, expensive, staff, accidentally, uk, win, worth, twitter, told, served, bottle, wine


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Chris Hughes one of many former Facebook insiders turned critics

Facebook Co-founder Chris Hughes on Thursday published an opinion piece for the New York Times critical of the company he helped create, calling for the break up of the company. Hughes is the latest former Facebook executive to criticize the company, its practices and its impact on society, but he is hardly the first. Over the past two years, numerous executives have shared their concerns over Facebook and how CEO Mark Zuckerberg has handled the company. Chamath Palihapitiya, former vice preside


Facebook Co-founder Chris Hughes on Thursday published an opinion piece for the New York Times critical of the company he helped create, calling for the break up of the company. Hughes is the latest former Facebook executive to criticize the company, its practices and its impact on society, but he is hardly the first. Over the past two years, numerous executives have shared their concerns over Facebook and how CEO Mark Zuckerberg has handled the company. Chamath Palihapitiya, former vice preside
Chris Hughes one of many former Facebook insiders turned critics Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, days, critics, facebook, hughes, palihapitiya, parker, chris, society, company, think, turned, early, user, zuckerberg, insiders


Chris Hughes one of many former Facebook insiders turned critics

Facebook Co-founder Chris Hughes on Thursday published an opinion piece for the New York Times critical of the company he helped create, calling for the break up of the company.

Hughes is the latest former Facebook executive to criticize the company, its practices and its impact on society, but he is hardly the first. Over the past two years, numerous executives have shared their concerns over Facebook and how CEO Mark Zuckerberg has handled the company.

Here are the key former Facebook insiders who have criticized the company:

Sean Parker, Facebook’s president in its early days, took to the stage at an Axios event in November 2017 to criticize the company he helped steer during its early days. Parker discussed the thought process that went into developing Facebook in the early days, saying that it was all about “How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?”

“The unintended consequences of a network when it grows to a billion or 2 billion people … it literally changes your relationship with society, with each other,” Parker said. “God only knows what it’s doing to our children’s brains.”

Chamath Palihapitiya, former vice president of platform and monetization and later user growth, had harsh words for Facebook in November 2017. Palihapitiya told an audience at the Stanford Graduate School of Business that he felt “tremendous guilt” over Facebook.

“I think in the back, deep, deep recess of our minds we kind of knew something bad could happen,” Palihapitiya said. “I think we have created tools that are ripping apart the social fabric of how society works.”

Roger McNamee, an early Facebook investor and mentor of Zuckerberg, published a piece in January 2018 urging Facebook to sacrifice near-term profits for the sake of addressing its problems with user addiction and exploitation by bad actors.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, days, critics, facebook, hughes, palihapitiya, parker, chris, society, company, think, turned, early, user, zuckerberg, insiders


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How to see which apps are draining your iPhone battery the fastest

A lot of things can cause your battery to drain quickly. If you have your screen brightness turned up, for example, or if you’re out of range of Wi-Fi or cellular, your battery might drain quicker than normal. It might even die fast if your battery health has deteriorated over time. Some of those things are out of your control, but there are ways to better manage the battery on your iPhone, and Apple makes it easy.


A lot of things can cause your battery to drain quickly. If you have your screen brightness turned up, for example, or if you’re out of range of Wi-Fi or cellular, your battery might drain quicker than normal. It might even die fast if your battery health has deteriorated over time. Some of those things are out of your control, but there are ways to better manage the battery on your iPhone, and Apple makes it easy.
How to see which apps are draining your iPhone battery the fastest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battery, iphone, turned, range, things, fastest, wifi, quickly, draining, ways, drain, youre, apps, screen


How to see which apps are draining your iPhone battery the fastest

A lot of things can cause your battery to drain quickly. If you have your screen brightness turned up, for example, or if you’re out of range of Wi-Fi or cellular, your battery might drain quicker than normal. It might even die fast if your battery health has deteriorated over time. Some of those things are out of your control, but there are ways to better manage the battery on your iPhone, and Apple makes it easy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battery, iphone, turned, range, things, fastest, wifi, quickly, draining, ways, drain, youre, apps, screen


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How to see which apps are draining your iPhone battery the fastest

A lot of things can cause your battery to drain quickly. If you have your screen brightness turned up, for example, or if you’re out of range of Wi-Fi or cellular, your battery might drain quicker than normal. It might even die fast if your battery health has deteriorated over time. Some of those things are out of your control, but there are ways to better manage the battery on your iPhone, and Apple makes it easy.


A lot of things can cause your battery to drain quickly. If you have your screen brightness turned up, for example, or if you’re out of range of Wi-Fi or cellular, your battery might drain quicker than normal. It might even die fast if your battery health has deteriorated over time. Some of those things are out of your control, but there are ways to better manage the battery on your iPhone, and Apple makes it easy.
How to see which apps are draining your iPhone battery the fastest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battery, iphone, turned, range, things, fastest, wifi, quickly, draining, ways, drain, youre, apps, screen


How to see which apps are draining your iPhone battery the fastest

A lot of things can cause your battery to drain quickly. If you have your screen brightness turned up, for example, or if you’re out of range of Wi-Fi or cellular, your battery might drain quicker than normal. It might even die fast if your battery health has deteriorated over time. Some of those things are out of your control, but there are ways to better manage the battery on your iPhone, and Apple makes it easy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battery, iphone, turned, range, things, fastest, wifi, quickly, draining, ways, drain, youre, apps, screen


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How one entrepreneur’s American dream turned into a copycat nightmare

The copycat straws sell for as little as a dollar when sold at wholesale. Cohen showed CNBC copycat straws that did not pop into position to allow drinking the same way her company’s straws did. A copycat straw purchased by CNBC Beijing. CNBCCNBC Beijing purchased a copycat straw and asked Chinese product designer Bruce Qin to test it. Qin said the cleaning tool in the copycat straw seemed like it would break easily.


The copycat straws sell for as little as a dollar when sold at wholesale. Cohen showed CNBC copycat straws that did not pop into position to allow drinking the same way her company’s straws did. A copycat straw purchased by CNBC Beijing. CNBCCNBC Beijing purchased a copycat straw and asked Chinese product designer Bruce Qin to test it. Qin said the cleaning tool in the copycat straw seemed like it would break easily.
How one entrepreneur’s American dream turned into a copycat nightmare Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: jennifer schlesinger andrea day bianca fortis euni, jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, bianca fortis, eunice yoon, lilian wu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, entrepreneurs, nightmare, american, finalstraw, straw, straws, turned, cohen, kickstarter, copycat, dream, influencers, product


How one entrepreneur's American dream turned into a copycat nightmare

The business started out beyond Emma Cohen’s wildest dreams, but soon she discovered a threat to the brand she was building. Her company, FinalStraw, makes an environmentally friendly reusable straw. It took off on crowdfunding website Kickstarter about year ago. And then a few months later, in October, it got to pitch its product on ABC’s “Shark Tank.” But soon after launching, Cohen realized she had an unexpected problem — loads of counterfeits were coming to market from across the globe. “The whole point of the company is to reduce single-use plastic waste. And when people get one of these [knockoff straws], and they open it up, and it doesn’t work, and it only cost $5, guess where it’s going? It’s going in the trash,” said Cohen, FinalStraw’s CEO. “The entire mission of what we’re trying to do as a company has been defeated by these fake FinalStraws.” By comparison, FinalStraw sells its collapsible straw for $25. It comes in a carrying case with a cleaning brush. In 2018, the brand made $5 million in revenue, according to Cohen. FinalStraw’s problem isn’t unique. Copycatters are monitoring crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and watching for trendy products to go viral, according to Amedeo Ferraro, an intellectual property attorney. The situation is an example of U.S. complaints about China’s theft of intellectual property. That’s one issue in the trade war between Washington and Beijing. “We were just hoping and praying to sell enough straws that we wouldn’t have to make them ourselves,” said Cohen, who co-founded FinalStraw with Miles Pepper, reflecting on the decision to use Kickstarter. “And within 48 hours of launching the Kickstarter, we’d raised over $200,000,” she said. “We went from zero to 60 real fast.” FinalStraw was hoping for just $12,500 but quickly surpassed that goal. The company ultimately raised nearly $1.9 million on Kickstarter, but within weeks Cohen said she began seeing copies coming from China. On “Shark Tank,” Cohen and her partner received two offers but did not make a deal. One of the Sharks asked about counterfeiting.

FinalStraw founders Emma Rose Cohen and Miles Pepper pitch on ABC’s “Shark Tank.” Eric McCandless | Getty Images

“It took us about nine months to create the tooling, get the product ready to manufacture. They were able to do it a matter of weeks,” she said. FinalStraw launched on Kickstarter with a provisional U.S. patent. After raising funds, the company applied for and was granted a utility patent. Still, it’s an ongoing battle. “A patent is only as good as its enforcement,” Cohen said. “It’s essentially a nice, shiny, expensive piece of paper that we then need to go out and enforce.” On Chinese e-commerce site Alibaba and other major retail websites, CNBC found many listings for what appear to be knockoff FinalStraws. One was even using images from the brand’s Kickstarter campaign. One company located in Shenzhen, China, responded to an email from CNBC and said that it could make the straws and emailed pictures that look similar to FinalStraw. CNBC called the contact listed on Alibaba to visit the factory and get more information but the spokeswoman declined to comment.

A building in Shenzhen, China, the city where many companies making copycat FinalStraws are listed as being located in. CNBC

CNBC sent a team to Shenzhen to find other companies selling similar straws online. At least one of companies was not at the address listed online. Chinese laws allow different companies to register under one address, depending on the business scope. The team also visited a factory that produces similar straws but could not enter. A contact from another company that sells similar straws online, told CNBC by phone that the idea for the straw came from a crowdfunding internet company. The contact who only gave his last name Wu also said the straw is mainly sold in Europe and America. The copycat straws sell for as little as a dollar when sold at wholesale. Cohen says the price different comes down to quality. “We get angry emails all the time from customers who are confused as to why the quality of the product that they ordered is terrible,” Cohen said. “The scariest thing is that there is no regulation on the materials that they’re using. There’s no quality control.” Cohen showed CNBC copycat straws that did not pop into position to allow drinking the same way her company’s straws did.

A copycat straw purchased by CNBC Beijing. CNBC

CNBC Beijing purchased a copycat straw and asked Chinese product designer Bruce Qin to test it. “It’s not a good product,” he said. The real FinalStraw comes with a cleaning tool and a drying case so it can reused over and over. Qin said the cleaning tool in the copycat straw seemed like it would break easily. Alibaba originally agreed to an interview with CNBC but then declined hours before it was scheduled. “Protecting the IP of rights holders around the world is critical to our business. … We remove any IP infringing listings, period. Rights holders can enforce their IP rights outside China, e.g. U.S. patent rights, on our cross-border platform,” an Alibaba spokesperson said in part in a statement sent by email. “The fact that 180,000 brands and millions of SMBs [small and midsize businesses] operate on Alibaba’s platforms demonstrates the trust they place in us, and we will continue to work tirelessly to protect brands of all sizes and consumers.” After CNBC contacted Alibaba, the company began helping FinalStraw. “Once we understood the nature of their IP, we worked quickly and collaboratively with FinalStraw to remove suspected infringing listings, and continue to closely partner with them on the removal of the few that require additional analysis,” the spokesperson said. The battle with the copycats has cost the company millions, according to Cohen. FinalStraw has 16 contractors working for the company, three of whom work to fight fraud. Cohen says she is also paying two attorneys. “It’s also very burdensome on our resources, because this is time that my staff could be spending doing way more productive things, versus just fighting off these knockoffs,” Cohen said.

Some of the impostors set up fake websites that look like the real one. Cohen showed CNBC one website that showed the same bio and images of the company’s team that the real website does. The copycats even copied the picture of Cohen’s dog. Cohen and her team are working to take down the impostors. “Most of them were offshore. And it was, first of all, very difficult to find a person. They have good ways of hiding,” said Ferraro, who works with FinalStraw. “Once we finally got to them, wrote to them, some of them were taken down. But then they started popping up again.” Ads for the fake straws also can be found on social media.

Emma Cohen the CEO and co-founder of FinalStraw with her straw (left) and a copycat (right). CNBC

“We were seeing advertisements. And they were all using our own materials. But they were directing to different websites,” Cohen said. “Social media is a weapon for these impostors. They can use it at their discretion however they want. And there’s nobody out there that’s really enforcing it.” Some of the posts were by people known as influencers, people who are paid by companies to make posts promoting companies. Many of these influencers have meme accounts where they post funny images or videos and often stay anonymous. Use of influencers is a growing part of marketing. Eight-six percent of marketers used influencers in 2017, the latest numbers available, according to Linqia, a marketing agency that connects brands with influencers. It can be difficult for influencers working with small businesses to tell which ad requests are legitimate. One influencer, Emily, who posted a fake FinalStraw ad, said she had no idea the ad was fake until CNBC contacted her. The influencer asked CNBC not to use her last name because her account is anonymous. She has over 1 million followers. CNBC is not naming her account since it contains adult content. Emily said she was approached by a company to post the straw on her account. She said originally she did not respond, but when they contacted her again a few months later and had customer reviews, she agreed to post the ad and received a payment for an undisclosed amount. Emily said that while she does try to determine whether a product is legitimate, digging to find that information can be hard work. “I don’t know if it’s me, but I’m a trusting person,” she said in a phone interview. “Why would someone spend this money on an ad that’s not legitimate?” Another account, Funny.window, posted a video with Cohen and the straw in it, but linked to a different seller. “I can’t know who the real legitimate of a product is [sic],” Eugene, who runs the account, said in an email. Funny.window has 1.2 million followers. Other influencers take a different approach. Joey Hickson, who has about 17 million followers across three accounts — including his popular meme account @lmao — has a team of people helping to manage his business, which makes it easier to weed out bad actors. He said both Instagram, as well as influencers, need to work to stop the proliferation of ads for fake products. “We can’t just put all the blame on Instagram, because that’s not fair,” he said. “I think we have our own social compass that we should look at.” Justin Keller, Hickson’s manager, said there is very little regulation of these types of transactions. “It’s the Wild West,” he said. “It’s like a gold rush.”

Joey Hickson, an Instagram influencer, and his manager, Justin Keller. CNBC

“We review every IP report we receive and take action to protect rights holders when someone has used their IP without permission,” an Instagram spokesperson said in a statement sent by email. “When it comes to partnering with brands, we encourage creators to act responsibly and with integrity.” The FBI said the agency has seen similar incidents. “One of the prime examples of that is the hoverboards that came onto the scene a couple Christmases ago, where the counterfeiters — actually the hazardous devices that are being marketed as genuine products — got to market before the actual genuine product did, and obviously those products were dangerous and could catch fire,” said Steven Shapiro, unit chief for the FBI’s intellectual property rights unit. To protect their business, companies may want to consider other methods of funding besides crowdfunding or make sure its intellectual property is secure before launching. “If there is another alternative source of funding like private venture capital or any other way of funding, I would suggest doing that first. But that isn’t something that’s available to everyone,” Ferraro said. FinalStraw is still working on getting a patent and trademark in China. Not having them makes it more difficult for it to fight copycats there. It’s a problem Chinese product designer Qin knows very well. He said his own designs have been knocked off by local factories. “Without a Chinese patent, you probably would be copycatted,” Qin said. Kickstarter said it is aware of copycats that have happened to other entrepreneurs who launched on its site. “It depends on the product. But if you’re coming to Kickstarter to raise funding, you probably want to have all of your protection in place before you launch. That is very important,” said Clarissa Redwine, Kickstarter’s senior design and technology outreach lead. “Once you launch your product is out there in the world.”

Emma Cohen the CEO and co-founder of FinalStraw with her dog. CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: jennifer schlesinger andrea day bianca fortis euni, jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, bianca fortis, eunice yoon, lilian wu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, entrepreneurs, nightmare, american, finalstraw, straw, straws, turned, cohen, kickstarter, copycat, dream, influencers, product


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Dow futures edge lower as investors await Facebook, Microsoft earnings

U.S. stock index futures were slightly lower Wednesday morning, as market participants looked ahead to another deluge of corporate earnings. ET, Dow futures slipped 17 points, indicating a negative open of more than 28 points. Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq were both seen marginally lower. Market focus is largely attuned to earnings season, after better-than-feared figures from major companies in the previous session helped the Nasdaq and S&P 500 indexes reach record closing highs. But stocks qui


U.S. stock index futures were slightly lower Wednesday morning, as market participants looked ahead to another deluge of corporate earnings. ET, Dow futures slipped 17 points, indicating a negative open of more than 28 points. Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq were both seen marginally lower. Market focus is largely attuned to earnings season, after better-than-feared figures from major companies in the previous session helped the Nasdaq and S&P 500 indexes reach record closing highs. But stocks qui
Dow futures edge lower as investors await Facebook, Microsoft earnings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, futures, worst, closing, nasdaq, dow, investors, trade, 500, sp, points, edge, lower, uschina, microsoft, await, earnings, turned, facebook


Dow futures edge lower as investors await Facebook, Microsoft earnings

U.S. stock index futures were slightly lower Wednesday morning, as market participants looked ahead to another deluge of corporate earnings.

At around 02:45 a.m. ET, Dow futures slipped 17 points, indicating a negative open of more than 28 points. Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq were both seen marginally lower.

Market focus is largely attuned to earnings season, after better-than-feared figures from major companies in the previous session helped the Nasdaq and S&P 500 indexes reach record closing highs.

Tuesday’s move toward an all-time closing high comes less than six months after a sharp decline in late December, which led the S&P 500 to its worst annual performance since 2008. But stocks quickly turned around as the Federal Reserve reversed course on monetary policy while the tone around U.S.-China trade talks improved.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, futures, worst, closing, nasdaq, dow, investors, trade, 500, sp, points, edge, lower, uschina, microsoft, await, earnings, turned, facebook


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Why one billionaire says there’s ‘no way’ he’ll list his education business on the stock market

Malaysia’s multi-pronged real estate business Sunway Group has three public listings to its name. But what you’ll never find listed on any stock exchange is its education arm. “Right from the beginning, I had my mind set that no way I’m going to list the company,” said Sunway Group founder and chairman, Jeffrey Cheah. Cheah turned the banker down. “I told my people many a time, we will not go into businesses that hurt society,” said Cheah.


Malaysia’s multi-pronged real estate business Sunway Group has three public listings to its name. But what you’ll never find listed on any stock exchange is its education arm. “Right from the beginning, I had my mind set that no way I’m going to list the company,” said Sunway Group founder and chairman, Jeffrey Cheah. Cheah turned the banker down. “I told my people many a time, we will not go into businesses that hurt society,” said Cheah.
Why one billionaire says there’s ‘no way’ he’ll list his education business on the stock market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, list, turned, society, sunway, education, business, cheah, set, hell, stock, told, way, theres, malaysia, billionaire, market


Why one billionaire says there's 'no way' he'll list his education business on the stock market

Malaysia’s multi-pronged real estate business Sunway Group has three public listings to its name.

But what you’ll never find listed on any stock exchange is its education arm.

That’s despite Sunway Education’s links to well-known institutions like Le Cordon Bleu culinary institute and Australia’s Monash University.

“Right from the beginning, I had my mind set that no way I’m going to list the company,” said Sunway Group founder and chairman, Jeffrey Cheah.

As the sixth child in a large family whose father — the sole breadwinner — drove trucks, Cheah came from a humble background. He grew up in the small rural town of Pusing, Malaysia, and he saw the effects of poverty on families and on the education of children.

Cheah’s fortunes started to change when he seized the opportunity to pursue a business degree in Australia.

Today, the 73-year-old is one of the richest men in Malaysia, with a net worth of $1.3 billion, according to Forbes.

He is known for the building of mega townships and for being a strong advocate of transforming livelihoods through education.

About a decade ago, an investment banker approached Cheah with an offer to take the company public on a stock exchange. Cheah turned the banker down.

“So sorry, I’ve made up my mind,” he recalls saying at the time. “This is what I want to return back to society. I want to put it in a foundation, structure the thing in a proper manner and in perpetuity. Hopefully, it will be my good legacy.”

While not listing the education unit means turning away from potentially huge amount of funding, Cheah said the upside of his decision means the business will not be profit-driven. He won’t be held to the demands of shareholders.

Instead, management will do whatever is best in the school’s academic and research interests, he told Christine Tan at CNBC’s Managing Asia: Sustainable Entrepreneurship conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on March 21.

Cheah said his overriding principle is that the businesses must do no societal harm — which is why he has never dabbled in anything involved with gambling or smoking, he said.

In fact, he turned down offers from overseas to set up casinos in Sunway’s inaugural township in Greater Kuala Lumpur.

He had witnessed fellow townspeople addicted to gambling, he recalled — and compromising their children’s education as a result.

“I told my people many a time, we will not go into businesses that hurt society,” said Cheah.

Don’t miss: At 100 years old, the world’s oldest billionaire still goes to the office every day

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, list, turned, society, sunway, education, business, cheah, set, hell, stock, told, way, theres, malaysia, billionaire, market


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