Wrestling referee warned Rep. Jim Jordan about Ohio State doctor’s sex misconduct, new lawsuit says

Jordan and Hellickson responded, “Yeah, that’s Strauss,” according to the lawsuit filed Thursday in federal court in Columbus, Ohio. Multiple former wrestlers who were coached by Jordan during their time at Ohio State University have previously accused him of turning a blind eye to the abuse. After verbally confronting Strauss, Doe exited the shower, and told Jordan and Hellickson about what had happened, saying that Strauss was “whacking off in the shower.” “John Doe 30 told that person that he


Jordan and Hellickson responded, “Yeah, that’s Strauss,” according to the lawsuit filed Thursday in federal court in Columbus, Ohio.
Multiple former wrestlers who were coached by Jordan during their time at Ohio State University have previously accused him of turning a blind eye to the abuse.
After verbally confronting Strauss, Doe exited the shower, and told Jordan and Hellickson about what had happened, saying that Strauss was “whacking off in the shower.”
“John Doe 30 told that person that he
Wrestling referee warned Rep. Jim Jordan about Ohio State doctor’s sex misconduct, new lawsuit says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, told, wrestling, shower, jordan, strauss, ohio, misconduct, warned, rep, university, doe, sex, coach, house, lawsuit, referee


Wrestling referee warned Rep. Jim Jordan about Ohio State doctor's sex misconduct, new lawsuit says

Rep.Jim Jordan (R-OH) speaks to reporters during a break in a closed-door deposition as part of the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump led by the House Intelligence, House Foreign Affairs and House Oversight and Reform Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, November 6, 2019.

A college wrestling referee claimed in a new lawsuit that he told Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, two decades ago that an Ohio State University team doctor who has been accused of sexually assaulting students had masturbated in the shower in front of him.

But Jordan, who at the time was an assistant Ohio State wrestling coach – and then OSU head coach Russ Hellickson who was also told about the incident – just shrugged off the shocking claim about Dr. Richard Strauss, the suit says.

Jordan and Hellickson responded, “Yeah, that’s Strauss,” according to the lawsuit filed Thursday in federal court in Columbus, Ohio.

The allegation that Jordan knew of Strauss’ misdeeds comes on the heels of House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s announcement on Friday that the powerful congressman has been assigned to the House Intelligence Committee, which is conducting an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

The referee, identified in court papers as “John Doe 42” is the second person who says in legal filings that he told Jordan about being sexually approached or molested by Strauss, who since has died.

Multiple former wrestlers who were coached by Jordan during their time at Ohio State University have previously accused him of turning a blind eye to the abuse.

Jordan’s spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but Jordan has repeatedly denied knowing of the alleged abuse by Strauss.

“It’s not true,” the congressman told Politico in July last year.

“I never knew about any type of abuse. If I did, I would have done something about it. And look, if there are people who are abused, then that’s terrible and we want justice to happen.”

Hellickson, 71, the other coach who Doe accused of knowing about the abuse, did not comment on the allegations.

An investigation found that Strauss, who was the athletic team doctor at Ohio State University from 1978 to 1998, had sexually abused at least 177 male students over decades, with the earliest known abuse dating back to 1979. The university said he committed at least 1,429 sexual assaults and 47 rapes while employed by the school, according to the university’s 2019 crime report.

According to the latest lawsuit, John Doe 42 was with Strauss in an otherwise empty school locker room after a wrestling match that he refereed in 1994 or 1995.

John Doe 42 decided to shower at the far end, and Strauss chose the shower closest to him, despite having multiple open showers to choose from. Doe said he noticed Strauss’ body was touching his and found Strauss masturbating and staring at him, according to the court filing.

After verbally confronting Strauss, Doe exited the shower, and told Jordan and Hellickson about what had happened, saying that Strauss was “whacking off in the shower.”

Jordan and Hellickson replied, “Yeah, that’s Strauss.”

A second referee known as John Doe 30 said in the same court filing that he was also sexually abused by Strauss in 1990 or 1991, after he asked an unidentified wrestling coach if he could see a trainer to have his back wrapped to prevent injury before a wrestling match he was scheduled to referee.

“John Doe 30 was disturbed by Dr. Strauss’s behavior and called OSU’s Athletic Department to report the incident a few days later. He was connected to an OSU Athletics Department employee,” the suit says.

“John Doe 30 told that person that he was fondled while getting an ACE bandage wrapped during the wrestling meet. He also gave the OSU employee his name and phone number. The employee said, ‘OK, we’ll take care of it,’ according to the suit. “John Doe 30 was never contacted by anyone at OSU regarding his report.”

Jordan was employed as an assistant coach for the wrestling team between 1986 and 1994, which overlaps with the time frame of this incident.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, told, wrestling, shower, jordan, strauss, ohio, misconduct, warned, rep, university, doe, sex, coach, house, lawsuit, referee


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Why fewer couples are merging finances, and how you can make separate bank accounts work

Married and cohabitating millennials are more likely to hold separate bank accounts than previous generations, according to a Bank of America study. Why couples maintain separate accountsSociologist Joanna Pepin of the University of Maryland, who studies couples’ financial decisions, says many factors drive this trend. Joanna Pepin University of MarylandMany women have also experienced the unpleasantness that can result when money gets mingled. Many couples Pepin interviewed also cited student d


Married and cohabitating millennials are more likely to hold separate bank accounts than previous generations, according to a Bank of America study.
Why couples maintain separate accountsSociologist Joanna Pepin of the University of Maryland, who studies couples’ financial decisions, says many factors drive this trend.
Joanna Pepin University of MarylandMany women have also experienced the unpleasantness that can result when money gets mingled.
Many couples Pepin interviewed also cited student d
Why fewer couples are merging finances, and how you can make separate bank accounts work Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: aditi shrikant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, income, pepin, separate, couples, university, bank, shared, financial, accounts, work, crowe, finances, naputi, merging, fewer


Why fewer couples are merging finances, and how you can make separate bank accounts work

Tiara Na’puti and Chris Crowe have lived together since 2009. During the past decade they’ve shared six apartments, a car, and the expenses of a $72 elopement ceremony in 2013. But they’ve never shared a bank account. Na’puti and Crowe are part of the growing population of couples who, despite sharing multiple financial obligations, do not pool their income. Married and cohabitating millennials are more likely to hold separate bank accounts than previous generations, according to a Bank of America study. And a new survey from MagnifyMoney of 1,000 adults finds that 57% of unmarried couples living together keep their accounts separate, as do 16% of married couples. MagnifyMoney also finds that 1 in 5 couples with joint bank accounts say they regret combining their income with their partner or spouse.

Why couples maintain separate accounts

Sociologist Joanna Pepin of the University of Maryland, who studies couples’ financial decisions, says many factors drive this trend. For one, she says, “families are complicated these days.” In 1960, 65% of children grew up in a household where the mother was the homemaker and the father was the breadwinner. As of 2012, only 22% of children grew up this way, according to a report for the Council on Contemporary Families. Additionally, 25% of parents living with a child in the U.S. are unmarried and 35% of unmarried parents are cohabitating, according to Pew Research Center. Since families are no longer a unit that solely depends on one person’s income, sharing one bank account can make less sense. The gender wage gap sometimes plays a role, too. This generation of women still earns less than men, but they earn more than previous generations did. Nearly half of employed women, 49%, say they are the breadwinners in their family, meaning they don’t have to rely on a partner’s income for financial stability. And a lot of them want to retain that independence.

Families are complicated these days. Joanna Pepin University of Maryland

Many women have also experienced the unpleasantness that can result when money gets mingled. “Seeing family members go through financial stress because of their money being tied up with another person is an added layer of stress that I always observed,” says Na’puti. Many couples Pepin interviewed also cited student debt as a reason for keeping finances separate. “They don’t want to take on the financial burden of their partner’s student loans or they want to protect their partner from taking on theirs,” she says. Merging income also becomes less convenient as fewer couples marry and more couples live together. “Couples are likely keeping their finances separate when they cohabitate, so it would be counter-intuitive to change what is working,” Pepin says. Here are four tips experts say can help you handle money in your relationship if you plan to maintain separate accounts.

Communicate clearly to reduce conflict

Dr. Emily Garbinksy, a marketing professor at the University of Notre Dame who studies financial decision-making within romantic couples, found that couples experience the same degree of conflict regarding finance whether they pool their money or not. So there’s no one way to guarantee a peaceful relationship, but being open and honest with your partner can help. To lessen the odds of spending-related tension, CPA Tracie Miller-Nobles says couples should lay out a clear budget along with how much debt, savings, and retirement you each have.

Use financial management websites

“Technology has made it a lot easier to split finances,” Pepin says. Crowe and Na’puti use Splitwise, which she calls a “more business-savvy Venmo.” Through Splitwise you can keep a running tab of expenses, and the app will tabulate how much you owe each other. Other useful sites include Settle Up and Splittr.

Come up with a way to split joint expenses

Na’puti is a professor at the University of Colorado Boulder and makes more than Crowe, who represents a local brewery. Because they earn different amounts, Crowe says it is easier to pay for indulgences separately and equally split expenses like rent. Na’puti and Crowe share one credit card for rent, car payments, utilities, and groceries, but they keep individual purchases separate, so they can splurge at their own discretion.

Consider a shared bank account for shared obligations


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: aditi shrikant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, income, pepin, separate, couples, university, bank, shared, financial, accounts, work, crowe, finances, naputi, merging, fewer


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Here’s what it takes to get into a top college

Hill Street Studios | Getty ImagesTo get into an elite college, parents and students put a lot of emphasis on grades and test scores. However, in the wake of last year’s college admissions scandal, admissions directors are quietly turning their attention to something besides raw numbers. Today, “almost every institution is looking more carefully at character,” said Eric Greenberg, president of Greenberg Educational Group, a New York-based consulting firm with clients throughout the U.S. “Authent


Hill Street Studios | Getty ImagesTo get into an elite college, parents and students put a lot of emphasis on grades and test scores.
However, in the wake of last year’s college admissions scandal, admissions directors are quietly turning their attention to something besides raw numbers.
Today, “almost every institution is looking more carefully at character,” said Eric Greenberg, president of Greenberg Educational Group, a New York-based consulting firm with clients throughout the U.S. “Authent
Here’s what it takes to get into a top college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, admissions, takes, low, university, heres, rate, looking, applicants, students, greenberg, college, president


Here's what it takes to get into a top college

Hill Street Studios | Getty Images

To get into an elite college, parents and students put a lot of emphasis on grades and test scores. However, in the wake of last year’s college admissions scandal, admissions directors are quietly turning their attention to something besides raw numbers. Today, “almost every institution is looking more carefully at character,” said Eric Greenberg, president of Greenberg Educational Group, a New York-based consulting firm with clients throughout the U.S. “Authenticity and honesty are at a premium,” he said. Seeing applicants who are “excited and deeply engaged has made the difference,” said Jon Daly, the admissions director at Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula, California, which requires several essays and letters of recommendation as part of its application process.

Almost every institution is looking more carefully at character. Eric Greenberg president of Greenberg Educational Group

Of course, nonacademic factors have been used in an ad hoc way for years, according to Robert Massa, a former admissions dean at Drew University, Johns Hopkins and Dickinson College. “It’s going to become even more important in the years ahead,” he said, especially at the most selective institutions as more and more students apply. Last spring, Princeton University offered admission to just 5.8% of its 32,804 applicants, Yale hit an admissions rate low of 5.9% and, at Harvard, the admissions rate hit a record low 4.5% of applicants securing spots in the Class of 2023.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, admissions, takes, low, university, heres, rate, looking, applicants, students, greenberg, college, president


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Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate

Former community college professor Ghazala Hashmi just became the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate. Hashmi, a Democrat who ran for public office for the first time, unseated Republican state Sen. Glen Sturtevant on Tuesday to represent the state’s 10th Senate District. In 1991, Hashmi, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgia Southern University and a PhD from Emory University, moved to Richmond, Virginia with her husband. As a representative of the state’s 10th Senate Di


Former community college professor Ghazala Hashmi just became the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate.
Hashmi, a Democrat who ran for public office for the first time, unseated Republican state Sen. Glen Sturtevant on Tuesday to represent the state’s 10th Senate District.
In 1991, Hashmi, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgia Southern University and a PhD from Emory University, moved to Richmond, Virginia with her husband.
As a representative of the state’s 10th Senate Di
Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reports, hashmi, public, meet, richmond, ran, virginias, ghazala, elected, university, states, virginia, woman, muslim, state, senate


Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia's state Senate

Former community college professor Ghazala Hashmi just became the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate.

Hashmi, a Democrat who ran for public office for the first time, unseated Republican state Sen. Glen Sturtevant on Tuesday to represent the state’s 10th Senate District.

In a series of tweets sent out Tuesday night, Hashmi thanked her supporters for the win and said, “This victory is not mine alone. It belongs to all of you who believed that we need to make progressive change here in Virginia.”

As a child, Hashmi immigrated from India to the U.S. with her family, reports The Hill. According to her campaign website, she was raised in a small town in Georgia where she “saw firsthand how community-building and open dialogue can bridge cultural and socioeconomic divisions.”

In 1991, Hashmi, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgia Southern University and a PhD from Emory University, moved to Richmond, Virginia with her husband. For the past 25 years, she’s devoted her career to being an educator in the state. Before winning her election, she served as the Founding Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Reynolds Community College in Richmond.

The wife and mom of two ran her campaign with a focus on education, healthcare, gun violence prevention, environmental protection and workforce development. In her newly-appointed role, she says she plans to focus on establishing a paid family leave and medical leave program in Virginia that “will provide security for workers who need to temporarily take time away to care for themselves or a loved one.”

As a representative of the state’s 10th Senate District, Hashmi will oversee Richmond, Powhatan County and parts of Chesterfield County in Virginia. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that Hashmi and Sturtevant’s race was among the most competitive in the state, with more than $1.5 million in media buys including TV advertising. Between Oct. 1 and Oct. 24, the two public officials also received more than $1.1 million each in contributions.

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Don’t miss: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib and 13 others who made history in the 2018 midterm election


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reports, hashmi, public, meet, richmond, ran, virginias, ghazala, elected, university, states, virginia, woman, muslim, state, senate


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US-China ‘phase one’ trade deal won’t lead to ‘economic nirvana,’ Larry Summers says

I think the next decade in China is going to be less miraculous than the last two. Larry Summers former U.S. Treasury SecretarySummers was Treasury Secretary under former U.S. President Bill Clinton and an economic advisor for former President Barack Obama. Global economic growth has slowed since last year — coinciding with the start of the U.S.-China trade war. The International Monetary Fund said in a report last month that the global economy is projected to grow 3% this year, slower than last


I think the next decade in China is going to be less miraculous than the last two.
Larry Summers former U.S. Treasury SecretarySummers was Treasury Secretary under former U.S. President Bill Clinton and an economic advisor for former President Barack Obama.
Global economic growth has slowed since last year — coinciding with the start of the U.S.-China trade war.
The International Monetary Fund said in a report last month that the global economy is projected to grow 3% this year, slower than last
US-China ‘phase one’ trade deal won’t lead to ‘economic nirvana,’ Larry Summers says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, larry, war, deal, trade, wont, president, uncertainties, economy, weigh, nirvana, economic, global, phase, summers, lead, treasury, university, uschina


US-China 'phase one' trade deal won't lead to 'economic nirvana,' Larry Summers says

I think the next decade in China is going to be less miraculous than the last two. Larry Summers former U.S. Treasury Secretary

Summers was Treasury Secretary under former U.S. President Bill Clinton and an economic advisor for former President Barack Obama. He’s now a professor at Harvard University. Global economic growth has slowed since last year — coinciding with the start of the U.S.-China trade war. The International Monetary Fund said in a report last month that the global economy is projected to grow 3% this year, slower than last year’s 3.6% and 3.8% in 2017.

Summers said even if both sides sign the partial deal as planned, “there will still be large tensions and uncertainties” between the two countries — which would weigh on the global economy. His comments echoed the sentiment of other analysts and company executives who said longstanding concerns about Chinese theft of U.S. intellectual property and forced technology transfers would take longer to resolve.

China’s economic outlook


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, larry, war, deal, trade, wont, president, uncertainties, economy, weigh, nirvana, economic, global, phase, summers, lead, treasury, university, uschina


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5 things to know about Smarties, the women-led and family-run candy company celebrating 70 years in business

For Smarties, one of the oldest family-run candy companies in the U.S. with 70 years in the business, Halloween marks the biggest sales day of the year, Inc. reports. Originally launched as Ce De Candy, Inc., the founder changed the company name to Smarties Candy Company in 2011. A trio of cousins leads the companySmarties is currently led by Dee’s granddaughters: sisters Liz Dee and Jessica Dee Sawyer, and their cousin Sarah Dee. In an interview with Inc., the three co-presidents say it wasn’t


For Smarties, one of the oldest family-run candy companies in the U.S. with 70 years in the business, Halloween marks the biggest sales day of the year, Inc. reports.
Originally launched as Ce De Candy, Inc., the founder changed the company name to Smarties Candy Company in 2011.
A trio of cousins leads the companySmarties is currently led by Dee’s granddaughters: sisters Liz Dee and Jessica Dee Sawyer, and their cousin Sarah Dee.
In an interview with Inc., the three co-presidents say it wasn’t
5 things to know about Smarties, the women-led and family-run candy company celebrating 70 years in business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sarah, halloween, business, familyrun, university, company, celebrating, womenled, liz, family, dee, know, smarties, things, candy


5 things to know about Smarties, the women-led and family-run candy company celebrating 70 years in business

On Oct. 31, kids and parents across the country are busy hitting the streets in search of sugar. For Smarties, one of the oldest family-run candy companies in the U.S. with 70 years in the business, Halloween marks the biggest sales day of the year, Inc. reports. And it runs a tight ship in order to make the holiday a success. The maker of the candy wafer roll was founded in August 1949 by Edward Dee, who had immigrated with his family from London earlier that year. Originally launched as Ce De Candy, Inc., the founder changed the company name to Smarties Candy Company in 2011. These days, the company has two factories in Union, New Jersey, and Newmarket, Ontario, which produce over 2 billion Smarties rolls every year. Here are five things you might not know about the maker behind one of the most iconic Halloween treats.

A trio of cousins leads the company

Smarties is currently led by Dee’s granddaughters: sisters Liz Dee and Jessica Dee Sawyer, and their cousin Sarah Dee. In an interview with Inc., the three co-presidents say it wasn’t clear they would all go into the family business. According to a Q&A with HuffPost, Liz studied at Wesleyan University and later earned a master’s degree from New York University in media and culture communication; Jessica studied art history at the University of Colorado Boulder; and Sarah holds a degree in management and marketing from Emory University. By the 2010s, however, the three came back from their various career paths to Smarties to serve as executive presidents. The three were named co-presidents, taking over from their fathers, in 2017. This makes the Dee cousins the third generation to run the Smarties business, the first all-women leadership team for the company, and fifth generation of candy makers within their family. According to Harvard Business Review, just 10% of family businesses remain active and privately-held long enough for a third generation to lead them. That’s a particularly notable feat in the $10 billion candy industry, where the top four public businesses (think Mars and Hershey) make up 65% of the U.S. market, according to market research firm IBISWorld.

Everything revolves around Halloween

Oct. 31 is the Smarties version of Black Friday — “It’s by far the most important holiday for us,” Liz tells Inc. — and the company starts prepping for its biggest day of the year a full 11 months prior. That means in November, retailers begin ordering from Smarties to prepare for the next year’s trick-or-treating event. Smarties will start production for Halloween batches in spring, which are then shipped through summer. Smarties also ends its fiscal year on Halloween and hosts a company-wide lunch around that time to celebrate the end of its busy season.

Workers get a pretty sweet perk

Flexible scheduling is important for the family-run business, and the presidents make it a priority. “As a company, we pride ourselves on our family-friendly hours, encouraging us to spend more time with our families than a more traditional or corporate environment,” Sarah tells HuffPost. And maybe the sweetest perk of all: In preparation for Halloween, Smarties workers are gifted 30 pounds of the candy to share with family, friends and trick-or-treaters.

The company’s 95-year-old founder still stops by the office

Edward Dee celebrated his 95th birthday in October, near the 70th anniversary of the Smarties company founding. But he still drops by the New Jersey factory multiple times a week to check in on how business is going. “He could have retired years ago, but instead he still comes into the office nearly every day because he genuinely loves what he does,” Liz tells Guest of a Guest. Various members of the Dee family have always been a fixture at the office. Liz, Jessica and Sarah share with Inc. that they often Rollerbladed around the factory floor when they were kids in the 1980s. Sarah and Jessica also each have two kids under the age of 5 who often frequent the Smarties headquarters.

Smarties has an unspoken ‘no-spouse’ rule


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sarah, halloween, business, familyrun, university, company, celebrating, womenled, liz, family, dee, know, smarties, things, candy


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Jane Goodall was told she was ‘just a girl.’ But grew up to redefine mankind

Jane Goodall, world renowned for her landmark study on chimpanzees, was once dismissed as being “just a girl” when she shared her ambition of moving to Africa to work with animals. Goodall was speaking last week at the 2019 One Young World summit in London about her lifelong career working with some of the most endangered species on Earth. Goodall said it was her mother who provided her with the best advice to overcome these dismissive remarks. “My mother said, ‘If you really want to do somethin


Jane Goodall, world renowned for her landmark study on chimpanzees, was once dismissed as being “just a girl” when she shared her ambition of moving to Africa to work with animals.
Goodall was speaking last week at the 2019 One Young World summit in London about her lifelong career working with some of the most endangered species on Earth.
Goodall said it was her mother who provided her with the best advice to overcome these dismissive remarks.
“My mother said, ‘If you really want to do somethin
Jane Goodall was told she was ‘just a girl.’ But grew up to redefine mankind Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, young, really, used, world, study, mankind, university, work, grew, girl, redefine, jane, chimpanzees, goodall, discovery


Jane Goodall was told she was 'just a girl.' But grew up to redefine mankind

Jane Goodall, world renowned for her landmark study on chimpanzees, was once dismissed as being “just a girl” when she shared her ambition of moving to Africa to work with animals.

Goodall was speaking last week at the 2019 One Young World summit in London about her lifelong career working with some of the most endangered species on Earth.

“There was no expectation of becoming a scientist because girls didn’t do that sort of thing and everybody laughed at me,” said Goodall, 85, adding that some responded to her aspirations by telling her she was “just a girl.”

Goodall said it was her mother who provided her with the best advice to overcome these dismissive remarks.

“My mother said, ‘If you really want to do something like this, you’re going to have to work really hard, take advantage of every opportunity, but don’t give up.’,” she said.

This is the message Goodall said she has taken to young people around the world.

While she did well at school, Goodall said she had no money for university so opted to do a secretarial course.

She then embarked on her first trip to Africa after receiving a letter from a school friend inviting her to Kenya for a holiday.

There she met paleoanthropologist Louis Leakey, who was coincidentally in need of a secretary and was said to be so impressed by Goodall’s knowledge of the natural world, she ended up joining him on an expedition in Tanzania, according to a BBC report.

In 1960, she set about her own study in a reserve in Gombe Stream Chimpanzee Reserve. There she met a chimpanzee she named David Greybeard from whom she made her first discovery. While observing the chimp, she saw him using a blade of grass to fish out ants from a colony, countering the established belief that humans were the only species which used tools.

It was upon this discovery that Leakey said: “Now we must redefine ‘tool,’ redefine ‘man’ or accept chimpanzees as humans.”

Leakey enrolled Goodall at the University of Cambridge to do a PhD to continue her studies.

Goodall said she encountered some of the same dismissal from her fellow academics about the methods she used in her research, with some saying that she should not give the chimpanzees names or emotions.

And at this point, Goodall took inspiration from another big influence in her life — her dog Rusty.

“You can’t share your life in a meaningful way with a dog, a cat, a rabbit and so on, and not know the professors were wrong,” she said. “And now animal intelligence in particular is something that people are really interested in.”

Goodall’s finding is now considered a groundbreaking discovery, along with other work which has changed the understanding of the relationship between humans and chimpanzees. A number of media outlets, such as the BBC, have described her work as redefining mankind.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, young, really, used, world, study, mankind, university, work, grew, girl, redefine, jane, chimpanzees, goodall, discovery


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Former North Carolina Sen. Kay Hagan dies at 66

Incumbent U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC) visits her campaign workers at a campaign office November 3, 2014 in Cary, North Carolina. Kay Hagan, a former bank executive who rose from a budget writer in the North Carolina Legislature to a seat in the U.S. Senate, died Monday. Hagan, a Democrat, served a single term in the Senate and lost her 2014 re-election bid to Republican North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis. Hagan was born in Shelby, North Carolina, on May 26, 1953. For 10 years, Hagan worked


Incumbent U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC) visits her campaign workers at a campaign office November 3, 2014 in Cary, North Carolina.
Kay Hagan, a former bank executive who rose from a budget writer in the North Carolina Legislature to a seat in the U.S. Senate, died Monday.
Hagan, a Democrat, served a single term in the Senate and lost her 2014 re-election bid to Republican North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis.
Hagan was born in Shelby, North Carolina, on May 26, 1953.
For 10 years, Hagan worked
Former North Carolina Sen. Kay Hagan dies at 66 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, north, worked, dies, seat, hagan, kay, carolina, virus, sen, senate, won, state


Former North Carolina Sen. Kay Hagan dies at 66

Incumbent U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC) visits her campaign workers at a campaign office November 3, 2014 in Cary, North Carolina.

Kay Hagan, a former bank executive who rose from a budget writer in the North Carolina Legislature to a seat in the U.S. Senate, died Monday. She was 66.

Hagan died of encephalitis, or brain inflammation, caused by Powassan virus, a rare virus spread from ticks to humans, her former Senate spokeswoman Sadie Weiner said.

Hagan, a Democrat, served a single term in the Senate and lost her 2014 re-election bid to Republican North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis.

Hagan was born in Shelby, North Carolina, on May 26, 1953. She earned her undergraduate degree from Florida State University in 1975, then earned a law degree from Wake Forest University three years later.

For 10 years, Hagan worked for NationsBank, which was to become Bank of America, where she became a vice president in the estates and trust division. After being a stay-at-home mother, the niece of former Florida governor and U.S. Sen. Lawton Chiles launched her own political career and won a seat as a Democrat in the North Carolina state Senate in 1998.

Ten years later, Hagan sought and won the U.S. Senate seat held by Republican Elizabeth Dole.

Although she initially showed reluctance to lend her support, Hagan backed the Affordable Care Act pushed by President Barack Obama. She also worked to limit payday lending, continuing the work she began as a state senator.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, north, worked, dies, seat, hagan, kay, carolina, virus, sen, senate, won, state


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How Obama’s border enforcer Janet Napolitano is fighting Trump on immigration at the Supreme Court

Napolitano was instrumental in establishing the DACA program, which she signed into action in 2012 as DHS secretary. “I saw [DACA] first from the vantage point of being the Cabinet official responsible for immigration and immigration policy,” Napolitano said. Napolitano said that when the Trump administration attempted to end the program in 2017, “we immediately went into high gear.” In early 2013, ABC News analyzed Napolitano’s record in the Obama administration under the headline: “Janet Napol


Napolitano was instrumental in establishing the DACA program, which she signed into action in 2012 as DHS secretary.
“I saw [DACA] first from the vantage point of being the Cabinet official responsible for immigration and immigration policy,” Napolitano said.
Napolitano said that when the Trump administration attempted to end the program in 2017, “we immediately went into high gear.”
In early 2013, ABC News analyzed Napolitano’s record in the Obama administration under the headline: “Janet Napol
How Obama’s border enforcer Janet Napolitano is fighting Trump on immigration at the Supreme Court Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-27  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, immigration, fighting, program, university, janet, immigrants, administration, napolitano, court, fight, young, supreme, daca, obamas, border, trump, enforcer


How Obama's border enforcer Janet Napolitano is fighting Trump on immigration at the Supreme Court

Janet Napolitano Tucker Higgins | CNBC

Janet Napolitano used to set records for the number of people she deported from the United States in a single year, angering immigrant-rights groups. In her new role, the former Homeland Security secretary under President Barack Obama has those groups on her side. Next month, Napolitano will head to war against President Donald Trump in a blockbuster fight at the Supreme Court that will impact the lives of millions of immigrants and their family members. The court fight is over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which shields about 700,000 young people who were brought to the country unlawfully from deportation and allows them to receive work permits. “The real question is who is being deported,” Napolitano said in a recent interview in Manhattan, explaining her position as a tough-on-the-border advocate for immigrants. Napolitano was instrumental in establishing the DACA program, which she signed into action in 2012 as DHS secretary. Now, she is leading the legal challenge to the Trump administration’s efforts to end it. Napolitano is acting in her capacity as the president of the University of California system, the academic home to more than 1,000 DACA recipients. “I saw [DACA] first from the vantage point of being the Cabinet official responsible for immigration and immigration policy,” Napolitano said. “To then seeing the benefits the program created. To now, being at the university, where we have all of these DACA recipients as part of the university community.” Napolitano said that when the Trump administration attempted to end the program in 2017, “we immediately went into high gear.” “The next logical step was to file a lawsuit, which is what we did,” she said. Since then, courts in Washington, California and New York have temporarily halted the Trump administration’s attempts to end the program. The Supreme Court will hear arguments Nov. 12, and a decision is expected by the end of June.

Napolitano’s mixed record

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano speaks during a ceremony honoring Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chairman Sen. Joseph Leiberman (I-CT) at the at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services December 19, 2012 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

The situation has further muddied the waters around Napolitano’s record, which were far from clear at the start. In addition to criticizing her role overseeing an escalation in deportations, immigration advocates have questioned Napolitano for not being tough enough on Sheriff Joe Arpaio in Arizona while she was U.S. attorney in the state, and for her role in expanding a program that enlisted local authorities in immigration enforcement. In early 2013, ABC News analyzed Napolitano’s record in the Obama administration under the headline: “Janet Napolitano: Immigration Hero or Villain?” Months later, a UC alumus who is an undocumented immigrant wrote a stinging dissent against Napolitano’s nomination to lead the institution. It was under that cloud that Napolitano eventually built out a vast legal support system for young immigrants when she took over the university system. And, with a year to go before she has said she will step down, she has put herself at the center of the fight for the young immigrants known as “Dreamers.” “Let’s just say it’s complicated,” said Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, an immigrant rights group that was active during the original fight for DACA. Sharry said that on one hand, Napolitano does deserve credit for the work that she has done in California. On the other, he said, she’s the reason why Obama came to be known as the “deporter-in-chief.” “I know advocates who still spit bullets at her,” he said. “People who lost family members to deportation are not very sympathetic to Janet Napolitano.” The controversy over Obama’s deportation record exploded out of immigration circles and onto the national stage recently, when former Vice President Joe Biden was pressed on his role in the deportations during the September Democratic debate. Biden prompted further scrutiny by claiming the administration “didn’t separate families,” despite the fact that it did sometimes do so. For her part, Napolitano defends herself against progressive critiques by deploying the same argument she’s put forward in her legal challenge to the Trump administration: Border control is about setting priorities, and her top priority is deporting criminals, not children. “I think we had the right priorities and were enforcing the right priorities, and I think the approach of this administration, that anybody is fair game, is not good policy and it’s not consistent with our values,” Napolitano said. “In my view, the right approach is to recognize that we don’t have the resources to deport all of them. It would be like deporting all of Los Angeles.” Immigrant rights groups say Napolitano did not do enough to avoid deporting innocent immigrants. More than half of the more than 419,000 people deported in fiscal year 2012, for instance, were not criminals, according to the Pew Research Center. Napolitano says she got the ball rolling by the time she left the DHS in 2013. By 2016, more than 90% of those deported were convicted of serious crimes, she points out. Napolitano, a lawyer who has served as governor and attorney general of Arizona, is just as comfortable explaining her case against the Trump administration in legal terms as she is as a matter of policy. Legally, Napolitano said, refraining from deporting young, law-abiding immigrants is similar to the Justice Department’s general reluctance to bring cases against those who pass bad checks. “That’s just a realization that no law enforcement organization has the resources to do everything,” she said. “And that’s why law enforcement organizations have what’s called prosecutorial discretion. And that’s well embedded in the law, and it’s the theory on which we built DACA.”

The fight over DACA

In the Supreme Court’s hands


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-27  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, immigration, fighting, program, university, janet, immigrants, administration, napolitano, court, fight, young, supreme, daca, obamas, border, trump, enforcer


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Zuckerberg shouldn’t be the face of libra, says former Facebook security chief

Zuckerberg shouldn’t be the face of libra, says former Facebook security chief5 Hours AgoFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will face questions on Capitol Hill on Wednesday about the social media giant’s ambitious plan to create a cryptocurrency called “libra.” Alex Stamos, former chief security officer at Facebook who is now an adjunct professor at Stanford University, joins “Squawk Box” to discuss.


Zuckerberg shouldn’t be the face of libra, says former Facebook security chief5 Hours AgoFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will face questions on Capitol Hill on Wednesday about the social media giant’s ambitious plan to create a cryptocurrency called “libra.”
Alex Stamos, former chief security officer at Facebook who is now an adjunct professor at Stanford University, joins “Squawk Box” to discuss.
Zuckerberg shouldn’t be the face of libra, says former Facebook security chief Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, libra, chief, stamos, social, stanford, facebook, face, security, shouldnt, zuckerberg, university


Zuckerberg shouldn't be the face of libra, says former Facebook security chief

Zuckerberg shouldn’t be the face of libra, says former Facebook security chief

5 Hours Ago

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will face questions on Capitol Hill on Wednesday about the social media giant’s ambitious plan to create a cryptocurrency called “libra.” Alex Stamos, former chief security officer at Facebook who is now an adjunct professor at Stanford University, joins “Squawk Box” to discuss.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, libra, chief, stamos, social, stanford, facebook, face, security, shouldnt, zuckerberg, university


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