China says Canada’s detention of Huawei exec is ‘vile in nature’

China summoned the Canadian ambassador to protest the detention of a top executive of leading Chinese tech giant Huawei, calling it “unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature” and warning of “grave consequences” if she is not released. “Such a move ignores the law and is unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature,” Le said in the statement. “China strongly urges the Canadian side to immediately release the detained Huawei executive … or face grave consequences that the Canadian si


China summoned the Canadian ambassador to protest the detention of a top executive of leading Chinese tech giant Huawei, calling it “unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature” and warning of “grave consequences” if she is not released. “Such a move ignores the law and is unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature,” Le said in the statement. “China strongly urges the Canadian side to immediately release the detained Huawei executive … or face grave consequences that the Canadian si
China says Canada’s detention of Huawei exec is ‘vile in nature’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: ng han guan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, detention, canadas, mengs, foreign, court, violation, exec, nature, skycom, china, chinese, meng, vile, canadian, huawei


China says Canada's detention of Huawei exec is 'vile in nature'

China summoned the Canadian ambassador to protest the detention of a top executive of leading Chinese tech giant Huawei, calling it “unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature” and warning of “grave consequences” if she is not released.

A report by the official Xinhua News Agency carried on the Foreign Ministry’s website said that Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng called in Ambassador John McCallum on Saturday over the holding of Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, who is reportedly suspected of trying to evade U.S. trade curbs on Iran.

Huawei is the biggest global supplier of network gear for phone and internet companies and has been the target of deepening U.S. security concerns over its ties to the Chinese government. The U.S. has pressured European countries and other allies to limit use of its technology, warning they could be opening themselves up to surveillance and theft of information.

Le told McCallum that Meng’s detention at the request of the United States while transferring flights in Vancouver was a “severe violation” of her “legitimate rights and interests.”

“Such a move ignores the law and is unreasonable, unconscionable, and vile in nature,” Le said in the statement.

“China strongly urges the Canadian side to immediately release the detained Huawei executive … or face grave consequences that the Canadian side should be held accountable for,” Le said.

Roland Paris, a former foreign policy adviser to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, said that Chinese pressure on the Canadian government won’t work.

“Perhaps because the Chinese state controls its judicial system, Beijing sometimes has difficulty understanding or believing that courts can be independent in a rule-of-law country. There’s no point in pressuring the Canadian government. Judges will decide,” Paris tweeted in response to the comments from Beijing.

A Canadian prosecutor urged a Vancouver court to deny bail to Meng, whose case is shaking up U.S.-China relations and worrying global financial markets.

Meng, also the daughter of Huawei’s founder, was detained at the request of the U.S. during a layover at the Vancouver airport Dec. 1 — the same day that Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping of China agreed over dinner to a 90-day ceasefire in a trade dispute that threatens to disrupt global commerce.

The U.S. alleges that Huawei used a Hong Kong shell company to sell equipment in Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions. It also says that Meng and Huawei misled American banks about its business dealings in Iran.

The surprise arrest raises doubts about whether the trade truce will hold and whether the world’s two biggest economies can resolve the complicated issues that divide them.

Canadian prosecutor John Gibb-Carsley said in a court hearing Friday that a warrant had been issued for Meng’s arrest in New York Aug. 22. He said Meng, arrested en route to Mexico from Hong Kong, was aware of the investigation and had been avoiding the United States for months, even though her teenage son goes to school in Boston.

Gibb-Carsley alleged that Huawei had done business in Iran through a Hong Kong company called Skycom. Meng, he said, had misled U.S. banks into thinking that Huawei and Skycom were separate when, in fact, “Skycom was Huawei.” Meng has contended that Huawei sold Skycom in 2009.

In urging the court to reject Meng’s bail request, Gibb-Carsley said the Huawei executive had vast resources and a strong incentive to bolt: She’s facing fraud charges in the United States that could put her in prison for 30 years.

The hearing will resume Monday after Meng spends the weekend in jail.

Huawei, in a brief statement emailed to The Associated Press, said that “we have every confidence that the Canadian and U.S. legal systems will reach the right conclusion.”

Canadian officials have declined to comment on Chinese threats of retaliation over the case, instead emphasizing the independence of Canada’s judiciary along with the importance of Ottawa’s relationship with Beijing.

Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland said Canada “has assured China that due process is absolutely being followed in Canada, that consular access for China to Ms. Meng will absolutely be provided.”

“We are a rule of law country and we will be following our laws as we have thus far in this matter and as we will continue to do,” Freeland said Friday.

While protesting what it calls Canada’s violation of Meng’s human rights, China’s ruling Communist Party stands accused of mass incarcerations of its Muslim minority without due process, locking up those exercising their right to free speech and refusing to allow foreign citizens to leave the country in order to bring pressure on their relatives accused of financial crimes.

The party also takes the lead in prosecutions of those accused of corruption or other crimes in a highly opaque process, without supervision from the court system or independent bodies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: ng han guan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, detention, canadas, mengs, foreign, court, violation, exec, nature, skycom, china, chinese, meng, vile, canadian, huawei


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Arrest of Huawei CFO shows ‘the gloves are now fully off,’ says Eurasia Group

The arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Canada, reportedly related to a violation of U.S. sanctions, will corrode trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing, risk consultancy Eurasia Group said Thursday. “Beijing is likely to react angrily to this latest arrest of a Chinese citizen in a third country for violating U.S. law,” Eurasia analysts wrote. Canada’s Department of Justice said on Wednesday the country arrested Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she is facing extradit


The arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Canada, reportedly related to a violation of U.S. sanctions, will corrode trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing, risk consultancy Eurasia Group said Thursday. “Beijing is likely to react angrily to this latest arrest of a Chinese citizen in a third country for violating U.S. law,” Eurasia analysts wrote. Canada’s Department of Justice said on Wednesday the country arrested Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she is facing extradit
Arrest of Huawei CFO shows ‘the gloves are now fully off,’ says Eurasia Group Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: huileng tan, photographer, collection, getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, related, statement, cfo, fully, sanctions, chinese, violation, group, trade, telecommunications, arrest, gloves, told, huawei, shows, eurasia


Arrest of Huawei CFO shows 'the gloves are now fully off,' says Eurasia Group

The arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Canada, reportedly related to a violation of U.S. sanctions, will corrode trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing, risk consultancy Eurasia Group said Thursday.

“Beijing is likely to react angrily to this latest arrest of a Chinese citizen in a third country for violating U.S. law,” Eurasia analysts wrote.

In fact, Global Times — a hyper-nationalistic tabloid tied to the Chinese Communist Party — responded to the arrest by posting on Twitter a statement about trade war escalation it attributed to an expert “close to the Chinese Ministry of Commerce.”

“China should be fully prepared for an escalation in the #tradewar with the US, as the US will not ease its stance on China, and the recent arrest of the senior executive of #Huawei is a vivid example,” said the statement, paired with a photo of opposing fists with Chinese and American flags superimposed upon them.

Canada’s Department of Justice said on Wednesday the country arrested Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she is facing extradition to the U.S. The arrest is related to violations of U.S. sanctions, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters.

U.S. authorities have been probing Huawei, one of the world’s largest makers of telecommunications network equipment, since at least 2016 for allegedly shipping U.S.-origin products to Iran and other countries in violation of U.S. export and sanctions laws, sources told Reuters in April.

The analysts said the Huawei executive’s arrest will not derail the start of trade negotiations after U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping’s meeting last weekend in Argentina saw them agree to first steps to resolve their trade dispute. Still, they acknowledged, the incident involving Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is likely to cloud talks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: huileng tan, photographer, collection, getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, related, statement, cfo, fully, sanctions, chinese, violation, group, trade, telecommunications, arrest, gloves, told, huawei, shows, eurasia


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Europe markets at 2 year low

Europe’s basic resources stocks — with their heavy exposure to China — tumbled 4.2 percent during the session. Meanwhile, autos stocks — seen as a trade war proxy because of the sector’s export-heavy constituent’s — were also among the worst performers, down more than 4.5 percent. Tech stocks were also down more than 3 percent on Thursday, following the arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Vancouver on Wednesday. Meng Wanzhou, the daughter of Huawei’s founder, was arrested by Can


Europe’s basic resources stocks — with their heavy exposure to China — tumbled 4.2 percent during the session. Meanwhile, autos stocks — seen as a trade war proxy because of the sector’s export-heavy constituent’s — were also among the worst performers, down more than 4.5 percent. Tech stocks were also down more than 3 percent on Thursday, following the arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Vancouver on Wednesday. Meng Wanzhou, the daughter of Huawei’s founder, was arrested by Can
Europe markets at 2 year low Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, war, low, europe, worst, violation, stocks, tumbled, trade, wanzhou, arrest, vancouver, huaweis


Europe markets at 2 year low

Market focus is largely attuned to the arrest of a top executive at Chinese tech giant Huawei, amid investor concern that the news could derail progress in U.S.-Sino trade talks.

Europe’s basic resources stocks — with their heavy exposure to China — tumbled 4.2 percent during the session. Britain’s FTSE 100 index slumped 3.6 percent Thursday, as mining stocks plummeted. London-listed Antofagasta led the sectoral losses, down more than 7 percent.

Meanwhile, autos stocks — seen as a trade war proxy because of the sector’s export-heavy constituent’s — were also among the worst performers, down more than 4.5 percent. Faurecia and Daimler both dropped more than 6 percent.

Tech stocks were also down more than 3 percent on Thursday, following the arrest of Huawei’s global chief financial officer in Vancouver on Wednesday. Meng Wanzhou, the daughter of Huawei’s founder, was arrested by Canadian authorities on December 1, reportedly over the possible violation of sanctions against Iran. She now faces extradition to the United States.

Looking at individual stocks, Italy’s DiaSorin tumbled toward the bottom of the European benchmark Thursday morning, after Kepler Cheuvreux cut its stock recommendation to “hold” from “buy.” Shares of the Milan-listed company fell more than 7 percent on the news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, war, low, europe, worst, violation, stocks, tumbled, trade, wanzhou, arrest, vancouver, huaweis


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Six White House officials violated the Hatch Act, agency finds

1 Hour Ago | 05:12Signed into law in 1939, the Hatch Act bars employees of the executive branch from using their official positions to actively support or oppose any candidate for federal office. When the OSC finds that employees have violated the Hatch Act, the consequences are typically minimal, and usually consist of a warning or sometimes a remedial briefing on the rules. The OSC found that Shah’s tweet “highlighted research done by a political party and provided a link to the party’s websit


1 Hour Ago | 05:12Signed into law in 1939, the Hatch Act bars employees of the executive branch from using their official positions to actively support or oppose any candidate for federal office. When the OSC finds that employees have violated the Hatch Act, the consequences are typically minimal, and usually consist of a warning or sometimes a remedial briefing on the rules. The OSC found that Shah’s tweet “highlighted research done by a political party and provided a link to the party’s websit
Six White House officials violated the Hatch Act, agency finds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: christina wilkie, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tweets, osc, agency, violation, officials, violated, white, maga, hatch, finds, house, act, cited, research, trump


Six White House officials violated the Hatch Act, agency finds

The G-20 summit is underway, but what does it mean for investors? 1 Hour Ago | 05:12

Signed into law in 1939, the Hatch Act bars employees of the executive branch from using their official positions to actively support or oppose any candidate for federal office. This can mean making political speeches for a candidate, sending letters or endorsements, or publicly promoting one party over another. The president and vice president, however, are exempt from the restrictions. When the OSC finds that employees have violated the Hatch Act, the consequences are typically minimal, and usually consist of a warning or sometimes a remedial briefing on the rules.

Friday’s rulings were issued in response to formal complaints filed by the Committee for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a nonprofit public interest watchdog group.

Westerhout was cited for two tweets she posted this spring, both of which contained the acronym MAGA, which is short for Trump’s campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again.”

Farah was also cited for a MAGA tweet in May that read, “This is what #MAGA looks like: Under @POTUS TRUMP, the unemployment rate is the lowest it’s been in 17 years.”

Wood and Aguirre Ferre were also both cited for posting tweets that had MAGA in them.

Shah’s violation consisted of a June 4 tweet in which he wrote, “Fantastic @RNCResearch release #Winning: 500 Days of American Greatness.” The OSC found that Shah’s tweet “highlighted research done by a political party and provided a link to the party’s website and its research,” which constituted a Hatch Act violation.

The final aide to be cited, Jessica Ditto, had committed a violation by retweeting Shah’s tweet with the RNC research link, OSC found.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment from CNBC on Friday about the ruling.

CREW’s executive director, Noah Bookbinder, said in a statement that the group was “glad” to see the rulings, but he cautioned that official warnings have so far not been enough to stop the steady stream of Hatch Act violations being committed by aides in the Trump White House.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: christina wilkie, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tweets, osc, agency, violation, officials, violated, white, maga, hatch, finds, house, act, cited, research, trump


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UN ambassador Nikki Haley condemns Russia’s ‘outrageous’ seizure of Ukraine ships

The action sparked an international outcry, as well as calls for more sanctions against Russia. Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said Monday that he will impose martial law across Ukraine for 30 days, beginning Wednesday, Nov. 28. In a statement released later Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo echoed Haley’s condemnation of Russia’s actions in the Black Sea. Pompeo also urged Putin and Poroshenko to “engage directly to resolve this situation.” Haley did not say whether the U.S. would co


The action sparked an international outcry, as well as calls for more sanctions against Russia. Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said Monday that he will impose martial law across Ukraine for 30 days, beginning Wednesday, Nov. 28. In a statement released later Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo echoed Haley’s condemnation of Russia’s actions in the Black Sea. Pompeo also urged Putin and Poroshenko to “engage directly to resolve this situation.” Haley did not say whether the U.S. would co
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: kevin breuninger, don emmert, afp, getty images, pavel rebrov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russias, haley, sanctions, russian, president, pompeo, international, russia, poroshenko, nikki, ships, condemns, ukraine, putin, outrageous, seizure, violation, ambassador


UN ambassador Nikki Haley condemns Russia's 'outrageous' seizure of Ukraine ships

The action sparked an international outcry, as well as calls for more sanctions against Russia.

But the Kremlin’s foreign ministry blamed Ukraine for the incident, saying Kiev concocted a “painstakingly thought-through and planned provocation” that was “aimed at igniting another source of tension in the region in order to create a pretext to ramp up sanctions against Russia.”

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said Monday that he will impose martial law across Ukraine for 30 days, beginning Wednesday, Nov. 28.

In a statement released later Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo echoed Haley’s condemnation of Russia’s actions in the Black Sea. Pompeo also urged Putin and Poroshenko to “engage directly to resolve this situation.”

Haley noted during the Monday meeting that Trump’s administration “would welcome a normal relationship with Russia.”

Trump has complimented Putin before and after becoming president. During a joint news conference in Helsinki in July, Trump even appeared to side with Putin over the conclusions of his own U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia had interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Haley did not say whether the U.S. would consider ramping up sanctions against Russia in retaliation for its “violation under international law.”

But the U.S. will maintain existing sanctions slapped on Russia for its annexation of the Crimean peninsula in 2014, she said, and “further Russian escalation of this kind will only make matters worse.”

The “outrageous violation of sovereign Ukrainian territory is part of a pattern of Russian behavior that includes the purported annexation of Crimea, and abuses against countless Ukrainians in Crimea,” Haley said, “as well as stoking a conflict that has taken the lives of more than ten thousand people in eastern Ukraine.”

She added: “It shows no signs of decreasing.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: kevin breuninger, don emmert, afp, getty images, pavel rebrov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russias, haley, sanctions, russian, president, pompeo, international, russia, poroshenko, nikki, ships, condemns, ukraine, putin, outrageous, seizure, violation, ambassador


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Amazon investigating claims of employees leaking data for bribes

Amazon.com said on Monday it was investigating suspected internal leaks of confidential information by its employees for bribes to remove fake reviews and other seller scams from its website. Amazon employees are offering internal data and other classified information through intermediaries, to independent merchants selling their products on the site to help them boost sales in return for payments, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing sources. The practice, which is a violation of


Amazon.com said on Monday it was investigating suspected internal leaks of confidential information by its employees for bribes to remove fake reviews and other seller scams from its website. Amazon employees are offering internal data and other classified information through intermediaries, to independent merchants selling their products on the site to help them boost sales in return for payments, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing sources. The practice, which is a violation of
Amazon investigating claims of employees leaking data for bribes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: emmanuel dunnand, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, report, number, data, internal, violation, bribes, offering, suspected, reviews, investigating, employees, leaking, sales, claims, payments


Amazon investigating claims of employees leaking data for bribes

Amazon.com said on Monday it was investigating suspected internal leaks of confidential information by its employees for bribes to remove fake reviews and other seller scams from its website.

Amazon employees are offering internal data and other classified information through intermediaries, to independent merchants selling their products on the site to help them boost sales in return for payments, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing sources.

The practice, which is a violation of the company’s policy, is particularly strong in China, the report added, as the number of sellers there are soaring.

“We hold our employees to a high ethical standard and anyone in violation of our code faces discipline, including termination and potential legal and criminal penalties,” a company spokesperson told Reuters.

Brokers for Amazon employees in Shenzhen are offering internal sales metrics and reviewers’ email addresses, as well as a service to delete negative reviews and restore banned Amazon accounts in exchange for payments ranging from about $80 to more than $2,000, the WSJ report said.

The e-commerce giant is also investigating a number of cases involving employees, including some in the U.S., suspected of accepting these bribes, according to the Journal report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: emmanuel dunnand, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, report, number, data, internal, violation, bribes, offering, suspected, reviews, investigating, employees, leaking, sales, claims, payments


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Serena Williams fined $17,000 for US Open final remarks

The fine handed to Serena Williams of $17,000 was relatively insignificant compared to the $1.85 million she received for finishing as runner-up at the U.S. Open. During Saturday’s controversial final, in which Naomi Osaka provided Japan with its first tennis Grand Slam singles champion, Williams was cited three times for code violations in which she called the chair umpire Carlos Ramos a “liar” and a “thief.” Williams, who is still seeking a record-equaling 24th Grand Slam singles title, was ha


The fine handed to Serena Williams of $17,000 was relatively insignificant compared to the $1.85 million she received for finishing as runner-up at the U.S. Open. During Saturday’s controversial final, in which Naomi Osaka provided Japan with its first tennis Grand Slam singles champion, Williams was cited three times for code violations in which she called the chair umpire Carlos Ramos a “liar” and a “thief.” Williams, who is still seeking a record-equaling 24th Grand Slam singles title, was ha
Serena Williams fined $17,000 for US Open final remarks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: adam reed, michael owens, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, williams, serena, 17000, final, grand, womens, fined, game, thief, say, singles, shes, violation, remarks, open, slam


Serena Williams fined $17,000 for US Open final remarks

The fine handed to Serena Williams of $17,000 was relatively insignificant compared to the $1.85 million she received for finishing as runner-up at the U.S. Open. But, the ramifications of what caused it continue to divide the world of tennis.

During Saturday’s controversial final, in which Naomi Osaka provided Japan with its first tennis Grand Slam singles champion, Williams was cited three times for code violations in which she called the chair umpire Carlos Ramos a “liar” and a “thief.” She also alleged he treated her differently than male players.

Williams, who is still seeking a record-equaling 24th Grand Slam singles title, was handed a warning for a coaching violation, before being deducted a point for smashing her racket. She then had a heated argument with Ramos, resulting in her being docked a game during the second set.

As the first violation was announced, Williams approached the umpire’s chair to say she never takes coaching when on a competitive court and would rather lose than “cheat to win.”

“I’m here fighting for women’s rights and for women’s equality and for all kinds of stuff and for me to say thief and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was a sexist remark,” said Williams after the final. “He’s never took a game from a man ’cause they said thief, for me it blows my mind!”

Tennis great Billie Jean King, who won 12 Grand Slam titles of her own, said on social media: “When a woman is emotional, she’s ‘hysterical’ and she’s penalized for it. When a man does the same, he’s ‘outspoken’ and there are no repercussions.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: adam reed, michael owens, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, williams, serena, 17000, final, grand, womens, fined, game, thief, say, singles, shes, violation, remarks, open, slam


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French tennis player Alize Cornet gets violation after shirt change, sparking sexism chatter

The U.S. Open issued a statement Wednesday noting that, “All players (men’s and women’s) can change their shirts when sitting in the player chair. This is not considered Code violation. “We regret that a Code violation was assessed to Ms. Cornet yesterday. This code violation came under the Grand Slam rules and we are pleased to see the USTA has now changed this policy. Guidelines in the Grand Slam rule book state that female players are given change of attire breaks upon request.


The U.S. Open issued a statement Wednesday noting that, “All players (men’s and women’s) can change their shirts when sitting in the player chair. This is not considered Code violation. “We regret that a Code violation was assessed to Ms. Cornet yesterday. This code violation came under the Grand Slam rules and we are pleased to see the USTA has now changed this policy. Guidelines in the Grand Slam rule book state that female players are given change of attire breaks upon request.
French tennis player Alize Cornet gets violation after shirt change, sparking sexism chatter Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-29  Authors: scott gleeson, minas panagiotakis, getty images sport, getty images
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French tennis player Alize Cornet gets violation after shirt change, sparking sexism chatter

The U.S. Open issued a statement Wednesday noting that, “All players (men’s and women’s) can change their shirts when sitting in the player chair. This is not considered Code violation.

“We regret that a Code violation was assessed to Ms. Cornet yesterday. We have clarified the policy to ensure this will not happen moving forward.”

More from USA Today:

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With soaring temps in NY, US Open has new heat rule that also protects men

Browns LB Mychal Kendricks admits to insider trading after federal charges

The code violation “was unfair and it was not based on a WTA rule, as the WTA has no rule against a change of attire on court,” the WTA said in a statement Wednesday.

“The WTA has always been and always will be a pioneer for women and women’s sports. This code violation came under the Grand Slam rules and we are pleased to see the USTA has now changed this policy. Alize did nothing wrong.”

Guidelines in the Grand Slam rule book state that female players are given change of attire breaks upon request.

In all cases of players taking toilet breaks or change of attire breaks, the nearest assigned bathroom should be used, according to the Grand Slam rule book. “Additional breaks will be authorized but will be penalised … if the player is not ready to play within the allowed time.

“Any player abuse of this rule will be subject to penalty in accordance with the Unsportsmanlike Conduct section of the Code of Conduct,” the rules stated.

Although Cornet’s shirt change was a spur-of-the-moment situation that US Open officials further assessed Wednesday, it quickly prompted a sexism debate over social media on Tuesday given that male players often change their shirts in front of crowds — particularly during the latest heat wave in New York. Both Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer were seen on television Tuesday changing their T-shirts during their matches. That was while they were sitting, however.

Former British tennis player Judy Murray came to Cornet’s defense Tuesday, initially suggesting there was a double standard over Twitter. Fellow tennis players Casey Dellacqua and Bethanie Mattek-Sands also expressed frustration over social media.

The clothing issue comes on the heels of French Open officials banning Serena Williams’ catsuit outfit in the future, to which Williams batted down the uproar being an issue. “It’s fine,” she told reporters earlier this week.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-29  Authors: scott gleeson, minas panagiotakis, getty images sport, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, french, players, code, change, gets, slam, tennis, rule, open, player, shirt, wta, breaks, chatter, cornet, sparking, violation, sexism


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Trump didn’t disclose full payments to Cohen in official paperwork, a potential violation

In May, Trump signed a financial disclosure form that stated he “fully reimbursed” personal attorney Michael Cohen between $100,001 and $250,000 in 2017. Specifically, the letter says OGE should look at whether Trump underreported “knowingly and willfully, in violation of federal law.” It also asked for this inconsistency to expand the Department of Justice’s investigation into Trump’s previous financial disclosure report, which did not include any debts or payments to Cohen. Cohen then sent mon


In May, Trump signed a financial disclosure form that stated he “fully reimbursed” personal attorney Michael Cohen between $100,001 and $250,000 in 2017. Specifically, the letter says OGE should look at whether Trump underreported “knowingly and willfully, in violation of federal law.” It also asked for this inconsistency to expand the Department of Justice’s investigation into Trump’s previous financial disclosure report, which did not include any debts or payments to Cohen. Cohen then sent mon
Trump didn’t disclose full payments to Cohen in official paperwork, a potential violation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-24  Authors: jordan malter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payments, paid, president, potential, didnt, disclosure, paperwork, cohen, form, financial, trump, disclose, violation, payment, official, oge


Trump didn't disclose full payments to Cohen in official paperwork, a potential violation

President Donald Trump could be facing yet another legal headache. A watchdog group is pointing to a discrepancy between his financial disclosures and the payments made to his former lawyer as detailed in court documents.

In May, Trump signed a financial disclosure form that stated he “fully reimbursed” personal attorney Michael Cohen between $100,001 and $250,000 in 2017. But court documents filed by federal prosecutors Tuesday stated that Cohen received $420,000 from the Trump Organization over the course of last year.

The discrepancy prompted the Project on Government Oversight, or POGO, to send a letter to the Office of Government Ethics, or OGE, on Thursday, asking it to review the matter. POGO is a nonpartisan independent watchdog that investigates and exposes waste, corruption and abuse of power, according to its website.

Specifically, the letter says OGE should look at whether Trump underreported “knowingly and willfully, in violation of federal law.”

It also asked for this inconsistency to expand the Department of Justice’s investigation into Trump’s previous financial disclosure report, which did not include any debts or payments to Cohen.

“It is quite notable,” said POGO’s general counsel, Scott Amey. “This may constitute a false statement by the president. If they were paying him $420 [thousand] they should have put the whole amount in there.”

The OGE states on its website that criminal action could be taken against any individual who “knowingly and willfully falsifies information required to be reported.” The agency reiterated the point in a tweet Thursday.

John Coffee, a professor at Columbia Law school focusing on securities regulation and white-collar crime, said the difference of $170,000 is quite likely material, “and thus, a potential criminal violation.”

The whole situation revolves around payments that Cohen, Trump’s former personal lawyer, made to adult film star Stephanie Clifford, also known as Stormy Daniels. Cohen is known to have paid Clifford $130,000 just before the 2016 presidential election in exchange for her silence over an alleged affair with Trump.

Trump and his team initially dodged questions on the topic, and Trump denied knowing anything about the payment in April. But Rudy Giuliani, the president’s lead outside counsel in the Russia probe, confirmed the payment in early May in an interview with Fox News. Trump then tweeted about it, saying it wasn’t campaign related.

Ethics experts wondered whether Trump’s debt to Cohen would be disclosed on his OGE form 278e, a financial disclosure that candidates and public officials in the executive branch are required to complete annually.

Sure enough, the liability was reported in a footnote, dated May 15, 2018, and signed by Trump. The OGE told the Department of Justice that the payment made by Cohen was required to be reported as a liability and that the information provided in the form fulfilled that requirement.

But now, with Cohen pleading guilty to the felony of making an excessive campaign contribution, and implicating the president in the process, the value of the disclosure is getting a fresh look.

The filing states that Cohen showed a copy of a bank statement to executives of the Trump Organization, reflecting the $130,000 he paid Clifford. He also added in a wire fee and another $50,000 for “tech services.”

According to the filing, it was “the Company” that “grossed up” the requested reimbursement for “tax purposes” – to make sure Cohen got paid in full after paying taxes – an unorthodox practice for a reimbursement. They also added a bonus of $60,000. Cohen then sent monthly invoices, and the total of $420,000 was paid to Cohen in $35,000 increments.

Amey says he doesn’t think there’s much “wiggle room” over the value of the disclosure.

By the time the president signed the form on May 15, 2018, the full sum has been paid out to Cohen.

The concern over the discrepancy is not unanimous. Since U.S. attorneys for the Southern District of New York viewed Cohen’s payment to Clifford as an illegal campaign contribution, it may become unnecessary for Trump to disclose it personally.

But Trump can’t have it both ways. If he claims the payment had nothing to do with the campaign, as he did in his Fox News interview this week, then it would need to be disclosed on his form 278e. Walter Shaub, former director of the OGE, and former Obama ethics counsel Norm Eisen each tweeted about the issue this week. They are both frequent critics of Trump.

To be clear, Amey says he is unaware of anyone being charged for an inaccuracy on a financial disclosure like this. And Coffee points out, “You can make a factually incorrect statement without it being criminal,” for example, if Trump did not know about the additional payments beyond $130,000.

The White house did not return CNBC’s request for comment by the time of publication. The Office of Government Ethics pointed CNBC toward the letter it sent the Department of Justice in May and had no comment on the current matter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-24  Authors: jordan malter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payments, paid, president, potential, didnt, disclosure, paperwork, cohen, form, financial, trump, disclose, violation, payment, official, oge


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Here’s what that start-up using blockchain to save journalism is actually doing

Advertising-based revenue models are not banned, but Civil newsrooms will have to be transparent about their advertisers. “We recognize the significant role that advertising can play in a newsroom’s revenue model. Instead, the CVL tokens are meant to distribute the accountability for producing quality journalism among a large number of stakeholders interested in journalism, rather than a narrow group of business owners interested only in profits. If a citizen notices a newsroom in violation of C


Advertising-based revenue models are not banned, but Civil newsrooms will have to be transparent about their advertisers. “We recognize the significant role that advertising can play in a newsroom’s revenue model. Instead, the CVL tokens are meant to distribute the accountability for producing quality journalism among a large number of stakeholders interested in journalism, rather than a narrow group of business owners interested only in profits. If a citizen notices a newsroom in violation of C
Here’s what that start-up using blockchain to save journalism is actually doing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-18  Authors: chloe aiello, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quality, token, newsroom, civil, actually, citizens, using, heres, violation, tokens, newsrooms, revenue, save, startup, blockchain, doing, journalism


Here's what that start-up using blockchain to save journalism is actually doing

“We’re going to miss these newspapers if they disappear” 10:18 PM ET Sun, 6 May 2018 | 04:46

Beginning Aug. 13, Civil will have an initial coin offering, selling up $32 million worth of its cryptocurrency tokens, CVL, valued at 27 to 94 cents each. There will be a fixed number of tokens.

The company prefers to call the ICO a “token launch,” because it’s meant for people who want to participate in the platform rather than for speculators. To weed out people just trying to cash in, interested buyers are required to register, answer and pass a questionnaire and be approved. Then, they must demonstrate “proof of use” to ensure tokens are being used as intended.

People won’t have to use CVL tokens just to read the news — each newsroom will be a free-standing organization with conventional revenue streams, like subscription models and donations. Advertising-based revenue models are not banned, but Civil newsrooms will have to be transparent about their advertisers.

“We recognize the significant role that advertising can play in a newsroom’s revenue model. We’re not looking to create an additional hurdle by banning ads outright. Newsrooms will, however, need to be transparent about advertisers, and recognize that their ability to publish on Civil can be challenged if there’s ever a credible case that advertisers are influencing their editorial process,” the Civil team wrote in an email.

Instead, the CVL tokens are meant to distribute the accountability for producing quality journalism among a large number of stakeholders interested in journalism, rather than a narrow group of business owners interested only in profits. The tokens give stakeholders, known as citizens, the power to launch their own newsrooms on the platform, and to reward quality journalism by buying memberships to particular publications (although traditional currency can also be used for that).

More centrally, citizens can also use tokens to challenge a newsroom they find in gross violation of Civil’s constitution, which is built upon standard journalism ethics and prohibits things like hate speech, misinformation promotion and plagiarism.

“If you are committing a gross violation of these things, you have an incentivized audience ready to challenge a newsroom,” Coolidge said.

If a citizen notices a newsroom in violation of Civil’s constitution, he or she can stake tokens to challenge that newsroom. The stake is high, about $1,000, to dissuade citizens from challenging a newsroom based on typos and other minor mistakes.

Once a newsroom has been challenged, other citizens can then use tokens to vote on the issue. If the violation is determined to be valid, the newsroom must surrender the amount staked by the challenger, who then keeps half. Those who weigh in with their votes also get a token payout, thus giving citizens a financial incentive weigh in on the quality of the journalism they consume.

“We are using cryptoeconomics — cryptoeconomic games — to create a dynamic of incentives and dissuasion to facilitate good actors,” Civil co-founder Lillian Ruiz said.

Civil acknowledges the opinion of the masses is not infallible. In the case of a malicious attack or mob rule, token holders, journalists or newsrooms can appeal to a third party arbiter, known as the Civil Council. The Council is made up of notable journalists, including the Tow Center’s Emily Bell, Rappler CEO Maria Ressa, former Wikimedia Foundation director Sue Gardner, Columbia University professor Raju Narisetti and Ellen Goodman, professor of Law at Rutgers University.

If a newsroom violates the constitution, it will be excluded from the Civil Registry, a list of trustworthy news organizations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-18  Authors: chloe aiello, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quality, token, newsroom, civil, actually, citizens, using, heres, violation, tokens, newsrooms, revenue, save, startup, blockchain, doing, journalism


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