The top 10 public US colleges that pay off the most

Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. public colleges that pay off the most:1. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” Michigan Technological UniversityMichigan Technical University Jcvert


Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. public colleges that pay off the most:1. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” Michigan Technological UniversityMichigan Technical University Jcvert
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, alumni, college, school, net, salary, experience, pay, cost, public, colleges, average


The top 10 public US colleges that pay off the most

Then, using data from PayScale’s College Salary Report, we divided net cost by graduates’ expected annual earnings, which was calculated based on the median salary of graduates with less than five years of experience as well as those with 10 or more years of experience. The ranking gives greater weight to workers’ earnings in the years immediately after college, when individuals are the most impacted by college costs and student debt. (You can read our full methodology here.) The top public university on our list is the University of Washington in Seattle, a school where the average net cost for in-state students from families that make between $48,001 and $75,000 per year is $8,984 and the median salary for alumni with 10 or more years of experience is $111,800. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. public colleges that pay off the most:

1. University of Washington, Seattle

University of Washington Nikko Hellstern | Getty Images

The University of Washington, Seattle, is the flagship school of the University of Washington school system. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,984

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $111,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,850

2. University of Washington, Bothell

University of Washington Bothell Photo: Joe Mabel | Wikipedia CC

Also a member of the University of Washington school system, the University of Washington, Bothell, is a public university that offers roughly 55 degree programs and enrolls just 5,411 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,767

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $58,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $104,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,150

3. Massachusetts Maritime Academy

A Google Earth view of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Source: Google Earth

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is a public college located in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, that offers bachelor’s and master’s of science degrees in marine engineering fields. Many MMA students choose to volunteer for military service, though it is not a requirement. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,235

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $67,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $114,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,900

4. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

University of Michigan tiny-al | Getty Images

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, is the flagship campus of the University of Michigan school system. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,106

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $84,950

5. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology, often referred to as “Georgia Tech,” is a public university located in Atlanta. The school offers technology-focused education to more than 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students across six colleges and 28 schools focusing on business, computing, design, engineering, the liberal arts and sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,284

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $70,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,350

6. Purdue University, West Lafayette

Purdue University Michael Hickey/Getty Images

Purdue University’s campus in West Lafayette, Indiana, is the flagship campus of the Purdue University system. The public university enrolls 32,672 undergraduate students. Known for its strong engineering program, 28% of undergraduate students at Purdue study in the College of Engineering. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,828

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $105,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $83,000

7. College of William and Mary

College of William and Mary Will Pryce/Construction Photography/Avalon/Getty Images

Founded in 1693, the College of William and Mary is the second-oldest college in the country. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” The school offers a joint degree program with University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,320

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $113,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,350

8. Michigan Technological University

Michigan Technical University Jcvertin | Wikipedia CC

Michigan Technological University is a public university located in Houghton, Michigan. The technology-focused school is made up of seven colleges and schools including a College of Computing, a College of Engineering and a School of Business and Economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,080

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $64,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $110,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,400

9. University of California, Los Angeles

UCLA Al Seib | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

One of the most selective schools in the University of California school system, the University of California, Los Angeles, is known for its strong athletics department. The most popular majors at UCLA are biology, business economics, political science, psychology and psychobiology. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,416

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $118,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,250

10. Baruch College

CUNY Bernard M Baruch College Ben Hider/Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, alumni, college, school, net, salary, experience, pay, cost, public, colleges, average


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The 10 private US colleges that pay off the most

This means for some students, attending a private college can be surprisingly affordable. We found that many private colleges and universities can provide students significant value at manageable costs. The net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. private colleges that pay off the most:1. Pomona CollegePomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty ImagesPomona College is one of five private, no


This means for some students, attending a private college can be surprisingly affordable. We found that many private colleges and universities can provide students significant value at manageable costs. The net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. private colleges that pay off the most:1. Pomona CollegePomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty ImagesPomona College is one of five private, no
The 10 private US colleges that pay off the most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, colleges, net, cost, salary, experience, alumni, pay, average, private, college, students


The 10 private US colleges that pay off the most

Research consistently demonstrates that college graduates earn more than their peers without degrees, but rising college costs can also scare students into thinking that school may be out of reach for them. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, during the 2018 – 2019 school year, the tuition at private nonprofit four-year schools was $35,830 on average. But in reality, many students end up paying far less. These college “sticker prices” include tuition, fees, room and board, but they do not account for scholarships, grants and tax benefits. This means for some students, attending a private college can be surprisingly affordable. In fact, the average net price of tuition and fees in 2019 is $14,610 at private nonprofit four-year schools, and students at these schools typically receive an average $21,220 in grant aid and tax benefits. CNBC Make It set out to capture the information students would need to balance these considerations. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their education dollars. We found that many private colleges and universities can provide students significant value at manageable costs.

Click to expand To develop this list, we identified the true net cost of each college for the typical American student — including tuition, fees, books, supplies and other expenses — after subtracting scholarships and grants. Using data from Tuition Tracker, a tool created by education-focused nonprofit news organization The Hechinger Report, we looked at the net cost for students from families making between $48,001 and $75,000. We chose to focus on this bracket because it includes the median U.S. household income, $61,372. Then, using data from PayScale’s College Salary Report, we divided net cost by graduates’ expected annual earnings, which was calculated based on the median salary of graduates with less than five years of experience as well as those with 10 or more years of experience. The ranking gives greater weight to workers’ earnings in the years immediately after college, when individuals are the most impacted by college costs and student debt. (You can read our full methodology here.) Stanford University takes first place on the list. The net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. According to Stanford, the average scholarship and grant total for students from families making less than $65,000 a year is $74,095 per year. Students from families making between $65,000 and $95,000 receive $65,050 on average in scholarships and grant aid. Plus, Stanford graduates with more than 10 years of experience report average salaries of $143,100. But getting into a school like Stanford isn’t easy. The acceptance rate for the Stanford class of 2022 was just 4.4%, and other high-ranking private universities reported similarly low acceptance rates. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. private colleges that pay off the most:

1. Stanford University

Stanford University David Butow | Getty Images

Stanford University, often referred to as a “West Coast Ivy,” is located near Silicon Valley in Stanford, California. The highly selective school is known for its strong science, technology and engineering programs as well as its successful athletics programs. Stanford enrolls approximately 7,083 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,061

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $76,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $109,800

2. Princeton University

Princeton University Photo: Princeton University, Office of Communications.

Princeton University was founded in 1746, making it the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Undergraduate Princeton students study one of 37 concentrations and must be proficient in at least one language other than English. Known for its strong engineering program, approximately 25% of undergraduates at the Ivy League school study in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,557

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $141,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,000

3. University of Chicago

The University of Chicago Bob Krist | Getty Images

The University of Chicago is a private, nonprofit university in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. The school is known for its strong STEM programs, but the curriculum also requires students to complete courses in three areas: humanities, civilization studies and the arts; natural sciences; and social sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,536

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $117,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,550

4. California Institute of Technology

California Institute of Technology Danita Delimont | Getty Images

California Institute of Technology, known as CalTech, is a private, nonprofit engineering university located in Pasadena, California. The CalTech curriculum emphasizes STEM education and all students are required to take math, physics, chemistry, biology and scientific communication courses. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,781

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $113,250

5. Harvard University

Harvard University DenisTangneyJr | iStock | Getty Images

Founded in 1636, Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is the oldest college in the United States. Harvard is known for its historic legacy, famous alumni and generous financial aid, which the university is able to provide in part because of an endowment worth approximately $39.2 billion. Harvard students select “concentrations” instead of majors and one of the most popular is economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,577

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $142,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,600

6. Yale University

Yale University Yana Paskova / Stringer (Getty Images)

Located in New Haven, Connecticut, Yale is a private, Ivy League university. Founded in 1701, Yale is the third-oldest college in the United States. Yale teaches a liberal arts curriculum and requires students take classes in humanities and arts; sciences and social sciences; foreign languages; quantitative reasoning; and writing. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,551

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,850

7. Columbia University

Columbia University Getty Images

Columbia University is a private Ivy League university in New York City. Founded in 1754, Columbia is the fifth-oldest college in the United States. Columbia students can choose from 80 areas of study but must take six required classes, such as Contemporary Civilization and Frontiers of Science, and must fulfill several requirements including taking a foreign language. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,592

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $69,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $127,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,350

8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT Kevin Fleming | Corbis Documentary | Getty Images

Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a STEM-focused private, nonprofit university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Instead of majors, MIT students choose a “course” to specialize in. Electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science are among the most popular courses at MIT. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,633

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $150,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $117,000

9. Pomona College

Pomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty Images

Pomona College is one of five private, nonprofit, liberal arts colleges in Claremont, California. The curriculum at the highly selective school is broad and requires students take at least one course in each of six areas: criticism, analysis and contextual study of works of the human imagination; social institutions and human behavior; history, values, ethics and cultural studies; physical and biological sciences; mathematical reasoning; and creation and performance of works of art and literature. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,975

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $119,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,200

10. Duke University


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: abigail hess
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The top 50 US colleges that pay off the most

And less than half, 41%, of first-time, full-time college students earn their bachelor’s degree in four years. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their tuition dollars. According to The Hechinger Report, the net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 50 U.S. colleges that


And less than half, 41%, of first-time, full-time college students earn their bachelor’s degree in four years. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their tuition dollars. According to The Hechinger Report, the net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 50 U.S. colleges that
The top 50 US colleges that pay off the most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cost, university, salary, experience, income, pay, students, average, college, 50, alumni, colleges, net


The top 50 US colleges that pay off the most

Each year, high school students across the U.S. march through campuses on guided tours, pore over course catalogs, and frantically check mailboxes and inboxes for letters granting them admission to the next phase of life: college. Most are facing significant financial questions. Research consistently demonstrates that college graduates earn more than their peers without degrees. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Americans with a bachelor’s degree have median weekly earnings of $1,173, compared with just $712 a week for those who have a high school diploma. Still, experts urge high school students to think carefully before taking on significant amounts of debt to finance a college degree. College costs can be difficult to estimate, and even for college applicants with the foresight to research things like debt balances at graduation and average alumni salaries, outcomes can be challenging to quantify. Sticker prices published by universities do not include grants, scholarships or loans. Financial aid awards can change from year to year. Housing, travel, books and other personal expenses can add up quickly. And less than half, 41%, of first-time, full-time college students earn their bachelor’s degree in four years. Many of them end up paying for more than four years of college, driving up the cost of attendance significantly. CNBC Make It set out to capture the information students would need to balance these considerations. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their tuition dollars.

Click to expand We started by identifying the true net cost of each college for the typical American student — including tuition, fees, books, supplies and other expenses — after subtracting scholarships and grants. Using data from Tuition Tracker, a tool created by education-focused nonprofit news organization The Hechinger Report, we looked at the net cost for students from families making between $48,001 and $75,000, an income range established by the Department of Education. We chose to focus on this bracket because it includes the median U.S. household income, $61,372. The Hechinger Report calculates net cost by subtracting federal, state, local and institutional grants and scholarships from the sticker price for first-time, full-time (and, at public universities, in-state) undergraduates based on data provided by the U.S. Department of Education. Then, using data from PayScale’s College Salary Report, we divided net cost by graduates’ expected annual earnings, which was calculated based on the median salary of graduates with less than five years of experience as well as those with 10 or more years of experience. The ranking gives greater weight to workers’ earnings in the years immediately after college, when individuals are the most impacted by college costs and student debt. (You can read our full methodology here.) We excluded tuition-free institutions from the list, including military schools like West Point and U.S. Naval Academy, because the cost of post-college military service introduces an additional factor that’s challenging to measure against other schools. Stanford University takes first place on the list. According to The Hechinger Report, the net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Stanford graduates with more than 10 years of experience report average salaries of $143,100. According to PayScale, 51% of Stanford students major in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) field, a factor that contributes to high average salaries among graduates. And Stanford is known for providing robust financial aid. The average scholarship and grant total for students from families making less than $65,000 a year is $74,095 per year. Students from families making between $65,000 and $95,000 receive $65,050 on average in scholarships and grant aid. While Princeton, Harvard and Yale get top marks, a wide range of schools from across the U.S. are represented here. State schools like the University of Washington-Seattle, small liberal arts colleges like Pomona College and STEM-focused schools like MIT also appear on this list, indicating that you don’t have to attend the Ivy League to get a great return on your college investment. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 50 U.S. colleges that pay off the most:

The top 25 private universities

1. Stanford University

Stanford University David Butow | Getty Images

Stanford University, often referred to as a “West Coast Ivy,” is located near Silicon Valley in Stanford, California. The highly selective school is known for its strong science, technology and engineering programs as well as its successful athletics programs. Stanford enrolls approximately 7,083 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,061

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $76,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $109,800

2. Princeton University

Princeton University Photo: Princeton University, Office of Communications.

Princeton University was founded in 1746, making it the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Undergraduate Princeton students study one of 37 concentrations and must be proficient in at least one language other than English. Known for its strong engineering program, approximately 25% of undergraduates at the Ivy League school study in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,557

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $141,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,000

3. University of Chicago

The University of Chicago Bob Krist | Getty Images

The University of Chicago is a private, nonprofit university in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. The school is known for its strong STEM programs, but the curriculum also requires students to complete courses in three areas: humanities, civilization studies and the arts; natural sciences; and social sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,536

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $117,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,550

4. California Institute of Technology

California Institute of Technology Danita Delimont | Getty Images

California Institute of Technology, known as CalTech, is a private, nonprofit engineering university located in Pasadena, California. The CalTech curriculum emphasizes STEM education and all students are required to take math, physics, chemistry, biology and scientific communication courses. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,781

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $113,250

5. Harvard University

Harvard University DenisTangneyJr | iStock | Getty Images

Founded in 1636, Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is the oldest college in the United States. Harvard is known for its historic legacy, famous alumni and generous financial aid, which the university is able to provide in part because of an endowment worth approximately $39.2 billion. Harvard students select “concentrations” instead of majors and one of the most popular is economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,577

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $142,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,600

6. Yale University

Yale University Yana Paskova / Stringer (Getty Images)

Located in New Haven, Connecticut, Yale is a private, Ivy League university. Founded in 1701, Yale is the third-oldest college in the United States. Yale teaches a liberal arts curriculum and requires students take classes in humanities and arts; sciences and social sciences; foreign languages; quantitative reasoning; and writing. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,551

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,850

7. Columbia University

Columbia University Getty Images

Columbia University is a private Ivy League university in New York City. Founded in 1754, Columbia is the fifth-oldest college in the United States. Columbia students can choose from 80 areas of study but must take six required classes, such as Contemporary Civilization and Frontiers of Science, and must fulfill several requirements including taking a foreign language. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,592

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $69,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $127,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,350

8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT Kevin Fleming | Corbis Documentary | Getty Images

Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a STEM-focused private, nonprofit university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Instead of majors, MIT students choose a “course” to specialize in. Electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science are among the most popular courses at MIT. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,633

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $150,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $117,000

9. Pomona College

Pomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty Images

Pomona College is one of five private, nonprofit, liberal arts colleges in Claremont, California. The curriculum at the highly selective school is broad and requires students take at least one course in each of six areas: criticism, analysis and contextual study of works of the human imagination; social institutions and human behavior; history, values, ethics and cultural studies; physical and biological sciences; mathematical reasoning; and creation and performance of works of art and literature. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,975

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $119,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,200

10. Duke University

Duke University Lance King | Getty Images

Located in Durham, North Carolina, Duke University is a private university. The southern school, known for its strong athletic program, offers 4,000 courses each semester. The most popular major among Duke undergrads is computer science and 83% of students study more than just one major. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $7,880

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $133,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $100,900

11. Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee Doug Plummer | Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee is a private liberal arts university located in Lexington, Virginia. The small southern university is composed of two undergraduate schools: the Williams School of Commerce, Economics and Politics — which offers degrees in business administration, business administration and accounting, public accounting, economics and politics — as well as a liberal arts school referred to as “the College” that offers 40 different majors. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,962

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $130,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $96,800

12. Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt | Collegiate Images | Getty Images

Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, is a private, nonprofit university. Undergraduate Vanderbilt students can earn bachelor’s degrees from the College of Arts and Science, the Blair School of Music, the School of Engineering and the Peabody College of Education and Human Development. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,451

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $118,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $91,100

13. Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College Cheryl Senter/Bloomberg | Getty Images

Dartmouth College is a private, nonprofit, Ivy League university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, that enrolls approximately 4,400 undergraduate students and is known for its graduate programs, such as the Tuck School of Business. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,048

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $137,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $103,200

14. Olin College of Engineering

Olin College Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Founded in 1997, the Olin College of Engineering is a private, nonprofit, engineering college in Needham, Massachusetts. Located near Babson College and Wellesley College, Olin is known for its project-based engineering curriculum. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,706

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $81,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $134,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $108,050

15. Rice University

Rice University Craig Hartley | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Rice University is a private, nonprofit university located in Houston. Undergraduate students at Rice can study more than 50 different majors in the George R. Brown School of Engineering, the Shepherd School of Music, the School of Architecture, the School of Humanities, the School of Social Sciences and the Wiess School of Natural Sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,080

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $69,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $133,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,400

16. Williams College

Williams College John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

This highly respected private, nonprofit, liberal arts college is based in Williamstown, Massachusetts. All Williams students take at least two writing-intensive courses as well several courses in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and science and mathematics. Williams enrolls approximately 2,020 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,448

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $64,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $99,750

17. University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania Margie Politzer | Lonely Planet Images | Getty Images

The University of Pennsylvania is a private university known for its business program. Undergraduate students at this Ivy League school can choose from more than 90 majors across four schools: the College for Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Nursing and the Wharton Business School. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,322

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $70,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $102,950

18. Bowdoin College

Bowdoin College Derek Davis | Portland Press Herald | Getty Images

Bowdoin College is a private, nonprofit, liberal arts college located in Brunswick, Maine. Students at the small school must take at least one course in five areas: mathematical, computational or statistical reasoning; inquiry in the natural sciences; exploring social differences; international perspectives; and visual and performing arts. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,057

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $116,000

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,850

19. Webb Institute

Webb Institute Source: Webb Institute

Webb Institute in Glen Cove, New York, is a small, private, nonprofit college that educates students in naval architecture and marine engineering. During the 2018-2019 school year, the Webb Institute enrolled just 104 students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,682

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $79,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $134,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $106,900

20. Brown University

Brown University Yiming Chen | Getty Images

Brown University is an Ivy League university located in Providence, Rhode Island. Brown is known for its flexible “open curriculum ” that only requires that students complete at least 30 courses in eight semesters, complete at least one major and “demonstrate excellent skill in written English.” Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,697

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $65,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,500

21. Haverford College

Haverford College Source: Michael Branscom

Haverford College is a private liberal arts college in Haverford, Pennsylvania. Haverford’s liberal arts curriculum requires that students study in areas such as meaning, interpretation and creative expression or analysis and the social world: individuals, institutions and cultures. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,110

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $56,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $93,750

22. Swarthmore College

Swarthmore College aimintang | Getty Images

Swarthmore College is a private liberal arts college located in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1864 by Quakers, Swarthmore is part of a tri-college consortium with Bryn Mawr and Haverford College and also offers cross-registration with the University of Pennsylvania. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,638

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $129,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $96,500

23. The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art

Cooper Union Campus Source: Mario Morgado | Courtesy of The Cooper Union

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art Engineering, also referred to as “The Cooper Union,” is a private college located in New York City comprised of three schools specializing in architecture, art and engineering. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,743

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $65,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $128,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $97,100

24. Bates College

Bates College Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Located in Lewiston, Maine, Bates College is a private liberal arts college. Bates has a unique academic calendar that features two semesters and one “short term,” a five-week period that allows students to focus on one single class. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,108

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $120,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $88,900

25. Wesleyan University

Wesleyan University Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Located in Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University is a private, liberal arts school that enrolls roughly 3,000 undergraduate students. Wesleyan’s flexible curriculum requires that students study each of four “competencies” — mapping (navigating complex environments), expressing (writing and communication), mining (empirical analysis and interpretation) and engaging (negotiating cultural contexts). Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,996

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $114,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,000

The top 25 public universities

1. University of Washington, Seattle

University of Washington Nikko Hellstern | Getty Images

The University of Washington, Seattle, is the flagship school of the University of Washington school system. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,984

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $111,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,850

2. University of Washington, Bothell

University of Washington Bothell Photo: Joe Mabel | Wikipedia CC

Also a member of the University of Washington school system, the University of Washington, Bothell, is a public university that offers roughly 55 degree programs and enrolls just 5,411 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,767

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $58,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $104,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,150

3. Massachusetts Maritime Academy

A Google Earth view of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Source: Google Earth

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is a public college located in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, that offers bachelor’s and master’s of science degrees in marine engineering fields. Many MMA students choose to volunteer for military service, though it is not a requirement. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,235

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $67,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $114,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,900

4. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

University of Michigan tiny-al | Getty Images

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, is the flagship campus of the University of Michigan school system. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,106

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $84,950

5. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology, often referred to as “Georgia Tech,” is a public university located in Atlanta. The school offers technology-focused education to more than 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students across six colleges and 28 schools focusing on business, computing, design, engineering, the liberal arts and sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,284

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $70,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,350

6. Purdue University, West Lafayette

Purdue University Michael Hickey/Getty Images

Purdue University’s campus in West Lafayette, Indiana, is the flagship campus of the Purdue University system. The public university enrolls 32,672 undergraduate students. Known for its strong engineering program, 28% of undergraduate students at Purdue study in the College of Engineering. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,828

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $105,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $83,000

7. College of William and Mary

College of William and Mary Will Pryce/Construction Photography/Avalon/Getty Images

Founded in 1693, the College of William and Mary is the second-oldest college in the country. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” The school offers a joint degree program with University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,320

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $113,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,350

8. Michigan Technological University

Michigan Technical University Jcvertin | Wikipedia CC

Michigan Technological University is a public university located in Houghton, Michigan. The technology-focused school is made up of seven colleges and schools including a College of Computing, a College of Engineering and a School of Business and Economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,080

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $64,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $110,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,400

9. University of California, Los Angeles

UCLA Al Seib | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

One of the most selective schools in the University of California school system, the University of California, Los Angeles, is known for its strong athletics department. The most popular majors at UCLA are biology, business economics, political science, psychology and psychobiology. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,416

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $118,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,250

10. Baruch College

CUNY Bernard M Baruch College Ben Hider/Getty Images

Baruch College is one of 13 four-year colleges in The City University of New York school system. The public university is known for its business program and enrolls approximately 15,024 undergraduate students. The most popular majors at Baruch include accounting, finance and marketing. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,473

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $82,350

11. University of California, San Diego

University Of California, San Diego Education Images | Getty Images

University of California, San Diego, is part of the University of California school system and is located in La Jolla, California. The public university enrolls approximately 30,285 undergraduate students and is known both for its fine arts program and its engineering program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,367

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $126,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $94,050

12. University of California, Riverside

UC Riverside Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Part of the University of California system, University of California, Riverside, is a public university that offers more than 80 undergraduate majors across five schools. Located east of Los Angeles, UCR enrolls roughly 20,581 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,685

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $54,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $109,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,650

13. New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

The campus of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, or more commonly known as New Mexico Tech in Socorro, New Mexico. Source: Atomic Energy505 | Wikimedia Commons

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology is a public university that offers associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees primarily in science and engineering. NMT is located in Socorro, New Mexico, approximately 75 miles south of Albuquerque and is known for its chemical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,756

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $121,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $92,00

14. Missouri University of Science and Technology

Curtis Laws Wilson Library, Missouri S&T, Rolla, Missouri. Source: Steveewatkins | WikiMedia Commons

STEM-focused Missouri University of Science and Technology, often called Missouri S&T, is a public land grant university based in Rolla, Missouri. The school’s mission is to integrate “education, research and application to create and convey knowledge that serves our state and helps solve the world’s great challenges.” Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,066

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $66,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $116,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $91,550

15. University of California, Irvine

School of Biological Sciences, University of California at Irvine Source: WikiMedia Commons

University of California, Irvine, is one of 10 campuses in the University of California school system. In 2018, the public university enrolled approximately 29,736 undergraduate students. UCI is known for its engineering and criminal justice programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,820

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $121,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,750

16. Montana Tech

Source: Montan Tech

Originally named the Montana State School of Mines, today Montana Tech is part of the University of Montana system with an emphasis on STEM. The public university is located in Butte, Montana, and is known for its engineering and nursing programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,133

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $84,550

17. California State University Maritime Academy (tie)

The TS Golden Bear training ship at the California State University Maritime Academy. Photo: Coldasshonky | Wikipedia CC

California State University Maritime Academy, known as “Cal Maritime,” is one of 23 schools in the California State University system. Located in Vallejo, California, the university is the only degree-granting maritime academy on the West Coast and aims to prepare students for careers fields like engineering, transportation, international relations, business and global logistics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $15,515

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $67,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $129,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,300

17. University of Virginia, Charlottesville (tie)

University of Virginia Source: Dan Addison | UVA University Communications

The University of Virginia, is a public university located in Charlottesville, Virginia. Founded by Thomas Jefferson, the public university enrolls approximately 16,777 undergraduate students and is known for its law and business schools as well as for its strong athletics program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,374

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $119,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $91,100

19. University of California, Santa Barbara

UC Santa Barbara Patricia Marroquin | Getty Images

The University of California, Santa Barbara, is a public university within the University of California school system. During the 2018-2019 school year, UCSB enrolled 25,976 undergraduate students. UCSB is known for its engineering, education and environmental studies programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,176

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $121,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,400

20. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

California State Polytechnic University – Pomona Source: California State Polytechnic University-Pomona

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, known as Cal Poly Pomona, is a public polytechnic university located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Cal Poly Pomona enrolls approximately 24,314 undergraduate students and is known for its business and engineering programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,335

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $56,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $111,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $83,800

21. University of California, Davis

University of California, Davis Billy Hustace | Getty Images

University of California, Davis, known for its food and agriculture program, is a part of the University of California school system. The public university enrolls approximately 30,718 undergraduate students. The three most popular majors at UC Davis are psychology, managerial economics and economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,186

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $113,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $86,600

22. North Carolina State University, Raleigh

North Carolina State University DenisTangneyJr | Getty Images

NC State University in Raleigh, North Carolina, is a public university that enrolls roughly 35,479 students. The public university is known for its veterinary medicine program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,244

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $55,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $104,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $80,250

23. SUNY Maritime College

SUNY Maritime College Jim Henderson | Wikimedia Commons

Part of the State University of New York system, SUNY Maritime College is located in the Bronx, New York. The public university enrolls roughly 1,635 undergraduate students and offers bachelor’s of engineering, bachelor’s of science, master’s of science and associate’s of applied science degrees. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $18,019

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $73,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $140,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $106,700

24. University of Delaware, Newark

University of Delaware gregobagel | Getty Images

Located in Newark, Delaware, the University of Delaware is a public university. The school enrolls approximately 18,221 undergraduate students and is known for its chemical engineering program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,909

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $56,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $105,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,200

25. University of California, Berkeley

University of California, Berkeley Rick Gerharter | Getty Images

University of California, Berkeley, is the flagship school of the University of California system. Located in Berkeley, California, near San Francisco, the university enrolls some 30,853 undergraduate students. The school is home to the Haas School of Business. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $17,413

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $132,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $100,300 Beyond school selection, there are several steps students can take to maximize the value of their time in college while minimizing the costs. Consider pursuing a degree in a high-paying field. Earning a degree in a STEM field can help students at any college prepare themselves for in-demand high-paying jobs. Students can keep costs low by keeping on pace with their requirements and graduating on time. Additional semesters of college can be expensive and in some cases, scholarship and grant aid does not apply for semesters beyond the standard four years. But the most significant step students can take to ensure their college degree pays off is, simply, to complete their college degree. Just 60% of college students complete their bachelor’s in six years and many drop out altogether, and one of the worst outcomes for students is taking on loans for a degree they do not complete. The economic benefits of earning a bachelor’s degree are still significant, and if students study hard and play their cards right, college can pay off big time. Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cost, university, salary, experience, income, pay, students, average, college, 50, alumni, colleges, net


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These are the best places to launch a small business in America

They got hooked on doing business in the state after moving the start-up to Houston to participate in an accelerator there. Alec Manfre co-founded Bractlet and moved the start-up to Texas to tap the state’s talent pool. It’s not surprising that Manfre has found a lot to love about doing business in Texas — which finished second in CNBC’s 2019 America’s Top States for Business ranking. Abundant talentStates with a strong university system have an edge in an increasingly knowledge-based economy. 1


They got hooked on doing business in the state after moving the start-up to Houston to participate in an accelerator there. Alec Manfre co-founded Bractlet and moved the start-up to Texas to tap the state’s talent pool. It’s not surprising that Manfre has found a lot to love about doing business in Texas — which finished second in CNBC’s 2019 America’s Top States for Business ranking. Abundant talentStates with a strong university system have an edge in an increasingly knowledge-based economy. 1
These are the best places to launch a small business in America Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: elaine pofeldt, susan caminiti
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, texas, strong, tech, business, states, florida, capital, technology, places, america, talent, university, launch, small, best


These are the best places to launch a small business in America

Richard Cummins | Getty Images

Alec Manfre co-founded the tech start-up Bractlet as a student in Atlanta where he went to college, then ran it from an incubator in Santiago, Chile. But it was Texas where he and his two co-founders ultimately put down roots. They got hooked on doing business in the state after moving the start-up to Houston to participate in an accelerator there. Bractlet makes a technology that helps commercial real estate owners evaluate their buildings’ energy infrastructure. The entrepreneurs were excited about the deep expertise in energy that existed in the city. Twenty-person Bractlet has since moved to Austin, where its lead investor, a venture capital firm, is located. Thanks to the presence of schools such as University of Texas, the company has been able to find plentiful skilled talent, both within Austin and from cities such as Dallas, Houston and San Antonio, says Manfre. Adding to the lure of doing business in Austin, he says, is the active start-up crowd; community groups centered on energy efficiency; and events like the movie, music and tech festival SXSW.

Alec Manfre co-founded Bractlet and moved the start-up to Texas to tap the state’s talent pool. Shlomo Morgulis

“There are always connections to be made and communities being built — and there’s a strong emphasis on technology and investment,” says Manfre. “That’s a really powerful combination for us.” Oh, and the active outdoor culture doesn’t hurt, either. “Yesterday we were doing wakeboarding on a recreational lake 15 minutes away,” he says. It’s not surprising that Manfre has found a lot to love about doing business in Texas — which finished second in CNBC’s 2019 America’s Top States for Business ranking. Known for its low-tax environment — there’s no personal income tax or corporate income tax — business-friendly regulatory climate and innovation-focused economy, Texas has many champions in the business community. “It’s simply easier to do business in Texas than any other state,” says Bob Harvey, president and CEO of the Greater Houston Partnership, an economic development organization. But it’s not solely a low-tax, low-regulation environment that makes a state great for business. Some states have a completely different playbook for success that works for them. High-tax, highly regulated environments haven’t kept California’s Silicon Valley, the Rte. 128 Tech Corridor in Massachusetts or New York’s Silicon Alley from spawning innovation or attracting venture capital. These states owe their economic health to other factors, like excellent access to capital for their start-ups and dominance in particular industries. California, for instance, has its thriving film and aerospace industries. “California gets away with a horrible business climate because it’s got such strong industries,” says Steve King, a partner at Emergent Research, which studies small business trends out of Lafayette, California. Recognizing there’s no magic formula for building a thriving business community, CNBC’s 2019 America’s Top States for Business scores the states on 64 metrics across 10 main categories: their economy, workforce, infrastructure, cost of doing business, quality of life, education, technology and innovation, business friendliness, access to capital and cost of living. Here is a look at some of the qualities that are helping states foster entrepreneurial business growth.

Abundant talent

States with a strong university system have an edge in an increasingly knowledge-based economy. Florida (No. 12 on the list), for instance, has more than 60 universities around the state churning out well-educated graduates, among them the University of Florida, University of Central Florida and University of South Florida. The strong talent bench is fueling the growth of sectors such as cybersecurity, technology and finance and attracting venture capital, according to Craig Richard, president and CEO of the Tampa Hillsborough Economic Development Corp. “They are cranking out a lot of innovation and patents around cybersecurity,” says Richard. “That’s one of our fastest-growing tech sectors.” It’s not the only technology niche where Florida’s economy is percolating, thanks to the state’s deep pool of STEM-educated talent. Luminar Technologies, a fast-growing Silicon Valley-based start-up backed by Peter Thiel makes lidar-based sensors for vehicles. It established its R&D and manufacturing base in Orlando last year — and now about 265 of its roughly 370 employees work out of Orlando, according to the company’s chief business officer, Scott Faris.

Luminar’s co-founder Jason Eichenholz knew there was a concentration of specialized engineering talent in the area as an alum of the University of Central Florida’s Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers. Many engineers in the state’s aerospace industry had already worked on similar technology for laser-guided missiles. The company wanted to take advantage of that knowledge base. “There is no place in the universe where you have the density of talent in the lidar and sensing space that you do in Orlando,” says Faris. “It’s got a rich history and density of people who understand all aspects of this. We’re able to attract those folks into the organization.”

Quality of life

With unemployment at record lows and the talent wars accelerating, many business leaders realize it’s easier to recruit if they open their offices in places where workers want to live because of fantastic schools, a great arts scene, hot restaurants or easy access to parks and outdoor activities. “More companies are looking at the quality of life and eco-friendliness,” says attorney Andrew Sherman, a partner in Seyfarth Shaw in Washington, D.C., who advises both entrepreneurs and corporate businesses and is author of many books on entrepreneurship. “The state of Washington, for instance, has done a nice job of marketing their assets to small and midsize businesses, saying, ‘Not only do we have good universities and human capital but we have beautiful cities with access to the Pacific. ” Similarly, employers in Colorado have found that it’s not hard to entice recruits from other states to move to up-and-coming outdoor-oriented cities such as Denver, Colorado Springs, and Boulder, known for its thriving tech and natural-foods industries.

Denver’s economy is solid, and it has a strong, educated workforce. It also has the nation’s fourth-largest concentration of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) employees. photoquest7 | iStock | Getty Images

“I think our quality of life is an important contributor,” says Dirk Draper, president and CEO of the Colorado Springs Chamber and EDC. “Entrepreneurs and innovators may be working on their own or in small groups where they can make a decision more on a quality of life factor that adds spice to our community mix. They come here for the lifestyle.”

Taxes

A favorable regulatory environment

As technology upends many industries, a regulatory climate that allows for innovation is essential, say many business leaders. Tim Giuliani, president and CEO of the Orlando Economic Partnership, points to the bill Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed in June on autonomous vehicles. It allows the Florida Turnpike Enterprise to fund, construct and operate test facilities to advance autonomous and connected transportation technology. That will be a big advantage for businesses in this field, he believes. “It sends a signal that Florida is willing to continue to change its regulatory environment to adapt to new technologies,” says Giuliani.

TriggerPhoto | iStock Unreleased | Getty Images

That’s not to say that the business community wants a zero-regulation environment. “Sometimes government regulation can be a positive — but if it’s done too much, I’d be concerned,” says Elie Rieder, founder and CEO of Castle Lanterra Properties, a firm in Suffern, New York, that invests in multifamily real estate around the country and is affected by regulations such as rent stabilization laws.

Infrastructure


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: elaine pofeldt, susan caminiti
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, texas, strong, tech, business, states, florida, capital, technology, places, america, talent, university, launch, small, best


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Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es


Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es
Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


Here's an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache.

But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience.

Certainly, they aren’t exactly the same (resumes shouldn’t be written in a narrative style), but both share a few similarities: They tell the truth, differentiate you from others, highlight your most unique qualities and capture readers’ attention.

Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):

IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center

Don’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the essential tips below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


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Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree

Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” 2 Stanford University, the average


Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” 2 Stanford University, the average
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, half, finance, survey, nearly, programs, 100000, graduates, borrow, business, degree, university, mba, schools, students, stanford


Nearly half of students at five top MBA programs borrow at least $100,000 to finance their degree

A degree from a top business school has long been seen as a direct path to a job at a top company, but new data demonstrates just how much it costs to pursue that route. Bloomberg Businessweek surveyed more than 10,000 2018 graduates of MBA programs from 126 schools about the amount of debt they piled on earning their degrees. The survey found that almost half of students at leading business schools around the world borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their MBA. According to the survey, at minimum 40% of MBA graduates from U.S. News & World Report’s top-ranking business programs — those at Duke, Dartmouth, University of Michigan, Cornell and University of Chicago — reported incurring at least $100,000 in debt. That percentage drops a bit at nine other top MBA programs – including those at MIT, University of Pennsylvania, NYU and Northwestern University – where around a third of recent graduates borrowed at least $100,000 to finance their degrees.

University of Michigan students are seen in the Stephen M. Ross School of Business in Ann Arbor Rebecca Cook | Reuters

Conventional wisdom has held that the price tag on an MBA, however high, tends to be worth it. According to U.S. News & World Report, tuition for traditional full-time (two year) MBA students surpassed $50,000 per year at the top 15 ranked MBA programs in the 2019 Best Business Schools rankings – with some schools exceeding $70,000 annually. Prices at public schools, particularly for in-state students, tend to be lower. U.S. News says that, “among the 10 highest-ranked public B-schools, the average in-state tuition for full-time MBA students was slightly more than $42,000 per year.” But Bloomberg’s survey results illustrate just how steep the debt eager entrepreneurs and executives undertake to advance their careers. Graduates of the 26 schools where at least 20% of students report having had to borrow six-figure sums disclose median starting pay ranging from $80,000 to $140,000. “The survey data puts into stark relief just how much of a return some students need to justify their debt-financed investment,” Bloomberg reports. Students see a clear connection between the cost of their degree and the benefit. Mike Sanchez, a 32-year-old investment banker at Citigroup and 2018 graduate of University of Chicago Booth School of Business, told Bloomberg that he didn’t consider the $110,000 in student loans he took out to finance the program a hindrance. Booth reports its median starting salary for last year’s graduates was $130,000. Based on a 2018 report by QS Quacquarelli Symonds, a higher education data and research company, U.S. News reported that, “within 10 years of earning an MBA degree, the average MBA grad from either a U.S. or international business school had an estimated decade-long return on investment of $390,751, even after subtracting the tuition and opportunity costs of attending an MBA program.” At top business schools, like No. 2 Stanford University, the average decade-long ROI of an MBA degree exceeds $1 million.

Graduating Stanford University students are shown before the start of the 123rd Stanford commencement ceremony, June 15, 2014, in Stanford, Calif. Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, half, finance, survey, nearly, programs, 100000, graduates, borrow, business, degree, university, mba, schools, students, stanford


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New JAMA study shows legalizing pot might discourage teen use

Legalizing pot does not appear to encourage teen use and might actually discourage it, a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics suggests. The results show teen pot use both before and after medical marijuana laws were adopted in 27 states, seven of which also legalized recreational marijuana during the survey period. Teen marijuana use didn’t change much after medical marijuana was legalized, they found. The study estimates an association between legalization and teen use, not causation, mean


Legalizing pot does not appear to encourage teen use and might actually discourage it, a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics suggests. The results show teen pot use both before and after medical marijuana laws were adopted in 27 states, seven of which also legalized recreational marijuana during the survey period. Teen marijuana use didn’t change much after medical marijuana was legalized, they found. The study estimates an association between legalization and teen use, not causation, mean
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: angelica lavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recreational, legalizing, university, discourage, marijuana, study, states, teens, teen, pot, jama, shows, legalized, medical


New JAMA study shows legalizing pot might discourage teen use

Legalizing pot does not appear to encourage teen use and might actually discourage it, a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 1.4 million high school students between 1993 and 2017, collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for its Youth Risk Behavior survey. The results show teen pot use both before and after medical marijuana laws were adopted in 27 states, seven of which also legalized recreational marijuana during the survey period.

Teen marijuana use didn’t change much after medical marijuana was legalized, they found. In states that legalized recreational use, the number of teens who said they smoked pot in the previous 30 days dropped 8% while the number who used it 10 or more times fell by 9%.

One theory floated by the study’s authors was that teens may find it more difficult to access marijuana if drug dealers are replaced by licensed dispensaries that require proof of age, possibly contributing to the decrease.

Eleven states and the District of Columbia have now legalized recreational use of marijuana, while 34 states permit medical use. Some worry normalizing pot will give young people the impression that marijuana is harmless. Plus, they worry that selling pot at dispensaries will make it easy for young people to access the drug.

The study estimates an association between legalization and teen use, not causation, meaning the study does not show conclusively that legalizing pot causes a decrease in teen use. Still, the findings are consistent with similar research that suggests teens might smoke less pot in states where medical or recreational marijuana is legal.

The study was conducted by D. Mark Anderson of Montana State University, Benjamin Hansen of the University of Oregon, Daniel Rees of the University of Colorado Denver and Joseph Sabia of San Diego State University. The research was funded by grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health and the Charles Koch Foundation.

Though generally aligned with Republicans, the Koch brothers have split with the party on marijuana and some other issues. The powerful libertarian donors support states legalizing pot and criticize federal attempts to thwart local laws.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: angelica lavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recreational, legalizing, university, discourage, marijuana, study, states, teens, teen, pot, jama, shows, legalized, medical


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Huawei staff share deep links with Chinese military, new study claims

In this photo illustration, the Huawei logo and Chinese flag is seen displayed on an Android mobile phone. A new analysis of CVs of Huawei staff appeared to reveal deeper links between the technology giant and China’s military and intelligence bodies than had been previously acknowledged by the firm. The paper, which looks at employment records of Huawei employees, concluded that “key mid-level technical personnel employed by Huawei have strong backgrounds in work closely associated with intelli


In this photo illustration, the Huawei logo and Chinese flag is seen displayed on an Android mobile phone. A new analysis of CVs of Huawei staff appeared to reveal deeper links between the technology giant and China’s military and intelligence bodies than had been previously acknowledged by the firm. The paper, which looks at employment records of Huawei employees, concluded that “key mid-level technical personnel employed by Huawei have strong backgrounds in work closely associated with intelli
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, balding, university, study, chinese, intelligence, huawei, claims, deep, military, links, share, staff, employees, concerns, strong


Huawei staff share deep links with Chinese military, new study claims

In this photo illustration, the Huawei logo and Chinese flag is seen displayed on an Android mobile phone.

A new analysis of CVs of Huawei staff appeared to reveal deeper links between the technology giant and China’s military and intelligence bodies than had been previously acknowledged by the firm.

The paper, which looks at employment records of Huawei employees, concluded that “key mid-level technical personnel employed by Huawei have strong backgrounds in work closely associated with intelligence gathering and military activities.” Some employees can be linked “to specific instances of hacking or industrial espionage conducted against Western firms,” it claimed.

The study may heighten concerns among governments who are analyzing claims that Huawei poses a national security risk. Some countries are worried that Huawei could install so-called backdoors in its telecommunications networking equipment that would allow the Chinese government to access user data. Huawei has repeatedly denied it would ever engage in such activity.

The study, conducted by Christopher Balding, an associate professor at Fulbright University Vietnam, and London-based conservative think tank Henry Jackson Society, looked through CVs of Huawei employees that were leaked online from unsecured databases and websites run by recruitment firms.

One CV appeared to show a person who simultaneously held a position at Huawei and a teaching and research role at a military university through which they were employed by the Chinese People’s Liberation Army. Balding linked that employee to a section in the PLA that is responsible for the Chinese military’s space, cyber, and electronic warfare capabilities.

“The circumstantial evidence appears quite strong to support valid concerns about the relationship between Huawei, the PLA, and concerns about intelligence gathering,” Balding said in the paper.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, balding, university, study, chinese, intelligence, huawei, claims, deep, military, links, share, staff, employees, concerns, strong


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Google’s next battleground as it gets into health care will be privacy, lawsuit shows

Since Feinberg’s hiring, several units have been folded into Google Health, including Deep Mind’s health division, which was previously based in London. The lawsuit shows a major challenge for Google and other large technology companies marching into health care. Personal health information can be transferred between organizations as part of a so-called business associate agreement, said Lucia Savage, a health privacy lawyer with the digital health company Omada Health. These agreements ensure t


Since Feinberg’s hiring, several units have been folded into Google Health, including Deep Mind’s health division, which was previously based in London. The lawsuit shows a major challenge for Google and other large technology companies marching into health care. Personal health information can be transferred between organizations as part of a so-called business associate agreement, said Lucia Savage, a health privacy lawyer with the digital health company Omada Health. These agreements ensure t
Google’s next battleground as it gets into health care will be privacy, lawsuit shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, data, company, battleground, companies, chicago, information, privacy, shows, medical, patient, university, lawsuit, care, googles, gets, google


Google's next battleground as it gets into health care will be privacy, lawsuit shows

Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google, speaks to the media before the opening of the Berlin representation of Google Germany in Berlin on January 22, 2019.

In the wake of that, the company recently hired a health system executive, David Feinberg, to streamline its health efforts and create more unity among the various teams. Since Feinberg’s hiring, several units have been folded into Google Health, including Deep Mind’s health division, which was previously based in London. DeepMind has stressed that no patient data has been linked with Google products or services.

The lawsuit shows a major challenge for Google and other large technology companies marching into health care. These companies are facing looming regulation from Washington and increased scrutiny about whether the proper steps have been taken to safeguard data, especially in how the company allows third-party marketers to target users with ads. It also faced an outcry when a U.K. government privacy watchdog said a hospital had illegally sent 1.6 million records to Google DeepMind for a new health care app.

A new lawsuit against Google and the University of Chicago Medical Center alleges that researchers did not strip out date stamps or doctor’s notes buried within hundreds of thousands of patient medical records, and that this information could be used to identify a patient.

What the case says

Google and the University of Chicago have been partnering since 2017 in research aimed at what they said would “create predictive models that could help prevent unplanned hospital readmissions, avoid costly complications and save lives.”

The complaint was filed Wednesday on behalf of Matt Dinerstein, a patient with the University of Chicago Medical Center.

It argues that dates of service can be used to identify subjects, because “Google — as one of the most prolific data mining companies — is uniquely able to determine the identity of every medical record the University released.”

In other words, because Google already knows people’s location, their searches and their interests, theoretically that information could be used with dates of service to identify a specific individual.

It then accuses the university of consumer fraud and fraudulent business practices because it did not keep his private records confidential.

In a statement, Google said: “We believe our healthcare research could help save lives in the future, which is why we take privacy seriously and follow all relevant rules and regulations in our handling of health data. In particular, we take compliance with HIPAA seriously, including in the receipt and use of the limited data set provided by the University of Chicago. ”

The medical center said the lawsuit’s claims are without merit.

“That research partnership was appropriate and legal and the claims asserted in this case are baseless and a disservice to the Medical Center’s fundamental mission of improving the lives of its patients,” a spokesperson said. “The University and the Medical Center will vigorously defend this action in court.”

HIPAA, the federal privacy rule for health records and information, clearly outlines two methods for de-identifying data. One of them, the so-called “safe harbor” method, specifies that “all elements of dates,” should not be shared, in order for a company to claim that the patient health information data is, in fact, de-identified. That includes dates of service, which the University of Chicago shared with Google.

There’s another method, called “expert determination,” where a statistician or other expert claims that it’s unlikely that the data could be used to re-identify a person.

But there are times when health systems can transfer patient information.

Personal health information can be transferred between organizations as part of a so-called business associate agreement, said Lucia Savage, a health privacy lawyer with the digital health company Omada Health. These agreements ensure that personal health information is provided in a secure manner. And there are guidelines around the use of limited data sets in medical research.

That requires a company like Google to sign a data-use agreement with a health provider, and it specifies that really specific data like names and telephone numbers cannot be shared. In this case, Google would be required to safeguard the data, said David Harlow, a principal with The Harlow Group. And the lawsuit would need to prove that it did not.

But as tech companies march into health care, and see value in data, that could prompt debate about the proper uses of patient information. In some cases, that might mean more oversight of companies that sell it to third-parties or form collaborations with Big Pharma.

Ultimately, Google and other tech companies will need to determine whether they view their role in health as bolstering medical research to potentially save lives, or whether they will look to take advantage of the $3.5 trillion health-care sector in unforeseen ways.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, data, company, battleground, companies, chicago, information, privacy, shows, medical, patient, university, lawsuit, care, googles, gets, google


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Parkland shooting survivor says Harvard rescinded his admission after racist remarks surfaced

Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., says that Harvard has withdrawn his acceptance after racist comments he says he made as a 16-year-old student surfaced online in May. A Harvard spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the school does not “comment publicly on the admissions status of individual applicants.” Harvard accepted 5.3% of applicants to its incoming undergraduate class, the lowest acceptance rate of any Ivy League school this year. This is


Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., says that Harvard has withdrawn his acceptance after racist comments he says he made as a 16-year-old student surfaced online in May. A Harvard spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the school does not “comment publicly on the admissions status of individual applicants.” Harvard accepted 5.3% of applicants to its incoming undergraduate class, the lowest acceptance rate of any Ivy League school this year. This is
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: elizabeth gravier
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Parkland shooting survivor says Harvard rescinded his admission after racist remarks surfaced

Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., says that Harvard has withdrawn his acceptance after racist comments he says he made as a 16-year-old student surfaced online in May.

Kashuv, 18, took to Twitter on Monday morning with a thread recounting his communication with the Ivy League school. He shared a letter from the university requesting a written explanation from Kashuv after his offensive remarks became public and said he responded with “full explanation, apology, and requested documents.”

He also shared a letter from the university revoking his admission. Dated June 3rd, it notes that “the Committee takes seriously the qualities of maturity and moral character.”

According to HuffPost, Kashuv’s offensive remarks, which included the repeated use of a racial slur, were originally circulated in a shared Google document as part of a class study guide. After screenshots of the doc including the remarks became public, Kashuv apologized on Twitter for his “callous and inflammatory language,” saying, “we were 16-year-olds making idiotic comments.”

Kashuv became widely known in the wake of the February 2018 Parkland shooting for his pro-gun stance – a counterweight to March For Our Lives activists. He is the former high school outreach director for the conservative non-profit organization Turning Point USA, and has met with President Trump at the White House, appeared on Fox News and spoken at conservative conferences.

A Harvard spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the school does not “comment publicly on the admissions status of individual applicants.” Harvard accepted 5.3% of applicants to its incoming undergraduate class, the lowest acceptance rate of any Ivy League school this year.

In his tweet thread on Monday, Kashuv said that he “had given up huge scholarships in order to go to Harvard” and that as the deadline for other college offers has passed, he’s “exploring all options at the moment.” CNBC Make It reached out to Kashuv but did not receive a response.

This is not the first time Harvard rescinded an admission offer after discovering bad behavior of its already accepted applicants online. The New York Times reports that in 2017, Harvard withdrew offers for at least 10 students who shared anti-Semitic and sexist messages in a private Facebook group.

Anna Ivey, the founder of Ivey Consulting, an admissions-counseling company, and former college admissions dean at the University of Chicago Law School, tells The Atlantic that college admittance offers are conditional — it isn’t too late to withdraw decisions once learning of new revelations about incoming students.

“Everything a kid does starting in 9th grade matters for admissions purposes,” Ivey said. “That’s sometimes a tough thing to hear, especially if it happened earlier in one’s high school years. But that’s the reality for applicants.”

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Don’t miss: Harvard’s freshman class is more than one-third legacy—here’s why that’s a problem


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: elizabeth gravier
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