Secretary of State Pompeo heads to Silicon Valley to dine with tech leaders

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will visit the San Francisco Bay Area this week with the backdrop of uncertainty in Iran and the looming 2020 election. Pompeo was slated to arrive in the area Sunday, with his trip extending through Wednesday, according to a State Department press release. Following remarks to tech-heavy public policy organization, the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, at the Commonwealth Club of California, Pompeo will dine with about 15 people at a private meeting Monday, Bloombe


Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will visit the San Francisco Bay Area this week with the backdrop of uncertainty in Iran and the looming 2020 election.
Pompeo was slated to arrive in the area Sunday, with his trip extending through Wednesday, according to a State Department press release.
Following remarks to tech-heavy public policy organization, the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, at the Commonwealth Club of California, Pompeo will dine with about 15 people at a private meeting Monday, Bloombe
Secretary of State Pompeo heads to Silicon Valley to dine with tech leaders Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, dine, secretary, pompeo, visit, companies, state, leaders, heads, valley, department, schedule, silicon


Secretary of State Pompeo heads to Silicon Valley to dine with tech leaders

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo looks on during a brief photo opportunity before a meeting with Republic of Cyprus Foreign Minister Nikos Christodoulides at the U.S. Department of State on November 18, 2019 in Washington, DC.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will visit the San Francisco Bay Area this week with the backdrop of uncertainty in Iran and the looming 2020 election.

Pompeo was slated to arrive in the area Sunday, with his trip extending through Wednesday, according to a State Department press release. The secretary was set to meet with an undisclosed list of “technology companies and foreign counterparts from Japan and the Republic of Korea,” according to the press release.

Following remarks to tech-heavy public policy organization, the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, at the Commonwealth Club of California, Pompeo will dine with about 15 people at a private meeting Monday, Bloomberg reported. The guest list includes Oracle Executive Chairman Larry Ellison, Nextdoor CEO Sarah Friar, venture capitalist Marc Andreesen and Silicon Valley Bank CEO Gregory Becker, people familiar with the matter told Bloomberg.

An Oracle spokesperson declined to comment. The State Department and representatives from the other companies did not immediately return requests for comment or confirmation of Bloomberg’s reporting, but Pompeo’s public schedule confirms a “dinner with U.S. business leaders.”

Tech companies have had a cautious relationship with the Trump administration as employees at companies like Microsoft and Amazon have raised alarms about their leadership’s work with government agencies, especially over defense-related projects. But many executives have tried to maintain friendly relations as scrutiny of the power and size of the largest tech firms has grown in recent years.

According to the schedule, Pompeo will meet with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in Palo Alto on Monday before delivering remarks to students at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution. Ahead of his visit to the Commonwealth Club, Pompeo will have lunch with Rice and former Secretary of State George Shultz.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, dine, secretary, pompeo, visit, companies, state, leaders, heads, valley, department, schedule, silicon


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A bunch of people in tech are setting resolutions to spend less time using tech

In an interesting twist, many of the most popular tweets from folks who have resolved to get off tech are coming from people who work in tech. Others in the tech industry explicitly point to their emotional health and well-being as a factor that’s motivating them to reduce their reliance on social media. Some folks have a few theories about why the tech world is expressing an anti-tech zeitgeist. “There’s this huge openness these days to wanting to be offline,” said Nate Bosshard, a co-founder o


In an interesting twist, many of the most popular tweets from folks who have resolved to get off tech are coming from people who work in tech.
Others in the tech industry explicitly point to their emotional health and well-being as a factor that’s motivating them to reduce their reliance on social media.
Some folks have a few theories about why the tech world is expressing an anti-tech zeitgeist.
“There’s this huge openness these days to wanting to be offline,” said Nate Bosshard, a co-founder o
A bunch of people in tech are setting resolutions to spend less time using tech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyre, tech, bunch, using, setting, spend, break, world, valley, work, tweets, media, resolutions, social, twitter


A bunch of people in tech are setting resolutions to spend less time using tech

One of the most common resolutions this New Year’s? For many of us, it’s to spend less time staring at a screen, and far more pursuing new hobbies and personal relationships that don’t involve technology.

Somewhat ironically, a CNBC search found that top social media sites including Twitter and Facebook are littered with thousands of posts from users who say they are looking to delete or reduce their dependence on social media apps into the New Year.

The #deleteFacebook tag is starting to take off again on Twitter as of New Year’s Eve, and hundreds of people are sharing tweets to implore others to take a break from social media over the holidays so they can read a book or connect with people in real life. Many have expressed that they’re fed up with what they view as vitriolic and antagonistic behavior from strangers on the Internet, and are ready to disengage.

In an interesting twist, many of the most popular tweets from folks who have resolved to get off tech are coming from people who work in tech. After days at the office working on a computer, many are dead-set on picking up new hobbies in 2020 instead, like painting, playing board games, learning a language or picking up a musical instrument.

Former Google director of engineering Ankit Jain is one of them. He’s vowed on Twitter to watch less Netflix and pick up the saxophone next year. Over the phone, he explained that a side benefit would be to “not check my phone for an hour.” The sax was a gift from his wife for Christmas to re-ignite his longstanding passion for music, he said.

“Working in tech has definitely played a role (in my decision),” Jai explained. “But more than that my life has gotten busier and I’ve found myself spending less time focused on myself and some of my passions.”

Others in the tech industry explicitly point to their emotional health and well-being as a factor that’s motivating them to reduce their reliance on social media.

And in particular, a need to detach from the opinions of strangers on the Internet, at least temporarily.

Some folks have a few theories about why the tech world is expressing an anti-tech zeitgeist.

“There’s this huge openness these days to wanting to be offline,” said Nate Bosshard, a co-founder of the fitness-tech company Tonal and a tech investor, who describes taking a tech break as a new “luxury.”

He notes that many tech workers are increasingly under pressure to check email after work, or respond to notifications on Slack. So taking a break is a privilege for those who feel confident enough or senior enough to inform co-workers and bosses that they’re tapping out.

Bosshard has noted that there’s been a huge rise in the awareness of how the “always on” culture can lead to stress and anxiety in Silicon Valley. Increasingly, people in the tech world are signing up for silent retreats, or digital detox camps to take a much-needed break, and hone in on what matters to them.

“People in Silicon Valley are the architects of this ‘scrolling, constant notifications’ culture, and they’re the ones who are seeing the need to escape the most,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyre, tech, bunch, using, setting, spend, break, world, valley, work, tweets, media, resolutions, social, twitter


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Even amid the affluence of tech capital in Silicon Valley, local news struggles

What they no longer have is a thriving landscape of local daily newspapers. Ownership changes and consolidations have left the region known as the East Bay with just a single daily newspaper. But the East Bay — among the wealthiest and highest educated regions in the country — shows that no place is immune to the struggles of the traditional news industry. That includes backing for news sites in the East Bay, where many of the tech giants’ employees live. The East Bay Times won its own Pulitzer


What they no longer have is a thriving landscape of local daily newspapers.
Ownership changes and consolidations have left the region known as the East Bay with just a single daily newspaper.
But the East Bay — among the wealthiest and highest educated regions in the country — shows that no place is immune to the struggles of the traditional news industry.
That includes backing for news sites in the East Bay, where many of the tech giants’ employees live.
The East Bay Times won its own Pulitzer
Even amid the affluence of tech capital in Silicon Valley, local news struggles Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-28  Authors: janie har
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, struggles, bay, amid, tech, valley, local, richmond, facebook, affluence, capital, daily, city, east, newspaper, business, silicon


Even amid the affluence of tech capital in Silicon Valley, local news struggles

The cities and suburbs on the eastern side of San Francisco Bay are home to 2.7 million people, a world-class University of California campus and bedroom communities for Silicon Valley that produce median incomes 50 percent higher than the national average. What they no longer have is a thriving landscape of local daily newspapers. Gone are the Oakland Tribune, the Contra Costa Times, The Daily Review of Hayward, The Argus of Fremont and the Tri-Valley Herald, among others. All had tens of thousands of readers during their heyday and served communities populous enough to be among the largest cities in many other states. Ownership changes and consolidations have left the region known as the East Bay with just a single daily newspaper. The East Bay Times, based in Walnut Creek, attempts to cover a region nearly the size of Delaware with a fraction of the staff of the former dailies. The growing number of places across the country with dwindling or no local news options has been associated with mostly rural and lower-income areas, places that have little resilience to counter the trend among readers and advertisers to go online. But the East Bay — among the wealthiest and highest educated regions in the country — shows that no place is immune to the struggles of the traditional news industry. “It is really shocking that the place with the demographics and the business and the universities and the progressiveness, that this is a news desert … ” said U.S. Rep. Mark DeSaulnier, a Democrat who represents a significant part of the East Bay. The former small business owner started his political career on the Concord City Council nearly three decades ago, where he recalls seeing at least one reporter in the front row of every meeting. DeSaulnier is so concerned about the state of local news that he has backed legislative action in Congress to support it. One of those bills targets what he and others believe is a main culprit of the industry’s woes — the big tech and social media companies that profit from the content news outlets produce without adequately sharing the profits. Facebook and Google, among the most prominent of those targets, say they are not to blame for the news industry’s downfall and have pledged hundreds of millions of dollars to boost local news and help develop new business strategies. That includes backing for news sites in the East Bay, where many of the tech giants’ employees live. But some wonder if that philanthropy is too little, too late. In Fremont, Dan Smith used to have two copies of The Argus delivered daily, one to his family’s funeral home for the obituaries placed on behalf of clients and the other to his home, where he turned to sports and comics. But Smith, 60, no longer subscribes to a daily newspaper, after The Argus turned into a weekly insert to cover a community of nearly 240,000 people, where one of the local employers is electric car maker Tesla. “Where does one go for local coverage, high school sports? What’s going on with the city and the politics, and what’s happening around the community?” he said. “How can I be part of my community if I don’t know what’s going on?” Former journalists, civic leaders and others in the East Bay lament the loss of the community coverage that was once the staple of local dailies, many of which competed for scoops in towns where coverage areas overlapped. In Richmond, a working-class city of 110,000 dominated by Chevron and its oil refinery, Mayor Tom Butt recalls a time when two reporters were posted full-time in the press room in the basement of City Hall. “And everything that happened in the city of Richmond showed up in the newspaper the next day or two, a detailed, blow-by-blow account of every city council meeting, every planning commission meeting,” Butt said. Today, coverage of Richmond falls largely to two online publications. The graduate journalism school at the University of California, Berkeley, staffs Richmond Confidential, which goes on hiatus during summer and winter breaks. The city’s largest employer, Chevron, runs the other through a public relations firm. The Richmond Standard posts stories about crime, high school football and community events. It also provides “a voice for Chevron Products Company on civic issues.” The website has posted stories about a Chevron workforce program, its employees and philanthropy, including an article about Chevron taking kids to an Oakland A’s game.

Heat rises from stacks at the Chevron refinery in Richmond, California. Getty Images

A few miles down Interstate 80, Martin Reynolds gazes up at the 22-story Tribune Tower that defines the Oakland skyline and was home to the Oakland Tribune for decades before the paper was sold and its headquarters moved. The Tribune’s nameplate with fancy gold script remains over the building’s main entrance. The 142-year-old Tribune was the first African American-owned major metropolitan daily, and its staff took pride in its deep connection to the racially mixed city of over 400,000. The newspaper won a Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Its reporters scoured the city’s neighborhoods and institutions, and they filled the front page with Oakland-based stories, said Reynolds, who started as an intern and became editor in 2008. They also tried out new ideas in the digital age, such as blogging about life inside one of the city’s most dangerous zip codes. “We were just out there covering stuff all the time,” said Reynolds, 51. “We even had a Berkeley bureau.” But ownership consolidated and newsrooms shrank. The Digital First-owned Bay Area News Group eventually announced it would collapse the East Bay’s daily papers into one. “There was a time when newspapers were so powerful and so meaningful and so influential to the community,” Reynolds said. “To have lost that is a shame.” Digital First has a record of consolidating newspapers and trimming staff, but it also has said that its business model keeps local journalism alive. The company staffs reporters throughout the region and has separate regional sections on the East Bay Times’ website. The East Bay Times won its own Pulitzer in 2017 for its coverage of a fatal warehouse fire in Oakland. Even then, it wasn’t long before cutbacks resumed. Bay Area News Group Executive Editor Frank Pine said he understands the loyalty people have for the newspapers they grew up with, but said there is no way to turn back time. The East Bay Times has collaborated with other publications in efforts to beef up local reporting, including a recent in-depth project about law enforcement officers with criminal convictions. The news group also received a grant from Google to test a premium, ad-free service for subscribers. “Our business — the business of news — continues to be distressed, and we’re doing our level best to stabilize that business and make it sustainable into the future,” Pine said. The loss of so many daily news outlets in this relatively well-to-do region has a ring of irony: Much of the East Bay’s wealth and growth is due to tech giants — Apple, Facebook and Google — whose headquarters are a mere bridge crossing away on the other side of San Francisco Bay. The dominance of Facebook and Google, which rake in the majority of digital ad dollars, is a key reason the traditional news business has been struggling through a period of layoffs and readership decline. Apple’s iPhone conditioned people to abandon print and seek information with a swipe of a screen. Since the iPhone debuted in 2007, employment in U.S. newspaper newsrooms has dropped by nearly half, according to the Pew Research Center. David Chavern, president and chief executive of the News Media Alliance, said Google and Facebook can solve the crisis affecting the news industry by paying more for content and sharing more data about the people who click on it. “The fact of the matter is that both Google and Facebook control everything about the news experience, and yet they don’t want to compensate the people who create that content,” he said. Newspaper ad revenue was $50 billion in 2005, according to the Pew Research Center. Today, it’s $14 billion. Representatives of Google and Facebook reject the suggestion that their companies are responsible for the decline of newspapers, saying business models, readership and the way society operates changed dramatically. They say they are making it easier for people to subscribe and are offering grants, partnerships and training programs to boost local news, but draw the line at sharing digital revenue at the levels news executives want. “It’s not about providing artificial props to models that frankly are no longer valid,” said Richard Gingras, vice president of news for Google. “It’s not a healthy thing if you’re dependent on other sources for revenue to allow you to do your journalistic work.” Google drives an invaluable amount of traffic to news sites, he said, and shares revenue with publications that use its advertising technology. Campbell Brown, a former television journalist and current head of global news partnerships at Facebook, said publishers she talks to want to be less dependent on platforms such as Facebook. “We have to find new business models,” she said. “But it has to be something that’s sustainable over the long term.”

Campbell Brown speaks onstage at the Peabody-Facebook Futures Of Media Awards at Hotel Eventi on May 19, 2017 in New York City. Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-28  Authors: janie har
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, struggles, bay, amid, tech, valley, local, richmond, facebook, affluence, capital, daily, city, east, newspaper, business, silicon


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Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breaches

Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breachesCNBC’s Kate Rooney talks about silicon valley companies using freelance hackers to help find potential loop holes before data breaches occur on “Squawk Alley.”


Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breachesCNBC’s Kate Rooney talks about silicon valley companies using freelance hackers to help find potential loop holes before data breaches occur on “Squawk Alley.”
Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breaches Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, using, programs, tech, valley, startups, talks, breaches, data, bounty, protect, rooney, silicon, bug, created


Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breaches

Tech startups have created bug bounty programs to protect against data breaches

CNBC’s Kate Rooney talks about silicon valley companies using freelance hackers to help find potential loop holes before data breaches occur on “Squawk Alley.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, using, programs, tech, valley, startups, talks, breaches, data, bounty, protect, rooney, silicon, bug, created


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Critics find ‘Cats’ to be an ‘obscene,’ ‘garish’ and ‘overtly sexual’ adaptation of the hit Broadway show

“Cats” seemed to have it all — a stellar cast, memorable music from a Tony Award-winning Broadway show and the careful guidance of acclaimed director Tom Hooper. “Oh God, my eyes,” Ty Burr, a writer for the Boston Globe, wrote in his review of the film. “You’ve heard of the ‘uncanny valley’ effect?” The digital era has given us many examples of the uncanny valley, but ‘Cats’ is the first movie to entirely set up shop there.” Currently, the film holds a 17% “Rotten” score on review site Rotten To


“Cats” seemed to have it all — a stellar cast, memorable music from a Tony Award-winning Broadway show and the careful guidance of acclaimed director Tom Hooper.
“Oh God, my eyes,” Ty Burr, a writer for the Boston Globe, wrote in his review of the film.
“You’ve heard of the ‘uncanny valley’ effect?”
The digital era has given us many examples of the uncanny valley, but ‘Cats’ is the first movie to entirely set up shop there.”
Currently, the film holds a 17% “Rotten” score on review site Rotten To
Critics find ‘Cats’ to be an ‘obscene,’ ‘garish’ and ‘overtly sexual’ adaptation of the hit Broadway show Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, critics, cats, rotten, garish, broadway, jellicle, hit, trailer, uncanny, obscene, overtly, adaptation, film, wrote, music, sexual, valley, review


Critics find 'Cats' to be an 'obscene,' 'garish' and 'overtly sexual' adaptation of the hit Broadway show

“Cats” seemed to have it all — a stellar cast, memorable music from a Tony Award-winning Broadway show and the careful guidance of acclaimed director Tom Hooper.

Then the first trailer dropped.

While Hooper had said he planned to ditch the iconic costumes from the Broadway show, few were prepared for the “digital fur technology” that appeared in the two-minute trailer or the nearly two-hour movie.

“Oh God, my eyes,” Ty Burr, a writer for the Boston Globe, wrote in his review of the film.

“You’ve heard of the ‘uncanny valley’ effect?” he wrote. “The eeriness or revulsion felt when looking at a humanoid figure that’s not quite human? The digital era has given us many examples of the uncanny valley, but ‘Cats’ is the first movie to entirely set up shop there.”

Currently, the film holds a 17% “Rotten” score on review site Rotten Tomatoes from 101 reviews, as of midday Thursday.

Although, it seems, that the visual design of the film wasn’t the only thing that critics didn’t like. The plot of the musical was always thin, but the music and dancing were mesmerizing enough to distract from the small thread that connected all the songs together.

In the film, Hooper used Francesca Hayward, a Royal Ballet dancer, as Victoria, a young cat who famously does a ballet-inspired solo dance during the show, as the main character. The audience follows her through the streets of London, learning about the Jellicle tribe of cats that inhabit the rooftops and alleys and about the Jellicle Ball, an annual festivity for the cats.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, critics, cats, rotten, garish, broadway, jellicle, hit, trailer, uncanny, obscene, overtly, adaptation, film, wrote, music, sexual, valley, review


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As Google, Apple and others get into the banking business, here’s what you need to know

Technology firms dominate your online activity, so why not your wallet, too? Most recently, Google has announced it will offer checking accounts as part of a project code-named Cache, notching the boldest move yet by tech into consumer banking. In fact, the company is just the latest Silicon Valley leader to make a bid to be your bank. Meanwhile, Uber has also made a push into financial services and T-Mobile has a mobile-banking service called T-Mobile Money. While still a small segment of the m


Technology firms dominate your online activity, so why not your wallet, too?
Most recently, Google has announced it will offer checking accounts as part of a project code-named Cache, notching the boldest move yet by tech into consumer banking.
In fact, the company is just the latest Silicon Valley leader to make a bid to be your bank.
Meanwhile, Uber has also made a push into financial services and T-Mobile has a mobile-banking service called T-Mobile Money.
While still a small segment of the m
As Google, Apple and others get into the banking business, here’s what you need to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-14  Authors: sharon epperson jessica dickler, sharon epperson, jessica dickler, megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tmobile, uber, need, checking, users, google, valley, firms, wealthfront, know, wallet, heres, venmo, way, business, banking, apple


As Google, Apple and others get into the banking business, here's what you need to know

Technology firms dominate your online activity, so why not your wallet, too?

Most recently, Google has announced it will offer checking accounts as part of a project code-named Cache, notching the boldest move yet by tech into consumer banking.

In fact, the company is just the latest Silicon Valley leader to make a bid to be your bank.

Apple, for its part, launched a credit card for iPhone users earlier this year with Goldman Sachs, Amazon has reportedly been in talks with J.P. Morgan Chase over a checking account and just last month Facebook said it is taking on PayPal’s Venmo with a new payments service.

Meanwhile, Uber has also made a push into financial services and T-Mobile has a mobile-banking service called T-Mobile Money.

That’s in addition to new offerings from start-ups such as SoFi, Betterment, Wealthfront, Robinhood and CreditKarma.

While still a small segment of the market, these so-called fintech firms are battling for your banking business in a big way.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-14  Authors: sharon epperson jessica dickler, sharon epperson, jessica dickler, megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tmobile, uber, need, checking, users, google, valley, firms, wealthfront, know, wallet, heres, venmo, way, business, banking, apple


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Apple is offering free genetic tests to all its Silicon Valley employees

Apple employees in Silicon Valley can now get free genetic screenings for diseases from their on-site health clinics, thanks to a pilot partnership with Color Genomics. The idea is to move health care at Apple’s clinics from reactive to proactive, as genetic tests can offer a window into health risks down the line. By offering cutting-edge medical treatments like genetic testing, AC Wellness can help Apple recruit and retain talented employees. In addition, although AC Wellness is technically a


Apple employees in Silicon Valley can now get free genetic screenings for diseases from their on-site health clinics, thanks to a pilot partnership with Color Genomics.
The idea is to move health care at Apple’s clinics from reactive to proactive, as genetic tests can offer a window into health risks down the line.
By offering cutting-edge medical treatments like genetic testing, AC Wellness can help Apple recruit and retain talented employees.
In addition, although AC Wellness is technically a
Apple is offering free genetic tests to all its Silicon Valley employees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, free, tests, health, clinics, apples, offering, medical, color, valley, genetic, silicon, partnership, employees, apple, wellness


Apple is offering free genetic tests to all its Silicon Valley employees

Apple employees in Silicon Valley can now get free genetic screenings for diseases from their on-site health clinics, thanks to a pilot partnership with Color Genomics.

Apple, which recently set up dedicated health clinics known as “AC Wellness” for employees and their dependents near its headquarters, has been working with Color for several months, according to several people with direct knowledge of the discussions. The people requested anonymity because they were not authorized to publicize the deal on their companies’ behalf.

The idea is to move health care at Apple’s clinics from reactive to proactive, as genetic tests can offer a window into health risks down the line. In some cases, patients can take preventative steps to reduce their likelihood of getting a disease.

By offering cutting-edge medical treatments like genetic testing, AC Wellness can help Apple recruit and retain talented employees. In addition, although AC Wellness is technically a separate company from Apple, medical experts have speculated that it could help Apple quietly test new products or ideas without risking leaks. So the group’s partnership with Color could indicate Apple’s broader interest in the space.

Apple has publicly acknowledged its interest in health and is moving forward with a range of efforts, including its health and fitness-tracking Apple Watch, its clinical research apps in partnership with academic medical centers and its partnership with the health insurer Aetna. Thus far, it has taken only tentative steps into genetics through a move to bring genetic data into ResearchKit, its software that makes it easier for academic researchers to use the iPhone for medical studies.

AC Wellness, which got its start in early 2018, has already opened several medical centers on the Apple Park campus, and in Santa Clara, a few miles north of Apple’s Cupertino, Calif. headquarters. The goal is to bring the “world’s best health care experience” to employees, according to its website. Its clinicians and health coaches are not employed by Apple, but they treat only Apple employees and their dependents. The administrative part of the business, which orders supplies and manages the clinical software, is run through a separate legal subsidiary of Apple to comply with regulations that ensure that employers don’t have direct access to employees’ most sensitive health information.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, free, tests, health, clinics, apples, offering, medical, color, valley, genetic, silicon, partnership, employees, apple, wellness


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Bezos says ‘the country is in trouble’ if big tech turns its back on the Pentagon: ‘We are the good guys’

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos gave a dismal outlook for the nation if U.S. tech companies decide to not support the Pentagon’s war business. “If big tech is going to turn their backs on the Department of Defense, this country is in trouble, that just can’t happen,” Bezos said at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California. As Silicon Valley courts a closer relationship with the Pentagon, tech firms have faced backlash for pursuing lucrative Defen


SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos gave a dismal outlook for the nation if U.S. tech companies decide to not support the Pentagon’s war business.
“If big tech is going to turn their backs on the Department of Defense, this country is in trouble, that just can’t happen,” Bezos said at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California.
As Silicon Valley courts a closer relationship with the Pentagon, tech firms have faced backlash for pursuing lucrative Defen
Bezos says ‘the country is in trouble’ if big tech turns its back on the Pentagon: ‘We are the good guys’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, contract, bezos, going, valley, support, defense, good, tech, department, turns, big, trouble, amazon, pentagon, washington, guys


Bezos says 'the country is in trouble' if big tech turns its back on the Pentagon: 'We are the good guys'

Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., listens during an Economic Club of Washington discussion in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018.

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos gave a dismal outlook for the nation if U.S. tech companies decide to not support the Pentagon’s war business.

“If big tech is going to turn their backs on the Department of Defense, this country is in trouble, that just can’t happen,” Bezos said at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California.

“Look I understand these are emotional issues, that’s okay, we don’t have to agree on everything, but this is how we are going to do it, we are going to support the Department of Defense. This country is important,” he added.

As Silicon Valley courts a closer relationship with the Pentagon, tech firms have faced backlash for pursuing lucrative Defense Department contracts.

Last year, Google announced that it was working with the U.S. military to analyze drone videos by using artificial intelligence.

The controversial contract, dubbed Project Maven, caused thousands of employees to protest the initiative.

In the wake of the firestorm, Google decided to not renew the contract upon its expiry in March 2019.

Loosely referencing the sequence of events in the wake of Google’s Project Maven, Bezos said that tech firms should support the U.S. military’s efforts.

“I know it’s complicated but you know, do you want a strong national defense or don’t you? I think you do. So we have to support that,” he said.

“We are the good guys, I really do believe that,” Bezos said.

Bezos’ comments come on the heels of Amazon’s decision to contest the Pentagon’s cloud-computing contract awarded to Microsoft.

Read more: Amazon cites ‘unmistakable bias’ in Microsoft’s military cloud contract win

The Pentagon said Oct. 25 that Microsoft had won the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure Cloud contract, which could span 10 years and be worth up to $10 billion.

“Numerous aspects of the JEDI evaluation process contained clear deficiencies, errors, and unmistakable bias — and it’s important that these matters be examined and rectified,” Amazon told CNBC in an email.

Trump often criticizes Amazon and Bezos, who also owns The Washington Post.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, contract, bezos, going, valley, support, defense, good, tech, department, turns, big, trouble, amazon, pentagon, washington, guys


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Microsoft President Brad Smith says work on JEDI continues despite Amazon protest

Brad Smith, President, Microsoft, on Future Societies stage during day two of Web Summit 2019 at the Altice Arena in Lisbon, Portugal. SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Amazon’s decision to protest the Pentagon’s cloud computing contract hasn’t delayed Microsoft from working on the colossal Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, or JEDI, deal. The JEDI contract, which could be worth up to $10 billion for services rendered over as many as 10 years, was awarded to Microsoft on October 25. Last month, Amazon


Brad Smith, President, Microsoft, on Future Societies stage during day two of Web Summit 2019 at the Altice Arena in Lisbon, Portugal.
SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Amazon’s decision to protest the Pentagon’s cloud computing contract hasn’t delayed Microsoft from working on the colossal Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, or JEDI, deal.
The JEDI contract, which could be worth up to $10 billion for services rendered over as many as 10 years, was awarded to Microsoft on October 25.
Last month, Amazon
Microsoft President Brad Smith says work on JEDI continues despite Amazon protest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contract, cloud, trump, microsoft, smith, working, president, work, continues, despite, valley, told, protest, brad, amazon, jedi


Microsoft President Brad Smith says work on JEDI continues despite Amazon protest

Brad Smith, President, Microsoft, on Future Societies stage during day two of Web Summit 2019 at the Altice Arena in Lisbon, Portugal.

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Amazon’s decision to protest the Pentagon’s cloud computing contract hasn’t delayed Microsoft from working on the colossal Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, or JEDI, deal.

“We were working every day before we won that contract to make the product better,” Microsoft President Brad Smith told CNBC in an exclusive interview on the sidelines at the Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California. “We have if anything been moving even faster since that contract was awarded,” he added.

The JEDI contract, which could be worth up to $10 billion for services rendered over as many as 10 years, was awarded to Microsoft on October 25. Last month, Amazon filed a notice in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims indicating a plan to protest the Pentagon’s decision to award Microsoft the multibillion-dollar cloud contract.

“Numerous aspects of the JEDI evaluation process contained clear deficiencies, errors, and unmistakable bias — and it’s important that these matters be examined and rectified,” Amazon told CNBC in an email.

Amazon’s AWS chief Andy Jassy told CNBC’s Jon Fortt in an exclusive interview that the cloud contracting was not adjudicated fairly.

“You know, there was significant political interference here,” Jassy explained of the JEDI award.

“When you have a sitting president who’s willing to be very vocal that they dislike a company and the CEO of that company, it makes it difficult for government agencies, including the DoD to make objective decisions without fear of reprisal. And I think that’s dangerous and risky for our country,” he added.

The billionaire executive has been a constant source of frustration for the president. Bezos owns The Washington Post, which President Donald Trump regularly criticizes for its coverage of his administration. Trump also has gone after Amazon repeatedly for, as he claims, not paying its fair share of taxes and ripping off the U.S. Post Office.

Trump said in July that companies conveyed that the specifications of the JEDI cloud contract favored Amazon.

“I never had something where more people are complaining,” Trump said in July at the White House, adding that he was seriously considering looking at the Pentagon contract. “Some of the greatest companies in the world are complaining about it,” he added, naming Microsoft, Oracle and IBM.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contract, cloud, trump, microsoft, smith, working, president, work, continues, despite, valley, told, protest, brad, amazon, jedi


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Sundar Pichai just got the worst job in Silicon Valley

But even as the new leader of Alphabet, Pichai is stuck between a rock and a hard place. (In fact, some Other Bets like the smart home company Nest and cybersecurity company Chronicle have been folded back into Google.) If Pichai decides it’s time to cut back on some Other Bets, he could still be outvoted by Page and Brin. Beyond the power dynamic between Page, Brin and Pichai, Google faces crisis after crisis, ranging from employee protests to antitrust investigations that threaten to break up


But even as the new leader of Alphabet, Pichai is stuck between a rock and a hard place.
(In fact, some Other Bets like the smart home company Nest and cybersecurity company Chronicle have been folded back into Google.)
If Pichai decides it’s time to cut back on some Other Bets, he could still be outvoted by Page and Brin.
Beyond the power dynamic between Page, Brin and Pichai, Google faces crisis after crisis, ranging from employee protests to antitrust investigations that threaten to break up
Sundar Pichai just got the worst job in Silicon Valley Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, sundar, silicon, bets, job, google, alphabet, employees, pichai, valley, page, brin, business, company, googles


Sundar Pichai just got the worst job in Silicon Valley

And poor Pichai has been tasked with navigating Alphabet through all of it, while Page and Brin get to shield themselves from all of the scrutiny and challenges.

Now, after spending the last several years effectively AWOL from the public and much of Alphabet, Page and Brin, both 46, are out just in time for the company to muddle through its biggest challenges in its history.

The move comes over four years after Page orchestrated the most genius retirement plan in the history of business. Growing bored of Google’s day to day chores, he split the company into several “Other Bets,” or separate companies exploring science projects like self-driving cars and smart cities, while leaving the main internet search business to his trusted deputy Pichai. That freed Page to explore his passion projects.

On Tuesday, Google’s parent company Alphabet dropped the bombshell that co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin are stepping down as CEO and president , respectively, and that the 47-year-old Pichai will become CEO of all of Alphabet.

But even as the new leader of Alphabet, Pichai is stuck between a rock and a hard place. And Page and Brin will still loom over all of it.

The rock: Pichai is now in charge of a focus-free smattering of money-losing Other Bets that are noodling around with everything from curing death to beaming the internet to the Earth from high-altitude balloons. But none of those Other Bets has turned into the major businesses Alphabet hoped for.

Google is still Alphabet’s cash cow, generating effectively all of its revenue thanks to its lucrative digital ads business. There are no signs that the “next Google” will grow out of an Other Bet any time soon. (In fact, some Other Bets like the smart home company Nest and cybersecurity company Chronicle have been folded back into Google.)

Pichai’s task will now be to decide what to do with Alphabet’s duds. Do they spin back into Google? Do they pack it all up and call it quits? Does Alphabet invest less in them?

But that brings us to …

The hard place: Page and Brin may have stepped down from their day jobs, but they’re still lurking. They have controlling stakes in the company and said they’d remain “active” board members. If Pichai decides it’s time to cut back on some Other Bets, he could still be outvoted by Page and Brin. Good luck to Pichai if he ever wants to persuade them to put their favorite science projects on ice and focus on ways to keep Google growing instead.

But wait, there’s more.

Beyond the power dynamic between Page, Brin and Pichai, Google faces crisis after crisis, ranging from employee protests to antitrust investigations that threaten to break up the company.

Google’s employees are openly revolting over the company’s handling of sexual harassment and controversial executives hires like Miles Taylor, the former Department of Homeland Security chief of staff who defended the Trump administration’s Muslim travel ban. Last month, 200 employees in San Francisco protested Google’s various contentious decisions. Shortly after, four of the protesters were fired. Google has denied that the employees were fired for organizing. Now those former employees, dubbed the “Thanksgiving Four” plan to file charges against Google with the National Labor Relations Board.

Meanwhile, Google is investigating its own executives over inappropriate relationships they may have had with subordinates, CNBC first reported last month. That includes Chief Legal Officer David Drummond, who recently married an employee in Google’s legal department and faces a string of damaging allegations from another former employee with whom he had an extramarital affair.

Next, there’s YouTube, which has faced controversy after controversy in recent years, ranging from pedophiles lurking in video comments where underage children appear, to the spread of conspiracy theories about victims of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, last year. (We’d be here all day if I listed every recent YouTube crisis and failure.)

And then there are the dollars and cents. Growth in Google’s core digital advertising business is slowing, and the pressure is mounting for the company to find new areas of expansion. While its cloud and hardware businesses are showing some promise, they still make up a tiny fraction of Google’s overall revenue. At its core, Google is still an advertising company.

But that’s just the internal stuff. Outside the company, nearly every state attorney general in the country is looking into antitrust violations related to Google’s ad business. CNBC reported last month that the probes may expand into Google’s search business as well. The FTC and Department of Justice are also said to be looking at Google’s potential antitrust violations.

With so much scrutiny from regulators and attorneys general, there will almost certainly be some sort of action taken, and Pichai is now the one who has to steer the ship as various government agencies seek to punish his company. Page and Brin picked the perfect time to step down and protect themselves.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, sundar, silicon, bets, job, google, alphabet, employees, pichai, valley, page, brin, business, company, googles


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