These stocks may be your best bet during this earnings season

Earnings estimates are coming down fast, but AB Bernstein says that shouldn’t stop investors from picking up stocks. Wall Street analysts are slashing year-end earnings expectations for the S&P 500. They have fallen to about $170 per share from expectations of over $175 per share in mid-December. However, according to AB Bernstein, it’s typical to see larger than usual earnings revisions in January, and investors can turn to sectors where analysts are raising forecasts: heath care equipment and


Earnings estimates are coming down fast, but AB Bernstein says that shouldn’t stop investors from picking up stocks. Wall Street analysts are slashing year-end earnings expectations for the S&P 500. They have fallen to about $170 per share from expectations of over $175 per share in mid-December. However, according to AB Bernstein, it’s typical to see larger than usual earnings revisions in January, and investors can turn to sectors where analysts are raising forecasts: heath care equipment and
These stocks may be your best bet during this earnings season Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: yun li, drew angerer, getty images, david paul morris, bloomberg, patrick t fallon, tom strickland, scott mlyn, chip chipman, victor j blue
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expectations, typical, best, bernstein, usual, bet, season, share, investors, analysts, stocks, ab, yearend, earnings


These stocks may be your best bet during this earnings season

Earnings estimates are coming down fast, but AB Bernstein says that shouldn’t stop investors from picking up stocks.

Wall Street analysts are slashing year-end earnings expectations for the S&P 500. They have fallen to about $170 per share from expectations of over $175 per share in mid-December. However, according to AB Bernstein, it’s typical to see larger than usual earnings revisions in January, and investors can turn to sectors where analysts are raising forecasts: heath care equipment and services, software and retail.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: yun li, drew angerer, getty images, david paul morris, bloomberg, patrick t fallon, tom strickland, scott mlyn, chip chipman, victor j blue
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expectations, typical, best, bernstein, usual, bet, season, share, investors, analysts, stocks, ab, yearend, earnings


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Some taxpayers will still face a ‘marriage penalty’

The new tax law that took effect last year eliminated the so-called “marriage penalty” for many couples. For others, not so much. The term refers to paying more in taxes as a married couple than you would as two single filers. And depending on your income, the credits or deductions you use and where you live, you could still pay higher taxes by getting married. “It’s more typical for people to have a marriage bonus, but there are tax provisions that are not adjusted for marriage,” said Kyle Pome


The new tax law that took effect last year eliminated the so-called “marriage penalty” for many couples. For others, not so much. The term refers to paying more in taxes as a married couple than you would as two single filers. And depending on your income, the credits or deductions you use and where you live, you could still pay higher taxes by getting married. “It’s more typical for people to have a marriage bonus, but there are tax provisions that are not adjusted for marriage,” said Kyle Pome
Some taxpayers will still face a ‘marriage penalty’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-17  Authors: sarah obrien, digital vision, photodisc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marriage, think, taxpayers, took, typical, tank, socalled, taxes, single, face, term, penalty, tax


Some taxpayers will still face a 'marriage penalty'

The new tax law that took effect last year eliminated the so-called “marriage penalty” for many couples. For others, not so much.

The term refers to paying more in taxes as a married couple than you would as two single filers. And depending on your income, the credits or deductions you use and where you live, you could still pay higher taxes by getting married.

“It’s more typical for people to have a marriage bonus, but there are tax provisions that are not adjusted for marriage,” said Kyle Pomerleau, director of the Center for Quantitative Analysis at the Tax Foundation, a nonprofit think tank.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-17  Authors: sarah obrien, digital vision, photodisc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marriage, think, taxpayers, took, typical, tank, socalled, taxes, single, face, term, penalty, tax


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With some ugly earnings reports rolling in, investors hope the bad news is ‘priced in’

But the S&P 500 index is still 11 percent below its September record high and down 6 percent from a year ago. So what’s now priced into the market, as earnings reports start to pepper the tape? The market briefly flashed “cheap” near the December low at just under 14-times forward earnings, but quickly bounced from there to a more neutral valuation relative to its 10-year trend. Estimates for the fourth quarter results about to be reported in coming weeks have come down by five percentage points


But the S&P 500 index is still 11 percent below its September record high and down 6 percent from a year ago. So what’s now priced into the market, as earnings reports start to pepper the tape? The market briefly flashed “cheap” near the December low at just under 14-times forward earnings, but quickly bounced from there to a more neutral valuation relative to its 10-year trend. Estimates for the fourth quarter results about to be reported in coming weeks have come down by five percentage points
With some ugly earnings reports rolling in, investors hope the bad news is ‘priced in’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-13  Authors: michael santoli, drew angerer, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, typical, reports, market, strategist, multiple, earnings, stocks, priced, sp, quarter, say, bad, rolling, ugly, valuation, hope


With some ugly earnings reports rolling in, investors hope the bad news is 'priced in'

Stocks were lower Friday as the shutdown dragged on—here’s what five investing experts are watching next 1:58 PM ET Fri, 11 Jan 2019 | 03:40

After an uncommonly strong three-week rally, the stock market is up 10 percent from the harrowing 20-month low it reached in a nearly unprecedented December meltdown. But the S&P 500 index is still 11 percent below its September record high and down 6 percent from a year ago.

So what’s now priced into the market, as earnings reports start to pepper the tape? It’s a crucial question with a pretty wide range of answers.

(Futures pointed to a decline on Monday as earnings season kicks into full swing with Citigroup saying revenue missed expectations)

Starting from an undisputed point: Some degree of economic and profit-growth slowing has been factored into share prices at this point. The S&P 500’s multiple on the coming 12 months’ forecast earnings is now just above 15, down from above 18 a year ago — when the market was aggressively pricing in the 20-percent profit gains of 2018, much of it thanks to the corporate tax cut.

The market briefly flashed “cheap” near the December low at just under 14-times forward earnings, but quickly bounced from there to a more neutral valuation relative to its 10-year trend.

Source: FactSet

Here’s another look at the S&P 500 tracked against the earnings trend, showing that brief drop to what was arguably an overshoot below fundamental expectations:

Source: FactSet

Yet those earnings expectations are being cut at a fairly brisk clip. Estimates for the fourth quarter results about to be reported in coming weeks have come down by five percentage points in the past three months.

Deutsche Bank strategist Binky Chadha says this pattern should continue: “Historically, large cuts in a quarter have tended to be followed by further cuts in forward estimates;, they have typically taken time to play out. Earnings revisions are also tightly correlated to our US data surprise index which recently turned negative for the first time in two-and-a-half years and the typical pattern suggests more downside before a bottom, also suggesting earnings downgrades will continue.”

Yet he goes on to say that stocks can continue their recovery against this backdrop, citing other recent periods, in 2012 and 2016, when earnings expectations continued to slip while stocks edged higher following large declines.

Chadha argues that the market is already priced for a 10 percent slide in 2019 earnings, though that calculation relies on several assumptions about what a “fair” multiple is given current inflation, interest rate and cyclical factors.

RBC Capital Markets strategist Lori Calvasina says the drop in valuation in the past year almost perfectly matches the typical historical multiple compression seen during a Fed tightening cycle. So perhaps if the Federal Reserve is indeed done raising rates for the foreseeable future — as the bond market is now betting — then maybe the pain in P/Es has largely been felt.

Still, valuation models might say the market has factored in softer profitability, but the process of numbers being sliced company by company, analyst by analyst, can take its toll on the market all the same.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-13  Authors: michael santoli, drew angerer, getty images news, getty images
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US student debt levels set a new record in 2018—here’s how much the typical borrower owes

Based on SHED figures, Americans with education debt owe between $20,000 and $25,000 on average. There are several kinds of debt that Americans take on in order to afford an advanced degree, the most common being student loans. Among borrowers who took on debt to pay for their own schooling, 94 percent have taken on student loans, 25 percent have taken on credit card debt and 6 percent have taken on home equity loans. Americans are also increasingly likely to take on loans to help family members


Based on SHED figures, Americans with education debt owe between $20,000 and $25,000 on average. There are several kinds of debt that Americans take on in order to afford an advanced degree, the most common being student loans. Among borrowers who took on debt to pay for their own schooling, 94 percent have taken on student loans, 25 percent have taken on credit card debt and 6 percent have taken on home equity loans. Americans are also increasingly likely to take on loans to help family members
US student debt levels set a new record in 2018—here’s how much the typical borrower owes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-27  Authors: abigail hess, eduardo munoz alvarez getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, typical, borrower, debt, 2018heres, taken, credit, borrowers, set, levels, education, owes, loans, equity, card, record, student


US student debt levels set a new record in 2018—here's how much the typical borrower owes

Based on SHED figures, Americans with education debt owe between $20,000 and $25,000 on average. The typical monthly payment is between $200 and $300 per month.

There are several kinds of debt that Americans take on in order to afford an advanced degree, the most common being student loans. Among borrowers who took on debt to pay for their own schooling, 94 percent have taken on student loans, 25 percent have taken on credit card debt and 6 percent have taken on home equity loans.

Americans are also increasingly likely to take on loans to help family members with their education expenses. Of these borrowers, 82 percent have taken on student loans, 22 percent have taken on credit card debt and 14 percent have taken on home equity loans.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-27  Authors: abigail hess, eduardo munoz alvarez getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, typical, borrower, debt, 2018heres, taken, credit, borrowers, set, levels, education, owes, loans, equity, card, record, student


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There may be more at stake than just trade concessions in the US-China tariff battle

Trade frictions between the world’s two largest economies go well beyond the parameters of imports and exports. Washington has been attempting to negotiate with Beijing about issues like forced tech transfers and intellectual property theft, but there’s a growing sense among international analysts that talks may also be touching on other deep-rooted issues in their relationship, particularly on the national security and military front. The ongoing spat is a reflection of great power rivalries, p


Trade frictions between the world’s two largest economies go well beyond the parameters of imports and exports. Washington has been attempting to negotiate with Beijing about issues like forced tech transfers and intellectual property theft, but there’s a growing sense among international analysts that talks may also be touching on other deep-rooted issues in their relationship, particularly on the national security and military front. The ongoing spat is a reflection of great power rivalries, p
There may be more at stake than just trade concessions in the US-China tariff battle Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: nyshka chandran, kevin lemarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariff, transfers, concessions, wrote, battle, dispute, stake, war, worlds, trade, typical, uschina, tech, trumps, issues


There may be more at stake than just trade concessions in the US-China tariff battle

Trade frictions between the world’s two largest economies go well beyond the parameters of imports and exports.

Washington has been attempting to negotiate with Beijing about issues like forced tech transfers and intellectual property theft, but there’s a growing sense among international analysts that talks may also be touching on other deep-rooted issues in their relationship, particularly on the national security and military front.

The ongoing spat is a reflection of great power rivalries, political scientist Joseph Nye wrote in a Project Syndicate editorial last month: “It is much more than a typical trade dispute like, say, America’s recent clash with Canada over access to that country’s dairy market.”

Many economists have pointed out that the current dispute is more of a tech war than a tariff war as U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration targets China’s technology sector practices. Beijing’s militarization of the South China Sea and the sovereignty of Taiwan could also be influencing negotiations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: nyshka chandran, kevin lemarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariff, transfers, concessions, wrote, battle, dispute, stake, war, worlds, trade, typical, uschina, tech, trumps, issues


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Here’s the ‘dream salary’ Americans want—and how much they actually get paid

In an ideal world, Americans would like to earn well above $100,000 a year. Specifically, men say their “dream salary” is $445,000, while women wish they could earn a more modest, but still substantial, $279,000 per year. That’s according to a 2018 survey from MidAmerica Nazarene University (MNU) of 2,000 Americans. In reality, even the typical American family earns only a fraction of that: The median household income in the U.S. is $61,372. Here’s the full breakdown of how much full-time worker


In an ideal world, Americans would like to earn well above $100,000 a year. Specifically, men say their “dream salary” is $445,000, while women wish they could earn a more modest, but still substantial, $279,000 per year. That’s according to a 2018 survey from MidAmerica Nazarene University (MNU) of 2,000 Americans. In reality, even the typical American family earns only a fraction of that: The median household income in the U.S. is $61,372. Here’s the full breakdown of how much full-time worker
Here’s the ‘dream salary’ Americans want—and how much they actually get paid Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, nbcuniversal, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, actually, paid, heres, americans, median, salary, yearspecifically, dream, earn, payscale, world, wantand, 2018, american, typical


Here's the 'dream salary' Americans want—and how much they actually get paid

In an ideal world, Americans would like to earn well above $100,000 a year.

Specifically, men say their “dream salary” is $445,000, while women wish they could earn a more modest, but still substantial, $279,000 per year. That’s according to a 2018 survey from MidAmerica Nazarene University (MNU) of 2,000 Americans.

In reality, even the typical American family earns only a fraction of that: The median household income in the U.S. is $61,372.

And even during their peak earning years, the typical American with a BA isn’t making six figures: Compensation research firm PayScale found that the median salary for a college educated woman tops out at about $61,000, and for a man at just under $95,000.

Here’s the full breakdown of how much full-time workers with a Bachelor’s degree earn at every age. PayScale surveyed 972,788 U.S. workers between July 2015 and July 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, nbcuniversal, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, actually, paid, heres, americans, median, salary, yearspecifically, dream, earn, payscale, world, wantand, 2018, american, typical


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Professor Jeremy Siegel warns the stock market may not see its typical post-midterm surge next year

A split between House and Senate isn’t the worse thing, says Jeremy Siegel 3 Hours Ago | 02:46The stock market may not get the post-midterm surge over the next 12 months that usually happens, Wharton School finance professor Jeremy Siegel warned on Tuesday. Siegel blames worries about the Federal Reserve’s path higher for interest rates and the possibility of Democrats taking control of the House in Tuesday’s voting. Democrats are expected to win the House, while Republicans are expected to keep


A split between House and Senate isn’t the worse thing, says Jeremy Siegel 3 Hours Ago | 02:46The stock market may not get the post-midterm surge over the next 12 months that usually happens, Wharton School finance professor Jeremy Siegel warned on Tuesday. Siegel blames worries about the Federal Reserve’s path higher for interest rates and the possibility of Democrats taking control of the House in Tuesday’s voting. Democrats are expected to win the House, while Republicans are expected to keep
Professor Jeremy Siegel warns the stock market may not see its typical post-midterm surge next year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, siegel, sp, stock, jeremy, warns, months, professor, usually, market, typical, postmidterm, past, surge, investors


Professor Jeremy Siegel warns the stock market may not see its typical post-midterm surge next year

A split between House and Senate isn’t the worse thing, says Jeremy Siegel 3 Hours Ago | 02:46

The stock market may not get the post-midterm surge over the next 12 months that usually happens, Wharton School finance professor Jeremy Siegel warned on Tuesday.

“There’s a lot more uncertainties that will make next year not … a stellar year we usually get in third-year presidential cycles,” Siegel, a longtime stock bull, said in a “Squawk on the Street” interview.

Siegel blames worries about the Federal Reserve’s path higher for interest rates and the possibility of Democrats taking control of the House in Tuesday’s voting.

Democrats are expected to win the House, while Republicans are expected to keep their slim majority in the Senate.

Stocks have already reaped the benefits of President Donald Trump’s business-friendly deregulation and tax cuts, said Siegel, though he did admit that the market has historically done well under a divided government.

On average, the S&P 500 has been up 16.7 percent in the 12 months after midterm elections, going back to World War II, according to CFRA. (Of course, past performance is not indicative of future results.)

Stocks were higher Tuesday as investors awaited the results of the much-anticipated election.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 on Monday logged their fourth positive sessions out of the past five, with the Dow closing at its highest level in nearly three weeks.

Last month, Siegel urged investors to be somewhat cautious, saying numerous headwinds, including the midterms, will keep stock prices muted for 2019.

However, at the time, Siegel said he still favors stocks long term, adding the market will be the best-performing asset for investors looking out three to four years from now.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, siegel, sp, stock, jeremy, warns, months, professor, usually, market, typical, postmidterm, past, surge, investors


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Here’s the age at which you’ll earn the most in your career

Your peak earning years may be closer than you think. PayScale also found that when you earn the most during your career depends on your gender: Pay growth for college-educated women essentially stops around age 40. However, a shift occurs at age 34, when women’s earning growth starts to slow and men’s remains steady. Blue represents pay growth for men and orange represents pay growth for women. Here’s the full break down of the median pay by age and gender for full-time workers with a Bachelor’


Your peak earning years may be closer than you think. PayScale also found that when you earn the most during your career depends on your gender: Pay growth for college-educated women essentially stops around age 40. However, a shift occurs at age 34, when women’s earning growth starts to slow and men’s remains steady. Blue represents pay growth for men and orange represents pay growth for women. Here’s the full break down of the median pay by age and gender for full-time workers with a Bachelor’
Here’s the age at which you’ll earn the most in your career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-02  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, earn, typical, heres, age, career, pay, earning, peak, payscale, growth, workers, youll, wages, represents


Here's the age at which you'll earn the most in your career

Your peak earning years may be closer than you think. According to compensation research firm PayScale, full-time workers with Bachelor’s degrees tend to make the most money in their 40s and 50s.

PayScale also found that when you earn the most during your career depends on your gender: Pay growth for college-educated women essentially stops around age 40. For college-educated men, wages continue to grow for another decade and peak in their early 50s.

Male college graduates earn more from the get-go: They bring home a median salary of $50,700 at age 22, while their female counterparts earn $39,500 per year, for a difference of $11,200.

From ages 22 to 33, women’s pay actually grows slightly faster than men’s. However, a shift occurs at age 34, when women’s earning growth starts to slow and men’s remains steady.

By age 41, college-educated women see their salaries peak at about $61,000. Meanwhile, men continue seeing increases up until age 53, at which point they’re earning about $95,000.

“The smallest gap in raw wages occurs at age 25 (with the typical working man earning $10,600 than the typical working woman), and is largest at age 54 (when the typical man earns $32,800 more than the typical woman),” Payscale reports.

PayScale’s chart maps out the percent growth in pay by gender from age 22 to 67. Blue represents pay growth for men and orange represents pay growth for women.

The data “only represents wages for those who remain in the workforce,” PayScale notes. “The fall in wages for both genders over the age of 60 is likely due to people dropping out of the workforce due to retirement.”

Here’s the full break down of the median pay by age and gender for full-time workers with a Bachelor’s degree. PayScale surveyed 972,788 U.S. workers between July 2015 and July 2018:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-02  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, earn, typical, heres, age, career, pay, earning, peak, payscale, growth, workers, youll, wages, represents


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Museum Day 2018: How to get free tickets for Smithsonian museums

On Saturday, Smithsonian Magazine is hosting its annual Museum Day, during which admission fees at over 1,500 museums, zoos and cultural centers across the country are waived. “Museum Day goes beyond getting visitors through museum doors — it acts as a springboard to empower and help advance the hopes and ambitions of the public, particularly school-aged children and those in underrepresented communities,” says Smithsonian. Some of the museums offering free admission on Saturday include the 9/11


On Saturday, Smithsonian Magazine is hosting its annual Museum Day, during which admission fees at over 1,500 museums, zoos and cultural centers across the country are waived. “Museum Day goes beyond getting visitors through museum doors — it acts as a springboard to empower and help advance the hopes and ambitions of the public, particularly school-aged children and those in underrepresented communities,” says Smithsonian. Some of the museums offering free admission on Saturday include the 9/11
Museum Day 2018: How to get free tickets for Smithsonian museums Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-21  Authors: sarah berger, source, kropic, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, participating, free, museums, admission, visitors, typical, smithsonian, usually, tickets, fee, day, museum, 2018


Museum Day 2018: How to get free tickets for Smithsonian museums

Have a craving for culture? Now you can get your fix for free.

On Saturday, Smithsonian Magazine is hosting its annual Museum Day, during which admission fees at over 1,500 museums, zoos and cultural centers across the country are waived. All 50 states have participating institutions, ranging from the Museum of Pop Culture in Seattle, Washington to Zoo Miami in Florida.

“Museum Day goes beyond getting visitors through museum doors — it acts as a springboard to empower and help advance the hopes and ambitions of the public, particularly school-aged children and those in underrepresented communities,” says Smithsonian.

For free admission and to search which institutions near you are participating in the promotion, you can search here by state, zip code or specific institution, and then download your free ticket. Your ticket provides free, general admission for two people on Sept. 22.

Some of the museums offering free admission on Saturday include the 9/11 Tribute Museum in Manhattan, New York, (which usually has an admission fee of $15) and the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum there (which usually has a fee of $33).

In Chicago, participating museums include the Adler Planetarium (its typical fee is $12) and in San Francisco, you can get into the Cartoon Art Museum for free (its typical fee is $10).

This year, Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day is highlighting women making history, encouraging visitors to explore the stories of female trailblazers.

Don’t miss: This Italian island is so dreamy you have to apply to visit and there’s a waitlist — take a look

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-21  Authors: sarah berger, source, kropic, getty images
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Starbucks just opened its first location in Italy—see why it’s not your typical store

With more than 25,000 stores worldwide, it may seem like Starbucks has left no country unclaimed, yet Italy is uncharted territory for the coffee giant — until now, that is. Starbucks opened a Roastery location in Milan Thursday, marking its first foray into Italy. Roastery locations are far from the typical Starbucks store. Designed for a more upscale experience, rather than catering to those looking to get their quick caffeine fix. There is a coffee roasting facility inside the store and custo


With more than 25,000 stores worldwide, it may seem like Starbucks has left no country unclaimed, yet Italy is uncharted territory for the coffee giant — until now, that is. Starbucks opened a Roastery location in Milan Thursday, marking its first foray into Italy. Roastery locations are far from the typical Starbucks store. Designed for a more upscale experience, rather than catering to those looking to get their quick caffeine fix. There is a coffee roasting facility inside the store and custo
Starbucks just opened its first location in Italy—see why it’s not your typical store Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-06  Authors: uptin saiidi, sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opened, coffee, chairman, worldwide, store, typical, weve, location, venture, italysee, coming, working, starbucks, wide


Starbucks just opened its first location in Italy—see why it's not your typical store

With more than 25,000 stores worldwide, it may seem like Starbucks has left no country unclaimed, yet Italy is uncharted territory for the coffee giant — until now, that is.

Starbucks opened a Roastery location in Milan Thursday, marking its first foray into Italy.

Roastery locations are far from the typical Starbucks store. Designed for a more upscale experience, rather than catering to those looking to get their quick caffeine fix.

There is a coffee roasting facility inside the store and customers can choose a wide array of items from alcoholic beverages to pizza.

Howard Schultz, who stepped down as executive chairman in June and is now chairman emeritus, was cautious in entering the Italian market — choosing to open with the experiential-based store and working with multiple local partners.

“We are not coming here to teach Italians how to make coffee, we’re coming here with humility and respect, to show what we’ve learned,” he said last year when announcing the new venture.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-06  Authors: uptin saiidi, sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opened, coffee, chairman, worldwide, store, typical, weve, location, venture, italysee, coming, working, starbucks, wide


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