‘Shark Tank’: Why Mark Cuban invested $600,000 into a business that turns human ashes into diamonds

Billionaire Mark Cuban is known for his tech investments — but on Sunday’s “Shark Tank,” Cuban diversified in a unique way. Cuban invested six figures in Eterneva, a business that turns human or animal ashes or hair into diamonds. “What we do is grow real diamonds from the carbon in someone’s ashes,” Garrett Ozar, who co-founded the company with Adelle Archer, said during the episode. According to Archer and Ozar, customers receive a “welcome kit,” which includes a small container for a half-cup


Billionaire Mark Cuban is known for his tech investments — but on Sunday’s “Shark Tank,” Cuban diversified in a unique way. Cuban invested six figures in Eterneva, a business that turns human or animal ashes or hair into diamonds. “What we do is grow real diamonds from the carbon in someone’s ashes,” Garrett Ozar, who co-founded the company with Adelle Archer, said during the episode. According to Archer and Ozar, customers receive a “welcome kit,” which includes a small container for a half-cup
‘Shark Tank’: Why Mark Cuban invested $600,000 into a business that turns human ashes into diamonds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, human, invested, ashes, shark, archer, ozar, hair, turns, diamonds, cuban, tank, mark, customers, carbon, high, eterneva


'Shark Tank': Why Mark Cuban invested $600,000 into a business that turns human ashes into diamonds

Billionaire Mark Cuban is known for his tech investments — but on Sunday’s “Shark Tank,” Cuban diversified in a unique way.

Cuban invested six figures in Eterneva, a business that turns human or animal ashes or hair into diamonds.

“What we do is grow real diamonds from the carbon in someone’s ashes,” Garrett Ozar, who co-founded the company with Adelle Archer, said during the episode. “But really, we’re in the business of celebrating remarkable people. Our diamonds give you something positive to look forward to.”

According to Archer and Ozar, customers receive a “welcome kit,” which includes a small container for a half-cup of ashes or hair. Customers then send that back to Eterneva. Customers also pick the diamond of their liking.

Then “we extract carbon from a half a cup of ashes or hair,” Ozar said during the episode. “Once we have carbon, we then use high pressure, high temperature to grow a diamond.”

The prices of these diamonds range from $3,000 to $20,000, according to Archer. She said the average order value is $8,000, and customers “pay upfront, in full.”

“That’s smart,” Cuban said.

It takes 10 months to make the diamond, and it costs Eterneva between $3,000 to $5,000 to make.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, human, invested, ashes, shark, archer, ozar, hair, turns, diamonds, cuban, tank, mark, customers, carbon, high, eterneva


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The head of stores at Victoria’s Secret to step down

PG&E has power to shut you down, it’s time to take control of…As PG&E turns off power to millions in California as part of new measures to prevent wildfires, the message is clear, and it is not about being helpless in the face of a giant…Powering the Futureread more


PG&E has power to shut you down, it’s time to take control of…As PG&E turns off power to millions in California as part of new measures to prevent wildfires, the message is clear, and it is not about being helpless in the face of a giant…Powering the Futureread more
The head of stores at Victoria’s Secret to step down Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pge, secret, millions, wildfires, victorias, step, ofas, message, measures, stores, shut, turns, power, prevent, head


The head of stores at Victoria's Secret to step down

PG&E has power to shut you down, it’s time to take control of…

As PG&E turns off power to millions in California as part of new measures to prevent wildfires, the message is clear, and it is not about being helpless in the face of a giant…

Powering the Future

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pge, secret, millions, wildfires, victorias, step, ofas, message, measures, stores, shut, turns, power, prevent, head


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DNC turns to 2020 candidates for fundraising help in fourth quarter as committee struggles to raise cash

The Democratic National Committee, which is struggling to keep up with its Republican counterpart’s fundraising pace, is turning to 2020 presidential candidates for help raising cash in the pivotal fourth quarter. The DNC aide explained that for the donor events, tickets range from $100 to $50,000. After publication, this same aide said that they sold tickets to the Warren DNC fundraiser for $100. Representatives for all the other candidates that are being featured in fundraising events this mon


The Democratic National Committee, which is struggling to keep up with its Republican counterpart’s fundraising pace, is turning to 2020 presidential candidates for help raising cash in the pivotal fourth quarter. The DNC aide explained that for the donor events, tickets range from $100 to $50,000. After publication, this same aide said that they sold tickets to the Warren DNC fundraiser for $100. Representatives for all the other candidates that are being featured in fundraising events this mon
DNC turns to 2020 candidates for fundraising help in fourth quarter as committee struggles to raise cash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fourth, events, fundraising, help, turns, struggles, million, tickets, dnc, steyer, candidates, committee, cash, quarter, harris, raise, national, warren


DNC turns to 2020 candidates for fundraising help in fourth quarter as committee struggles to raise cash

2020 Democratic presidential candidates, Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Senator Bernie Sanders, Former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Kamala Harris, Andrew Yang, founder of Venture for America, Beto O’Rourke, and Julian Castro, Development (HUD), debate in Houston, Texas, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019.

The Democratic National Committee, which is struggling to keep up with its Republican counterpart’s fundraising pace, is turning to 2020 presidential candidates for help raising cash in the pivotal fourth quarter.

In an email to donors and forwarded to CNBC, Chris Lowe, the committee’s deputy national finance chair, listed two events in New York in October that will feature Sen. Kamala Harris and former Secretary of Housing, Julian Castro. Harris’ fundraiser is dubbed the “DNC Chairman’s Dinner.”

Separately, a DNC aide sent CNBC a list of other events this month, which will include a “chairman’s dinner” in San Francisco with billionaire candidate Tom Steyer and Sen. Elizabeth Warren headlining the “Women Will Vote Gala.” Warren’s event will coincide with the Women’s Leadership Forum Conference in Washington. All proceeds for these fundraisers go to the DNC and the party’s infrastructure, the aide added.

Warren has sworn off having her campaign take part in big money fundraisers. Tickets for Warren’s gala go up to $5,000 and others can gain access by raising up to $50,000 for the party, according to an online portal that allows attendees to buy tickets. Those who raise the five figure sum will receive 10 VIP tickets to the fundraiser.

The DNC aide explained that for the donor events, tickets range from $100 to $50,000. After publication, this same aide said that they sold tickets to the Warren DNC fundraiser for $100. DNC Chairman Tom Perez will be in attendance for Harris and Steyer’s dinners, this person added.

The latest Federal Election Commission filings show that in August, the Republican National Committee raised just over $23 million and have $53 million on hand, while the DNC brought in $7.9 million and had $7.2 million in debt. Meanwhile, Trump and the RNC combined in the third quarter to raise over $125 million.

While this would not mark the first time the DNC has hosted candidates for fundraisers this cycle, the October donor meetings coincide with a moment when the Republican National Committee are seeing a boom in fundraising while the DNC has seen a dip as their candidates battle it out in a primary.

Harris, Castro and Steyer are much lower in the polls than Warren, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders. For all the contenders, these occasions give candidates a chance to connect with donors who have yet to give to their campaigns. Sanders had the biggest third quarter haul with $25 million. Warren announced her $24.6 million take on Friday. Mayor Pete Buttigieg pulled in $19 million, while Biden raised $15 million.

Ian Sams, a spokesman for Harris, insisted the proceeds from her dinner will only go to the DNC and noted that she had a committee based event earlier this summer in her home state of California. Alberto Lammers, a spokesman for Steyer, said they plan to review the guest list before their event to make sure no fossil fuel executives attend. Steyer was one of many candidates who signed the no fossil fuel money pledge.

“It’s a small event focused on climate and the campaign will review the list to make sure fossil fuel executives are not included,” Lammers said.

Representatives for all the other candidates that are being featured in fundraising events this month did not return requests for comment.

Veteran Democratic donors have taken notice of the party’s struggle to raise cash and argue that it’s due to a lack of cohesion around a single candidate. There are close to 20 participants in the primary.

“It’s a standard off year fundraising challenge. No candidate, hard to get good surrogates for fundraising,” Rufus Gifford, President Barack Obama’s 2012 fundraising chief, told CNBC. “This will change when we have a candidate, but when will that be? Will it be too late?”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fourth, events, fundraising, help, turns, struggles, million, tickets, dnc, steyer, candidates, committee, cash, quarter, harris, raise, national, warren


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Dow turns positive, erases 118-point loss on report China could agree to buy more US agricultural products

Stocks fell on Tuesday, weighed down by a continuing decline in tech shares while Ford was pressured by a downgrade to its credit rating. The Dow Jones Industrial Average traded 110 points lower, or 0.4%. The Nasdaq Composite lost 0.9% while the S&P 500 slid 0.7%. The S&P 500 tech sector was one of the worst performers on Monday, sliding 0.7%. Ford Motor was the biggest decliner in the S&P 500 on Tuesday, dropping 3.5%.


Stocks fell on Tuesday, weighed down by a continuing decline in tech shares while Ford was pressured by a downgrade to its credit rating. The Dow Jones Industrial Average traded 110 points lower, or 0.4%. The Nasdaq Composite lost 0.9% while the S&P 500 slid 0.7%. The S&P 500 tech sector was one of the worst performers on Monday, sliding 0.7%. Ford Motor was the biggest decliner in the S&P 500 on Tuesday, dropping 3.5%.
Dow turns positive, erases 118-point loss on report China could agree to buy more US agricultural products Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lower, credit, report, products, erases, dow, buy, fell, tech, loss, china, decline, agricultural, slid, turns, 500, sector, positive


Dow turns positive, erases 118-point loss on report China could agree to buy more US agricultural products

Stocks fell on Tuesday, weighed down by a continuing decline in tech shares while Ford was pressured by a downgrade to its credit rating.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average traded 110 points lower, or 0.4%. The Nasdaq Composite lost 0.9% while the S&P 500 slid 0.7%.

Shares of Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Alphabet all fell at least 0.4%. The Technology Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLK) slid 1.4%.

The S&P 500 tech sector was one of the worst performers on Monday, sliding 0.7%. The sector’s decline pushed the broad index to close lower for the first time in four sessions.

Ford Motor was the biggest decliner in the S&P 500 on Tuesday, dropping 3.5%. The stock fell after Moody’s downgraded the auto maker’s credit rating to junk status, citing below-expectations profit margins and cash flow.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lower, credit, report, products, erases, dow, buy, fell, tech, loss, china, decline, agricultural, slid, turns, 500, sector, positive


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With Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s health in the spotlight, attention turns to abortion foe waiting in the wings

United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg . That description echoes what many in Washington are preparing for if Ginsburg retires prior to the 2020 election. The White House, Senate Judiciary Committee and the Supreme Court did not return requests for comment. Steve Sanders, a law professor at Indiana University who has argued before the Supreme Court and formerly clerked on the Seventh Circuit, reviewed Barrett’s record at CNBC’s request. The law was ultimately upheld by the Supre


United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg . That description echoes what many in Washington are preparing for if Ginsburg retires prior to the 2020 election. The White House, Senate Judiciary Committee and the Supreme Court did not return requests for comment. Steve Sanders, a law professor at Indiana University who has argued before the Supreme Court and formerly clerked on the Seventh Circuit, reviewed Barrett’s record at CNBC’s request. The law was ultimately upheld by the Supre
With Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s health in the spotlight, attention turns to abortion foe waiting in the wings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: brian schwartz tucker higgins, brian schwartz, tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attention, vacancy, barrett, supreme, turns, ginsburgs, election, waiting, trump, spotlight, wings, bader, think, kavanaugh, court, ginsburg, justice, health, ruth, foe


With Ruth Bader Ginsburg's health in the spotlight, attention turns to abortion foe waiting in the wings

United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg . Pat Greenhouse | Boston Globe | Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is on the mend after another health scare, but that hasn’t stopped political operatives and those on Capitol Hill from laying the groundwork for an unprecedented battle set to ensue if she leaves the bench ahead of the 2020 presidential election. Both sides are preparing for an election-year fight that could dwarf last year’s contentious confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who was dogged by allegations of sexual misconduct. With Kavanaugh in the rearview mirror and two Trump appointees on the nine-member panel, conservatives are salivating over the prospect of replacing their first Democratic-appointed justice during the Trump presidency — and liberals say the stakes have never been more clear.

Adding to the anticipation is the possible nomination of Amy Coney Barrett, widely seen as President Donald Trump’s most likely next pick. Barrett, a young conservative Catholic who has tangled with Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, was the favorite of social conservatives who believed last year that Kavanaugh was not a reliable enough vote on abortion. “If it’s before Election Day, it’s going to be all out war. It’s going to make Kavanaugh look like Triple A [baseball],” a GOP strategist with knowledge of the talks told CNBC, speaking on condition of anonymity in order to discuss the situation candidly. “I think people recognize its going to be brutal and I think people recognize as close to the Election Day, there’s very little room for failure.” That description echoes what many in Washington are preparing for if Ginsburg retires prior to the 2020 election. This account is based on interviews with White House advisors, Republican donors, leaders of activist groups, independent court observers and congressional aides. The deliberations among Republicans came before the top court announced last Friday that the 86-year-old Ginsburg, the most senior member of the court’s liberal wing, completed a three-week course of radiation therapy for a tumor found on her pancreas. Republican members of the Judiciary Committee have been reviewing likely nominees, including Barrett, but these lawmakers have privately fretted over whether it’s worth the political fight to nominate someone too close or during an election, if there were an opening on the Supreme Court, aides said. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said he would fill a vacancy on the court in the 2020 election cycle, prompting charges of hypocrisy because of the Kentucky Republican’s refusal to allow a vote on Judge Merrick Garland, President Barack Obama’s nominee in 2016. Ginsburg has previously been treated for pancreatic and colon cancers, and in December underwent surgery to remove cancerous growths on her lungs. Despite those setbacks, Ginsburg has regularly bounced back and has said she has no intention of retiring any time soon. The White House, Senate Judiciary Committee and the Supreme Court did not return requests for comment. Ginsburg did not respond to a request for comment submitted to a court spokeswoman.

‘People know what the stakes are’

Though any confirmation fight in the midst of a presidential election will be hard fought, the battle is expected to be amplified if Barrett is picked, because of her track record. Barrett, who has served on the federal appeals court in Chicago since 2017, has regularly been discussed at gatherings of conservative organizations in conversations about a potential vacancy, according to an executive from one of the groups who has been at the meetings and who worked on Kavanaugh’s hearings. The Judicial Crisis Network, a conservative dark money group that reportedly spent at least $10 million backing Kavanaugh, is looking to invest even more within the next Supreme Court fight. Carrie Severino, the group’s chief counsel and policy director, said in a statement that if a vacancy arises, “we will do whatever needs to be done to confirm a constitutionalist.”

Progressive groups also say they have learned from Kavanaugh’s nomination and are prepared for an even bigger round of activism if another vacancy arises. While some on the left acknowledge that the practical impact of Trump’s potential third justice will likely be less significant than the first two, they say the Kavanaugh hearings fired up activists and brought new attention to the court, narrowing the so-called enthusiasm gap between the left and right on the issue. “I think if you look back at the enormous activism around the country around Kavanaugh, I think you’ll see it magnified next vacancy,” said Daniel Goldberg, legal director at the progressive legal group Alliance for Justice and a former senior Justice Department official. “People know what the stakes are, and I think you are going to see activism like you’ve never before seen.” “Progressives are already focused on the court in ways we have not seen before,” said Aaron Belkin, director of Take Back the Court, which advocates for court expansion. “Senator McConnell stole the court, then President Trump nominated an alleged rapist to the court, and then 2020 candidates have started talking for the first time in nearly a century about expanding the court. And that talk has unleashed a lot of passion.” “You’re already coming up one of the most intense Supreme Court terms when it comes to race and reproductive justice, things like DACA, all in an election year, and then you add this [a potential vacancy],” said Sean McElwee, a left-wing activist and co-founder of the think tank Data for Progress. “I think that our politics is in something of a hyper-partisan death spiral in which each political event becomes escalated.” Some of the battle lines over a possible Barrett nomination were drawn last year, when her name was floated as a possible replacement for Justice Anthony Kennedy. In particular, liberals zeroed in on Barrett’s prolific academic writings, in which she raised questions about the importance of respecting precedent and referred to “unborn victims” of abortion. In a 2013 article in Notre Dame’s quarterly alumni magazine, Barrett is paraphrased as saying the landmark abortion ruling Roe v. Wade created “through judicial fiat a framework of abortion on demand.” Trump ultimately picked Kavanaugh instead, an establishment Republican figure who enraged some on the religious right for not being conservative enough even as he set off storms of panic on the left. In an opinion article in The Washington Post titled “Trump picked the wrong judge,” the National Review’s David French wrote in 2018 that selecting Barrett would have created an opportunity for a “cultural moment” in which “young professional Christians … face the worst of progressive antireligion bias and prevail.” For Trump, who has said that his Supreme Court picks are the most important decisions of his presidency, a vacancy would allow him to deliver red meat to his base and refocus the conversation away from signs of slowing economic growth and onto the culturally divisive topics that ushered him into office. With Republican control of the Senate and an eager partner in McConnell, appointing a controversial Supreme Court justice could also be easier than other top promises the president has struggled or failed to deliver on, such as constructing a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, funded by Mexico. Trump’s campaign and his closest allies believe that a presidential decision on replacing Ginsburg due to her health will be on the minds of voters on Election Day. “Supreme Court nominations were on the minds of many Trump voters in 2016 and will be again in 2020,” Trump’s campaign communications director Tim Murtaugh said in a statement. “President Trump’s two stellar choices for the high court, in addition to well over a hundred other choices for the federal bench, are proof of the type of solid judges he will select,” he added. “I think you know the health of Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be a point of discussion going into the 2020 elections, but I don’t think people are going to the ballot box on Election Day thinking whether or not Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be alive,” former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski said in an interview. Lewandowski has been considering a run for New Hampshire’s Senate seat.

New fights to emerge

There will be new fights in a potential confirmation hearing for Barrett. That’s because, when Kennedy retired, she had served as a federal judge for less than a year. In the time since, Barrett has authored dozens of opinions and dissents that offer fertile ground for her supporters and opposition researchers. Steve Sanders, a law professor at Indiana University who has argued before the Supreme Court and formerly clerked on the Seventh Circuit, reviewed Barrett’s record at CNBC’s request. Sanders said that on the whole, most of Barrett’s opinions have been fairly innocuous; in 49 opinions and several dissents, Barrett has touched on abortion only once and has yet to write directly about religious liberty. But, he said, he spotted a number of cases that activists might seek to highlight. In a case over the Second Amendment, for instance, Barrett disagreed with two Reagan appointees over a law that barred felons from owning guns. In a dissent, Barrett suggested the law should not apply to those convicted of nonviolent offenses. In another, Barrett sided with a Purdue University student suspended after he was accused of sexually assaulting a classmate, saying he was not granted a fair hearing process. In the abortion case, Barrett signed onto a dissent that was sympathetic to an Indiana law requiring the burial of fetal remains. Critics of the law argued that it would make obtaining abortions more difficult. The law was ultimately upheld by the Supreme Court. “Many of her decisions are arguably somewhat conservative, but as most of them are simply affirming what a lower court did, it’s hard to say that she’s being activist in some way,” Sanders said. “In any judge’s record, there are things that can be spun to make them nasty, or mean, or cold hearted,” he said.

Other nominees are possible, mostly women


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: brian schwartz tucker higgins, brian schwartz, tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attention, vacancy, barrett, supreme, turns, ginsburgs, election, waiting, trump, spotlight, wings, bader, think, kavanaugh, court, ginsburg, justice, health, ruth, foe


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Miami orders scooters removed from streets before Hurricane Dorian turns them into projectiles

The city of Miami has notified a number of companies that they must remove their fleets of electric scooters from the streets in preparation for Hurricane Dorian, lest the devices become flying projectiles. Hurricane Dorian, currently a strong Category 2 storm, is forecast to become a Category 4 storm with potentially “devastating hurricane-force winds,” the National Hurricane Center said on Friday. Should Hurricane Dorian grow into a Category 4 storm, it could produce winds of more than 130 mph


The city of Miami has notified a number of companies that they must remove their fleets of electric scooters from the streets in preparation for Hurricane Dorian, lest the devices become flying projectiles. Hurricane Dorian, currently a strong Category 2 storm, is forecast to become a Category 4 storm with potentially “devastating hurricane-force winds,” the National Hurricane Center said on Friday. Should Hurricane Dorian grow into a Category 4 storm, it could produce winds of more than 130 mph
Miami orders scooters removed from streets before Hurricane Dorian turns them into projectiles Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, noon, scooters, storm, spokesperson, turns, company, hurricane, orders, removed, miami, operations, streets, projectiles, dorian, city


Miami orders scooters removed from streets before Hurricane Dorian turns them into projectiles

Officials told the six companies that operate fleets in the city — Bird, Bolt, Uber ‘s Jump, Lime, Lyft and Spin — to clear out their scooters by noon on Friday. The order is meant to prevent any potential hazards that could arise from the scooters being left out during the storm, including fears that the vehicles could be swept up in the storm’s dangerous winds.

The city of Miami has notified a number of companies that they must remove their fleets of electric scooters from the streets in preparation for Hurricane Dorian, lest the devices become flying projectiles.

A number of scooter companies said they’ve also removed or reduced their fleets in Fort Lauderdale, Tampa and Orlando, which are also expected to be in the path of the storm.

Hurricane Dorian, currently a strong Category 2 storm, is forecast to become a Category 4 storm with potentially “devastating hurricane-force winds,” the National Hurricane Center said on Friday. The storm is expected to make landfall on Florida’s east coast this weekend, before rolling inland toward Orlando early next week.

Should Hurricane Dorian grow into a Category 4 storm, it could produce winds of more than 130 mph. No one has been evacuated yet, but officials in Miami have taken a number of steps to ensure residents’ safety, including the removal of dockless scooters.

“With Hurricane Dorian threatening to impact Miami, city leaders made the decision to have the companies pick up the scooters early today and leave them out of service until further notice,” said John Heffernan, a spokesperson for the city of Miami.

A Lime spokesperson said the company is pulling its scooters in Orlando, Miami and Fort Lauderdale, as well as reducing its fleet size in Tampa, which amounts to almost 1,500 scooters and 500 bicycles.

“We’re in touch with each city and will comply with any request to prioritize safety,” the spokesperson said. “We’re also communicating with our riders to let them know of these steps and to encourage them to follow the guidance of their local authorities and remain safe.”

Lyft spokeswoman Kaitlyn Carl said the company has paused all scooter operations in Miami and expects to meet the city’s noon deadline. Lyft’s operations team is picking up each of the 244 scooters in the city and storing them in a warehouse until the storm passes.

“We will resume operations only once conditions improve and will continue to follow the guidance provided by the City of Miami,” Carl added.

Uber spokesman Javi Correoso said the company has suspended Jump scooter rentals in Miami and Tampa.

“Our operations team is currently removing all of the scooters in both markets so that they do not become a hazard before any storm impacts are felt,” Correoso said. “This process will be completed by noon today.”

A Bird spokesperson confirmed the company is collecting and storing its scooters in Miami. A spokesperson from Spin said all scooters will be “retrieved well before the storm is expected to arrive” and that it will keep riders notified with any updates.

In a statement, a Bolt spokesperson said, “In anticipation of the storm and at the direction of the Miami officials we began taking our scooters off of the streets yesterday and will have the remainder of them removed ahead of today’s noon deadline.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, noon, scooters, storm, spokesperson, turns, company, hurricane, orders, removed, miami, operations, streets, projectiles, dorian, city


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Trade war turns into ‘nasty’ currency war as US calls China manipulator for first time since ’90s

The Trump administration took the trade war up another notch, calling China a currency manipulator and ratcheting up expectations that the White House has other moves it could make to retaliate against China. “It’s clear now the trade war has become integrated with currency war,” said Marc Chandler, chief market strategist at Bannockburn Global Forex. Chandler noted that the U.S. has a six month period of review for China and it gave China a pass in May. The Treasury’s move came less than 24 hou


The Trump administration took the trade war up another notch, calling China a currency manipulator and ratcheting up expectations that the White House has other moves it could make to retaliate against China. “It’s clear now the trade war has become integrated with currency war,” said Marc Chandler, chief market strategist at Bannockburn Global Forex. Chandler noted that the U.S. has a six month period of review for China and it gave China a pass in May. The Treasury’s move came less than 24 hou
Trade war turns into ‘nasty’ currency war as US calls China manipulator for first time since ’90s Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, currency, chandler, 90s, market, dollar, fell, turns, war, treasury, manipulator, calls, risk, nasty, china


Trade war turns into 'nasty' currency war as US calls China manipulator for first time since '90s

The Trump administration took the trade war up another notch, calling China a currency manipulator and ratcheting up expectations that the White House has other moves it could make to retaliate against China.

Last used in the 1990s, the designation was announced by the U.S. Treasury Monday after U.S. markets closed out a turbulent session. The Dow, down 767 points in Monday trading, fell hundreds of points more in the futures market in after-market trading. The offshore yuan fell to a new low of 7.13 per dollar.

“It’s clear now the trade war has become integrated with currency war,” said Marc Chandler, chief market strategist at Bannockburn Global Forex. Chandler noted that the U.S. has a six month period of review for China and it gave China a pass in May.

In its release, the Treasury cited an original law from 1988 on currency manipulation, but that law was altered in 2015 and 2018 and the changes were not mentioned.

In May, the Treasury said in a report that China did not meet standards identified in that act. But it said it would “carefully monitor and review this determination over the following 6-month period in light of the exceptionally large and growing bilateral trade imbalance between China and the United States and China’s history of facilitating an undervalued currency.”

“They side-stepped it by having this come out between reports, and ignoring the size of the bilateral trade balance with the U.S.; the overall current account position, which should be substantial, and the fact that they would have to be consistently intervening on one side of the market to influence it,” said Chandler.

The Treasury’s move came less than 24 hours after China’s currency fell below the psychological red line of 7 to the dollar for the first time since 2008 on Monday. That triggered a major sell-off in risk assets globally, as investors speculated the U.S. and China were far apart on any trade deal and the world is more at risk of recession.

“This plays up the risk of intervention, in a lot of people minds, and that’s why you see the dollar weakening” against major currencies, said Chandler. The White House had discussed intervening in the currency market last month to weaken the U.S. dollar, but had ruled it out at the time, sources told CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, currency, chandler, 90s, market, dollar, fell, turns, war, treasury, manipulator, calls, risk, nasty, china


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After years of spending, tech’s political machine turns to high gear

When Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., introduced legislation last month aimed at major technology companies, a near-endless parade of groups quickly voiced disapproval. TechFreedom, a tech-focused Washington nonprofit, said the proposal would “set up a partisan bloodmatch” between big companies and regulators. The Computer & Communications Industry Association said the bill would set up “government censorship of online speech” and limit freedom. Each of those think tanks and advocacy groups is backed by


When Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., introduced legislation last month aimed at major technology companies, a near-endless parade of groups quickly voiced disapproval. TechFreedom, a tech-focused Washington nonprofit, said the proposal would “set up a partisan bloodmatch” between big companies and regulators. The Computer & Communications Industry Association said the bill would set up “government censorship of online speech” and limit freedom. Each of those think tanks and advocacy groups is backed by
After years of spending, tech’s political machine turns to high gear Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: allan smith, mary catherine wellons
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, political, machine, gear, high, google, groups, bill, institute, think, turns, facebook, internet, techs, companies, tech, spending


After years of spending, tech's political machine turns to high gear

Colin Stretch (L), General Counsel of Facebook, Sean Edgett (C), Acting General Counsel of Twitter, and Richard Salgado (R), Director of Law Enforcement And Information Security of Google, are sworn in prior to testifying during a US Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism hearing on Russian influence on social networks on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, October 31, 2017.

When Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., introduced legislation last month aimed at major technology companies, a near-endless parade of groups quickly voiced disapproval.

There was plenty of pushback from tech advocacy groups.

TechFreedom, a tech-focused Washington nonprofit, said the proposal would “set up a partisan bloodmatch” between big companies and regulators. The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a tech-focused civil liberties nonprofit, said it would “let the government decide who speaks.” Engine Advocacy, an organization that advocates for policies that help startups, said the legislation, “in an effort to address a nonexistent problem” would “dismantle the sensible regulatory regime that is responsible for the development of the Internet.” The Computer & Communications Industry Association said the bill would set up “government censorship of online speech” and limit freedom.

Those concerns were echoed by a litany of conservative and libertarian-leaning think tanks. Libertarian think tank R Street said the legislation “hurts conservatives” while the Competitive Enterprise Institute, another conservative think tank, said it was “highly regulatory and should be rejected.” The Cato Institute, the American Enterprise Institute, and Americans for Prosperity lambasted the proposal too, calling it “the latest potential disaster ” that “would blow up the internet. ”

Each of those think tanks and advocacy groups is backed by Google, Facebook or both. The companies are not only two of the main targets of Hawley’s bill, but they’re also the focus of broader political scrutiny that now spans both parties and has spilled over into the Democratic presidential race.

With lawmakers ramping up debate over privacy, antitrust and, in Hawley’s case, legal protections the platforms rely on, the Silicon Valley giants are unleashing some of the Washington power they’ve spent the past few years building up, going from a low-key player into the biggest spender in D.C.

And while tech-funded think tanks and advocacy groups have fought other initiatives, the fervor over Hawley’s bill has revealed just how well powerful companies have laid the foundation in Washington to fight efforts to rein them in.

“I’ve never seen pushback in such a fashion before,” Terry Schilling, executive director of the American Principles Project, a conservative think tank, told NBC News. “Even with net neutrality, these groups were all over the place — even though Facebook and Google supported it. It’s safe to say that it’s largely due to pressure from the social media giants that hasn’t been seen before.”

In recent years — after relatively little interaction between Silicon Valley and Capitol Hill — Google and Facebook have ramped up their spending on lobbying, with both companies spending more on such services in 2018 than any year prior, data from the Center for Responsive Politics showed.

Alphabet, Google’s parent company, spent more on federal lobbying than any other company in 2018 at more than $21.7 million. Facebook spent nearly $13 million. That does not include money those companies have spent bolstering think tanks and other Washington influencers, who help shape discussion about policies that affect those companies.

Of course, that comes as the tech giants face calls to be broken up from politicians including Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democratic presidential contender, and amid a broader bipartisan push for more stringent regulations and intense scrutiny in Capitol Hill hearings.

“Corporate funded groups are always engaged in issues like this; have done so for many years,” Jeffrey Chester, executive director of the nonprofit Center for Digital Democracy, told NBC News. “But clearly the stakes are higher now, because we have never ever had a time when serious regulation (privacy, antitrust) is on the agenda. And bipartisan. So [last month’s] reaction shows there are five-alarm bells ringing in D.C. from Google and Facebook that have galvanized the groups they support.”

The connection goes as follows: Google provides, in its own terms, “substantial funding” to R Street, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Engine Advocacy, the Computer & Communications Industry Association, TechFreedom, the Cato Institute, and AEI. Those organizations also receive funding from a variety of other corporate benefactors.

Google, in addition to Facebook, also backs the Competitive Enterprise Institute, while Facebook has provided backing for Americans for Prosperity through The State Policy Network.

Earlier this year, Wired reported on how Google specifically influences Washington, D.C., noting that experts aligned with the company’s viewpoints “frame populist fervor to regulate Big Tech as the work of unserious ‘hipster antitrust’ activists who don’t understand the law, and argue that consumers are better off with the status quo.”

“Scholars and experts may hold these positions independent of financial incentives from tech companies like Google, but both regulators and the public are sometimes left in the dark about potential conflicts of interest,” Wired added.

Google and Facebook did not respond to requests for comment from NBC News.

Hawley’s bill is hardly without opposition from non-tech sources.

A first-term senator who has made battling big tech core to his brand, Hawley proposed the Ending Support for Internet Censorship Act, which would make big tech platforms liable for content posted by their users unless they can earn immunity through FTC audits that prove they’re “politically neutral” when it comes to their algorithms and content-removal practices. The legislation would alter protections enjoyed by tech platforms under Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act.

Critics of all stripes have said that if those protections were to change, the internet “would probably be decimated overnight ” and that changes to the law could create the opposite effect, causing platforms to purge many more users.

“Senator Hawley has written a bill to deputize the federal government as the Speech Police in flagrant violation of the First Amendment,” Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and a major player in the passage of the Communications Decency Act, said in a statement.

Meanwhile, the Internet Association — a lobbying group that includes Google and Facebook as members but advocates on industry-wide issues and counts many tech companies in its fold — issued a strong rebuke of the proposal, indicating the totality of the tech objection to the proposal.

Matt Stoller, a fellow at the Open Markets Institute who focuses on monopoly power, told NBC News that last time he “saw this kind of collective temper tantrum by all their trade groups was” during the legislative battle over a pair of bills aimed at curtailing sex trafficking online, which altered Section 230 to remove liability protection for sites that “knowingly” publish any material pertaining to sex trafficking.

But, unlike Hawley’s bill — which Stoller says he does not support — much of that backlash was joined by grassroots activism from sex workers, advocates and survivors of sex trafficking.

On the Hawley bill, Schilling said: “It’s a very tough case to make that the Facebook and Google money don’t play a factor in such a strong and united pushback on this issue.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: allan smith, mary catherine wellons
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, political, machine, gear, high, google, groups, bill, institute, think, turns, facebook, internet, techs, companies, tech, spending


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Police repeatedly fire tear gas on protesters as confrontation turns violent in Hong Kong

Protesters flee the area after police fired tear gas during demonstrations outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. Isaac Lawrence | AFP | Getty ImagesHong Kong police repeatedly fired tear gas and rubber bullets into large crowds of protesters gathering around the local legislature on Wednesday. After one instance of tear gas being fired, protesters yelled “Shame on the Hong Kong police.” A spokesman at the Hong Kong office of China’s foreign ministry declined to c


Protesters flee the area after police fired tear gas during demonstrations outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. Isaac Lawrence | AFP | Getty ImagesHong Kong police repeatedly fired tear gas and rubber bullets into large crowds of protesters gathering around the local legislature on Wednesday. After one instance of tear gas being fired, protesters yelled “Shame on the Hong Kong police.” A spokesman at the Hong Kong office of China’s foreign ministry declined to c
Police repeatedly fire tear gas on protesters as confrontation turns violent in Hong Kong Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legal, tear, legislature, local, hong, protesters, gas, confrontation, kong, violent, repeatedly, protest, china, turns


Police repeatedly fire tear gas on protesters as confrontation turns violent in Hong Kong

Protesters flee the area after police fired tear gas during demonstrations outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. Isaac Lawrence | AFP | Getty Images

Hong Kong police repeatedly fired tear gas and rubber bullets into large crowds of protesters gathering around the local legislature on Wednesday. That came as lawmakers postponed debate on proposed legal changes condemned by hundreds of thousands in the city. The protests, which kicked off over the weekend, were aimed at stopping a government plan to allow extraditions to mainland China. The heart of the issue, demonstrators say, is the city’s ceding its autonomy to Beijing. Large crowds overflowed roads and pathways leading to the Legislative Council, the local assembly, while police in riot gear were deployed. Police early on raised a red warning flag that reads: “Stop Charging or We Use Force.” Crowds surrounded Legco — as the council is informally known — in the morning but by late afternoon had largely been pushed to areas south of the facility. In the afternoon, explosion-like sounds could be heard and smoke from tear gas was seen rising from near one protest point where police squared off with demonstrators. Video showed authorities using gas canisters and other methods to push back demonstrators. Protesters wearing white or black paper face masks dispersed and shouted amid the smoky tear gas. Police walked through cleared areas knocking debris out of the way. Sirens from emergency vehicles were occasionally heard. Massed protesters shouted “go away” to police and yelled out warnings and made gestures with their hands to send signals to others in the crowd. After one instance of tear gas being fired, protesters yelled “Shame on the Hong Kong police.” Security was heavy in central Hong Kong from the morning with non-authorized access blocked to the legislature. Activists have called on opponents of the proposal to surround the facility days after the biggest public demonstration in years shook the global finance and trade hub of 7.4 million people.

‘A large crowd’

Lawmakers were scheduled to discuss the proposal Wednesday but the legislature announced in a brief statement on its website that the meeting would be “changed to a later time.” Hong Kong’s Chief Secretary for Administration, Matthew Cheung, later issued a video statement saying: “Due to a large crowd blocking areas around the Legislative Council building, the president of Legislative Council ordered to delay the meeting to another time,” according to a CNBC translation. “The government urges citizens who are occupying the roads to return to the pedestrian walkways so that traffic can resume soon,” said Cheung, the No. 2 official in Hong Kong. “I also wanted to call for the citizens here to remain calm and restrained, to leave peacefully soon and not to break the law.” The Legco press office subsequently confirmed to CNBC that lawmakers will not meet Wednesday. Dennis Kwok, one of the legislators who has led opposition to the government plan, said he’s doing so because of Hong Kong and the mainland’s fundamentally different legal characters. “It’s because we do not trust the legal system in China, where there is no independence of judiciary and there is no respect for human rights and due process,” Kwok told CNBC on Wednesday. “And sending people there to face serious criminal trials with no human rights safeguard is below our standard.” A spokesman at the Hong Kong office of China’s foreign ministry declined to comment when contacted by CNBC for reaction to Kwok’s remarks. Police said that 240,000 people participated at the peak of Sunday’s protest that saw throngs march down a main street shouting slogans and carrying signs denouncing the legislation and demanding Hong Kong’s top official, Chief Executive Carrie Lam, resign. Organizers, however, claimed a turnout of slightly more than 1 million. The last time Hong Kong saw a protest of such scale was in 2003 when an estimated 500,000 people rallied against a proposed security law that also raised fears of closer links to China. Sunday’s protest was overwhelmingly peaceful, but there were clashes at night between protesters and police at the legislature with injuries suffered and arrests made. Lam, who next month starts the third year of a five-year term, on Monday rejected calls to quit , telling reporters that she will push ahead with the plan in the local assembly.

‘Hong Kong is Hong Kong’

Lam also said the idea for the legal change came from her government, denying widespread suspicions that she is acting at the behest of Beijing authorities. The government says it is necessary to close a legal “gap” that prevents it from extraditing a local man to Taiwan for allegedly killing his girlfriend while on a visit there last year. It wants to amend a local ordinance to that effect, but the change would also apply to China and other locales with which Hong Kong lacks extradition treaties. The government says the bill includes strong safeguards, including those that will prevent human rights abuses, and has claimed it won’t be used for political purposes.

A demonstrator displays the U.K. flag behind a police line on June 10 in Hong Kong. Chan Long Hei | SOPA Images | LightRocket | Getty Images

But Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan’s president, in a Tuesday Facebook post lauded the Hong Kong protesters and criticized the proposal, saying the self-governing island would not accept the accused man’s extradition under the proposed legal change. Many in Hong Kong, which has a separate legal system from mainland China, fear being caught up in mainland courts, which are widely criticized by human groups as a political tool of the Chinese Communist Party. “I think Hong Kong is Hong Kong. It’s not China,” said Jeace Chan, who participated in Sunday’s demonstration and was having breakfast Wednesday before heading to the legislature to join the latest protest aimed at stopping passage of the bill. “This is our goal,” she added.

Hong Kong’s role as a business hub


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legal, tear, legislature, local, hong, protesters, gas, confrontation, kong, violent, repeatedly, protest, china, turns


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Amazon’s shareholder meeting turns testy as investors demand action on climate crisis and diversity

Amazon’s annual shareholder meeting on Thursday turned hostile as shareholders demanded change on a number of issues, ranging from renewable energy use to equal pay. Dozens of shareholders, including current employees, joined the meeting in Seattle, presenting their case in over 12 different proposals. They included demands that the company take action on climate change through energy use, as well as improving diversity and pay equality in its workforce. Emily Cunningham, an Amazon employee who


Amazon’s annual shareholder meeting on Thursday turned hostile as shareholders demanded change on a number of issues, ranging from renewable energy use to equal pay. Dozens of shareholders, including current employees, joined the meeting in Seattle, presenting their case in over 12 different proposals. They included demands that the company take action on climate change through energy use, as well as improving diversity and pay equality in its workforce. Emily Cunningham, an Amazon employee who
Amazon’s shareholder meeting turns testy as investors demand action on climate crisis and diversity Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: eugene kim paayal zaveri, eugene kim, paayal zaveri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diversity, meeting, demand, amazons, change, annual, shareholders, turns, testy, investors, crisis, asked, shareholder, bezos, energy, climate, amazon, presentation


Amazon's shareholder meeting turns testy as investors demand action on climate crisis and diversity

Amazon’s annual shareholder meeting on Thursday turned hostile as shareholders demanded change on a number of issues, ranging from renewable energy use to equal pay.

Dozens of shareholders, including current employees, joined the meeting in Seattle, presenting their case in over 12 different proposals. They included demands that the company take action on climate change through energy use, as well as improving diversity and pay equality in its workforce. Two of the resolutions asked for Amazon to stop the sale of its facial recognition software to government agencies, which the backers say raises concerns of racial bias and discrimination.

While large companies often face dissent among investors at their annual meetings, Amazon is in a particularly sensitive spot because of its growing size, influence and CEO Jeff Bezos’s incredible wealth – he passed Bill Gates in 2017 to become the world’s richest person. Amazon is facing pressure among policymakers, regulators and activists for how it pays and treats warehouse workers, how it collects consumer data and promotes products and how it uses artificial intelligence.

Emily Cunningham, an Amazon employee who led the climate change initiative, asked Bezos to come out on stage to listen to her presentation. Bezos did not appear until later when he took questions from the crowd. Roughly 50 people in the room, however, stood up during her presentation in support of her resolution asking Amazon to reduce its use of fossil fuels.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: eugene kim paayal zaveri, eugene kim, paayal zaveri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diversity, meeting, demand, amazons, change, annual, shareholders, turns, testy, investors, crisis, asked, shareholder, bezos, energy, climate, amazon, presentation


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