Huawei may demand more royalties from US firms that rely on its patented tech

Last week, Reuters reported that Huawei had asked Verizon to pay $1 billion in royalties for more than 230 of Huawei’s patents. Ren Zhengfei, the company’s CEO and founder, said this week that Huawei could seek royalties from more firms. How are firms using Huawei patents? “Huawei knows … enforcing patents and asking for royalties is expensive and also not their main business,” Pohlmann told CNBC. Huawei CEO told CNBC on Wednesday that if Senator Rubio’s law was passed, it would hurt America’s


Last week, Reuters reported that Huawei had asked Verizon to pay $1 billion in royalties for more than 230 of Huawei’s patents. Ren Zhengfei, the company’s CEO and founder, said this week that Huawei could seek royalties from more firms. How are firms using Huawei patents? “Huawei knows … enforcing patents and asking for royalties is expensive and also not their main business,” Pohlmann told CNBC. Huawei CEO told CNBC on Wednesday that if Senator Rubio’s law was passed, it would hurt America’s
Huawei may demand more royalties from US firms that rely on its patented tech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, patent, told, royalties, huawei, technology, verizon, demand, huaweis, firms, patents, tech, rely, patented


Huawei may demand more royalties from US firms that rely on its patented tech

Huawei may demand more royalties from U.S. firms for technology they’re using that’s been patented by the Chinese telecom giant, experts say, as the beleaguered firm looks to fight back against continued pressure from Washington. It would mark a big shift in strategy for Huawei, which typically is not seen as especially litigious in terms of intellectual property rights (IPR), even though it holds some crucial patents that underpin the world of telecommunication. Last week, Reuters reported that Huawei had asked Verizon to pay $1 billion in royalties for more than 230 of Huawei’s patents. The Wall Street Journal reported that the patents related to Huawei range from core network equipment to so-called internet of things technology — defined as physical devices that are linked to one another over the internet. The Verizon case is not a legal case at the moment. Verizon might not be the only company in the crosshairs of Huawei when it comes to patent disputes. Ren Zhengfei, the company’s CEO and founder, said this week that Huawei could seek royalties from more firms. “Over the past years, we were not aggressive seeking IPR royalties to companies that use our IPR — that’s because we were busy pursuing our business growth. Once we have more time off, we may try to get some money from those companies who use our IPR,” Ren said, adding that patents would not be used as a “weapon to hinder the development of human society.”

How are firms using Huawei patents?

Huawei has been effectively banned from selling telecommunications equipment in the U.S., but its technology is still being used by American firms via third parties that employ tech patented by Huawei.

A Huawei logo displayed at a retail store in Beijing. Fred Dufour | AFP | Getty Images

When next-generation mobile networks are created, such as 4G or 5G, global standards need to be agreed upon. These are essentially protocols for how the technology will work globally, so that there’s a systemic coherence that allows smartphones to communicate with networks. So-called standards bodies are tasked with doing this. Companies like Huawei — as well as rivals like Ericsson and Nokia — will contribute to building the architecture of mobile networks through these standards groups. In doing so, these companies devise technologies which they then patent. The patents, which are critical to the standards of say 4G or 5G, will be deemed a “standard essential patent” or SEP.

Huawei has been granted more than 69,000 patents globally related to everything from data transmission to network traffic management, according to data compiled for CNBC by Relecura, an intellectual property (IP) analytics platform. Another 49,379 patent applications are pending. Of those granted, over 57% are in China, while nearly 18% are in the U.S., Huawei’s second-largest market for patents. While the Chinese firm lagged other firms somewhat in terms of SEPs when it came to 4G, it is the leader in the 5G age. Huawei has the largest portfolio of patents for 5G — about 1,554 SEPs — and is ahead of Nokia, Samsung and LG Electronics, according to IPlytics, a market intelligence firm that tracks patents. So even though Huawei’s networking equipment is not being used by major telecom players in the U.S., other vendors that they buy products from could be using technology which is patented by Huawei. Given that Huawei owns so many key patents, the likelihood is that several other American carriers could also be using technology patented by the Chinese firm.

Why take action now?

Patent disputes are not uncommon in the technology and telecom world, and there have been a number of high-profile ones including between Apple and Qualcomm. Even Huawei’s rival Nokia was embroiled in a dispute with Apple in 2016. Huawei has not been particularly aggressive in bringing legal action against companies with regard to intellectual property. However, the thinking within the company could be changing given the continued political pressure, and the demand that Verizon pay $1 billion in royalties could be the first step. “There has been consideration about the role of IP and what it mean(s) in terms of the U.S. and Huawei,” a source at the company told CNBC. “Huawei in the near future will be briefing media and stakeholders about its IPR efforts around 5G,” added the source, who wished to remain anonymous because he is not authorized to speak publicly. Huawei declined to comment when contacted by CNBC. “We have no comment regarding this specific issue because it’s a potential legal matter,” Verizon spokesperson Richard Young told CNBC in an email. “However, these issues are larger than just Verizon. Given the broader geopolitical context, any issue involving Huawei has implications for our entire industry and also raise(s) national and international concerns.”

The U.S. has continued to pile pressure on the Chinese company. Huawei was recently added to a blacklist that restricts American firms from selling products to the company. Experts say this could threaten Huawei’s smartphone business. Huawei was forced to cancel a planned launch for a new laptop in June. The company relies on some key U.S. components for many of its devices. Huawei has also slashed its revenue forecast for the next two years, with CEO Ren saying that the company could take a $30 billion hit to sales as its troubles with the U.S. continue. “Huawei definitely knew about it,” Nikhil Batra, senior telecom research manager at IDC, told CNBC, suggesting the Chinese company was aware that Verizon was using its patents and could potentially extract royalties from the American telco giant. “This is going to be a longer battle. We can all go back … and say it is all coincidental, but there is a reason we haven’t seen this happen until now. It’s because, maybe, they were waiting for an opportune time to strike back,” Batra added. Tim Pohlmann, CEO of IPlytics, said that Huawei hasn’t typically focused on getting royalties, because it was growing very quickly in its smartphone and networking equipment business. But facing a complete ban in the U.S., as well as in some other countries, Huawei could look toward getting more revenue from patent royalties, he said. “Huawei knows … enforcing patents and asking for royalties is expensive and also not their main business,” Pohlmann told CNBC. “Royalties through patents is a small fraction compared to how much revenue they created through smartphones and base stations. But when the latter revenue stream is taken from them, this is just a logical consequence.” Pohlmann noted that this was similar to what Nokia did when their handset business was sold off in the early 2010s.

What’s the US trying to do?

It appears that Senator Marco Rubio has recognized Huawei’s potential to use patents against U.S. companies. On Monday, he filed legislation that would block Huawei from fighting patent disputes in U.S. courts, according to Reuters. That proposal is far from becoming a law. On Twitter earlier this week, Rubio accused Huawei of being a “patent troll.” Huawei CEO told CNBC on Wednesday that if Senator Rubio’s law was passed, it would hurt America’s image as a lawful place. “If his recommendation can get past to the Congress, then … the image of the U.S. as a country ruled by laws, would be damaged,” Ren said, according to a CNBC translation of his remarks in Chinese. Currently, Huawei would be able to fight any patent battles in U.S. courts. “Without any direct legislation by Congress on the issue, the United States federal court system will continue to be available to Huawei for patent infringement claims, just as it is available to any other company,” Robert Mattson, a U.S.-based intellectual property lawyer, told CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, patent, told, royalties, huawei, technology, verizon, demand, huaweis, firms, patents, tech, rely, patented


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These stocks — including Home Depot and Verizon — are big winners when rates drop

History shows, there are certain stocks that could be the biggest winners from declining rates. The Fed removed its “patience” approach which sent treasury yields plunging. For investors looking for an edge in this low rate environment, here are some strategies that have worked well in the past. Communications stocks are big winners because of their big dividend yields, which get more attractive when fixed income yields decline. The dollar dropped broadly against its rivals on Thursday and is on


History shows, there are certain stocks that could be the biggest winners from declining rates. The Fed removed its “patience” approach which sent treasury yields plunging. For investors looking for an edge in this low rate environment, here are some strategies that have worked well in the past. Communications stocks are big winners because of their big dividend yields, which get more attractive when fixed income yields decline. The dollar dropped broadly against its rivals on Thursday and is on
These stocks — including Home Depot and Verizon — are big winners when rates drop Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sector, yield, depot, yields, treasury, winners, stocks, including, verizon, environment, big, rates, drop, rate, fell


These stocks — including Home Depot and Verizon — are big winners when rates drop

The collapse in bond yields has helped lift the stock market to a record high this week. History shows, there are certain stocks that could be the biggest winners from declining rates.

On Wednesday, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell signaled interest rate cuts beginning as early as July. The Fed removed its “patience” approach which sent treasury yields plunging. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, a benchmark for mortgage rates and corporate borrowing, fell below 2% for the first time since November 2016.

For investors looking for an edge in this low rate environment, here are some strategies that have worked well in the past.

CNBC analysis using Kensho, a hedge fund analytics tool, found that the communications sector was the top performing sector in the S&P 500 if you bought when the 10-year yield broke below 2% and then sold when it fell all the way to 1.5%.

The analysis, which looked at trading activity over the last two decades, found that the energy and materials sectors also tend to jump in declining-rate environment, largely because of a weakening dollar caused by the falling rates. Communications stocks are big winners because of their big dividend yields, which get more attractive when fixed income yields decline.

The dollar dropped broadly against its rivals on Thursday and is on track for its biggest two-day drop in a year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sector, yield, depot, yields, treasury, winners, stocks, including, verizon, environment, big, rates, drop, rate, fell


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Huawei asks Verizon to pay more than $1 billion for over 230 patents: Source

Verizon should pay to “solve the patent licensing issue,” a Huawei intellectual property licensing executive wrote in February, The Wall Street Journal reported earlier. The licensing fees for the more than 230 patents sought is more than $1 billion, the person said. National security experts worry that “back doors” in routers, switches and other Huawei equipment could allow China to spy on U.S. communications. Companies involved, including Verizon have notified the U.S. government and the dispu


Verizon should pay to “solve the patent licensing issue,” a Huawei intellectual property licensing executive wrote in February, The Wall Street Journal reported earlier. The licensing fees for the more than 230 patents sought is more than $1 billion, the person said. National security experts worry that “back doors” in routers, switches and other Huawei equipment could allow China to spy on U.S. communications. Companies involved, including Verizon have notified the U.S. government and the dispu
Huawei asks Verizon to pay more than $1 billion for over 230 patents: Source Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, person, issue, pay, billion, states, patents, 230, asks, source, licensing, equipment, china, huawei, verizon


Huawei asks Verizon to pay more than $1 billion for over 230 patents: Source

In this photo illustration, the Huawei logo and Chinese flag is seen displayed on an Android mobile phone.

Huawei Technologies has told Verizon Communications that the U.S. carrier should pay licensing fees for more than 230 of the Chinese telecoms equipment maker’s patents and in aggregate is seeking more than $1 billion, a person briefed on the matter said on Wednesday.

Verizon should pay to “solve the patent licensing issue,” a Huawei intellectual property licensing executive wrote in February, The Wall Street Journal reported earlier. The patents cover network equipment for more than 20 of the company’s vendors including major U.S. tech firms but those vendors would indemnify Verizon, the person said. Some of those firms have been approached directly by Huawei, the person said.

The patents in question range from core network equipment, wireline infrastructure to internet-of-things technology, the Journal reported. The licensing fees for the more than 230 patents sought is more than $1 billion, the person said.

Huawei has been battling the U.S. government for more than a year. National security experts worry that “back doors” in routers, switches and other Huawei equipment could allow China to spy on U.S. communications. Huawei has denied that it would help China spy.

Companies involved, including Verizon have notified the U.S. government and the dispute comes amid a growing feud between China and the United States. The licensing fee demand may be more about the geopolitical battle between China and the United States rather than a demand for patent fees.

Huawei and Verizon representatives met in New York last week to discuss some of the patents at issue and whether Verizon is using equipment from other companies that could infringe on Huawei patents.

Verizon spokesman Rich Young declined to comment “regarding this specific issue because it’s a potential legal matter.”

However, Young said, “These issues are larger than just Verizon. Given the broader geopolitical context, any issue involving Huawei has implications for our entire industry and also raise national and international concerns.”

Huawei and U.S. wireless carriers T-Mobile US and AT&T did not respond to Reuters’ requests for comment. Sprint declined to comment.

The United States last month put Huawei on a blacklist that barred it from doing business with U.S. companies on security grounds without government approval, prompting some global tech firms to cut ties with the world’s largest telecoms equipment maker.

Washington is also seeking the extradition of Huawei Chief Financial Executive Meng Wanzhou from Canada after her arrest in Vancouver last December on a U.S. warrant.

China has since upped the pressure on Canada, halting Canadian canola imports and in May suspended the permits of two major pork producers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, person, issue, pay, billion, states, patents, 230, asks, source, licensing, equipment, china, huawei, verizon


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5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments


An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments
5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


5G rollout will 'make things better' for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019.

The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon.

“I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.

“I think there is a lot of research and development that we’ve done and I know others have done as well to make sure that 5G doesn’t just bring speed and reliability, but also that it’s done in a secure manner and addresses any of those kinds of concerns,” Novak said.

Novak’s comments come amid increasing scrutiny on companies seeking to win contracts to develop 5G capabilities for national networks. Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is chief among the firms under the spotlight as the U.S. seeks to dissuade America’s allies from purchasing its equipment, with claims that the firm is “too close to the government. ”

Recent moves by the U.S. have reportedly resulted in major tech companies limiting their employees’ access to Huawei. On May 16, the U.S. Department of Commerce put Huawei on a blacklist, barring it from doing business with American companies without government approval, then a few days later it authorized firms to interact with Huawei in standards bodies through August “as necessary for the development of 5G standards.”

For its part, U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration appears to have a conflicting stance on Huawei.

Trump told CNBC on Monday that Huawei could be part of the U.S. trade negotiation with China, contradicting remarks by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told CNBC on Sunday that Washington’s concerns surrounding the telecommunications behemoth are “national security” issues separate from trade.

On the subject of whether banning perceived bad actors from developing 5G networks would reduce the likelihood of data breaches, Novak said: “To be honest, it’s not even just the espionage element. In reality, the bigger percentage of that pie is actually financially motivated breaches.”

“If you actually roll back and look at the last decade, we’ve got almost about a half million security incidents that we’ve looked at over the course of that research,” he said. “While espionage plays a role in things and I think that’s kind of fired up a lot of the conversation here, I think ultimately there’s a lot of other facets to what we see happening in the cybersecurity and data breach landscape.”

— Reuters and CNBC’s Kate Fazzini contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


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These stocks — including Coca-Cola, Verizon — are the biggest Dow winners when rates fall

The data show Verizon, UnitedHealth, Coca-Cola, McDonald’s and Walmart have been the best performers in the Dow during those periods of declining yields. Verizon has risen 1.78% in the 30-day period after the 10-year yield dropped more than 20bps, while UnitedHealth, Coco-Cola and McDonald’s all eked out gains of more than 1%. Drug giants Pfizer and Merck are also leaders in the 30-stock Dow during periods of falling yields. Notably, UnitedHealth surged nearly 6% month to date, while Verizon has


The data show Verizon, UnitedHealth, Coca-Cola, McDonald’s and Walmart have been the best performers in the Dow during those periods of declining yields. Verizon has risen 1.78% in the 30-day period after the 10-year yield dropped more than 20bps, while UnitedHealth, Coco-Cola and McDonald’s all eked out gains of more than 1%. Drug giants Pfizer and Merck are also leaders in the 30-stock Dow during periods of falling yields. Notably, UnitedHealth surged nearly 6% month to date, while Verizon has
These stocks — including Coca-Cola, Verizon — are the biggest Dow winners when rates fall Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, including, yield, fall, month, verizon, stocks, rates, dow, dropped, data, biggest, trade, low, unitedhealth, winners, cocacola, periods


These stocks — including Coca-Cola, Verizon — are the biggest Dow winners when rates fall

Traders and financial professionals work during the opening bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), May 14, 2019 in New York City.

The latest bout of trade-war jitters sparked a rally in Treasurys as investors fled to safe havens from risky assets, pushing the yield on the 10-year Treasury note to a 19-month low. But history shows there are big stock winners when yields fall.

The 10- year yield, which moves inversely to price, has fallen around 25 basis points in May, while the S&P 500 has dropped more than 4% this month as investors grappled with the escalated U.S.-China trade war.

CNBC analysis using Kensho, a hedge fund analytics tool, found which stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average have been the biggest winners in 30-day periods when the 10-year yield declined at least 20 basis points.

The data show Verizon, UnitedHealth, Coca-Cola, McDonald’s and Walmart have been the best performers in the Dow during those periods of declining yields. Verizon has risen 1.78% in the 30-day period after the 10-year yield dropped more than 20bps, while UnitedHealth, Coco-Cola and McDonald’s all eked out gains of more than 1%. The S&P 500 on average has dropped 1.17% in those periods.

It’s actually no surprise that these stocks are winning bets during heightened market uncertainties as they all provide big dividends and are relatively less impacted by economic weakness. Drug giants Pfizer and Merck are also leaders in the 30-stock Dow during periods of falling yields.

This group is already showing their resilience as all of them are in the green this month amid trade tensions and weak economic data. Notably, UnitedHealth surged nearly 6% month to date, while Verizon has risen more than 4%.

Yields extended their declines last week after survey data showed U.S. manufacturing activity tumbled to more than 9-year low on trade war worries. Low rates may be here for longer as the trade-war tensions show no signs of easing.

“Month-end, seasonals, and a supportive technical landscape all point toward an extension of the current rally in Treasuries,” Ian Lyngen, BMO’s head of U.S. rates, said in a note on Tuesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, including, yield, fall, month, verizon, stocks, rates, dow, dropped, data, biggest, trade, low, unitedhealth, winners, cocacola, periods


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5G is at the center of America’s beef with Huawei — here’s why it’s such a big deal

5G is also a big topic for Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and AT&T. Put simply, 5G is a next-generation wireless network that will give you much faster internet connections. The greater bandwidth of 5G means that more devices can use the network at the same time. Those cables also need to connect to a modem and/or router to provide wireless internet to your house. This is how devices like the Apple TV 4K, your smartphone, computer and other internet gadgets will connect to Verizon’s 5G wireless netwo


5G is also a big topic for Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and AT&T. Put simply, 5G is a next-generation wireless network that will give you much faster internet connections. The greater bandwidth of 5G means that more devices can use the network at the same time. Those cables also need to connect to a modem and/or router to provide wireless internet to your house. This is how devices like the Apple TV 4K, your smartphone, computer and other internet gadgets will connect to Verizon’s 5G wireless netwo
5G is at the center of America’s beef with Huawei — here’s why it’s such a big deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, center, deal, beef, tmobile, tv, means, huawei, americas, sprint, network, verizon, internet, heres, big, 5g, cable, wireless


5G is at the center of America's beef with Huawei -- here's why it's such a big deal

5G logo is seen on an android mobile phone with Huawei logo on the background. Omar Marques | LightRocket | Getty Images

You’ve probably heard “5G” a lot recently. It’s been in a lot of stories. It’s at the center of America’s fight with China’s Huawei, which provides cellular equipment for wireless carriers around the globe. 5G is also a big topic for Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and AT&T. Those carriers are working to build out the faster networks now, and Sprint and T-Mobile have even used 5G to discuss the competitive landscape in an effort to get merger approval from the Justice Department.

Apple recently ended a bitter, yearslong legal battle with Qualcomm mainly because the chipmaker manufactures some core 5G technology that Apple needs to make future iPhones competitive. But what the heck is 5G? Put simply, 5G is a next-generation wireless network that will give you much faster internet connections. But, because of the way it works, it’s about to change the way lots of other things connect to the internet, too, like cars and TVs, and even things like connected lights on city streets. Here’s what you need to know:

Faster connections, and more of them

Busakorn Pongparnit | Moment | Getty Images

5G promises much faster network speeds, which means heavy-duty content like video should travel much more quickly to connected devices. Verizon’s 5G network, which is live in Minneapolis and Chicago, is already providing speeds in excess of 1Gbps, or about 10 times the speeds you might get on a good day with 4G LTE, the current standard offered by wireless carriers in most places. That means you should be able to download an hourlong high-definition video in seconds instead of minutes. The lower latency of 5G also means that it takes less time for one gadget to talk to another. This is important in places like smart cities that are connecting to smart cars, since information needs to be delivered instantly. One day, 5G might be able to tell your car that someone is about to run a red light and that your car needs to slam on the brakes. In that sort of situation, you can’t have much delay in the network. The greater bandwidth of 5G means that more devices can use the network at the same time. This means it should alleviate problems at places like sports stadiums or concerts where thousands of people may be trying to place a phone call or upload a picture at the same time. In these instances, a network can get jammed up and stops working for everyone. 5G should prevent that from happening.

5G will change the way you get TV and internet at home

Verizon Communications Inc. 5G wireless signage is displayed at the company’s booth during the Mobile World Congress Americas in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Right now, you probably have a cable wire running from the telephone poles on your street to your house. It might come in the attic and then, thanks to some drilling done by the cable guy, snakes its way from room to room connecting to cable boxes. Those cables also need to connect to a modem and/or router to provide wireless internet to your house. That means even if you “cut the cord” and ditch cable, you still need the same coaxial cable line for internet at home. 4G LTE is fast but not quite fast enough for an entire house of people to play games and stream 4K movies at the same time. It makes a poor replacement for wired broadband. According to proponents, 5G will be fast enough for that, and you can forget the cords. It’s supposed to be just as reliable as the wired broadband internet you’re used to, and it could save you a lot of headaches. Verizon has already talked a bit about how this will work. Instead of giving you a bunch of cable boxes and other gadgets, it’s going to simply give you an Apple TV 4K and a wireless modem. Since Verizon isn’t going to run a standard cable line to your house, it’s also going to include a subscription to YouTube TV, YouTube’s streaming service that will provide access to TV channels. YouTube TV normally costs $40 per month, but Verizon’s deal is likely only a limited-time offer. You’ll still have a modem at home, but it’ll connect to Verizon’s wireless 5G signal and then serve as a home Wi-Fi router, complete with standard Ethernet ports. This is how devices like the Apple TV 4K, your smartphone, computer and other internet gadgets will connect to Verizon’s 5G wireless network.

What phones support it?

Samsung Galaxy S10 5G Benjamin Hall | CNBC

It’s still super early in 5G days for phones, but things are about to take off quickly. Verizon and AT&T already have some 5G markets active, and Sprint and T-Mobile will begin rolling them out this year. Verizon is now selling the first 5G phone in the U.S. — the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G — in just two markets. Meanwhile, Sprint’s LG V50 ThinQ 5G launches on May 31 for its first markets. AT&T isn’t selling a true 5G phone just yet, but it’s signed up to sell the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G later this year, as are T-Mobile and Sprint. These are all Android phones, but Apple is expected to have its first 5G iPhone ready in 2020.

How does 5G impact Sprint and T-Mobile’s merger?

John Legere, chief executive officer and president of T-Mobile US Inc., left, gives two thumbs-up as Marcelo Claure, chief executive officer of Sprint Corp., listens during an interview on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Monday, April 30, 2018. Michael Nagle | Bloomberg | Getty Images

5G also plays a role in the proposed merger of T-Mobile and Sprint. Earlier this week, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai recommended that the FCC approve the $26.5 billion merger because he argues that it’ll speed up how quickly the two carriers are able to activate 5G in the U.S. “Two of the FCC’s top priorities are closing the digital divide in rural America and advancing United States leadership in 5G, the next generation of wireless connectivity. The commitments made today by T-Mobile and Sprint would substantially advance each of these critical objectives,” Pai said. But the decision is up to the DOJ, which has antitrust concerns if the two companies join.

Trump says 5G is a race America must win

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Commissioner Ajit Pai during an event on United States 5G deployment in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., April 12, 2019. Carlos Barria | Reuters

Even President Donald Trump is all in on 5G. In April, Trump said that 5G is a race that America “will win.” He said 92 5G markets will be up and running by the end of the year, which will be ahead of South Korea, which is said to have 48 live at the same time. “According to some estimates, the wireless industry plans to invest $275 billion in 5G networks, creating 3 million American jobs quickly, and adding $500 billion to our economy,” Trump said in April. At the same time, the FCC announced new rules that will make it easier to deploy next-generation networks, including hub and relay antennas, to spur the advancement of 5G. The FCC also announced a $20.4 billion Rural Digital Opportunity Fund to bring faster 5G networks to rural areas, and a new spectrum auction that opens up 3,400 MHz of wireless spectrum for carriers to bid on. The spectrum can be thought of as a highway: the more lanes you have, the more customers you can support and the faster you can go.

5G, Huawei and the U.S. trade war

Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s consumer business, speaks as he presents the P30 series smartphone during a launch event in Paris. Marlene Awaad | Bloomberg | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, center, deal, beef, tmobile, tv, means, huawei, americas, sprint, network, verizon, internet, heres, big, 5g, cable, wireless


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Verizon CEO: ‘Tens of thousands’ of customers buying new 5G phones

Verizon is betting that customers will pay up for Samsung’s new 5G smartphone, even though the price point is high and the technology’s infrastructure is still being built up. “It’s a great experience,” Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg said in an interview with CNBC’s “Closing Bell ” on Thursday. We are seeing tens of thousands of customers taking it already,” he said. The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is the first device that supports Verizon’s new 5G network out of the box. It follows the Motorola Z3, which


Verizon is betting that customers will pay up for Samsung’s new 5G smartphone, even though the price point is high and the technology’s infrastructure is still being built up. “It’s a great experience,” Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg said in an interview with CNBC’s “Closing Bell ” on Thursday. We are seeing tens of thousands of customers taking it already,” he said. The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is the first device that supports Verizon’s new 5G network out of the box. It follows the Motorola Z3, which
Verizon CEO: ‘Tens of thousands’ of customers buying new 5G phones Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, z3, today, taking, verizon, thousands, 5g, buy, vestberg, phones, upits, tens, ceo, customers, buying, verizons


Verizon CEO: 'Tens of thousands' of customers buying new 5G phones

Verizon is betting that customers will pay up for Samsung’s new 5G smartphone, even though the price point is high and the technology’s infrastructure is still being built up.

“It’s a great experience,” Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg said in an interview with CNBC’s “Closing Bell ” on Thursday.

“I believe that there’s going to be people taking it. We are seeing tens of thousands of customers taking it already,” he said. “And today is the first day you can actually buy it.”

The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is the first device that supports Verizon’s new 5G network out of the box. It follows the Motorola Z3, which also runs on 5G but only if you buy an additional $200 accessory that enables it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, z3, today, taking, verizon, thousands, 5g, buy, vestberg, phones, upits, tens, ceo, customers, buying, verizons


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The first 5G phone will cost $1,300 on Verizon

Verizon on Thursday announced that it will begin to sell the Galaxy S10 5G on May 16 for $1,300. It’s the first phone with 5G included that Verizon will sell. It follows the Motorola Z3, which supports 5G, but requires a separate accessory that adds the functionality to the phone. The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is a larger version of the Galaxy S10 that Samsung launched earlier this year. Verizon will sell two models including the $1,300 option as well as a $1,400 version with twice the storage.


Verizon on Thursday announced that it will begin to sell the Galaxy S10 5G on May 16 for $1,300. It’s the first phone with 5G included that Verizon will sell. It follows the Motorola Z3, which supports 5G, but requires a separate accessory that adds the functionality to the phone. The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is a larger version of the Galaxy S10 that Samsung launched earlier this year. Verizon will sell two models including the $1,300 option as well as a $1,400 version with twice the storage.
The first 5G phone will cost $1,300 on Verizon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: todd haselton, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, benjamin hall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sell, including, city, phone, cost, galaxy, samsung, verizon, 1300, 5g, s10, version


The first 5G phone will cost $1,300 on Verizon

Verizon on Thursday announced that it will begin to sell the Galaxy S10 5G on May 16 for $1,300. It’s the first phone with 5G included that Verizon will sell. It follows the Motorola Z3, which supports 5G, but requires a separate accessory that adds the functionality to the phone.

The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is a larger version of the Galaxy S10 that Samsung launched earlier this year. Verizon will sell two models including the $1,300 option as well as a $1,400 version with twice the storage. The phone will also launch on AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile later this year.

Verizon also said it will activate 5G in 20 new markets this year including Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dallas, Des Moines, Denver, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Little Rock, Memphis, Phoenix, Providence, San Diego, Salt Lake City and Washington DC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: todd haselton, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, benjamin hall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sell, including, city, phone, cost, galaxy, samsung, verizon, 1300, 5g, s10, version


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‘There’s zero chance that 5G is a ubiquitous technology’ by 2021

“There is a zero chance that 5G is a ubiquitous technology” by 2021, Moffett said Tuesday in a “Squawk Box” interview. “The standards of 5G were set for insanely wide blocks of spectrum,” he explained. Verizon turned on its 5G network in Chicago and Minneapolis earlier this month, at an additional cost of $10 for customers with existing unlimited plans. So far this year, AT&T stock is up about 12%, but down 8% over the past 12 months. Verizon shares are up nearly 4% in 2019 and almost 20% higher


“There is a zero chance that 5G is a ubiquitous technology” by 2021, Moffett said Tuesday in a “Squawk Box” interview. “The standards of 5G were set for insanely wide blocks of spectrum,” he explained. Verizon turned on its 5G network in Chicago and Minneapolis earlier this month, at an additional cost of $10 for customers with existing unlimited plans. So far this year, AT&T stock is up about 12%, but down 8% over the past 12 months. Verizon shares are up nearly 4% in 2019 and almost 20% higher
‘There’s zero chance that 5G is a ubiquitous technology’ by 2021 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 12, ubiquitous, technology, theres, spectrum, months, zero, san, wide, 2021, network, chance, 5g, stock, verizon


'There's zero chance that 5G is a ubiquitous technology' by 2021

There’s no chance that fifth generation wireless, or 5G, will become available everywhere in two years’ time, according to Craig Moffett, who has been a leading telecommunications analyst for years.

Moffett, co-founder of boutique research firm MoffettNathanson, is skeptical that Verizon and other telecom companies can make the transition because spectrum — the range of frequencies an operator network is allowed to radiate — is not sufficient enough in the U.S. to completely support 5G mobile.

“There is a zero chance that 5G is a ubiquitous technology” by 2021, Moffett said Tuesday in a “Squawk Box” interview.

“The standards of 5G were set for insanely wide blocks of spectrum,” he explained. “You can’t find insanely wide blocks of spectrum anywhere but these stratospheric high frequencies.”

The 5G standard is meant to be at least 50 times faster than its 4G predecessor. Competition to move to the new technology is fierce.

Verizon turned on its 5G network in Chicago and Minneapolis earlier this month, at an additional cost of $10 for customers with existing unlimited plans. Earlier this month, AT&T said its 5G service went live in parts of seven more cities — Austin, Los Angeles, Nashville, Orlando, San Diego, San Francisco, and San Jose.

Moffett appeared on CNBC shortly after Verizon posted first-quarter earnings and revenue that beat Wall Street expectations. It raised its 2019 profit forecast.

The MoffettNathanson analyst said Verizon is a “fully valued” stock, but more favorable than AT&T.

So far this year, AT&T stock is up about 12%, but down 8% over the past 12 months. Verizon shares are up nearly 4% in 2019 and almost 20% higher over 12 months.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 12, ubiquitous, technology, theres, spectrum, months, zero, san, wide, 2021, network, chance, 5g, stock, verizon


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Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Tesla, Coca-Cola, Twitter, Verizon, Hasbro & more

Coca-Cola — The beverage giant beat estimates by 2 cents a share, with adjusted quarterly profit of 48 cents per share. Verizon — Verizon earned an adjusted $1.20 per share for the first quarter, 3 cents a share above estimates. Twitter — Twitter’s quarterly earnings came in at an adjusted 37 cents per share, well above the consensus estimate of 15 cents a share. Hasbro — The toymaker reported a quarterly profit of 21 cents per share, surprising analysts who had expected an 11 cents per share lo


Coca-Cola — The beverage giant beat estimates by 2 cents a share, with adjusted quarterly profit of 48 cents per share. Verizon — Verizon earned an adjusted $1.20 per share for the first quarter, 3 cents a share above estimates. Twitter — Twitter’s quarterly earnings came in at an adjusted 37 cents per share, well above the consensus estimate of 15 cents a share. Hasbro — The toymaker reported a quarterly profit of 21 cents per share, surprising analysts who had expected an 11 cents per share lo
Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Tesla, Coca-Cola, Twitter, Verizon, Hasbro & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: peter schacknow
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, premarket, revenue, quarterly, making, share, cents, forecasts, quarter, profit, twitter, tesla, hasbro, stocks, estimate, estimates, adjusted, biggest, moves, verizon, cocacola


Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Tesla, Coca-Cola, Twitter, Verizon, Hasbro & more

Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:

United Technologies — The aerospace company reported an adjusted $1.91 per share for the first quarter, 20 cents a share above estimates. Revenue also came in above Wall Street forecasts, and the company raised its full-year outlook.

Coca-Cola — The beverage giant beat estimates by 2 cents a share, with adjusted quarterly profit of 48 cents per share. Revenue came in above forecasts as well. Coca-Cola benefited from improved sales of water and new soft drink flavors.

Procter & Gamble — The consumer products maker earned an adjusted $1.06 per share for its latest quarter, 3 cents a share above estimates. Revenue topped Wall Street forecasts and P&G raised its organic sales growth outlook.

Verizon — Verizon earned an adjusted $1.20 per share for the first quarter, 3 cents a share above estimates. Revenue was slightly below forecasts, however, but Verizon did boost its full-year guidance.

Twitter — Twitter’s quarterly earnings came in at an adjusted 37 cents per share, well above the consensus estimate of 15 cents a share. Revenue also beat forecasts. Twitter’s monetizable daily users — a new metric — rose by eight million to 134 million, also exceeding analysts’ forecasts.

Hasbro — The toymaker reported a quarterly profit of 21 cents per share, surprising analysts who had expected an 11 cents per share loss. Revenue was well above expectations, and the company said its overall results were helped by cost savings and higher profit margins.

Lockheed Martin — The defense contractor earned $5.99 per share for the first quarter, well above the consensus estimate of $4.34 a share. Revenue also came in above Wall Street forecasts and Lockheed Martin raised its full-year outlook.

Harley-Davidson — Harley earned 80 cents per share for the first quarter, beating the consensus estimate of 65 cents per share. Revenue beat forecasts, as well, and Harley’s U.S. market share increased.

Whirlpool — Whirlpool reported adjusted quarterly profit of $3.11 per share, beating the consensus estimate of $2.86 a share. Revenue fell below forecasts, however. Whirlpool said it expected lower costs from tariffs and raw materials this year.

Exxon Mobil — Exxon Mobil struck a 20-year liquefied natural gas supply agreement with China’s Zhejiang Energy. Financial details were not disclosed.

Dow Inc. — Dow locked out union workers at its Deer Park, Texas, chemical plant after members of the United Steelworks Union rejected its latest contract proposal.

Tesla — CEO Elon Musk said the automaker’s robotaxis with no human drivers would hit some U.S. markets next year. He made the pronouncement at an investor webcast presentation. Musk also said: “It’s financially insane to buy anything other than a Tesla,” says the CEO of the electric auto maker. It would be like owning a horse in three years.”

Sprint — Sprint and AT&T have settled a lawsuit in which Sprint had accused its rival of deceptive advertising over its “5G E” branding. Terms of the settlement weren’t announced, but an AT&T spokesman told CNBC that the two sides have “amicably” settled the matter.

Facebook — Facebook hired State Department lawyer Jennifer Newstead as its general counsel, and also named former Microsoft public relations chief John Pinette as its new vice president of global communications.

PG&E — PG&E will add another director to its board with experience in the utility industry, as well as adding a safety specialist as an executive advisor. The moves are part of an agreement by the California utility with activist investor BlueMountain Capital Management.

Lyft — Lyft was rated “buy” in new coverage at both Stifel Nicolaus and Jefferies, with both citing the growth of the ride-sharing industry and Lyft’s strong No. 2 position in the market.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: peter schacknow
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, premarket, revenue, quarterly, making, share, cents, forecasts, quarter, profit, twitter, tesla, hasbro, stocks, estimate, estimates, adjusted, biggest, moves, verizon, cocacola


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