How TaskRabbit’s Stacy Brown-Philpot is creating one of the most diverse workforces in Silicon Valley

Stacy Brown-Philpot of TaskRabbit, a company that hires freelancers to do odd jobs, is the first to admit that she doesn’t look like most CEOs in tech. And as one of the few black women CEOs in Silicon Valley, she’s making it her mission to change the landscape, beginning with her own business. Since Brown-Philpot began at TaskRabbit in 2016, she has created a diverse and inclusive workplace. However, some of the more unique tasks have included helping to plan an anniversary surprise and even he


Stacy Brown-Philpot of TaskRabbit, a company that hires freelancers to do odd jobs, is the first to admit that she doesn’t look like most CEOs in tech. And as one of the few black women CEOs in Silicon Valley, she’s making it her mission to change the landscape, beginning with her own business. Since Brown-Philpot began at TaskRabbit in 2016, she has created a diverse and inclusive workplace. However, some of the more unique tasks have included helping to plan an anniversary surprise and even he
How TaskRabbit’s Stacy Brown-Philpot is creating one of the most diverse workforces in Silicon Valley Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: renee morad
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taskrabbits, valley, mission, helping, brownphilpot, tasks, shes, stacy, creating, taskrabbit, women, diverse, inclusive, workforces, silicon, unique


How TaskRabbit's Stacy Brown-Philpot is creating one of the most diverse workforces in Silicon Valley

Stacy Brown-Philpot of TaskRabbit, a company that hires freelancers to do odd jobs, is the first to admit that she doesn’t look like most CEOs in tech. And as one of the few black women CEOs in Silicon Valley, she’s making it her mission to change the landscape, beginning with her own business.

“I’m focusing on changing the face of technology by creating a diverse company where people feel they can bring their whole selves to work,” Brown-Philpot recently told Know Your Value.

Brown-Philpot refers to her staff of 200 as “unicorn employees” who possess a unique set of qualities that are rare and extremely valuable to an organization. Since Brown-Philpot began at TaskRabbit in 2016, she has created a diverse and inclusive workplace. Today, 60 percent of the company’s leadership is women, 48 percent of its employees are Hispanic, African-American, Asian or two or more races and 16 percent identify as LGBTQ.

TaskRabbit’s mission is to make everyday life easier for people, and the platform has grown to incorporate more than 70 metro areas across four countries so far, saving Americans over four million hours of time. The “taskers” themselves earn an average of $34 per hour, which is five times the U.S. minimum wage. Some of the most common tasks include moving household items, assembling furniture, cleaning and doing minor home repairs. However, some of the more unique tasks have included helping to plan an anniversary surprise and even helping a customer find a lost pet cockatoo.

Here are five key steps that Brown-Philpot has taken to ensure that she’s leading TaskRabbit on a diverse and inclusive path.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: renee morad
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taskrabbits, valley, mission, helping, brownphilpot, tasks, shes, stacy, creating, taskrabbit, women, diverse, inclusive, workforces, silicon, unique


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Silicon Valley is eyeing the giant market for infant formula

Laura Modi, Co-Founder of Bobbie Baby, wants to create a new “European style” infant formula here in the U.S. In Europe, there are different rules around the ingredients that brands are allowed to use in formulas, and some parents believe that European formulas are healthier. So Modi set about forming a start-up that would essentially recreate European formulas for the U.S. market. But after less than 10 days on the market, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning in June to consum


Laura Modi, Co-Founder of Bobbie Baby, wants to create a new “European style” infant formula here in the U.S. In Europe, there are different rules around the ingredients that brands are allowed to use in formulas, and some parents believe that European formulas are healthier. So Modi set about forming a start-up that would essentially recreate European formulas for the U.S. market. But after less than 10 days on the market, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning in June to consum
Silicon Valley is eyeing the giant market for infant formula Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eyeing, silicon, market, valley, giant, infant, modi, european, working, bobbie, formula, formulas, parents, different


Silicon Valley is eyeing the giant market for infant formula

Laura Modi, Co-Founder of Bobbie Baby, wants to create a new “European style” infant formula here in the U.S.

While working at Airbnb, Laura Modi noticed a strange trend among Bay Area mothers.

Many new parents were circumventing U.S. regulators by importing their formulas from Europe.

In Europe, there are different rules around the ingredients that brands are allowed to use in formulas, and some parents believe that European formulas are healthier.

So Modi set about forming a start-up that would essentially recreate European formulas for the U.S. market. She started a new venture, called Bobbie Baby, alongside her former Airbnb colleague Sarah Hardy, and the pair raised $2.5 million in venture capital funding.

But after less than 10 days on the market, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning in June to consumers to stop using Bobbie’s infant formula. Among its various complaints, the U.S. FDA told parents that the formula was manufactured in Germany and imported to the United States, and that there weren’t sufficient nutrients for some infants, especially those born premature or with a low birth weight.

“We were very surprised,” said Modi.

Modi explained that the company faced a number of hurdles in manufacturing its product in America. Modi said there are only a handful of approved facilities to manufacture infant formula, and most require a minimum batch of orders that far exceeds what a start-up can realistically achieve in its first months. Modi considered going down a different route, such as the toddler formula market, but she remains committed to working with regulators to bring Bobbie to market as an approved infant formula.

“Toddler is a totally different category, and our mission is to support the infants and new parents,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eyeing, silicon, market, valley, giant, infant, modi, european, working, bobbie, formula, formulas, parents, different


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The EU has new people in charge. And it’s not good news for US tech firms

New officials at the heart of the EU will likely keep America’s big tech firms under close scrutiny, experts have told CNBC. It has also proposed different laws that seek to limit online content and there’s little evidence that anything will change under the EU’s new leadership. Dexter Thillien, a senior industry analyst at Fitch Solutions, told CNBC via telephone Wednesday that Europe is keen to continue to be seen as the global leading force in tech regulation. Thillien explained that Europe s


New officials at the heart of the EU will likely keep America’s big tech firms under close scrutiny, experts have told CNBC. It has also proposed different laws that seek to limit online content and there’s little evidence that anything will change under the EU’s new leadership. Dexter Thillien, a senior industry analyst at Fitch Solutions, told CNBC via telephone Wednesday that Europe is keen to continue to be seen as the global leading force in tech regulation. Thillien explained that Europe s
The EU has new people in charge. And it’s not good news for US tech firms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, regulation, eus, told, charge, europe, thillien, good, eu, global, theres, valley, firms


The EU has new people in charge. And it's not good news for US tech firms

New officials at the heart of the EU will likely keep America’s big tech firms under close scrutiny, experts have told CNBC.

The European Commission — the EU’s executive arm — has fined companies such as Google and Apple for disrespecting its competition rules and is currently investigating Amazon. It has also proposed different laws that seek to limit online content and there’s little evidence that anything will change under the EU’s new leadership.

Dexter Thillien, a senior industry analyst at Fitch Solutions, told CNBC via telephone Wednesday that Europe is keen to continue to be seen as the global leading force in tech regulation. Thillien explained that Europe saw a loophole in global tech regulation and felt the need to act. “Europeans have all the negatives but none of the positives,” he said, referring to the fact that Europe has not created any large tech firms but has had to deal with the presence of Silicon Valley behemoths.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, regulation, eus, told, charge, europe, thillien, good, eu, global, theres, valley, firms


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Apple lost the 5G battle, but it paid Intel $1 billion to win the war

Apple may have lost the 5G battle to Qualcomm, but it’s now in a position to win the war. Apple said Thursday it will buy Intel’s smartphone modem business, which includes several patents and about 2,000 Intel employees, for $1 billion. Option two: Wait for Intel to catch up with its 5G modems, which were said to be running behind schedule. Option three: Choose Huawei’s 5G modems, which would be a tough sell in today’s environment thanks to trade tensions and cybersecurity concerns. Option four:


Apple may have lost the 5G battle to Qualcomm, but it’s now in a position to win the war. Apple said Thursday it will buy Intel’s smartphone modem business, which includes several patents and about 2,000 Intel employees, for $1 billion. Option two: Wait for Intel to catch up with its 5G modems, which were said to be running behind schedule. Option three: Choose Huawei’s 5G modems, which would be a tough sell in today’s environment thanks to trade tensions and cybersecurity concerns. Option four:
Apple lost the 5G battle, but it paid Intel $1 billion to win the war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, qualcomm, battle, apple, paid, settled, intel, win, 5g, lost, chips, war, billion, modems, plans, valley, position


Apple lost the 5G battle, but it paid Intel $1 billion to win the war

Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple, and Eddy Cue, senior vice president of Internet Software and Services at Apple, attend the annual Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference, July 10, 2019 in Sun Valley, Idaho.

Apple may have lost the 5G battle to Qualcomm, but it’s now in a position to win the war.

Apple said Thursday it will buy Intel’s smartphone modem business, which includes several patents and about 2,000 Intel employees, for $1 billion. It’s no secret Apple has been interested in developing its own modems for the iPhone, and buying up all that Intel IP puts it in a position to have one ready by the time its deal with Qualcomm runs out.

Apple had four bad options when it came to its 5G plans after it settled the royalty spat with Qualcomm in April:

Option one: Settle with Qualcomm and get its 5G chips into iPhones by 2020.

Option two: Wait for Intel to catch up with its 5G modems, which were said to be running behind schedule.

Option three: Choose Huawei’s 5G modems, which would be a tough sell in today’s environment thanks to trade tensions and cybersecurity concerns.

Option four: Make its own 5G chips, which would take several years and put Apple far behind other handset competitors that are already releasing 5G phones this year.

So Apple went with the least of all evils. It settled with Qualcomm and laid the groundwork for a long-term plan to develop its own modems. Meanwhile, Intel was forced to back out of its 5G modem plans once Apple and Qualcomm signed their deal, and its assets were relatively cheap and attractive for Apple to scoop up and get a head start on its own chips.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, qualcomm, battle, apple, paid, settled, intel, win, 5g, lost, chips, war, billion, modems, plans, valley, position


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Silicon Valley has found its presidential candidate in Andrew Yang

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks to media outside the Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. The terms described Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, who was trending on Google Search. He attracts Silicon Valley Democrats, libertarians and even a few conservatives, all of whom have given up on politicians who don’t understand them. Presidential candidate Andrew Yang hi-fives supp


Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks to media outside the Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. The terms described Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, who was trending on Google Search. He attracts Silicon Valley Democrats, libertarians and even a few conservatives, all of whom have given up on politicians who don’t understand them. Presidential candidate Andrew Yang hi-fives supp
Silicon Valley has found its presidential candidate in Andrew Yang Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, san, workers, product, presidential, yang, andrew, francisco, candidate, silicon, tech, valley


Silicon Valley has found its presidential candidate in Andrew Yang

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks to media outside the Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle | Getty Images

Just before Elon Musk unveiled his latest plan for brain implants in San Francisco Tuesday night, people waiting for the live-stream to begin watched the comment section flood with “Yang Gang” and “Yang 2020!” The terms described Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, who was trending on Google Search. The same response was echoed in physical center of the tech world. Approximately 200 Silicon Valley engineers, graphic designers, and product managers crammed into a sold-out, standing room-only discussion at a civic community space called Manny’s in San Francisco’s Mission District Tuesday night. Workers from all different areas within tech gathered to hear Yang deliver dry-humored responses ranging from healthcare to memes. Yang, who is polling around 2% in most polls of Democratic primary voters, has a surprisingly devoted core in the tech community. When he held a rally in March in San Francisco, nearly 3,000 people showed up. He attracts Silicon Valley Democrats, libertarians and even a few conservatives, all of whom have given up on politicians who don’t understand them. Yang connects with them because of his approach to data, his unrehearsed — and sometimes awkward — candor, and a perceived understanding of the moral dilemmas surrounding the tech industry. He also speaks tech’s inside language. On Tuesday night, he had answers to audience questions from childhood trauma to pessimism around automation, and even e-sports. “I feel like I get characterized as an Asian tech bro,” he told the San Francisco crowd Tuesday, which got a large laugh from the crowd. “But I spent the last several years at a nonprofit and that’s very wholesome.”

Presidential candidate Andrew Yang hi-fives supporters in San Francisco. Jennifer Elias | CNBC

“I know everyone in Silicon Valley and I’ve never met you,” said interviewer and Recode founder Kara Swisher. “But you’re the candidate of Silicon Valley.” After Swisher’s interview, Yang asked if the event “the first political thing” they had been to. About one quarter of the people in the room raised their hands. “Most politicians are just responding to culture whereas he is the culture and anticipates the future,” said Joel Scoles, a food and beverage worker who serves tech workers daily in San Francisco.

‘An Asian man who likes math’

Yang appeals to SIlicon Valley tech types in part because of his straightforward and quick-witted responses, which are delivered with with few political embellishments or emotions. For instance, Yang cracked a joke about his parents, who met as graduate students at University California of Berkeley — his brother Lawrence is named after Berkeley’s Lawrence Hall of Science. “We used to joke that’s where our parents got busy,” Yang told Tuesday’s crowd, garnering roaring laughs. Yang supporters often wear hats and shirts with the acronym “MATH,” which Yang said stands for “Make America Think Harder.” Tech workers say this refers to Yang’s habit of answering questions with multiple data points at the drop of a hat. “I’m going to be the alternative to the establishment that grows the whole time,” Yang said about the presidential candidate process. “And I’m the man for that job because the opposite of Donald Trump is an Asian man who likes math,” he added as the room erupted in laughter and applause. Several “Yang Gang” groups have formed around the San Francisco Bay Area, according to Dylan Enright, finance director for Yang’s campaign. Andrew Barakat, a product manager for a major tech company which he asked us not to name, said he likes Yang because he’s a numbers guy. “We’re in a stage in economic development where people shouldn’t be on the verge of bankruptcy or being in debt all the time,” he said. If you start to measure what actually matters and then incentivize people to pursue those things, you have a real chance at changing the economy.”

Andrew Barakat, a product manager for a FANG company wears Yang gear that stands for “Make America Think Again.” Jennifer Elias | CNBC

Barakat, who has a background in data analytics, economics and behavioral studies, pointed to venture capitalist John Doerr’s book “Measure What Matters,” which dissects the popular tech business concept of measuring objectives and key results. “That system is the backbone of how Silicon Valley has developed its biggest companies — it’s focused on OKRs (objective key results) that are numerical and trackable, and Andrew wants to do the same thing.” “He actually answers questions and when he evaluates an argument, he refers to studies and data,” agreed Ash Hussain, who works as the head of finance for a tech startup in San Francisco that he asked us not to identify.

Free money for everyone

Yang’s platform centers on the concept of universal basic income, and he proposes a “Freedom Dividend” that would allow each U.S. resident to receive $1,000 a month. “What I say is that it’s not socialism. It’s capitalism that doesn’t start at zero,” Yang said. He believes the dividend will build a “trickle up” effect because that money will go right back into the economy. He views the only reason people are resisting it is because we’ve been programmed to assume that there’s a limited amount of resources to go around. “A neuroscientist put it to me best and said, ‘Andrew, you’re going to be fighting the human mind because the human mind is programmed for resource scarcity,” he said Tuesday. The freedom dividend has attracted donations from some of the most well-known tech leaders. That list includes OpenAI CEO and former Y-combinator president Sam Altman who gave $2,700, Google G suite product lead Scott Johnston who gave $2,700, and Gerald Huff, principal software engineer at Tesla who gave $2,000. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes reportedly donated $250 to Yang’s campaign too. Yang also caters to tech workers who face moral dilemmas about their effect on complicated societal issues such as automation and data privacy. “Being in the Bay Area, you know first-hand the impacts of AI: You have peers working on technologies to streamline and make processes more efficient — which effectively automates away millions of jobs,” said Eric Quach, a product lead for a Silicon Valley tech giant, which he asked us not to name. Quach, who said he considers himself a Democrat, volunteered to organize parts of the “Yang Gang.” “I am supporting Andrew Yang because he understands better than any other candidate how technology and artificial intelligence is affecting the workforce of today and tomorrow.” Yang points out flaws of popular workforce retraining solutions touted by both corporations and politicians, which resonates with tech workers. That includes the concept of “turning coal miners into coders,” Yang said Tuesday. “I was just at a truck stop in Iowa, and if I said, ‘Hey, have any interest in a coding career?’ they’d be more likely to punch you in the face.”

Breaking up Big Tech


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, san, workers, product, presidential, yang, andrew, francisco, candidate, silicon, tech, valley


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Peter Thiel’s comments about spies in Silicon Valley have some basis in reality, but no evidence

Facebook board member and Trump supporter Peter Thiel made explosive comments Sunday about Google at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington D.C., setting off a wave of skepticism and drawing attention from the president. Among other things, Thiel said that the FBI and CIA should investigate Google and ask whether any foreign spies, particularly Chinese spies, have infiltrated its research into artificial intelligence. It was a fiery political speech by a firebrand with an interest in


Facebook board member and Trump supporter Peter Thiel made explosive comments Sunday about Google at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington D.C., setting off a wave of skepticism and drawing attention from the president. Among other things, Thiel said that the FBI and CIA should investigate Google and ask whether any foreign spies, particularly Chinese spies, have infiltrated its research into artificial intelligence. It was a fiery political speech by a firebrand with an interest in
Peter Thiel’s comments about spies in Silicon Valley have some basis in reality, but no evidence Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peter, drawing, attention, silicon, evidence, comments, worked, reality, valley, chinese, thiel, facebook, thiels, basis, google, intelligence, spies, foreign


Peter Thiel's comments about spies in Silicon Valley have some basis in reality, but no evidence

Facebook board member and Trump supporter Peter Thiel made explosive comments Sunday about Google at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington D.C., setting off a wave of skepticism and drawing attention from the president.

Among other things, Thiel said that the FBI and CIA should investigate Google and ask whether any foreign spies, particularly Chinese spies, have infiltrated its research into artificial intelligence.

It was a fiery political speech by a firebrand with an interest in deflecting regulators’ attention from Facebook. Facebook is under scrutiny for its privacy lapses and initiative to build a new cryptocurrency, and drawing it toward Google, which competes with Facebook for billions of dollars in advertising revenue.

Google has said repeatedly that it does not work with the Chinese military.

But the rhetoric about foreign spies infiltrating U.S. companies is not new or surprising to people in the intelligence community, and it based in reality.

Facebook’s former chief security officer Alex Stamos honed in those realities Tuesday, tweeting that it’s “completely reasonable” to imagine Chinese intelligence has worked to recruit technology employees at big companies.

It’s important to separate this very real threat from Thiel’s allegations about Google, which were presented without specifics or proof, and from his claims that Google has participated in “treasonous” activity.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peter, drawing, attention, silicon, evidence, comments, worked, reality, valley, chinese, thiel, facebook, thiels, basis, google, intelligence, spies, foreign


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‘Google is not a patriotic company,’ says co-founder of data-mining company Palantir

Joe Lonsdale said on CNBC on Monday that his fellow Palantir co-founder Peter Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Alphabet’s Google. “Google is not a patriotic company,” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC. Google, responding to Thiel’s comments, said, “As we have said before, we do not work with the Chinese military.” The environment at Google is very “academic,” Lonsdale said, where people want to share their work across the world. Lonsdale on M


Joe Lonsdale said on CNBC on Monday that his fellow Palantir co-founder Peter Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Alphabet’s Google. “Google is not a patriotic company,” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC. Google, responding to Thiel’s comments, said, “As we have said before, we do not work with the Chinese military.” The environment at Google is very “academic,” Lonsdale said, where people want to share their work across the world. Lonsdale on M
‘Google is not a patriotic company,’ says co-founder of data-mining company Palantir Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, palantir, datamining, google, patriotic, company, thiel, lonsdale, chinese, valley, cofounder, talk, taking, speaking


'Google is not a patriotic company,' says co-founder of data-mining company Palantir

Joe Lonsdale said on CNBC on Monday that his fellow Palantir co-founder Peter Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Alphabet’s Google.

“Google is not a patriotic company,” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC.

Lonsdale was responding to the criticism levied since Thiel on Sunday said the FBI and the CIA should investigate whether Google has been infiltrated by Chinese intelligence.

Thiel, also a Facebook board member and a supporter of Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, was speaking at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington, D.C., and Axios reported on his speech.

“Everyone in [Silicon] Valley knows that the Chinese government is very involved,” Lonsdale told “Squawk Alley” in an interview, though he didn’t point to any clear evidence. “It’s something we don’t talk about a lot. It was very courageous of [Thiel] to talk about it.”

Google, responding to Thiel’s comments, said, “As we have said before, we do not work with the Chinese military.”

The environment at Google is very “academic,” Lonsdale said, where people want to share their work across the world. “There’s nationalists in China coming and taking whatever they can learn and taking it back and using it for their own nationalist purposes.”

Lonsdale also commented on Google’s contract with the Defense Department, which expired earlier this year and was not renewed. “When Google made the choice ‘we’re not going to help the U.S., but we’re going to continue to work in China,’ it was very clear,” Lonsdale said of the company’s patriotism.

Silicon Valley-based Palantir, the data analytics miner, has worked with many agencies of the U.S. government, including the Defense Department, CIA and FBI. Lonsdale on Monday called Palantir “probably the most patriotic in the Valley.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, palantir, datamining, google, patriotic, company, thiel, lonsdale, chinese, valley, cofounder, talk, taking, speaking


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Tech and media moguls arrive in Sun Valley, Idaho, where many of the biggest deals in history have gone down

Private jets are parked at the Friedman Memorial Airport during the annual Allen and Co. Sun Valley media conference in Sun Valley, IdahoThe invite-only Allen & Co. Sun Valley conference, also known as “summer camp for billionaires,” kicks off in Sun Valley, Idaho this week. It’s where some of the biggest names in tech and media flock, and where seeds have been planted for tech and media acquisitions, including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, Verizon’s acquisition of


Private jets are parked at the Friedman Memorial Airport during the annual Allen and Co. Sun Valley media conference in Sun Valley, IdahoThe invite-only Allen & Co. Sun Valley conference, also known as “summer camp for billionaires,” kicks off in Sun Valley, Idaho this week. It’s where some of the biggest names in tech and media flock, and where seeds have been planted for tech and media acquisitions, including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, Verizon’s acquisition of
Tech and media moguls arrive in Sun Valley, Idaho, where many of the biggest deals in history have gone down Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton alex sherman, todd haselton, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idaho, sale, tech, deals, biggest, billion, allen, media, disney, history, including, arrive, gone, original, moguls, tv, valley


Tech and media moguls arrive in Sun Valley, Idaho, where many of the biggest deals in history have gone down

Private jets are parked at the Friedman Memorial Airport during the annual Allen and Co. Sun Valley media conference in Sun Valley, Idaho

The invite-only Allen & Co. Sun Valley conference, also known as “summer camp for billionaires,” kicks off in Sun Valley, Idaho this week.

It’s where some of the biggest names in tech and media flock, and where seeds have been planted for tech and media acquisitions, including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, Verizon’s acquisition of Yahoo and, in 1995, Disney’s merger with ABC. It’s also great marketing for investment bank boutique Allen & Co., which has advised on some of the biggest tech, media and telecom mergers, including Time Warner’s $108 billion sale to AT&T and LinkedIn’s $26 billion sale to Microsoft.

A lot has changed in the media landscape since last year. Fox sold its entertainment assets to Disney for $71 billion. Netflix, once the king of streaming, will soon compete for viewers with new services from Disney, AT&T and Comcast’s NBC, all of which are competing to create the best collection of original and existing TV and movie content. Apple is also throwing its hat in the game, with a new service called Apple TV+ that will launch this fall with original movies.

Here’s who’s showing up:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton alex sherman, todd haselton, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idaho, sale, tech, deals, biggest, billion, allen, media, disney, history, including, arrive, gone, original, moguls, tv, valley


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Social Capital’s Palihapitiya says bitcoin is ‘schmuck insurance you have under your mattress’

Silicon Valley venture capitalist Chamath Palihapitiya, an early investor in bitcoin, is still crazy about the cryptocurrency. “It’s the single best hedge against the traditional financial infrastructure,” Palihapitiya said in an interview Tuesday with CNBC’s Squawk Box. Palihapitiya first bought bitcoin years ago at an average price of about $100, he previously told CNBC. The venture capitalist said he and two other friends in Silicon Valley at one point in 2013 owned 5% of the entire float of


Silicon Valley venture capitalist Chamath Palihapitiya, an early investor in bitcoin, is still crazy about the cryptocurrency. “It’s the single best hedge against the traditional financial infrastructure,” Palihapitiya said in an interview Tuesday with CNBC’s Squawk Box. Palihapitiya first bought bitcoin years ago at an average price of about $100, he previously told CNBC. The venture capitalist said he and two other friends in Silicon Valley at one point in 2013 owned 5% of the entire float of
Social Capital’s Palihapitiya says bitcoin is ‘schmuck insurance you have under your mattress’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, palihapitiya, social, bitcoin, tumbled, schmuck, capitals, venture, insurance, investor, coin, yearsbitcoin, mattress, capitalist, silicon, valley


Social Capital's Palihapitiya says bitcoin is 'schmuck insurance you have under your mattress'

Silicon Valley venture capitalist Chamath Palihapitiya, an early investor in bitcoin, is still crazy about the cryptocurrency.

“It’s the single best hedge against the traditional financial infrastructure,” Palihapitiya said in an interview Tuesday with CNBC’s Squawk Box. “Whether you support the fiscal and monetary policy or not, it doesn’t matter. This is the schmuck insurance you have under your mattress.”

“Just buy the coins. It’s a fantastic instrument,” he added.

Palihapitiya first bought bitcoin years ago at an average price of about $100, he previously told CNBC. The venture capitalist said he and two other friends in Silicon Valley at one point in 2013 owned 5% of the entire float of bitcoin.

He had predicted that bitcoin is going to be $1 million a piece in the next 20 years.

Bitcoin has had a stellar comeback this year, soaring more than 200% as the crypto space attracted more interest after Facebook’s announcement of its own digital coin. Bitcoin tumbled more than 70% in 2018 as high-profile hacks and crackdowns on initial coin offerings dampened investor enthusiasm.

Palihapitiya is founder and CEO of Social Capital. He was a former member of the senior executive team at Facebook.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, palihapitiya, social, bitcoin, tumbled, schmuck, capitals, venture, insurance, investor, coin, yearsbitcoin, mattress, capitalist, silicon, valley


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Koch network throws its weight behind Silicon Valley in the regulatory battle with Washington

The libertarian Koch network has long been a powerful advocate for conservative causes and a major funder for Republican politicians. During the midterms, for example, the network spent $2.1 million on ads supporting then-Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley’s challenge to incumbent Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. The Koch network quickly issued a statement slamming Hawley’s bill as “toxic” and argued it would “punish success in the next generation of innovative startups.” That’s why we’re ta


The libertarian Koch network has long been a powerful advocate for conservative causes and a major funder for Republican politicians. During the midterms, for example, the network spent $2.1 million on ads supporting then-Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley’s challenge to incumbent Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. The Koch network quickly issued a statement slamming Hawley’s bill as “toxic” and argued it would “punish success in the next generation of innovative startups.” That’s why we’re ta
Koch network throws its weight behind Silicon Valley in the regulatory battle with Washington Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-30  Authors: ylan mui
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summit, network, regulatory, battle, sen, washington, silicon, political, technology, supporting, tech, speech, valley, koch, spent, weight, throws


Koch network throws its weight behind Silicon Valley in the regulatory battle with Washington

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Billionaire industrialist Charles Koch has waded into the battle over Big Tech.

Koch’s sprawling network of advocacy and philanthropy organizations has quietly spent at least $10 million over the past four years to combat the backlash against new technologies and encourage digital free speech, according to a person familiar with the group’s funding. The effort has encompassed grants to academics and think tanks, support for state and local legal battles, and political ad campaigns.

“In this time of disruption, people are wondering if they can adapt and succeed,” Koch said in a video message to wealthy donors invited to the network’s summer summit. “Our answer is yes.”

The libertarian Koch network has long been a powerful advocate for conservative causes and a major funder for Republican politicians. But since the election of President Donald Trump, the group has distanced itself somewhat from the GOP and focused on building coalitions from across the political spectrum on specific issues instead.

Tech is one of the latest examples of that new strategy. The industry has come under fire from both sides of the aisle, and the network said it would not hesitate to cross party lines to defend innovation.

During the midterms, for example, the network spent $2.1 million on ads supporting then-Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley’s challenge to incumbent Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. Hawley won the election and has since emerged as one of the leading critics of the tech industry on Capitol Hill. Last month, he introduced a bill that would eliminate liability immunity for online platforms unless they get clearance from federal regulators — a potential death blow to internet companies.

The Koch network quickly issued a statement slamming Hawley’s bill as “toxic” and argued it would “punish success in the next generation of innovative startups.”

This spring, after presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., called for breaking up companies such as Facebook and Google, the group released an ad campaign warning members of the Senate Judiciary Committee not to use antitrust law as a “political weapon.” The targets included Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., whom the network has otherwise staunchly supported.

“We believe technology greatly improves people’s lives,” said Jesse Blumenthal, director of technology and innovation for Stand Together, the Koch network’s umbrella organization. “In order to facilitate that, we need cultural attitudes and policies that allow for experimentation. That’s why we’re taking a more active role in supporting positive tech work and holding government accountable on tech issues.”

At the Koch summit, tech was a recurring theme over the three-day gathering. Donors could take a spin in a self-driving minivan. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is scheduled to deliver a speech at the summit on Monday. And AOL founder Steve Case addressed the audience on Sunday and implored them to invest in start-ups outside of established bases such as California, New York and Massachusetts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-30  Authors: ylan mui
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summit, network, regulatory, battle, sen, washington, silicon, political, technology, supporting, tech, speech, valley, koch, spent, weight, throws


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