Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg says the company needs to do more to protect civil rights of users

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said Tuesday, “We know we need to do more” to protect civil rights on the platform. “Facebook is committed to working with leading U.S. civil rights organizations to strengthen and advance civil rights on our service. We know that we need to do more: to listen, look deeper and take action to respect fundamental rights,” Sandberg said. She advocated for more transparency, improved content moderation and creating a “civil rights advocacy infrastructure.” But as bad act


Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said Tuesday, “We know we need to do more” to protect civil rights on the platform. “Facebook is committed to working with leading U.S. civil rights organizations to strengthen and advance civil rights on our service. We know that we need to do more: to listen, look deeper and take action to respect fundamental rights,” Sandberg said. She advocated for more transparency, improved content moderation and creating a “civil rights advocacy infrastructure.” But as bad act
Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg says the company needs to do more to protect civil rights of users Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-18  Authors: sara salinas, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images, christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rights, civil, users, concerns, sheryl, facebook, murphy, needs, sandberg, company, facebooks, voter, protect, audit


Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg says the company needs to do more to protect civil rights of users

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said Tuesday, “We know we need to do more” to protect civil rights on the platform.

Her comments come on the same day that the NAACP launched a week-long boycott of the service and that 31 civil rights groups called for a restructuring of Facebook’s top ranks. It also comes after a report commissioned by the Senate Intelligence Committee said Russian-backed actors targeted African-American Facebook users in an attempt to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

“Facebook is committed to working with leading U.S. civil rights organizations to strengthen and advance civil rights on our service. They’ve raised a number of important concerns, and I’m grateful for their candor and guidance. We know that we need to do more: to listen, look deeper and take action to respect fundamental rights,” Sandberg said.

Facebook released the findings on Tuesday of a civil rights audit led by Laura Murphy, a former director of the ACLU Legislative Office. Murphy highlighted particular areas of concern on the platform, including voter suppression, advertising targeting and practices and diversity among Facebook’s own employees.

She advocated for more transparency, improved content moderation and creating a “civil rights advocacy infrastructure.”

“For the past several years, civil rights groups have consistently expressed, both publicly and privately, their deeply held concerns about Facebook’s products, policies, and practices and their implications on civil and human rights,” Murphy said. “The work that has been done over the last six months is an attempt to capture and consolidate their concerns to produce meaningful results. Given Facebook’s scope and scale, this continues to be a challenge.”

Facebook has acknowledged and addressed many of the civil rights abuses outlined in the audit report. In October, Facebook updated its platform policies to explicitly combat attempts at voter suppression and the spreading of false information about voting. But as bad actors get increasingly clever and find new ways to manipulate Facebook users, the company faces new challenges and changing calls for action.

The audit comes just one day after the release of two independent studies commissioned by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. The reports revealed, among other things, that Russian-backed troll accounts disproportionately targeted minorities and marginalized groups.

“We take this incredibly seriously, as demonstrated by the investments we’ve made in safety and security,” Sandberg said of the Senate-commissioned reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-18  Authors: sara salinas, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images, christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rights, civil, users, concerns, sheryl, facebook, murphy, needs, sandberg, company, facebooks, voter, protect, audit


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How to clear all those old emails out of Gmail so you don’t have to pay for storage

If you’ve been using Gmail for a decade or so, you’re probably running into your storage limit. You can pay for more space, or you can simply delete old emails and make room. This space can be used for your Gmail, Google Drive files and Google Photo images. Below is a 30-minute process I use about once a year to delete thousands of emails in bulk. That’s about 3 percent of the total storage Google offers.


If you’ve been using Gmail for a decade or so, you’re probably running into your storage limit. You can pay for more space, or you can simply delete old emails and make room. This space can be used for your Gmail, Google Drive files and Google Photo images. Below is a 30-minute process I use about once a year to delete thousands of emails in bulk. That’s about 3 percent of the total storage Google offers.
How to clear all those old emails out of Gmail so you don’t have to pay for storage Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-17  Authors: salvador rodriguez, jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youve, pay, clear, dont, users, used, delete, old, bulk, space, google, emails, gmail, storage


How to clear all those old emails out of Gmail so you don't have to pay for storage

If you’ve been using Gmail for a decade or so, you’re probably running into your storage limit. You can pay for more space, or you can simply delete old emails and make room.

Since 2013, Google has offered users 15 gigabytes of free storage. This space can be used for your Gmail, Google Drive files and Google Photo images. For many users like me, emails take up the bulk of this space.

Below is a 30-minute process I use about once a year to delete thousands of emails in bulk. I recently used this technique to delete about 18,000 emails from my inbox, freeing up about half a gigabyte. That’s about 3 percent of the total storage Google offers.

Here’s how to do it:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-17  Authors: salvador rodriguez, jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youve, pay, clear, dont, users, used, delete, old, bulk, space, google, emails, gmail, storage


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UPS tweet offering to shred children’s letters to Santa falls flat

Some Twitter users compared UPS to popular Christmas antagonists like the Grinch and the Scrooge, calling the tweet “dark.” The tweet, intended as a marketing tactic for The UPS Store’s shredding service, missed the mark with some customers, said spokeswoman Staci Reidinger. The tweet was part of The UPS Store’s shift to a lighter, “whimsical” personality on Twitter with the goal of increasing engagement, Reidinger said. Social media gives businesses the opportunity to develop their own voice, b


Some Twitter users compared UPS to popular Christmas antagonists like the Grinch and the Scrooge, calling the tweet “dark.” The tweet, intended as a marketing tactic for The UPS Store’s shredding service, missed the mark with some customers, said spokeswoman Staci Reidinger. The tweet was part of The UPS Store’s shift to a lighter, “whimsical” personality on Twitter with the goal of increasing engagement, Reidinger said. Social media gives businesses the opportunity to develop their own voice, b
UPS tweet offering to shred children’s letters to Santa falls flat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-17  Authors: marilyn haigh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reidinger, falls, media, users, flat, twitter, trying, santa, whimsical, shred, ups, letters, offering, wendys, childrens, stores, voice


UPS tweet offering to shred children's letters to Santa falls flat

Some Twitter users compared UPS to popular Christmas antagonists like the Grinch and the Scrooge, calling the tweet “dark.” Others saw the humor in the tweet.

The tweet, intended as a marketing tactic for The UPS Store’s shredding service, missed the mark with some customers, said spokeswoman Staci Reidinger.

“At the end of the day, we’re not sitting here trying to offend anyone, we’re trying to get people to just engage with us,” Reidinger said. “And truly, we want people know that we do shredding.”

The tweet was part of The UPS Store’s shift to a lighter, “whimsical” personality on Twitter with the goal of increasing engagement, Reidinger said. The Sunday post had more than 3,000 retweets and 11,000 likes before it was deleted Monday afternoon.

Social media gives businesses the opportunity to develop their own voice, but they can also put their reputation at risk if used incorrectly. Consumer backlash comes swiftly when corporate social media accounts flub. It happened to Wendy’s last year, when it tweeted an image of Pepe the Frog, a hate symbol. In 2014, United Airways posted a lewd tweet it later said was accidental.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-17  Authors: marilyn haigh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reidinger, falls, media, users, flat, twitter, trying, santa, whimsical, shred, ups, letters, offering, wendys, childrens, stores, voice


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Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users

A Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users using third-party apps, the company disclosed Friday. The exposed photos include those that users never finished sharing to the site, Facebook said. Facebook said that photos that had yet to be shared could have been accessed by apps that users gave permission to access their Facebook photos. Facebook said the bug did not affect photos that were shared in Messenger conversations and that Facebook became aware of the bug and fixed it on S


A Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users using third-party apps, the company disclosed Friday. The exposed photos include those that users never finished sharing to the site, Facebook said. Facebook said that photos that had yet to be shared could have been accessed by apps that users gave permission to access their Facebook photos. Facebook said the bug did not affect photos that were shared in Messenger conversations and that Facebook became aware of the bug and fixed it on S
Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, developers, facebook, exposed, 68, bug, apps, breach, data, photos, gdpr, million, users


Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users

A Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users using third-party apps, the company disclosed Friday. The exposed photos include those that users never finished sharing to the site, Facebook said.

The disclosure is one of several privacy scandals the company has grappled with over the past year. In March, reports from the New York Times and the Guardian shed light on how Cambridge Analytica used data on Facebook users to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election. In September, it announced a security breach that affected up to 50 million users and sent its stock price plunging more than 2.5 percent.

Facebook said that photos that had yet to be shared could have been accessed by apps that users gave permission to access their Facebook photos. Facebook said that photos that hadn’t yet been shared on its platform could be accessed because the platform stores a copy of photos that users do not finish sharing on their profile after attempting to upload.

Facebook said the bug in its photo API affected a 12 day window between Sept. 13 and Sept. 25 and gave access to up to 1,500 apps built by 876 developers. Facebook said the bug did not affect photos that were shared in Messenger conversations and that Facebook became aware of the bug and fixed it on Sept. 25.

Under the European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), companies must notify appropriate authorities of any data breach within 72 hours of finding out about it. While Facebook said it took them some time to alert the public while it investigated the impact of the bug, the company said it complied with GDPR reporting standards by reporting the bug to the Irish Data Protection Commission on Nov. 22 once it was able to conclude it was “a reportable breach under GDPR.”

“We notified the IDPC as soon as we established it was considered a reportable breach under GDPR. We had to investigate in order to make that conclusion. And once we did, we let our regulator know within the 72 [hour] timeframe,” a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement.

The IDPC confirmed it began reviewing Facebook’s compliance with GDPR this week. In a statement, Graham Doyle, the head of communications at the IDPC said, “The Irish DPC has received a number of breach notifications from Facebook since the introduction of the GDPR on May 25, 2018. With reference to these data breaches, including the breach in question, we have this week commenced a statutory inquiry examining Facebook’s compliance with the relevant provisions of the GDPR.”

Facebook said it will alert users who may have been affected by the breach through a notice on the site that will show them how to see if apps they use were affected. The company also advises users log into apps they believe they granted access to Facebook photos to see which photos they have accessed.

“We’re sorry this happened,” Facebook said in the post on its developers blog written by Tomer Bar, an engineering director at the company. “Early next week we will be rolling out tools for app developers that will allow them to determine which people using their app might be impacted by this bug. We will be working with those developers to delete the photos from impacted users.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, developers, facebook, exposed, 68, bug, apps, breach, data, photos, gdpr, million, users


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Instagram will start telling brands which products users bookmark

Instagram last month introduced a tool that lets users bookmark products they find on the social network. Now, Instagram is working on an insight tool that will show brands which of their items users are saving, said Layla Amjadi, Instagram product manager. In short, bookmarking a product you see on Instagram could mean that one day you’ll start seeing ads for it. Since then, the team has built out features that allow brands to tag their products in photos and videos. In September, Instagram sai


Instagram last month introduced a tool that lets users bookmark products they find on the social network. Now, Instagram is working on an insight tool that will show brands which of their items users are saving, said Layla Amjadi, Instagram product manager. In short, bookmarking a product you see on Instagram could mean that one day you’ll start seeing ads for it. Since then, the team has built out features that allow brands to tag their products in photos and videos. In September, Instagram sai
Instagram will start telling brands which products users bookmark Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez, beck diefenbach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, telling, shopping, features, right, bookmark, brands, team, amjadi, product, products, instagram, users, start


Instagram will start telling brands which products users bookmark

One year after forming a team to develop shopping specific features, Facebook’s Instagram is now beginning to develop analytics tools that brands could eventually use for ad targeting.

Instagram last month introduced a tool that lets users bookmark products they find on the social network. Now, Instagram is working on an insight tool that will show brands which of their items users are saving, said Layla Amjadi, Instagram product manager. Instagram intends to release this feature within the first half of 2019.

“It’s a difficult thing to maintain all of the products that have piqued your interests across these multiple sites,” Amjadi said in a phone call on Thursday. “That’s a problem that businesses told us they personally have and are excited for us to help them solve within Instagram.”

In short, bookmarking a product you see on Instagram could mean that one day you’ll start seeing ads for it. But Facebook hasn’t developed or offered those kinds of ads yet. The analytics tools for brands are the first step.

“We do not currently have ads retargeting based on Saved posts our roadmap,” an Instagram spokeswoman said in a statement.

Amjadi referred to this as a “reconsideration problem,” in which a user expresses interests in an item but does not complete the purchase for numerous reasons, such as the item not being seasonably in style or a user not having the budget at that particular time.

“We can help with the reconsideration at the right time and the right place,” Amjadi said.

Instagram has been experimenting with shopping features since late 2016, but it was a year ago that the company formed a dedicated shopping team, which is lead by Amjadi.

Since then, the team has built out features that allow brands to tag their products in photos and videos. Users can tap those tags for more product details and eventually be redirected to brands’ websites to complete purchases. In September, Instagram said that 90 million of its 1 billion users are now tapping on tagged products on a monthly basis.

“We’re trying to build for people a personalized mall within Instagram,” said Amjadi, comparing shopping on the app to the real-life experience of going window shopping from store to store with a bunch of friends.

Instagram says it is focused on “nailing the consumer experience” of its shopping feature, but it’s certainly signaling that eventually these features will have advertising components to them.

“This is just an additional path right now to give people and businesses an opportunity to come closer together in a way that people want,” Amjadi said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez, beck diefenbach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, telling, shopping, features, right, bookmark, brands, team, amjadi, product, products, instagram, users, start


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In race to IPO, Uber is bigger but Lyft is friendlier, survey finds

Uber’s value could hit $120 billion after it goes public 8 Hours Ago | 02:03As they race to become public companies, Uber is bigger but Lyft is friendlier. But one-third of respondents picked Lyft for its driver friendliness and brand image, compared to one-fourth who picked Uber for those parameters. “While Lyft trails Uber in share, it does have a highly engaged user base – we found that Lyft users actually use the service more frequently than Uber users,” the report said. The research comes a


Uber’s value could hit $120 billion after it goes public 8 Hours Ago | 02:03As they race to become public companies, Uber is bigger but Lyft is friendlier. But one-third of respondents picked Lyft for its driver friendliness and brand image, compared to one-fourth who picked Uber for those parameters. “While Lyft trails Uber in share, it does have a highly engaged user base – we found that Lyft users actually use the service more frequently than Uber users,” the report said. The research comes a
In race to IPO, Uber is bigger but Lyft is friendlier, survey finds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uber, finds, companies, survey, bigger, ridehailing, race, billion, public, friendlier, week, lyft, users, confidential, ipo


In race to IPO, Uber is bigger but Lyft is friendlier, survey finds

Uber’s value could hit $120 billion after it goes public 8 Hours Ago | 02:03

As they race to become public companies, Uber is bigger but Lyft is friendlier.

That’s according to a new survey of 1,062 U.S. consumers conducted by investment firm Raymond James.

The report, published Monday, found Uber is the most popular ride-hailing app with 60 percent of market share, compared to Lyft’s 23 percent. But one-third of respondents picked Lyft for its driver friendliness and brand image, compared to one-fourth who picked Uber for those parameters.

Lyft customers were also more loyal; it was the top choice among users who take at least two trips with ride-hailing apps per month.

“While Lyft trails Uber in share, it does have a highly engaged user base – we found that Lyft users actually use the service more frequently than Uber users,” the report said.

The research comes as both companies are racing to list as public companies next year. Uber reportedly filed confidential paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission last week for an initial public offering (IPO) that could put the ride-hailing giant’s valuation at $120 billion. Lyft also filed a confidential paperwork for an IPO last week. The offering is expected to exceed the $15.1 billion valuation Lyft posted in June.

Uber declined to comment on its potential IPO when contacted by CNBC. Lyft issued a press release that confirmed the confidential filing but did not specify the number of shares to be offered or the price range.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uber, finds, companies, survey, bigger, ridehailing, race, billion, public, friendlier, week, lyft, users, confidential, ipo


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Google gears up for congressional hearing with patriotic prepared remarks

Google has staunchly denied these accusations when they’ve come up in the past, and did so again in Pichai’s remarks. Critics have contrasted this move with how Google has worked with China on controversial plans to launch a censored search engine there. “As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users,” he wrote. Today, Google is more than a search engine. As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed


Google has staunchly denied these accusations when they’ve come up in the past, and did so again in Pichai’s remarks. Critics have contrasted this move with how Google has worked with China on controversial plans to launch a censored search engine there. “As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users,” he wrote. Today, Google is more than a search engine. As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed
Google gears up for congressional hearing with patriotic prepared remarks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, remarks, google, technology, search, american, today, congressional, work, hearing, company, patriotic, prepared, gears, users, googles


Google gears up for congressional hearing with patriotic prepared remarks

CEO Sundar Pichai put an emphasis on Google’s patriotism in his prepared remarks for a congressional hearing on Tuesday where he’ll likely face questions about a purported bias against conservative content on search and YouTube.

“Even as we expand into new markets we never forget our American roots,” he wrote.

Tuesday’s hearing will focus on potential political bias on Google’s platforms, as well as the company’s data filtering practices, with House Majority leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Ca.) highlighting claims that Google’s business practices “may have been affected by political bias” in a statement.

Google has staunchly denied these accusations when they’ve come up in the past, and did so again in Pichai’s remarks.

“I lead this company without political bias and work to ensure that our products continue to operate that way,” Pichai writes. “To do otherwise would go against our core principles and our business interests.”

By underscoring Google’s patriotism Pichai’s comments may also attempt to address criticism around the company’s decision earlier this year not to renew a Pentagon contract for analyzing drone videos using artificial intelligence. Critics have contrasted this move with how Google has worked with China on controversial plans to launch a censored search engine there.

After The Intercept first reported details about Google’s censored search plans, human rights groups, lawmakers, and Google’s own employees all blasted the company, arguing that by cooperating with the Chinese government, it would have violated principles of free expression and users’ privacy rights, among other issues.

The censored search app, which Google has said it is “not close” to launching, would have debatably violated a set of artificial intelligence ethics that the company posted following employee blowback to its dropped Department of Defense contract. The document stipulated that Google would work with the government and military on cybersecurity and training, but not on weapons or surveillance that violates “internationally accepted norms.”

Pichai never directly mentions either controversy, but his prepared comments dance around both.

“As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users,” he wrote. “I am proud to say we do work, and we will continue to work, with the government to keep our country safe and secure.”

Here are Pichai’s full remarks:

Chairman Goodlatte, Ranking Member Nadler, distinguished members of the Committee: Thank you for the opportunity to be here today. I joined Google 15 years ago and have been privileged to serve as CEO for the past three years—though my love for information and technology began long before that. It’s been 25 years since I made the US my home. Growing up in India, I have distinct memories of when my family got its first phone and our first television. Each new technology made a profound difference in our lives. Getting the phone meant that I could call ahead to the hospital to check that the blood results were in before I traveled 2 hours by bus to get them. The television, well, it only had one channel, but I couldn’t have been more thrilled by its arrival! Those experiences made me a technology optimist, and I remain one today. Not only because I believe in technology, but because I believe in people and their ability to use technology to improve their lives. I’m incredibly proud of what Google does to empower people around the world, especially here in the US. I’d like to take a moment to share a bit of background on that. 20 years ago, two students—one from Michigan and one from Maryland—came together at Stanford with a big idea: to provide users with access to the world’s information. That mission still drives everything we do, whether that’s saving you a few minutes on your morning commute or helping doctors detect disease and save lives. Today, Google is more than a search engine. We are a global company that is committed to 1 building products for everyone. That means working with many industries, from education and healthcare to manufacturing and entertainment. Even as we expand into new markets we never forget our American roots. It’s no coincidence that a company dedicated to the free flow of information was founded right here in the US. As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users. I am proud to say we do work, and we will continue to work, with the government to keep our country safe and secure. Over the years our footprint has expanded far beyond California to states such as Texas, Virginia, Oklahoma and Alabama. Today in the US, we’re growing faster outside of the Bay Area than within it. I’ve had the opportunity to travel across the country and see all the places that are powering our digital economy—from Clarksville, to Pittsburgh, to San Diego, where we recently launched a partnership with the USO to help veterans and military families. Along the way, I’ve met many people who depend on Google to learn new skills, find jobs, or build new businesses. Over the past year, we have supported more than 1.5 million American businesses. Over the past three, we have made direct contributions of $150 billion to the US economy, added more than 24,000 employees, and paid over $43 billion to US partners across Search, YouTube, and Android. These investments strengthen our communities and support thousands of American jobs. They also allow us to provide great services to our users to help them through the day. It’s an honor to play this role in people’s lives, and it’s one we know comes with great responsibility. Protecting the privacy and security of our users has long been an essential part of our mission. We have invested an enormous amount of work over the years to bring choice, transparency, and control to our users. These values are built into every product we make. We recognize the important role of governments, including this Committee, in setting rules for the development and use of technology. To that end, we support federal privacy legislation and proposed a legislative framework for privacy earlier this year. Users also look to us to provide accurate, trusted information. We work hard to ensure the integrity of our products, and we’ve put a number of checks and balances in place to ensure they continue to live up to our standards. I lead this company without political bias and work to ensure that our products continue to operate that way. To do otherwise would go against our core principles and our business interests. We are a company that provides platforms for diverse perspectives and opinions—and we have no shortage of them among our own employees. Some of our Googlers are former servicemen and women who have risked much in defense of our country. Some are civil libertarians who fiercely defend freedom of expression. Some are parents who worry about the role technology plays in our households. Some—like me—are immigrants to this country, profoundly grateful for the freedoms and opportunities it offers. Some of us are many of these things. Let me close by saying that leading Google has been the greatest professional honor of my life. It’s a challenging moment for our industry, but I’m privileged to be here today. I greatly appreciate you letting me share the story of Google and our work to build products worthy of the trust users place in us. Thank you for your attention. I look forward to answering your questions.

WATCH: Google’s Larry Page has backed two flying-car start-ups — here’s a look inside one of them


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, remarks, google, technology, search, american, today, congressional, work, hearing, company, patriotic, prepared, gears, users, googles


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Google shutting down social network sooner because of new security bug

Google is shutting down its beleaguered social network sooner than expected in the wake of a new security issue that affected 52.5 million users. Google Plus received its initial kiss of death in early October, when the company revealed that a security bug had exposed the account information of 500,000 users, including their names, email addresses and occupations. At the time, Google planned to shut down the social network by August 2019. However, it now plans to shut down Google Plus by April 2


Google is shutting down its beleaguered social network sooner than expected in the wake of a new security issue that affected 52.5 million users. Google Plus received its initial kiss of death in early October, when the company revealed that a security bug had exposed the account information of 500,000 users, including their names, email addresses and occupations. At the time, Google planned to shut down the social network by August 2019. However, it now plans to shut down Google Plus by April 2
Google shutting down social network sooner because of new security bug Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, sean gallup, getty images, cnbc, jeniece pettitt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, shut, google, bug, plus, network, shutting, set, data, users, sooner, information, social


Google shutting down social network sooner because of new security bug

Google is shutting down its beleaguered social network sooner than expected in the wake of a new security issue that affected 52.5 million users.

Google Plus received its initial kiss of death in early October, when the company revealed that a security bug had exposed the account information of 500,000 users, including their names, email addresses and occupations. At the time, Google planned to shut down the social network by August 2019.

But in a blog post Monday Google wrote that it discovered a second bug that allowed the profile information of 52.5 million users to be viewable by developers, even if the profiles were set to private, using one of Google’s application programming interfaces, or APIs, for six days in November. Once again, the available data included information like users’ names, email addresses, occupations and ages.

Google said that the bug did not give third-party apps access to users’ financial data or passwords and that it didn’t find any evidence that the private profile information was accessed or misused. However, it now plans to shut down Google Plus by April 2019, and access to its APIs in the next 90 days.

Google’s initial security bug raised hackles in Washington and with the general public because The Wall Street Journal reported at the time that Google didn’t disclose it for months because it feared regulatory scrutiny and reputational damage.

Monday’s disclosure comes a day before Google CEO Sundar Pichai is set to testify before Congress about transparency and accountability.

“We understand that our ability to build reliable products that protect your data drives user trust,” Google’s blog post said.

“We have always taken this seriously, and we continue to invest in our privacy programs to refine internal privacy review processes, create powerful data controls, and engage with users, researchers, and policymakers to get their feedback and improve our programs.”

The enterprise version of Google Plus will remain active.

WATCH:Meet the man behind Google Assistant’s personality – Ryan Germick


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, sean gallup, getty images, cnbc, jeniece pettitt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, shut, google, bug, plus, network, shutting, set, data, users, sooner, information, social


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Google shutting down Allo

Google plans to kill chat app Allo by the middle of next year, the company said in a blog post, confirming a report earlier on Wednesday about the product’s imminent demise. Despite owning the world’s dominant smartphone operating system in Android, Google has never been able to create a chat experience to rival Apple’s iMessage or Facebook’s Messenger and WhatsApp. Meanwhile, Google will focus fully on the development of Messages, its other chat app for Android phones. That initiative was the b


Google plans to kill chat app Allo by the middle of next year, the company said in a blog post, confirming a report earlier on Wednesday about the product’s imminent demise. Despite owning the world’s dominant smartphone operating system in Android, Google has never been able to create a chat experience to rival Apple’s iMessage or Facebook’s Messenger and WhatsApp. Meanwhile, Google will focus fully on the development of Messages, its other chat app for Android phones. That initiative was the b
Google shutting down Allo Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: jillian donfro, stephen lam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, yeargoogle, google, products, earlier, android, allo, apps, users, chat, shutting, work


Google shutting down Allo

Google plans to kill chat app Allo by the middle of next year, the company said in a blog post, confirming a report earlier on Wednesday about the product’s imminent demise.

Despite owning the world’s dominant smartphone operating system in Android, Google has never been able to create a chat experience to rival Apple’s iMessage or Facebook’s Messenger and WhatsApp.

Allo, which launched two years ago to much fanfare, will only work until March 2019, at which point users will have to download any conversations they want to save. Meanwhile, Google will focus fully on the development of Messages, its other chat app for Android phones. Earlier this year, Google announced that it was working with mobile carriers on a new Rich Communication Services (RCS) standard, an upgrade to classic SMS texting, to make messaging work better across Android devices, and bring users features like read receipts and seamless group chats.

That initiative was the beginning of the end for Allo, which saw its product lead defect to Facebook earlier this year.

Google also said in its blog post that it plans to support another one of its chat apps, Hangouts, until it makes two of its enterprise apps, Hangouts Chat and Meet, available for non-paying users.

A Google employee tweeted earlier on Thursday that Meet and Chat would launch for regular consumers next year:

Google has long had a complicated, messy strategy when it comes to chat apps, and has axed a laundry list of communication products, including the original GChat, the social network Buzz, and the collaboration tool Wave. Earlier this year, it announced it was shutting down its social network Google Plus after it discovered a security bug that left private profile data exposed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: jillian donfro, stephen lam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, yeargoogle, google, products, earlier, android, allo, apps, users, chat, shutting, work


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A popular Q&A website says hackers stole information on 100 million users

Quora, the popular question-and-answer website, said Monday evening that hackers broke into one of its systems and compromised information from approximately 100 million users. CEO Adam D’Angelo said in a blog post the company discovered last week that a malicious third party had gained unauthorized access to one of its systems. Account information, including names, email addresses and encrypted passwords, may have been illegally accessed, according to the post. But the majority of the content t


Quora, the popular question-and-answer website, said Monday evening that hackers broke into one of its systems and compromised information from approximately 100 million users. CEO Adam D’Angelo said in a blog post the company discovered last week that a malicious third party had gained unauthorized access to one of its systems. Account information, including names, email addresses and encrypted passwords, may have been illegally accessed, according to the post. But the majority of the content t
A popular Q&A website says hackers stole information on 100 million users Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, accessed, qa, website, users, post, compromised, stole, information, wrotewere, week, data, dangelo, 100, popular, hackers, million


A popular Q&A website says hackers stole information on 100 million users

Quora, the popular question-and-answer website, said Monday evening that hackers broke into one of its systems and compromised information from approximately 100 million users.

CEO Adam D’Angelo said in a blog post the company discovered last week that a malicious third party had gained unauthorized access to one of its systems.

Account information, including names, email addresses and encrypted passwords, may have been illegally accessed, according to the post. User-imported data from other social networks could also have been taken.

But the majority of the content the hackers accessed was already public on the site — such as questions, answers, and comments, D’Angelo wrote.

“We’re in the process of notifying users whose data has been compromised,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, accessed, qa, website, users, post, compromised, stole, information, wrotewere, week, data, dangelo, 100, popular, hackers, million


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