State Department calls Jamal Khashoggi’s death human rights violation

The State Department acknowledges Saudi Arabia’s killing of U.S. resident Jamal Khashoggi in its annual human rights report but makes no mention of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the section on his death. The Trump administration has long resisted implicating the crown prince in the murder, citing what it says is insufficient evidence. Initially, Saudi Arabia claimed Khashoggi, an outspoken critic of the Saudi government, left the consulate unharmed. At a press conference unveiling th


The State Department acknowledges Saudi Arabia’s killing of U.S. resident Jamal Khashoggi in its annual human rights report but makes no mention of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the section on his death. The Trump administration has long resisted implicating the crown prince in the murder, citing what it says is insufficient evidence. Initially, Saudi Arabia claimed Khashoggi, an outspoken critic of the Saudi government, left the consulate unharmed. At a press conference unveiling th
State Department calls Jamal Khashoggi’s death human rights violation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: ashley turner, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salman, arabia, involved, human, prince, department, state, jamal, khashoggis, death, calls, trump, rights, violation, saudi, report, crown


State Department calls Jamal Khashoggi's death human rights violation

The State Department acknowledges Saudi Arabia’s killing of U.S. resident Jamal Khashoggi in its annual human rights report but makes no mention of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the section on his death. That’s despite reports that the CIA determined the Saudi leader ordered Khashoggi’s assassination.

The Trump administration has long resisted implicating the crown prince in the murder, citing what it says is insufficient evidence.

While the report fails to connect the crown prince to Khashoggi’s death, it notes that Saudi Arabia’s King Salman “pledged to hold all individuals involved accountable, regardless of position or rank,” adding that several officials have been removed from their positions.

Khashoggi, who was a columnist for The Washington Post, was killed in October when he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to pick up documents that would allow him to marry his Turkish fiancee.

Initially, Saudi Arabia claimed Khashoggi, an outspoken critic of the Saudi government, left the consulate unharmed. Days later, Turkish authorities released images of a 15-person “hit squad” from Saudi Arabia arriving at the consulate at the time of Khashoggi’s disappearance and later said he was killed by them.

Saudi Arabia has charged 11 people in the murder — the kingdom said it’s seeking the death penalty for five of those people — but the country has remained firm in its assertion that the crown prince was not involved in the plot.

At a press conference unveiling the report, Ambassador Michael Kozak said the U.S. has made it clear Khashoggi’s death was a “horrendous” and “horrific” act. Regarding the crown prince’s possible role in the killing, Kozak said the U.S. is committed to getting all the facts and that Saudi Arabia has not completed its own investigation.

“We’re going to hold the government of Saudi Arabia to its promise that it will do a thorough investigation and find all of the facts,” Kozak said. We “can all have our suspicions or our speculation as to where it may lead, but our effort has been to have where it comes out be fact-driven rather than opinion-driven.”

The U.S. sanctioned 17 people allegedly involved in the murder. Despite outcry from lawmakers demanding an answer from Trump on whether he believes Mohammed bin Salman was involved, Trump has cast doubt that the crown prince played a role.

“Maybe he did and maybe he didn’t!” Trump said.

The Saudis have denied the CIA allegations.

Trump said in November that he stood with Saudi Arabia because spoiling relations could negatively impact oil prices, the U.S.’ plan to counter Iran in the Middle East and a promise to buy U.S.-made arms. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, however, told CNBC in January that oil prices would not affect America’s response to the Khashoggi killing.

The Saudi Arabian Embassy in Washington, D.C., did not immediately respond to CNBC’s requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: ashley turner, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salman, arabia, involved, human, prince, department, state, jamal, khashoggis, death, calls, trump, rights, violation, saudi, report, crown


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Huawei reportedly preparing to sue US government

China’s Huawei is preparing to file a lawsuit in the Eastern District of Texas to sue the United States government for banning federal agencies from using the company’s products, the New York Times reported on Monday, citing people familiar with the matter. The lawyers for Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou sued the Canadian government, its border agency and federal police on Sunday, alleging their client was detained, searched and interrogated for three hours in violation of her cons


China’s Huawei is preparing to file a lawsuit in the Eastern District of Texas to sue the United States government for banning federal agencies from using the company’s products, the New York Times reported on Monday, citing people familiar with the matter. The lawyers for Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou sued the Canadian government, its border agency and federal police on Sunday, alleging their client was detained, searched and interrogated for three hours in violation of her cons
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: alvin chan, sopa images, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wanzhou, york, preparing, united, chinas, huawei, sue, reportedly, meng, states, violation, federal, wire


Huawei reportedly preparing to sue US government

China’s Huawei is preparing to file a lawsuit in the Eastern District of Texas to sue the United States government for banning federal agencies from using the company’s products, the New York Times reported on Monday, citing people familiar with the matter.

Huawei’s suit is likely to argue that the provision is a “bill of attainder,” or a legislative act that singles out a person or group for punishment without trial, according to the newspaper report.

The lawyers for Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou sued the Canadian government, its border agency and federal police on Sunday, alleging their client was detained, searched and interrogated for three hours in violation of her constitutional rights.

Canada arrested Meng in Vancouver on December 1 at the request of the United States, which has brought sweeping charges against her and China’s Huawei that portray the company as a threat to U.S. national security. Meng was charged with bank and wire fraud to violate American sanctions against Iran.

Huawei declined to comment on the NYT report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: alvin chan, sopa images, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wanzhou, york, preparing, united, chinas, huawei, sue, reportedly, meng, states, violation, federal, wire


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US calls on Russia to destroy new missile system

The United States called on Russia on Monday to destroy a new cruise missile system which it said constituted a “direct violation” of the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, and accused Moscow of destabilising global security. “Unfortunately, the United States increasingly finds that Russia cannot be trusted to comply with its arms control obligations and that its coercive and malign actions around the globe have increased tensions,” Robert Wood, U.S. disarmament ambassador, told the


The United States called on Russia on Monday to destroy a new cruise missile system which it said constituted a “direct violation” of the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, and accused Moscow of destabilising global security. “Unfortunately, the United States increasingly finds that Russia cannot be trusted to comply with its arms control obligations and that its coercive and malign actions around the globe have increased tensions,” Robert Wood, U.S. disarmament ambassador, told the
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-21  Authors: anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, missile, treaty, destroy, russia, states, inf, withdraw, violation, verifiably, system, wood, calls, united


US calls on Russia to destroy new missile system

The United States called on Russia on Monday to destroy a new cruise missile system which it said constituted a “direct violation” of the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, and accused Moscow of destabilising global security.

“Unfortunately, the United States increasingly finds that Russia cannot be trusted to comply with its arms control obligations and that its coercive and malign actions around the globe have increased tensions,” Robert Wood, U.S. disarmament ambassador, told the U.N.-sponsored Conference on Disarmament.

“Russia must verifiably destroy all SSC-8 missiles, launchers and associated equipment in order to come back into compliance with the INF Treaty,” he said, reiterating the Trump administration’s plan to withdraw from the 1987 pact in early February.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-21  Authors: anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, missile, treaty, destroy, russia, states, inf, withdraw, violation, verifiably, system, wood, calls, united


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US judge dismisses suit against Google over facial recognition software

The suit, filed in March 2016, alleged Alphabet’s Google violated Illinois state law by collecting and storing biometric data from people’s photographs using facial recognition software without their permission through its Google Photos service. Plaintiffs had sought more than $5 million collectively for the “hundreds of thousands” of state residents affected, according to court documents. Plaintiffs had asked the court for $5,000 for each intentional violation of the Illinois Biometric Informat


The suit, filed in March 2016, alleged Alphabet’s Google violated Illinois state law by collecting and storing biometric data from people’s photographs using facial recognition software without their permission through its Google Photos service. Plaintiffs had sought more than $5 million collectively for the “hundreds of thousands” of state residents affected, according to court documents. Plaintiffs had asked the court for $5,000 for each intentional violation of the Illinois Biometric Informat
US judge dismisses suit against Google over facial recognition software Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-30  Authors: nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suit, software, violated, dismisses, suffered, plaintiffs, illinois, google, facial, violation, state, court, documents, recognition, judge, district


US judge dismisses suit against Google over facial recognition software

A lawsuit filed against Google by consumers who claimed the search engine’s photo sharing and storage service violated their privacy was dismissed on Saturday by a U.S. judge who cited a lack of “concrete injuries.”

U.S. District Judge Edmond Chang in Chicago granted a Google motion for summary judgment, saying the court lacked “subject matter jurisdiction because plaintiffs have not suffered concrete injuries.”

The suit, filed in March 2016, alleged Alphabet’s Google violated Illinois state law by collecting and storing biometric data from people’s photographs using facial recognition software without their permission through its Google Photos service.

Plaintiffs had sought more than $5 million collectively for the “hundreds of thousands” of state residents affected, according to court documents. Plaintiffs had asked the court for $5,000 for each intentional violation of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, or $1,000 for every negligent violation, court documents said.

Attorneys for the plaintiffs as well as officials with Google could not immediately be reached to comment. Google had argued in court documents that the plaintiffs were not entitled to money or injunctive relief because they had suffered no harm.

The case is Rivera v Google, U.S. District Court, Northern District of Illinois, No. 16-02714.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-30  Authors: nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suit, software, violated, dismisses, suffered, plaintiffs, illinois, google, facial, violation, state, court, documents, recognition, judge, district


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China says Canada’s detention of Huawei exec is ‘vile in nature’

China summoned the Canadian ambassador to protest the detention of a top executive of leading Chinese tech giant Huawei, calling it “unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature” and warning of “grave consequences” if she is not released. “Such a move ignores the law and is unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature,” Le said in the statement. “China strongly urges the Canadian side to immediately release the detained Huawei executive … or face grave consequences that the Canadian si


China summoned the Canadian ambassador to protest the detention of a top executive of leading Chinese tech giant Huawei, calling it “unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature” and warning of “grave consequences” if she is not released. “Such a move ignores the law and is unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature,” Le said in the statement. “China strongly urges the Canadian side to immediately release the detained Huawei executive … or face grave consequences that the Canadian si
China says Canada’s detention of Huawei exec is ‘vile in nature’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: ng han guan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, detention, canadas, mengs, foreign, court, violation, exec, nature, skycom, china, chinese, meng, vile, canadian, huawei


China says Canada's detention of Huawei exec is 'vile in nature'

China summoned the Canadian ambassador to protest the detention of a top executive of leading Chinese tech giant Huawei, calling it “unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature” and warning of “grave consequences” if she is not released.

A report by the official Xinhua News Agency carried on the Foreign Ministry’s website said that Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng called in Ambassador John McCallum on Saturday over the holding of Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, who is reportedly suspected of trying to evade U.S. trade curbs on Iran.

Huawei is the biggest global supplier of network gear for phone and internet companies and has been the target of deepening U.S. security concerns over its ties to the Chinese government. The U.S. has pressured European countries and other allies to limit use of its technology, warning they could be opening themselves up to surveillance and theft of information.

Le told McCallum that Meng’s detention at the request of the United States while transferring flights in Vancouver was a “severe violation” of her “legitimate rights and interests.”

“Such a move ignores the law and is unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature,” Le said in the statement.

“China strongly urges the Canadian side to immediately release the detained Huawei executive … or face grave consequences that the Canadian side should be held accountable for,” Le said.

Roland Paris, a former foreign policy adviser to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, said that Chinese pressure on the Canadian government won’t work.

“Perhaps because the Chinese state controls its judicial system, Beijing sometimes has difficulty understanding or believing that courts can be independent in a rule-of-law country. There’s no point in pressuring the Canadian government. Judges will decide,” Paris tweeted in response to the comments from Beijing.

A Canadian prosecutor urged a Vancouver court to deny bail to Meng, whose case is shaking up U.S.-China relations and worrying global financial markets.

Meng, also the daughter of Huawei’s founder, was detained at the request of the U.S. during a layover at the Vancouver airport Dec. 1 — the same day that Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping of China agreed over dinner to a 90-day ceasefire in a trade dispute that threatens to disrupt global commerce.

The U.S. alleges that Huawei used a Hong Kong shell company to sell equipment in Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions. It also says that Meng and Huawei misled American banks about its business dealings in Iran.

The surprise arrest raises doubts about whether the trade truce will hold and whether the world’s two biggest economies can resolve the complicated issues that divide them.

Canadian prosecutor John Gibb-Carsley said in a court hearing Friday that a warrant had been issued for Meng’s arrest in New York Aug. 22. He said Meng, arrested en route to Mexico from Hong Kong, was aware of the investigation and had been avoiding the United States for months, even though her teenage son goes to school in Boston.

Gibb-Carsley alleged that Huawei had done business in Iran through a Hong Kong company called Skycom. Meng, he said, had misled U.S. banks into thinking that Huawei and Skycom were separate when, in fact, “Skycom was Huawei.” Meng has contended that Huawei sold Skycom in 2009.

In urging the court to reject Meng’s bail request, Gibb-Carsley said the Huawei executive had vast resources and a strong incentive to bolt: She’s facing fraud charges in the United States that could put her in prison for 30 years.

The hearing will resume Monday after Meng spends the weekend in jail.

Huawei, in a brief statement emailed to The Associated Press, said that “we have every confidence that the Canadian and U.S. legal systems will reach the right conclusion.”

Canadian officials have declined to comment on Chinese threats of retaliation over the case, instead emphasizing the independence of Canada’s judiciary along with the importance of Ottawa’s relationship with Beijing.

Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland said Canada “has assured China that due process is absolutely being followed in Canada, that consular access for China to Ms. Meng will absolutely be provided.”

“We are a rule of law country and we will be following our laws as we have thus far in this matter and as we will continue to do,” Freeland said Friday.

While protesting what it calls Canada’s violation of Meng’s human rights, China’s ruling Communist Party stands accused of mass incarcerations of its Muslim minority without due process, locking up those exercising their right to free speech and refusing to allow foreign citizens to leave the country in order to bring pressure on their relatives accused of financial crimes.

The party also takes the lead in prosecutions of those accused of corruption or other crimes in a highly opaque process, without supervision from the court system or independent bodies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: ng han guan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, detention, canadas, mengs, foreign, court, violation, exec, nature, skycom, china, chinese, meng, vile, canadian, huawei


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Arrest of Huawei CFO shows ‘the gloves are now fully off,’ says Eurasia Group

The arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Canada, reportedly related to a violation of U.S. sanctions, will corrode trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing, risk consultancy Eurasia Group said Thursday. “Beijing is likely to react angrily to this latest arrest of a Chinese citizen in a third country for violating U.S. law,” Eurasia analysts wrote. Canada’s Department of Justice said on Wednesday the country arrested Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she is facing extradit


The arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Canada, reportedly related to a violation of U.S. sanctions, will corrode trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing, risk consultancy Eurasia Group said Thursday. “Beijing is likely to react angrily to this latest arrest of a Chinese citizen in a third country for violating U.S. law,” Eurasia analysts wrote. Canada’s Department of Justice said on Wednesday the country arrested Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she is facing extradit
Arrest of Huawei CFO shows ‘the gloves are now fully off,’ says Eurasia Group Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: huileng tan, photographer, collection, getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, related, statement, cfo, fully, sanctions, chinese, violation, group, trade, telecommunications, arrest, gloves, told, huawei, shows, eurasia


Arrest of Huawei CFO shows 'the gloves are now fully off,' says Eurasia Group

The arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Canada, reportedly related to a violation of U.S. sanctions, will corrode trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing, risk consultancy Eurasia Group said Thursday.

“Beijing is likely to react angrily to this latest arrest of a Chinese citizen in a third country for violating U.S. law,” Eurasia analysts wrote.

In fact, Global Times — a hyper-nationalistic tabloid tied to the Chinese Communist Party — responded to the arrest by posting on Twitter a statement about trade war escalation it attributed to an expert “close to the Chinese Ministry of Commerce.”

“China should be fully prepared for an escalation in the #tradewar with the US, as the US will not ease its stance on China, and the recent arrest of the senior executive of #Huawei is a vivid example,” said the statement, paired with a photo of opposing fists with Chinese and American flags superimposed upon them.

Canada’s Department of Justice said on Wednesday the country arrested Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she is facing extradition to the U.S. The arrest is related to violations of U.S. sanctions, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters.

U.S. authorities have been probing Huawei, one of the world’s largest makers of telecommunications network equipment, since at least 2016 for allegedly shipping U.S.-origin products to Iran and other countries in violation of U.S. export and sanctions laws, sources told Reuters in April.

The analysts said the Huawei executive’s arrest will not derail the start of trade negotiations after U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping’s meeting last weekend in Argentina saw them agree to first steps to resolve their trade dispute. Still, they acknowledged, the incident involving Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is likely to cloud talks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: huileng tan, photographer, collection, getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, related, statement, cfo, fully, sanctions, chinese, violation, group, trade, telecommunications, arrest, gloves, told, huawei, shows, eurasia


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Europe markets at 2 year low

Europe’s basic resources stocks — with their heavy exposure to China — tumbled 4.2 percent during the session. Meanwhile, autos stocks — seen as a trade war proxy because of the sector’s export-heavy constituent’s — were also among the worst performers, down more than 4.5 percent. Tech stocks were also down more than 3 percent on Thursday, following the arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Vancouver on Wednesday. Meng Wanzhou, the daughter of Huawei’s founder, was arrested by Can


Europe’s basic resources stocks — with their heavy exposure to China — tumbled 4.2 percent during the session. Meanwhile, autos stocks — seen as a trade war proxy because of the sector’s export-heavy constituent’s — were also among the worst performers, down more than 4.5 percent. Tech stocks were also down more than 3 percent on Thursday, following the arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Vancouver on Wednesday. Meng Wanzhou, the daughter of Huawei’s founder, was arrested by Can
Europe markets at 2 year low Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, war, low, europe, worst, violation, stocks, tumbled, trade, wanzhou, arrest, vancouver, huaweis


Europe markets at 2 year low

Market focus is largely attuned to the arrest of a top executive at Chinese tech giant Huawei, amid investor concern that the news could derail progress in U.S.-Sino trade talks.

Europe’s basic resources stocks — with their heavy exposure to China — tumbled 4.2 percent during the session. Britain’s FTSE 100 index slumped 3.6 percent Thursday, as mining stocks plummeted. London-listed Antofagasta led the sectoral losses, down more than 7 percent.

Meanwhile, autos stocks — seen as a trade war proxy because of the sector’s export-heavy constituent’s — were also among the worst performers, down more than 4.5 percent. Faurecia and Daimler both dropped more than 6 percent.

Tech stocks were also down more than 3 percent on Thursday, following the arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Vancouver on Wednesday. Meng Wanzhou, the daughter of Huawei’s founder, was arrested by Canadian authorities on December 1, reportedly over the possible violation of sanctions against Iran. She now faces extradition to the United States.

Looking at individual stocks, Italy’s DiaSorin tumbled toward the bottom of the European benchmark Thursday morning, after Kepler Cheuvreux cut its stock recommendation to “hold” from “buy.” Shares of the Milan-listed company fell more than 7 percent on the news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, war, low, europe, worst, violation, stocks, tumbled, trade, wanzhou, arrest, vancouver, huaweis


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Six White House officials violated the Hatch Act, agency finds

1 Hour Ago | 05:12Signed into law in 1939, the Hatch Act bars employees of the executive branch from using their official positions to actively support or oppose any candidate for federal office. When the OSC finds that employees have violated the Hatch Act, the consequences are typically minimal, and usually consist of a warning or sometimes a remedial briefing on the rules. The OSC found that Shah’s tweet “highlighted research done by a political party and provided a link to the party’s websit


1 Hour Ago | 05:12Signed into law in 1939, the Hatch Act bars employees of the executive branch from using their official positions to actively support or oppose any candidate for federal office. When the OSC finds that employees have violated the Hatch Act, the consequences are typically minimal, and usually consist of a warning or sometimes a remedial briefing on the rules. The OSC found that Shah’s tweet “highlighted research done by a political party and provided a link to the party’s websit
Six White House officials violated the Hatch Act, agency finds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: christina wilkie, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tweets, osc, agency, violation, officials, violated, white, maga, hatch, finds, house, act, cited, research, trump


Six White House officials violated the Hatch Act, agency finds

The G-20 summit is underway, but what does it mean for investors? 1 Hour Ago | 05:12

Signed into law in 1939, the Hatch Act bars employees of the executive branch from using their official positions to actively support or oppose any candidate for federal office. This can mean making political speeches for a candidate, sending letters or endorsements, or publicly promoting one party over another. The president and vice president, however, are exempt from the restrictions. When the OSC finds that employees have violated the Hatch Act, the consequences are typically minimal, and usually consist of a warning or sometimes a remedial briefing on the rules.

Friday’s rulings were issued in response to formal complaints filed by the Committee for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a nonprofit public interest watchdog group.

Westerhout was cited for two tweets she posted this spring, both of which contained the acronym MAGA, which is short for Trump’s campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again.”

Farah was also cited for a MAGA tweet in May that read, “This is what #MAGA looks like: Under @POTUS TRUMP, the unemployment rate is the lowest it’s been in 17 years.”

Wood and Aguirre Ferre were also both cited for posting tweets that had MAGA in them.

Shah’s violation consisted of a June 4 tweet in which he wrote, “Fantastic @RNCResearch release #Winning: 500 Days of American Greatness.” The OSC found that Shah’s tweet “highlighted research done by a political party and provided a link to the party’s website and its research,” which constituted a Hatch Act violation.

The final aide to be cited, Jessica Ditto, had committed a violation by retweeting Shah’s tweet with the RNC research link, OSC found.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment from CNBC on Friday about the ruling.

CREW’s executive director, Noah Bookbinder, said in a statement that the group was “glad” to see the rulings, but he cautioned that official warnings have so far not been enough to stop the steady stream of Hatch Act violations being committed by aides in the Trump White House.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: christina wilkie, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tweets, osc, agency, violation, officials, violated, white, maga, hatch, finds, house, act, cited, research, trump


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UN ambassador Nikki Haley condemns Russia’s ‘outrageous’ seizure of Ukraine ships

The action sparked an international outcry, as well as calls for more sanctions against Russia. Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said Monday that he will impose martial law across Ukraine for 30 days, beginning Wednesday, Nov. 28. In a statement released later Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo echoed Haley’s condemnation of Russia’s actions in the Black Sea. Pompeo also urged Putin and Poroshenko to “engage directly to resolve this situation.” Haley did not say whether the U.S. would co


The action sparked an international outcry, as well as calls for more sanctions against Russia. Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said Monday that he will impose martial law across Ukraine for 30 days, beginning Wednesday, Nov. 28. In a statement released later Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo echoed Haley’s condemnation of Russia’s actions in the Black Sea. Pompeo also urged Putin and Poroshenko to “engage directly to resolve this situation.” Haley did not say whether the U.S. would co
UN ambassador Nikki Haley condemns Russia’s ‘outrageous’ seizure of Ukraine ships Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: kevin breuninger, don emmert, afp, getty images, pavel rebrov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russias, haley, sanctions, russian, president, pompeo, international, russia, poroshenko, nikki, ships, condemns, ukraine, putin, outrageous, seizure, violation, ambassador


UN ambassador Nikki Haley condemns Russia's 'outrageous' seizure of Ukraine ships

The action sparked an international outcry, as well as calls for more sanctions against Russia.

But the Kremlin’s foreign ministry blamed Ukraine for the incident, saying Kiev concocted a “painstakingly thought-through and planned provocation” that was “aimed at igniting another source of tension in the region in order to create a pretext to ramp up sanctions against Russia.”

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said Monday that he will impose martial law across Ukraine for 30 days, beginning Wednesday, Nov. 28.

In a statement released later Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo echoed Haley’s condemnation of Russia’s actions in the Black Sea. Pompeo also urged Putin and Poroshenko to “engage directly to resolve this situation.”

Haley noted during the Monday meeting that Trump’s administration “would welcome a normal relationship with Russia.”

Trump has complimented Putin before and after becoming president. During a joint news conference in Helsinki in July, Trump even appeared to side with Putin over the conclusions of his own U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia had interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Haley did not say whether the U.S. would consider ramping up sanctions against Russia in retaliation for its “violation under international law.”

But the U.S. will maintain existing sanctions slapped on Russia for its annexation of the Crimean peninsula in 2014, she said, and “further Russian escalation of this kind will only make matters worse.”

The “outrageous violation of sovereign Ukrainian territory is part of a pattern of Russian behavior that includes the purported annexation of Crimea, and abuses against countless Ukrainians in Crimea,” Haley said, “as well as stoking a conflict that has taken the lives of more than ten thousand people in eastern Ukraine.”

She added: “It shows no signs of decreasing.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: kevin breuninger, don emmert, afp, getty images, pavel rebrov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russias, haley, sanctions, russian, president, pompeo, international, russia, poroshenko, nikki, ships, condemns, ukraine, putin, outrageous, seizure, violation, ambassador


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Amazon investigating claims of employees leaking data for bribes

Amazon.com said on Monday it was investigating suspected internal leaks of confidential information by its employees for bribes to remove fake reviews and other seller scams from its website. Amazon employees are offering internal data and other classified information through intermediaries, to independent merchants selling their products on the site to help them boost sales in return for payments, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing sources. The practice, which is a violation of


Amazon.com said on Monday it was investigating suspected internal leaks of confidential information by its employees for bribes to remove fake reviews and other seller scams from its website. Amazon employees are offering internal data and other classified information through intermediaries, to independent merchants selling their products on the site to help them boost sales in return for payments, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing sources. The practice, which is a violation of
Amazon investigating claims of employees leaking data for bribes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: emmanuel dunnand, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, report, number, data, internal, violation, bribes, offering, suspected, reviews, investigating, employees, leaking, sales, claims, payments


Amazon investigating claims of employees leaking data for bribes

Amazon.com said on Monday it was investigating suspected internal leaks of confidential information by its employees for bribes to remove fake reviews and other seller scams from its website.

Amazon employees are offering internal data and other classified information through intermediaries, to independent merchants selling their products on the site to help them boost sales in return for payments, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing sources.

The practice, which is a violation of the company’s policy, is particularly strong in China, the report added, as the number of sellers there are soaring.

“We hold our employees to a high ethical standard and anyone in violation of our code faces discipline, including termination and potential legal and criminal penalties,” a company spokesperson told Reuters.

Brokers for Amazon employees in Shenzhen are offering internal sales metrics and reviewers’ email addresses, as well as a service to delete negative reviews and restore banned Amazon accounts in exchange for payments ranging from about $80 to more than $2,000, the WSJ report said.

The e-commerce giant is also investigating a number of cases involving employees, including some in the U.S., suspected of accepting these bribes, according to the Journal report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: emmanuel dunnand, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, report, number, data, internal, violation, bribes, offering, suspected, reviews, investigating, employees, leaking, sales, claims, payments


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