Seth Meyers’ new Netflix comedy special ‘Lobby Baby’ will let you skip his political jokes

That won’t stop you from enjoying Seth Meyers’ new comedy special on Netflix. The comedian and late night host’s new special “Lobby Baby” will feature a “skip politics” button, allowing viewers to opt out of his political jokes. If viewers click the button, they will miss about 10 minutes worth of Meyer’s comedy special. Meyers’ “Lobby Baby” special won’t just focus on politics, however. Netflix said the comedy special will also tackle “family, fatherhood, and why you should never take your girl


That won’t stop you from enjoying Seth Meyers’ new comedy special on Netflix.
The comedian and late night host’s new special “Lobby Baby” will feature a “skip politics” button, allowing viewers to opt out of his political jokes.
If viewers click the button, they will miss about 10 minutes worth of Meyer’s comedy special.
Meyers’ “Lobby Baby” special won’t just focus on politics, however.
Netflix said the comedy special will also tackle “family, fatherhood, and why you should never take your girl
Seth Meyers’ new Netflix comedy special ‘Lobby Baby’ will let you skip his political jokes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, netflix, seth, political, button, wont, meyers, lobby, comedy, jokes, politics, let, special, viewers, skip


Seth Meyers' new Netflix comedy special 'Lobby Baby' will let you skip his political jokes

Tired of political jokes? That won’t stop you from enjoying Seth Meyers’ new comedy special on Netflix.

The comedian and late night host’s new special “Lobby Baby” will feature a “skip politics” button, allowing viewers to opt out of his political jokes.

“I want to talk about politics for a second,” Meyers says a little more than halfway through his special. “But I also know there are people who don’t like jokes about politics and because this is on Netflix, it presents us with a unique opportunity. We are going to have an option for people watching at home to skip politics. There will be a box right down there. And they can just click that and it will take them to the next moment of the show when it’s not about politics.”

Meyers then points to the side of the screen, and a button called “skip politics” appears. If viewers click the button, they will miss about 10 minutes worth of Meyer’s comedy special.

CNN was the first to report the politics skip button.

Meyers has long been poking fun at President Donald Trump and other political figures. In 2011, Meyers hosted the White House Correspondents’ Dinner and roasted Trump, who was in attendance. Years later, Meyers has spent much of his late-night career dissecting Trump’s 2016 campaign and current presidency. His “A Closer Look” segment, which appears on the show almost nightly, satirizes political scandals and difficult or misunderstood political issues.

Meyers’ “Lobby Baby” special won’t just focus on politics, however. Netflix said the comedy special will also tackle “family, fatherhood, and why you should never take your girlfriend to Paris for her birthday.”

The title of the show is a nod to how Meyers’ second child, a son named Axel, was born in the lobby of his apartment building. The special is now available to stream.

Disclosure: Comcast is the parent company of NBCUniversal and CNBC. “Late Night with Seth Meyers” is an NBC show.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, netflix, seth, political, button, wont, meyers, lobby, comedy, jokes, politics, let, special, viewers, skip


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Value investor Joel Greenblatt says this company could solve a key hurdle in esports’ growth

The rising hype surrounding esports has presented the industry with one big hurdle: The lack of scalable technology to meet the demands of an immense, digitally-based audience. Backing the company is famed value investor Joel Greenblatt, who expects Vindex is in a position to meet the demand and solve this problem plaguing esports. By 2021, that number could hit 645 million as the biggest esports events often draw in more viewers than traditional sports. And that’s why Greenblatt has decided to


The rising hype surrounding esports has presented the industry with one big hurdle: The lack of scalable technology to meet the demands of an immense, digitally-based audience.
Backing the company is famed value investor Joel Greenblatt, who expects Vindex is in a position to meet the demand and solve this problem plaguing esports.
By 2021, that number could hit 645 million as the biggest esports events often draw in more viewers than traditional sports.
And that’s why Greenblatt has decided to
Value investor Joel Greenblatt says this company could solve a key hurdle in esports’ growth Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: annie pei
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, publishers, greenblatt, esports, value, scale, investor, hurdle, company, support, growth, solve, viewers, industry, joel, vindex, global, key


Value investor Joel Greenblatt says this company could solve a key hurdle in esports' growth

The San Francisco Shock celebrate their victory in the 2019 Overwatch League Grand Finals e-sports championship against the Vancouver Titans at Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, September 29, 2019.

The rising hype surrounding esports has presented the industry with one big hurdle: The lack of scalable technology to meet the demands of an immense, digitally-based audience.

That’s where a company known as Vindex could step in.

Backing the company is famed value investor Joel Greenblatt, who expects Vindex is in a position to meet the demand and solve this problem plaguing esports.

“[The leagues and publishers need to] keep up with the high demand of an enormous and growing fanbase, so to keep up with the execution of esports programs, content and events is incredibly difficult,” Greenblatt told CNBC. “It’s very hard to do so internally and very hard to do without a set of vendors and partners from outside.”

Right now, according to Greenblatt, the size of the esports audience and the gaming industry as a whole has left many league operators and publishers alike racing to keep up with the want for new content and programming. Not only is the global video games industry projected to generate more than $150 billion in revenue this year, but research firm Newzoo sees esports viewership growing 15% year-on-year to hit 454 million global viewers in 2019.

By 2021, that number could hit 645 million as the biggest esports events often draw in more viewers than traditional sports.

While Greenblatt does believe that the industry will continue to grow “like crazy,” he also believes that the infrastructure needs to be in place to support the audience boom that will come with it.

But accomplishing something of that scale requires capital along with sustainable growth potential, part of which the Gotham Asset Management founder believes involves harnessing the organic growth of gaming and esports while investing in the support elements of the ecosystem.

And that’s why Greenblatt has decided to back Vindex as both an investor and board member. The company aims to provide partners with the means necessary to scale up their esports operations through global platforms, technologies and services.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: annie pei
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, publishers, greenblatt, esports, value, scale, investor, hurdle, company, support, growth, solve, viewers, industry, joel, vindex, global, key


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HBO’s ‘Watchmen’ is getting ‘review bombed,’ but that won’t scare off any viewers

“A complete disrespect of the source material,” said one commenter. “Review bombing speaks to a larger movement at hand, which is what I call ‘outrage culture,'” he said. Not all review bombing is ideologically motivated. He added that other properties based on comic books, such as “The Walking Dead,” have strayed from their source material without suffering the same fate. “If the material is good enough, the tactic of review bombing is toothless.”


“A complete disrespect of the source material,” said one commenter.
“Review bombing speaks to a larger movement at hand, which is what I call ‘outrage culture,'” he said.
Not all review bombing is ideologically motivated.
He added that other properties based on comic books, such as “The Walking Dead,” have strayed from their source material without suffering the same fate.
“If the material is good enough, the tactic of review bombing is toothless.”
HBO’s ‘Watchmen’ is getting ‘review bombed,’ but that won’t scare off any viewers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-26  Authors: daniel bukszpan, in danielbukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hbos, source, taken, viewers, watchmen, bombed, scare, bombing, reviews, material, tulsa, theyre, getting, review, wont


HBO's 'Watchmen' is getting 'review bombed,' but that won't scare off any viewers

The new series “Watchmen,” based on the comic by writer Alan Moore, premiered last weekend on HBO, and according to The Daily Beast, it’s the latest victim of “review bombing.” However, if the perpetrators are hoping to sink the show, they’re unlikely to succeed.

For those not in the know, “review bombing” is what happens when scads of disgruntled viewers go to the Rotten Tomatoes website and leave one-star reviews for a movie or television show to drag down its overall rating. In the case of “Watchmen,” it received a score of 98% from critics and 43% from audiences.

“A complete disrespect of the source material,” said one commenter. “We have enough politics in our lives right now, can we just escape a little?” groused another. Another called it “the worst show HBO has ever created.”

The show has indeed taken liberties with the source material. But if it’s a victim of review bombing, writer, social media specialist and advocate Chad MacDonald said it has nothing to do with the quality of the show and is the product of an orchestrated effort.

“I regularly see people encouraging each other to do it, and bragging about it when they’re done,” he said. “They will display how a film or show’s rating is plummeting thanks to their efforts.”

MacDonald said that in some cases, people who participate in this behavior are fans who view themselves as “gatekeepers” of a franchise. However, he said that racism and misogyny are more likely causes.

“‘Captain Marvel’ and ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ were attacked for their female leads,” he said. “I would argue that the reason HBO’s ‘Watchmen’ is getting review bombed right now is not necessarily because of how the show strays from the material, but because it opened with the Tulsa massacre of black Americans.”

The Tulsa massacre was an incident that took place in Tulsa, OK, in 1921, in which thousands of white rioters attacked the city’s black business district, causing multiple fatalities. MacDonald said that the initial responses to the show that he saw all focused on this, in part because many viewers never knew that the incident had even taken place.

“It was taken as an educational experience, as a positive that the show had unearthed a forgotten but crucial part of America’s history,” he said. “The review bombings started after that. Add to this that the lead character is a black woman, and well, there you go.”

Ironically, Matt Klein, a cultural researcher at the Sparks & Honey consulting firm, compared the people who engage in review bombing to a mob as well, albeit with much less harmful results.

“Review bombing speaks to a larger movement at hand, which is what I call ‘outrage culture,'” he said. “Digital mobs are ruthless, and like physical mobs, are hard to corral.”

Klein said that HBO’s best course of action at this point is to do nothing.

“Giving the mob or trolls attention keeps them alive and conditions them to believe what they’re doing is effective,” he said.

Todd M. Schoenberger, senior research analyst and director of research at the Wellington & Co. investment firm, said that if review bombing does hurt HBO’s coffers, it comes at a bad time. The service just bid farewell to “Game of Thrones,” and many subscribers canceled their service when it ended.

“The streaming subscriber is the golden goose for HBO, which they lost quite a few of following the finale of ‘Game of Thrones’,” he said. At the same time, it could also play in the service’s favor for other types of customers.

“The package player, the one who subscribes as a result of a deal with a local cable company, won’t cancel their subscription, and may even tune in to see if the reviews are correct,” he said. “The problem is the negative reviews are just that, negative … that will have an immediate impact on HBO’s gross revenues in the coming quarters.”

Not all review bombing is ideologically motivated. Matt Klein of Sparks & Honey noted that in October 2018, Lady Gaga fans review bombed “Venom,” which was playing in theaters at the same time as “A Star is Born,” in which she starred. These fans hoped to depress ticket sales for “Venom” and make “A Star Is Born” look more popular by comparison.

While one can only speculate as to whether or not these poor reviews for “Watchmen” are sincere opinion or contrived effort, Chad MacDonald felt that it had nothing to do with a lack of faithfulness to the source material.

“Fans of ‘Watchmen’ have already seen the material advance beyond the original limited series,” he said. “DC Comics published ‘Beyond Watchmen’ years ago, and have even dabbled with bringing the ‘Watchmen’ characters into the DC Universe proper, having them interact with Superman and Batman.”

He added that other properties based on comic books, such as “The Walking Dead,” have strayed from their source material without suffering the same fate. But even if it had, he said that it rarely does much to affect a property’s value.

“If the material is good enough, the tactic of review bombing is toothless.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-26  Authors: daniel bukszpan, in danielbukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hbos, source, taken, viewers, watchmen, bombed, scare, bombing, reviews, material, tulsa, theyre, getting, review, wont


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Stephen Colbert extends ‘Late Show’ contract through 2023

Stephen Colbert is sticking around as the host of “The Late Show” on CBS for at least four more years. The current late-night king signed a three-year contract extension that will keep him at the desk through August 2023. In addition to securing Colbert’s contract, CBS also extended “The Late Late Show” host James Cordon’s contract through August 2022. His broadcast won premiere week by more than 1.5 million viewers and that lead continued into the week two. “I’ve been asked by CBS to host ‘The


Stephen Colbert is sticking around as the host of “The Late Show” on CBS for at least four more years.
The current late-night king signed a three-year contract extension that will keep him at the desk through August 2023.
In addition to securing Colbert’s contract, CBS also extended “The Late Late Show” host James Cordon’s contract through August 2022.
His broadcast won premiere week by more than 1.5 million viewers and that lead continued into the week two.
“I’ve been asked by CBS to host ‘The
Stephen Colbert extends ‘Late Show’ contract through 2023 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, colbert, week, viewers, extends, cbs, contract, 2023, million, late, stephen, earned, host, showtime


Stephen Colbert extends 'Late Show' contract through 2023

Stephen Colbert is sticking around as the host of “The Late Show” on CBS for at least four more years.

The current late-night king signed a three-year contract extension that will keep him at the desk through August 2023. His previous deal was set to expire in summer 2020.

“Stephen Colbert is one of the most entertaining, influential and relevant voices in America today,” David Nevins, chief creative officer of CBS Corp. and chairman and CEO of Showtime, said in a statement Thursday. “His monologue has become a vibrant part of the national discussion, and a spot on Stephen’s couch places guests from the worlds of entertainment, news and politics in front of late night’s largest and most desirable audience.”

Colbert reportedly secured a substantial salary bump, according to Deadline.

“The Late Show” under Colbert has earned 13 Emmy nominations since its premiere in 2015, including three nominations for his critically acclaimed election night special, which aired on Showtime in 2018.

In addition to securing Colbert’s contract, CBS also extended “The Late Late Show” host James Cordon’s contract through August 2022.

Colbert’s sharp wit and punchy political humor has earned him the best ratings in the business and a set of monologues that have been viewed nearly 57 million times on YouTube. The contract extension ensures that Colbert will be broadcasting during the 2020 election.

His broadcast won premiere week by more than 1.5 million viewers and that lead continued into the week two. His show earned nearly 2 million more viewers than NBC.

“I’ve been asked by CBS to host ‘The Late Show’ until 2023, and I have every intention of honoring their subpoena,” Colbert said.

Prior to taking the reins at “The Late Show,” Colbert helmed “The Colbert Report” on Comedy Central, winning two Emmys for outstanding variety series, two Peabody Awards and two Grammys. Prior to that, he worked as a correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.”

Disclosure: Comcast is the parent company of CNBC and NBCUniversal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, colbert, week, viewers, extends, cbs, contract, 2023, million, late, stephen, earned, host, showtime


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NBC has a new TV ad format that starts with sound over a black screen

A new ad spot from Royal Caribbean created with NBCUniversal gives new meaning to audio-first: The 30-second commercial begins with just sound over a black screen. Royal Caribbean is the first brand to use the ad product. The ad begins with four seconds of a black screen with the sounds of a water park. Royal Caribbean worked with its creative and media agencies, MullenLowe and MediaHub, on the commercial. Though four seconds of black screen doesn’t sound like much, it’s an interesting twist for


A new ad spot from Royal Caribbean created with NBCUniversal gives new meaning to audio-first: The 30-second commercial begins with just sound over a black screen. Royal Caribbean is the first brand to use the ad product. The ad begins with four seconds of a black screen with the sounds of a water park. Royal Caribbean worked with its creative and media agencies, MullenLowe and MediaHub, on the commercial. Though four seconds of black screen doesn’t sound like much, it’s an interesting twist for
NBC has a new TV ad format that starts with sound over a black screen Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, black, viewers, seconds, watching, spot, caribbean, sound, royal, nbcuniversal, nbc, screen, starts, format


NBC has a new TV ad format that starts with sound over a black screen

A new ad spot from Royal Caribbean created with NBCUniversal gives new meaning to audio-first: The 30-second commercial begins with just sound over a black screen.

The spot, called “Perfect Day,” premiered Thursday in prime time on NBC. The ad will run three more times on Bravo, USA and E!, and will appear near “energetic” scenes from shows on those networks to create a “compelling juxtaposition of sound and energy that will capture viewers’ attention,” an NBCUniversal spokeswoman said. Adweek first reported on the ad on Thursday.

This new format of ad from NBCUniversal is called “Must Hear TV” and was first announced as an offering in June at the Cannes International Festival of Creativity, the industry’s most illustrious awards event and conference. Royal Caribbean is the first brand to use the ad product.

The ad begins with four seconds of a black screen with the sounds of a water park. Then, words begin to pop up on the screen: “This is turning it up a notch,” they read. Then, “Without your remote.” Then the ad continues with full color and visuals a few seconds later. The spot promotes Royal Caribbean’s new private island resort Perfect Day at CocoCay in the Bahamas.

Royal Caribbean worked with its creative and media agencies, MullenLowe and MediaHub, on the commercial.

Though four seconds of black screen doesn’t sound like much, it’s an interesting twist for TV, where every second is valuable for a brand. It’s also long enough perhaps to confuse viewers, who might hear the sounds and be curious to find out more (or wonder if there’s something wrong with their television).

NBCUniversal has been testing out a number of other commercial innovations, like ShoppableTV, which lets viewers buy products in the environment of the shows they’re watching. For instance, viewers watching the French Open tennis tournament in May were able to buy Lacoste’s Novak Djokovic clothing collection while watching him play, Ad Age reported at the time.

Disclosure: NBCUniversal is the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, black, viewers, seconds, watching, spot, caribbean, sound, royal, nbcuniversal, nbc, screen, starts, format


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Dave Chappelle’s Netflix special is offending critics, but viewers don’t care

Comedian Dave Chappelle’s latest stand-up comedy special, “Sticks and Stones,” premiered on Netflix last week — and it immediately faced a firestorm of criticism for its jokes. If the critics alone are anything to go by, both Chappelle and Netflix may have reason to worry. Martin pulled no punches when he wrote simply, “‘Sticks and Stones’ is terrible, and Chappelle can only blame himself for that.” Keith Bergman, a stand-up comedian from Toledo, Ohio, also said that he believes “Sticks and Ston


Comedian Dave Chappelle’s latest stand-up comedy special, “Sticks and Stones,” premiered on Netflix last week — and it immediately faced a firestorm of criticism for its jokes. If the critics alone are anything to go by, both Chappelle and Netflix may have reason to worry. Martin pulled no punches when he wrote simply, “‘Sticks and Stones’ is terrible, and Chappelle can only blame himself for that.” Keith Bergman, a stand-up comedian from Toledo, Ohio, also said that he believes “Sticks and Ston
Dave Chappelle’s Netflix special is offending critics, but viewers don’t care Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-07  Authors: daniel bukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dave, critics, offending, dont, chappelle, comedian, netflix, chappelles, stones, special, streaming, jokes, viewers, sticks, care


Dave Chappelle's Netflix special is offending critics, but viewers don't care

Comedian Dave Chappelle’s latest stand-up comedy special, “Sticks and Stones,” premiered on Netflix last week — and it immediately faced a firestorm of criticism for its jokes.

Many of the jokes were perceived as tone-deaf and hurtful, particularly those which used various groups of people as punchlines, such as women, sexual assault victims, Asians and members of the LGBTQ community — transgender people in particular.

Many characterized these jokes as gratuitously cruel. Will this round of criticism affect his career negatively, and will Netflix, which paid $60 million in 2016 for five stand-up specials from the comedian, lose subscribers as a result?

If the critics alone are anything to go by, both Chappelle and Netflix may have reason to worry.

Inkoo Kang of Slate compared “Sticks and Stones” to “dropping in on a rascally uncle who doesn’t know, or doesn’t care, how much he’s disappointing you… his jokes make you wince.” Garrett Martin of Paste said that the show “is terrible not because audiences have changed, but because Chappelle himself is so thoroughly out of touch with today.” Martin pulled no punches when he wrote simply, “‘Sticks and Stones’ is terrible, and Chappelle can only blame himself for that.”

Despite this critical response, family and relationship therapist Fran Walfish said that it’s unlikely the comedian will pay any price for it. She chalked that up to ignorance about the LGBTQ community on the part of the general public.

“Sadly, the majority of the American population is still vastly uneducated about the LGBTQ and trans community,” Walfish said. “There is still a great deal of ignorance, fear, and confusion… people are unclear and uninformed about various sexual identities.”

Keith Bergman, a stand-up comedian from Toledo, Ohio, also said that he believes “Sticks and Stones” won’t harm Chappelle’s career. If anything, he believes that the mean spirited and callous nature of the material was designed to keep viewers engaged, even after they’ve finished watching.

“Most of the special felt calculated to generate clickbait,” he said. “Chappelle is dropping bombs that enrage one group of people, and whether it’s good or heartfelt or even well crafted is beside the point.”

Brian Hart, founder and president of the public relations agency Flackable, agreed that the humor in “Sticks and Stones” is unlikely to damage Chappelle’s career, but for entirely different reasons. He said that societal shifts exist on a pendulum, and right now, that pendulum is swinging away from sensitivity after years of swinging toward it.

“The Millennial generation, which I’m a part of, has been steadily driving this heightened level of social sensitivity for the past decade,” he said. “There are hurtful words, phrases and characterizations that needed to be retired, and I’m glad my generation took the lead on removing them from modern dialogue. But if these sensitive young adults are serious about improving society and the world, they need to learn how to take a joke.”

Hart said that if anything, “Sticks and Stones” is the perfect vehicle to allow Chappelle to leave his former Comedy Central program, “Chappelle’s Show,” in the past.

“He knew what he was doing, and he nailed it,” Hart said. “This special will prove to be a significant net gain for his brand and his post-Chappelle’s Show career.”

While the critics may not have cared for “Sticks and Stones,” viewers gave it a 99% audience score on Rotten Tomatoes, so those who believe Chappelle won’t pay a price for his humor may be onto something. But what about Netflix? Will this special and their ongoing association with the comedian cost them, subscribers?

Representatives for Netflix could not be reached for comment, but Todd M. Schoenberger, senior research analyst and director of research at the Wellington & Co. Institutional Research Firm, said that the service has nothing to worry about. Streaming services are currently in “hypergrowth mode,” he explained, and the number of viewers adopting streaming services vastly outnumbers those who would cancel their subscriptions because a show offended them.

“There won’t be a net loss,” he said. “We’re in a trend of people cutting the cord, so even if you lose subscribers, you’ll gain enough to balance the loss.”

Schoenberger also said that even if Netflix were to decide to end their association with the comedian, he can take the $60 million Netflix has already given him and go to Prime Video, Hulu, or any other streaming service wishing to retain him.

“If you have someone with a following, and Chappelle still has a strong following, there’s significant value there,” he said. “Streaming services are willing to go through some viewers being offended to bring others to the table.”

Whatever effect “Sticks and Stones” has, comedian Bergman said that Chappelle has a choice to make. Much of the material in the special takes aim at political correctness and “cancel culture,” and Bergman noted that you can’t complain about those things and tell raunchy jokes at the same time.

“Comedy can’t be some burly, swaggering, tell-it-like-it-is mosh pit and also be a delicate vase that needs to be protected,” he said. “People are allowed to think something sucks.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-07  Authors: daniel bukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dave, critics, offending, dont, chappelle, comedian, netflix, chappelles, stones, special, streaming, jokes, viewers, sticks, care


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US viewership of the 2019 Women’s World Cup final was 22% higher than the 2018 men’s final

According to a statement from Fox Sports, citing data from Nielsen, approximately 14.3 million U.S. viewers tuned in to the final match on television, compared to 11.4 million for the 2018 Men’s World Cup Final, a 22% U.S. viewership boost. The 2015 Women’s World Cup Final in Canada aired at night in the U.S., while the 2019 Women’s World Cup Final in France aired earlier in the day. The 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup Final also had to compete for viewers with the Men’s Concacaf Gold Cup final and


According to a statement from Fox Sports, citing data from Nielsen, approximately 14.3 million U.S. viewers tuned in to the final match on television, compared to 11.4 million for the 2018 Men’s World Cup Final, a 22% U.S. viewership boost. The 2015 Women’s World Cup Final in Canada aired at night in the U.S., while the 2019 Women’s World Cup Final in France aired earlier in the day. The 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup Final also had to compete for viewers with the Men’s Concacaf Gold Cup final and
US viewership of the 2019 Women’s World Cup final was 22% higher than the 2018 men’s final Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, final, cup, match, higher, 2019, womens, viewers, soccer, viewership, million, 22, 2018, world, mens


US viewership of the 2019 Women's World Cup final was 22% higher than the 2018 men's final

On Sunday, a crowd of nearly 60,000 people gathered at France’s Parc Olympique Lyonnais to watch as the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team (USWNT) defeated the Netherlands 2-0 in the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup Final.

Back in the U.S., millions more were watching. According to a statement from Fox Sports, citing data from Nielsen, approximately 14.3 million U.S. viewers tuned in to the final match on television, compared to 11.4 million for the 2018 Men’s World Cup Final, a 22% U.S. viewership boost.

Fox Sports’ statement reports that online streaming viewership peaked at roughly 20 million, making it the most-watched soccer match on English-language television, men’s or women’s, in the U.S. since the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup final, which delivered 25.4 million viewers.

According to CNN, an additional 1.6 million viewers watched the final match in Spanish on Telemundo.

The 2015 Women’s World Cup Final in Canada aired at night in the U.S., while the 2019 Women’s World Cup Final in France aired earlier in the day. The 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup Final also had to compete for viewers with the Men’s Concacaf Gold Cup final and the Men’s Copa América final, which both took place on Sunday as well.

USWNT captain Megan Rapinoe called the scheduling of all three matches on the same day “ridiculous and disappointing. ”

Despite these challenges, the 2019 championship game set a record for online streaming for Fox Sports. The match delivered an average minute audience of 289,000 viewers for the network — up 402% from the 2015 Women’s World Cup — making it the most-streamed women’s final in history.

Fox Sports reports that 17.8 million people viewed the 2019 final match on social media, an increase of 18% on Twitter and YouTube, compared to the men’s final in 2018.

According to The Wall Street Journal, U.S. women’s soccer games have generated more revenue for the USSF than U.S. men’s games over the past three years, and according to Nike, the 2019 women’s stadium home jersey is the top-selling soccer jersey, men’s or women’s, ever sold on Nike.com in one season.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, final, cup, match, higher, 2019, womens, viewers, soccer, viewership, million, 22, 2018, world, mens


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Kim Kardashian gave a tour of her home on Instagram

As Vogue’s May cover star, Kim Kardashian West gave the magazine’s website a tour of her Hidden Hills, California home during her “73 questions” interview. When asked to describe its style, Kardashian West replied: “I would say like a minimal monastery.” Kardashian West later explained some of the unique features of her home in an Instagram Story. “Since everyone is a little confused about our sinks, I thought I would just show you guys a little tour of our bathroom,” Kardashian West says in her


As Vogue’s May cover star, Kim Kardashian West gave the magazine’s website a tour of her Hidden Hills, California home during her “73 questions” interview. When asked to describe its style, Kardashian West replied: “I would say like a minimal monastery.” Kardashian West later explained some of the unique features of her home in an Instagram Story. “Since everyone is a little confused about our sinks, I thought I would just show you guys a little tour of our bathroom,” Kardashian West says in her
Kim Kardashian gave a tour of her home on Instagram Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: jimmy im, david crotty, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, viewers, west, gave, insidethis, instagram, million, look, tour, kardashian, little, kim, bathroom


Kim Kardashian gave a tour of her home on Instagram

As Vogue’s May cover star, Kim Kardashian West gave the magazine’s website a tour of her Hidden Hills, California home during her “73 questions” interview. When asked to describe its style, Kardashian West replied: “I would say like a minimal monastery.”

As Kardashian West walks through her home, viewers can see a large bedroom, a bathroom with a square bathtub in the middle, a long hallway with an arched ceiling and glass doors and a living room with an “unbleached Steinway” piano, according to Kardashian West.

Kardashian West later explained some of the unique features of her home in an Instagram Story.

First is the bathroom. Kardashian West says the bathtub “fits all our kids,” and there is a rain shower. “Since everyone is a little confused about our sinks, I thought I would just show you guys a little tour of our bathroom,” Kardashian West says in her Instagram story.

She explains there were eight versions of the prototype sink made. In the story, viewers can see that there are two faucets that appear to have no basin, though Kardashian West clarifies the countertop “slopes down.”

When she turns on the faucet, the water pours into a slit. “You can put it on as high pressure as you want and no back splash will come up.”

In her bedroom, Kardashian West shows off a flat-screen TV that rises up from its hiding spot in the floor.

She says it’s a “130-inch” in front of the bed.

In April 2018, People magazine reported the house is worth $20 million. Kardashian West’s mom, Kris Jenner, responded in a Tweet: “WOW wrong again!! Their house is $60 MIL.”

Kardashian West recently announced she wants to be a lawyer. She plans to take the bar exam in 2022 and registered with the California State Bar to study law last year, according to her Instagram post.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: jimmy im, david crotty, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, viewers, west, gave, insidethis, instagram, million, look, tour, kardashian, little, kim, bathroom


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‘Game of Thrones’ hits record viewership in season 8 premiere

The much anticipated eighth season premiere of “Game of Thrones” aired Sunday — and viewership was hotter than dragon fire. It exceeded the previous series high of 16.9 million viewers, who tuned in for the season seven finale in 2017. Each year “Game of Thrones” has seen its audience grow, a rarity for television shows that typically lose viewership over the course of their runs. It is the final season of “Game of Thrones” and it’s set to wrap up nearly a decade of dynamic storytelling. He was


The much anticipated eighth season premiere of “Game of Thrones” aired Sunday — and viewership was hotter than dragon fire. It exceeded the previous series high of 16.9 million viewers, who tuned in for the season seven finale in 2017. Each year “Game of Thrones” has seen its audience grow, a rarity for television shows that typically lose viewership over the course of their runs. It is the final season of “Game of Thrones” and it’s set to wrap up nearly a decade of dynamic storytelling. He was
‘Game of Thrones’ hits record viewership in season 8 premiere Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: sarah whitten, source, helen sloan, kevork djansezian
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, series, thrones, viewers, hits, viewership, game, hbo, record, season, million, shows, premiere, warner


'Game of Thrones' hits record viewership in season 8 premiere

The much anticipated eighth season premiere of “Game of Thrones” aired Sunday — and viewership was hotter than dragon fire.

Coming back from its longest hiatus in series history, “Game of Thrones” earned its highest showing for a first-run telecast with an average of 17.4 million viewers, according to HBO. It exceeded the previous series high of 16.9 million viewers, who tuned in for the season seven finale in 2017.

Each year “Game of Thrones” has seen its audience grow, a rarity for television shows that typically lose viewership over the course of their runs. The series also has the distinct honor of being one of the most pirated television shows ever, something HBO has worked hard to prevent in recent years.

Adding to the excitement for the fantasy drama’s debut is that this episode marks the beginning of the end for the beloved series. It is the final season of “Game of Thrones” and it’s set to wrap up nearly a decade of dynamic storytelling.

The TV series, crafted by D.B. Weiss and David Benioff, comes from the mind of George R.R. Martin, the best-selling author of “A Song of Ice and Fire,” a series of novels set in the fictional land of Westeros.

Here, warring factions vie for the Iron Throne, the symbol of power in the realm, and the seat of the King of the Seven Kingdoms. Over the course of the series, characters come to realize that there are bigger threats coming to destroy them all.

The finale of “Game of Thrones” comes at a time that HBO is at a crossroads. Last year, the network’s parent company Time Warner was acquired by AT&T in a deal worth $85 billion. Time Warner was renamed WarnerMedia and, within the year, all top executives at the company have stepped down and been replaced.

Most notably, HBO’s longtime chairman, Richard Plepler, resigned Feb. 28. He was the mastermind behind HBO’s content and the one to sign-off on massive TV projects like “Game of Thrones.”

While “Game of Thrones” is seen as a masterful move by HBO today, when it was first greenlit, there was no guarantee that it was going to be the massive success it became. Episode budgets were in excess of $15 million each, unheard of in the industry previously. These costs went towards manufacturing weaponry, sets in a dozen countries, cast and crew salaries and dozens of special effects houses needed to bring some of the show’s more fantastical elements — like fire-breathing dragons — to life.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: sarah whitten, source, helen sloan, kevork djansezian
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, series, thrones, viewers, hits, viewership, game, hbo, record, season, million, shows, premiere, warner


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‘Game of Thrones’ hits record viewership in season 8 premiere

The much anticipated eighth season premiere of “Game of Thrones” aired Sunday — and viewership was hotter than dragon fire. It exceeded the previous series high of 16.9 million viewers, who tuned in for the season seven finale in 2017. Each year “Game of Thrones” has seen its audience grow, a rarity for television shows that typically lose viewership over the course of their runs. It is the final season of “Game of Thrones” and it’s set to wrap up nearly a decade of dynamic storytelling. He was


The much anticipated eighth season premiere of “Game of Thrones” aired Sunday — and viewership was hotter than dragon fire. It exceeded the previous series high of 16.9 million viewers, who tuned in for the season seven finale in 2017. Each year “Game of Thrones” has seen its audience grow, a rarity for television shows that typically lose viewership over the course of their runs. It is the final season of “Game of Thrones” and it’s set to wrap up nearly a decade of dynamic storytelling. He was
‘Game of Thrones’ hits record viewership in season 8 premiere Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: sarah whitten, source, helen sloan, kevork djansezian
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, season, hits, shows, million, viewership, viewers, series, hbo, game, premiere, record, thrones, warner


'Game of Thrones' hits record viewership in season 8 premiere

The much anticipated eighth season premiere of “Game of Thrones” aired Sunday — and viewership was hotter than dragon fire.

Coming back from its longest hiatus in series history, “Game of Thrones” earned its highest showing for a first-run telecast with an average of 17.4 million viewers, according to HBO. It exceeded the previous series high of 16.9 million viewers, who tuned in for the season seven finale in 2017.

Each year “Game of Thrones” has seen its audience grow, a rarity for television shows that typically lose viewership over the course of their runs. The series also has the distinct honor of being one of the most pirated television shows ever, something HBO has worked hard to prevent in recent years.

Adding to the excitement for the fantasy drama’s debut is that this episode marks the beginning of the end for the beloved series. It is the final season of “Game of Thrones” and it’s set to wrap up nearly a decade of dynamic storytelling.

The TV series, crafted by D.B. Weiss and David Benioff, comes from the mind of George R.R. Martin, the best-selling author of “A Song of Ice and Fire,” a series of novels set in the fictional land of Westeros.

Here, warring factions vie for the Iron Throne, the symbol of power in the realm, and the seat of the King of the Seven Kingdoms. Over the course of the series, characters come to realize that there are bigger threats coming to destroy them all.

The finale of “Game of Thrones” comes at a time that HBO is at a crossroads. Last year, the network’s parent company Time Warner was acquired by AT&T in a deal worth $85 billion. Time Warner was renamed WarnerMedia and, within the year, all top executives at the company have stepped down and been replaced.

Most notably, HBO’s longtime chairman, Richard Plepler, resigned Feb. 28. He was the mastermind behind HBO’s content and the one to sign-off on massive TV projects like “Game of Thrones.”

While “Game of Thrones” is seen as a masterful move by HBO today, when it was first greenlit, there was no guarantee that it was going to be the massive success it became. Episode budgets were in excess of $15 million each, unheard of in the industry previously. These costs went towards manufacturing weaponry, sets in a dozen countries, cast and crew salaries and dozens of special effects houses needed to bring some of the show’s more fantastical elements — like fire-breathing dragons — to life.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: sarah whitten, source, helen sloan, kevork djansezian
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, season, hits, shows, million, viewership, viewers, series, hbo, game, premiere, record, thrones, warner


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