Stamps.com jumps more than 50% Thursday, a year after crashing nearly 50% in a single day

There’s volatility and then there’s Stamps.com. Shares of Stamps.com rallied more than 50% on Thursday after the mailing and shipping services company posted quarterly numbers that blew away analyst expectations. The company reported an adjusted profit of $2.12 per share for the fourth quarter on revenue of $160.9 million. The company expects full-year earnings per share to range between $4 and $5, well above a FactSet estimate of $3.24. Subscribe to CNBC PRO for exclusive insights and analysis,


There’s volatility and then there’s Stamps.com.
Shares of Stamps.com rallied more than 50% on Thursday after the mailing and shipping services company posted quarterly numbers that blew away analyst expectations.
The company reported an adjusted profit of $2.12 per share for the fourth quarter on revenue of $160.9 million.
The company expects full-year earnings per share to range between $4 and $5, well above a FactSet estimate of $3.24.
Subscribe to CNBC PRO for exclusive insights and analysis,
Stamps.com jumps more than 50% Thursday, a year after crashing nearly 50% in a single day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-20  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, single, volatility, jumps, day, share, stampscom, crashing, partnership, nearly, company, earnings, stock, service, theres, shipping


Stamps.com jumps more than 50% Thursday, a year after crashing nearly 50% in a single day

There’s volatility and then there’s Stamps.com.

Shares of Stamps.com rallied more than 50% on Thursday after the mailing and shipping services company posted quarterly numbers that blew away analyst expectations.

The company reported an adjusted profit of $2.12 per share for the fourth quarter on revenue of $160.9 million. Analysts polled by Refinitiv expected earnings of $1.03 per share on sales of $144.7 million.

Stamps.com’s stock has experienced high levels of volatility over the past year. The company said in late February 2019 that it was discontinuing its partnership with the U.S. Postal Service. The shares crashed nearly 50% then. However, the stock later rebounded from those losses and in October the company announced a partnership with UPS.

CEO Ken McBride said during a call with analysts on Wednesday that the partnership offers Stamps.com customers discounts of up to 55% on UPS standard shipping rates. The partnership “drives the value proposition of our service offerings, empowers our customers by offering them more choice and control over their shipping needs,” he said.

Stamps.com also issued better-than-expected earnings guidance for fiscal 2020. The company expects full-year earnings per share to range between $4 and $5, well above a FactSet estimate of $3.24.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-20  Authors: fred imbert
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Stocks expected to rise even as virus creates volatility: ‘The market thinks the worst is over’

“It does feel as though the market thinks the worst is over,” said Ed Keon, chief investment strategist at QMA. Nvidia said it would take a $100 million hit from the virus, but its revenue forecast was still above expectations. Resilient marketEven with the negative news and doubts about the virus, analysts say the market has the momentum to move higher. But Robert Sluymer, technical analyst with Fundstrat, said the market may stay range bound for awhile until there’s more clarity on the virus.


“It does feel as though the market thinks the worst is over,” said Ed Keon, chief investment strategist at QMA.
Nvidia said it would take a $100 million hit from the virus, but its revenue forecast was still above expectations.
Resilient marketEven with the negative news and doubts about the virus, analysts say the market has the momentum to move higher.
But Robert Sluymer, technical analyst with Fundstrat, said the market may stay range bound for awhile until there’s more clarity on the virus.

Stocks expected to rise even as virus creates volatility: ‘The market thinks the worst is over’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, virus, expected, creates, higher, quarter, work, hit, market, volatility, companies, range, fed, rise, think, thinks, worst


Stocks expected to rise even as virus creates volatility: 'The market thinks the worst is over'

Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange. Brendan McDermid | Reuters

Stocks are likely to remain hostage to developments involving the coronavirus in the week ahead, and even so, the market could continue to hit new highs. Economists have been reducing China’s growth outlook for the quarter, with some seeing little or no growth and then a bounce back in the high single digits next quarter. The U.S. economy is not expected to take a big hit, but the question for the stock market is how will corporate earnings be impacted. “It does feel as though the market thinks the worst is over,” said Ed Keon, chief investment strategist at QMA. “The pace of change is slowing. None of us really know, and there’s a lot of skepticism, including in Washington that they can’t believe what’s coming out of China.”

Keon believes the market looks poised to head higher and it is trading as if the virus will not make a big dent in the economy or profits. “The market didn’t really get much of a drawback, compared to SARS or other episodes. There’s no doubt he world will suffer a hit over the first and second quarter and maybe longer,” he said. Companies reporting earnings in the coming week include Walmart Tuesday; ViacomCBS Thursday, and Deere on Friday. Hyatt Hotels reports Wednesday, and Norwegian Cruise Lines reports Thursday. Economic releases include Tuesday’s Empire State and Thursday’s Philadelphia Fed manufacturing surveys, as well as Markit PMI on Friday. There are also a parade of Fed speakers, including Vice Chairman Richard Clarida, Fed Governor Lael Brainard and Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan.

Profit warnings

Some companies are already raising warnings, like Cisco which said orders were down and that the forward-looking numbers were not factoring in potential supply chain disruptions. Nvidia said it would take a $100 million hit from the virus, but its revenue forecast was still above expectations. Under Armour said its sales will be impacted by the virus, when it projected disappointing revenue growth this week. Estee Lauder said its sales will be hit by a decline in travel-related luxury sales. “This is going to start to show up because it will affect supply chains” and exporters, said Keon. “It will have a negative impact. But at the moment, at least, it doesn’t look like it will be a huge deal to companies in the U.S…It will be a factor. The question is, is it a lasting factor that will hurt them through the year, or is it a quarter or two and then gets back to normal. None of us know.”

About 64,000 people, mostly in China, have been infected and about 1,400 have died from the virus. Barry Knapp, Ironsides Macroeconomics director of research, said he sees only a minor impact on U.S. corporate earnings. “There will be some hits in some of the consumer companies that have reasonably big businesses in China. I see this as being a fairly small effect on the U.S.,” Knapp said. He said the disruption to the supply chain should not be nearly as bad as it was when Japan was hit by a tsunami and earthquake in 2011. He expects stocks to continue to move higher, ending the year higher, but he says the market could run into turbulence in the spring when the Fed discusses cutting back its purchases of Treasury bills. For now, the Fed asset purchases, a strong U.S. consumer and the positive benefit to business spending from the trade deal should help drive stocks higher. But by April or May, the Fed could become a negative. “Could we go up another 3 or 4% between now and then? Sure, we could,” he said. Knapp said since World War II, market corrections fanned by Fed policy changes have resulted in brief pullbacks, averaging about 8%. He said the market should then rebound. “It trades in a range for a quarter or two and then resumes its uptrend,” he said, noting the uptrend could coincide with the presidential election this year.

Resilient market

Even with the negative news and doubts about the virus, analysts say the market has the momentum to move higher. But Robert Sluymer, technical analyst with Fundstrat, said the market may stay range bound for awhile until there’s more clarity on the virus. “I had a 3,340 to 3,360 [on the S&P 500] as the point where the market starts to consolidate, and we’re there,” said Sluymer. “I don’t have a year-end target but I think it’s higher. I think we’re in a sloppy range. I think it’s range bound.” But Sluymer also said he thinks the market is just pausing. “Stocks are consolidating above support. The market is acting incredibly resilient and it still looks like an intermediate term pause, a consolidation,” he said. Keon said he’s looking for more gains though the market will continue to be swung by virus-related headlines. “I think it’s going to work its way higher, not at the pace you saw last year. But that’s the way we have our portfolios positioned — the market will work its way higher this year,” he said.

Week ahead calendar


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, virus, expected, creates, higher, quarter, work, hit, market, volatility, companies, range, fed, rise, think, thinks, worst


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Coronavirus is ‘one of the biggest risks to the market,’ $113 billion money manager warns

Wilmington Trust’s Meghan Shue believes the coronavirus outbreak is a huge wildcard for Wall Street. “Coronavirus remains one of the biggest risks to the market at this point,” the firm’s head of investment strategy told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Monday. “I don’t think we know enough to know whether we’re out of the woods as of yet.” Shue, who has $113 billion in assets under management, expects elevated market volatility until number of coronavirus cases peak. “I would expect some further chop


Wilmington Trust’s Meghan Shue believes the coronavirus outbreak is a huge wildcard for Wall Street.
“Coronavirus remains one of the biggest risks to the market at this point,” the firm’s head of investment strategy told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Monday.
“I don’t think we know enough to know whether we’re out of the woods as of yet.”
Shue, who has $113 billion in assets under management, expects elevated market volatility until number of coronavirus cases peak.
“I would expect some further chop
Coronavirus is ‘one of the biggest risks to the market,’ $113 billion money manager warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trading, risks, manager, stocks, impact, warns, money, shue, know, economy, 113, biggest, coronavirus, market, volatility, billion


Coronavirus is 'one of the biggest risks to the market,' $113 billion money manager warns

Wilmington Trust’s Meghan Shue believes the coronavirus outbreak is a huge wildcard for Wall Street.

If the infectious disease keeps spreading, stocks are in trouble, she said.

“Coronavirus remains one of the biggest risks to the market at this point,” the firm’s head of investment strategy told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Monday. “I don’t think we know enough to know whether we’re out of the woods as of yet.”

Despite the fears, stocks kicked off the week in record territory for the S&P 500 and tech-heavy Nasdaq. The Dow rose 174 points, closing Monday’s trading within a hair of its record high.

Shue, who has $113 billion in assets under management, expects elevated market volatility until number of coronavirus cases peak. Historically, she finds the market doesn’t bottom until similar outbreaks reach a top.

“On the international front, we’re watching coronavirus very carefully,” she said. “The U.S. economy is certainly more insulated from the impact of any international slowdown — not necessarily the S&P 500, but the economy as a whole.”

Shue sees two key things to consider: How much the virus spreads outside China and the impact on supply chains.

“From what we’ve been hearing, the larger technology companies [and] semiconductor companies have been able to manage this so far. But we’re getting new information daily,” said Shue, a CNBC contributor. “So, everything I’m saying is with a healthy dose of humility that we still don’t know everything there is to know about the global impact that this disease will have.”

Despite her concern, Shue is still overweight stocks. Her base case is the coronavirus outbreak will plateau this quarter and the global economy will quickly rebound.

“I would expect some further choppiness, some further volatility,” Shue said. “But over the next 12 months, we’re still optimistic on equities.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trading, risks, manager, stocks, impact, warns, money, shue, know, economy, 113, biggest, coronavirus, market, volatility, billion


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The 60-40 portfolio just doesn’t ‘cut it anymore’ in this market, Wharton’s Jeremy Siegel says

Hindsight is 20/20 on the 60/40 portfolio. That’s what WisdomTree and Jeremy Siegel, professor of finance at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, are emphasizing as they encourage investors to consider alternatives to the traditional 60% stock, 40% bond allocation. The latest developments in their mission are two model portfolios made up entirely of exchange-traded funds: the Siegel-WisdomTree Global Equity Model Portfolio and the Siegel-WisdomTree Longevity Model Portfolio. “We beli


Hindsight is 20/20 on the 60/40 portfolio.
That’s what WisdomTree and Jeremy Siegel, professor of finance at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, are emphasizing as they encourage investors to consider alternatives to the traditional 60% stock, 40% bond allocation.
The latest developments in their mission are two model portfolios made up entirely of exchange-traded funds: the Siegel-WisdomTree Global Equity Model Portfolio and the Siegel-WisdomTree Longevity Model Portfolio.
“We beli
The 60-40 portfolio just doesn’t ‘cut it anymore’ in this market, Wharton’s Jeremy Siegel says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-08  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yield, market, 6040, siegelwisdomtree, siegels, siegel, anymore, stocks, cut, wisdomtree, volatility, model, portfolio, investors, whartons, doesnt, funds, jeremy


The 60-40 portfolio just doesn't 'cut it anymore' in this market, Wharton's Jeremy Siegel says

Hindsight is 20/20 on the 60/40 portfolio.

That’s what WisdomTree and Jeremy Siegel, professor of finance at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, are emphasizing as they encourage investors to consider alternatives to the traditional 60% stock, 40% bond allocation.

The latest developments in their mission are two model portfolios made up entirely of exchange-traded funds: the Siegel-WisdomTree Global Equity Model Portfolio and the Siegel-WisdomTree Longevity Model Portfolio.

The two funds, offered first on TD Ameritrade’s Model Market Center platform, take inspiration from two of Siegel’s books — “Stocks for the Long Run” and “The Future for Investors” — in an effort to provide investors with higher returns in a declining interest-rate environment.

“We believe that the old 60/40 model just won’t be able to cut it anymore,” Siegel, who is also a senior investment strategy advisor at WisdomTree, said Monday on CNBC’s “ETF Edge.”

“This environment of low interest rates is not going to change,” Siegel said, noting that the dividend yield on the S&P 500 is higher than the U.S. 10-year Treasury’s 1.5% yield. “How is [that] … going to give you enough income?”

The Siegel-WisdomTree funds will try to solve for that problem by offering low-cost, high-yield investment strategies that highlight one of Siegel’s main arguments from “Stocks for the Long Run”: that stocks may be subject to volatility in the short term, but ultimately have less long-term volatility when compared with bonds.

“That’s why we recommend 75/25 as the equity/fixed-income allocation,” he said, adding that it “would be the best way for those approaching retirement to establish their assets to get enough income and gains so they can maintain spending through retirement.”

Global central banks have been partly to blame for the yearslong decline in interest rates as their monetary policies become more accommodative, but they’re hardly the only driver of the phenomenon, the professor said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-08  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yield, market, 6040, siegelwisdomtree, siegels, siegel, anymore, stocks, cut, wisdomtree, volatility, model, portfolio, investors, whartons, doesnt, funds, jeremy


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Stocks surge for the second day in a row — here’s what to watch now

Stocks soared for the second straight day Tuesday despite the growing coronavirus outbreak. Jeff Mills, chief investment officer at Bryn Mawr Trust, says the chances for volatility are high. And we should either have a very good idea of who the nominee is or who the front-runners are. Chetan Ahya, chief economist at Morgan Stanley, says the global economy should continue to expand once the coronavirus outbreak stabilizes. “We just got the global PMIs data yesterday.


Stocks soared for the second straight day Tuesday despite the growing coronavirus outbreak.
Jeff Mills, chief investment officer at Bryn Mawr Trust, says the chances for volatility are high.
And we should either have a very good idea of who the nominee is or who the front-runners are.
Chetan Ahya, chief economist at Morgan Stanley, says the global economy should continue to expand once the coronavirus outbreak stabilizes.
“We just got the global PMIs data yesterday.
Stocks surge for the second day in a row — here’s what to watch now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-04  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, volatility, market, second, day, watch, heres, row, surge, really, data, stocks, talking, yesterday, point, say, perspective


Stocks surge for the second day in a row — here's what to watch now

Stocks soared for the second straight day Tuesday despite the growing coronavirus outbreak.

Three experts say investors should be watching this now.

Jeff Mills, chief investment officer at Bryn Mawr Trust, says the chances for volatility are high.

“I do see complacency in the market. I think you can point to a number of different data points, whether it’s flows into SPY or the QQQs in the 95th percentile, whether you’re looking at the options market, the put call ratio is still very very low. AAI came out with the survey yesterday, the lowest percentage allocated to cash in nearly two years, so I would not be surprised to see additional volatility here. So I wouldn’t necessarily be chasing this higher and buying with both hands but what I would say is the market is not as stretched as it was, say, in the beginning of 2018.”

Libby Cantrill, head of public policy at PIMCO, says Monday’s Iowa debacle did little to clear the political fog.

“We’ve been talking with our clients about Iowa and New Hampshire, that even though they capture the imagination, from a delegates perspective they really don’t matter. Now they came at it from a momentum and fundraising perspective, but what really does matter for the current investors and markets perspective will be March 3. March 3 almost 40% of the delegates will be decided. And we should either have a very good idea of who the nominee is or who the front-runners are. And if we don’t, then we would say the chances of a brokered convention actually increase, and not many people are talking about a brokered convention.”

Chetan Ahya, chief economist at Morgan Stanley, says the global economy should continue to expand once the coronavirus outbreak stabilizes.

“We just got the global PMIs data yesterday. And that was very strong. We had a one-point-plus jump in the global headline PMI, and we had 1.9 percentage point jump in the new orders index, which is a sub-index which is more forward looking. So we had pretty good data in terms of what’s going on in the global economy before we got this virus … You probably get the resumption of recovery as soon as the situation is controlled.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-04  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, volatility, market, second, day, watch, heres, row, surge, really, data, stocks, talking, yesterday, point, say, perspective


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If Bernie Sanders wins Iowa Monday and gains momentum, that would spook the stock market

Iowa is just the first ballot, but a win by the Vermont senator could give him more momentum, and that certainly could get the market’s attention. Sanders is viewed as negative for the stock market, and he is in favor of significantly raising taxes on individuals and companies. Long shot no moreSanders had once been seen as a long shot, but he is now leading former Vice President Joseph Biden in Iowa polls by an average 24.2% to 20.2%, according to RealClearPolitics.com. Sanders is also leading


Iowa is just the first ballot, but a win by the Vermont senator could give him more momentum, and that certainly could get the market’s attention.
Sanders is viewed as negative for the stock market, and he is in favor of significantly raising taxes on individuals and companies.
Long shot no moreSanders had once been seen as a long shot, but he is now leading former Vice President Joseph Biden in Iowa polls by an average 24.2% to 20.2%, according to RealClearPolitics.com.
Sanders is also leading
If Bernie Sanders wins Iowa Monday and gains momentum, that would spook the stock market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sanders, bernie, states, theres, super, market, spook, democratic, polls, options, iowa, wins, gains, volatility, momentum, stock


If Bernie Sanders wins Iowa Monday and gains momentum, that would spook the stock market

Democratic 2020 presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks with reporters as he walks through the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa on August 11, 2019 Alex Edelman | AFP | Getty Images

Iowa’s Democratic presidential caucus Monday is a step toward narrowing the far-flung field of Democratic candidates, and investors could start getting worried if polls prove correct and Bernie Sanders emerges as the winner. Iowa is just the first ballot, but a win by the Vermont senator could give him more momentum, and that certainly could get the market’s attention. Analysts do not expect a sell-off just based on an Iowa win for Sanders, but if he begins to look like the nominee in more races, volatility could increase. New Hampshire’s primary is the following week, and Sanders won there in 2016. “I think the market really has run up for a lot of reasons, but they clearly have been pricing in a Trump re-election,” said Lori Calvasina, chief U.S.equity strategist at RBC. “The betting markets are sending a positive signal on Sanders right now. The big sort of shift in trend is Bernie.” Still, strategists say the left-leaning candidate would have a hard time beating President Donald Trump if he were the party nominee, but the fear is there’s now some level of risk that he could. Sanders is viewed as negative for the stock market, and he is in favor of significantly raising taxes on individuals and companies.

Long shot no more

Sanders had once been seen as a long shot, but he is now leading former Vice President Joseph Biden in Iowa polls by an average 24.2% to 20.2%, according to RealClearPolitics.com. Sanders is also leading Biden by a wider average 9.5 percentage points in polls in his neighboring state of New Hampshire. “Anybody who has won two of the first three, they’ve all gone on” to be the nominee, said Daniel Clifton, head of policy research at Strategas. Read more: Voters largely favor capitalism over socialism amid Sanders’ rise Biden is leading in the third and fourth states scheduled to hold votes. He leads by 5.7 percentage points on average in Nevada polls ahead of its Democratic presidential caucus Feb. 22, and is ahead in the Feb. 29 vote in South Carolina, where RealClearPolitics.com puts him up by an average 17 percentage points. A much anticipated final poll by the Des Moines Register was not released over the weekend, due to a potential error. “Iowa has picked the last four Democratic nominees. The early states, which are often disregarded as not important, create momentum for winners and really start to hurt the losers,” Clifton said.

This year, there is an early “Super Tuesday” of primaries on March 3 in more than a dozen states, including Texas, North Carolina and California, a key state where Sanders now has a large lead. Those states hold 42% of the delegates, but Clifton said Iowa can be pivotal and provide important early momentum for candidates. He said the next pre-caucus poll on Saturday by the Des Moines Register will be important. “This is why the volatility is around February, and not March. Super Tuesday has many investors making that bet,” he said. “They’re betting on March. You want to make your bet around February because there’s a lack of realization that Bernie could win the nomination, and he’s going to get a fresh bout of momentum if he wins those first states.”

Super Tuesday options

There has been trading in weekly options betting that the market this week would see elevated volatility in the S&P 500 around the caucuses. There’s also been a trade around Super Tuesday March 3, but the scare over the rapidly spreading coronavirus has brought its own hedging. “There was a volatility premium built into next Wednesday. People would much rather buy options that incorporate the election-related events. Weekly options go out three months. March 6 options were listed about a month ago. That has Super Tuesday in it,” said Patrick Kernan, CEO of Cardinal Capital, which trades S&P options. “Those options were significantly more expensive, puts and calls, relative to the options that expired right before it at the end of February.” Health care stocks have also been hit in part because of the potential rise of Sanders. Calvasina said normally with a health scare, those stocks should be doing well, but they have been trading lower, particularly managed care. The S&P health care sector was one of last week’s worst performers, down 3.6%. “That’s been his signature issue …I think people really identify him with the health care policy,” said Calvasina. “There’s no virus-related reason that healthcare stocks should be down this week, these large cap, policy sensitive names.” Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth Warren are the most progressive and both favor “Medicare for All.” Both also would ban fracking, or the shale drilling that has taken the U.S. from a major importer of oil to an exporter and the biggest producer in the world.

“Their policies are clearly not pro-market. Regardless of what the odds might be in the general election, they have a puncher’s chance,” said QMA chief market strategist Ed Keon. Biden wants to preserve and expand upon Obamacare, with a private insurance option. He has also supported fracking, which is important to voters in key states such as Pennsylvania and Texas. The coronavirus has dominated this past week’s trading, and bond strategists say the sharp decline in yields has been the direct result of fears the virus will slow the world economy. But they also say investors could get increasingly nervous about the Democratic primaries and there are some investors using bonds as a safety play against election-related volatility. “It’s a reason not to push rates higher. It’s a reason you’re willing to be neutral,” said Jon Hill, BMO senior rate strategist.

The Bloomberg factor


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sanders, bernie, states, theres, super, market, spook, democratic, polls, options, iowa, wins, gains, volatility, momentum, stock


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Wall Street braces for more volatility ahead: ‘It could go up huge or it could go down huge’

REUTERS/Brendan McDermid Brendan McDermid | ReutersStocks have whipsawed investors more in the past two weeks than they have since early October, and it’s likely that type of volatile trading will continue. Even before investors became aware of the coronavirus, Emanuel said he had expected the market to get more volatile, just because it had become so overbought. Sanders is leading in the polls in Iowa, and is also ahead in New Hampshire, which holds its primary next week. “Our presumption is if


REUTERS/Brendan McDermid Brendan McDermid | ReutersStocks have whipsawed investors more in the past two weeks than they have since early October, and it’s likely that type of volatile trading will continue.
Even before investors became aware of the coronavirus, Emanuel said he had expected the market to get more volatile, just because it had become so overbought.
Sanders is leading in the polls in Iowa, and is also ahead in New Hampshire, which holds its primary next week.
“Our presumption is if
Wall Street braces for more volatility ahead: ‘It could go up huge or it could go down huge’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03  Authors: patti domm
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Wall Street braces for more volatility ahead: 'It could go up huge or it could go down huge'

Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange, October 3, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid Brendan McDermid | Reuters

Stocks have whipsawed investors more in the past two weeks than they have since early October, and it’s likely that type of volatile trading will continue. Even with Monday’s rally, analysts were skeptical that the market would be able to recover its bullish composure. The Dow was up as much as 374 points, but a round of coronavirus-related headlines deflated its gains in late morning trading. In early afternoon trading, the Dow was more than 225 points off the high. “The market is a wild animal right now,” said Julian Emanuel, head of equities and derivatives strategy at BTIG. “It could go up huge or it could go down huge, but the key is how do stocks react to the massive amount of incoming news over the next several days.” Emanuel says he’s sticking to a year-end target of has a target of 3,450, but he said it’s possible stocks could dip to his downside target of 3,070 in a sell-off. Even before investors became aware of the coronavirus, Emanuel said he had expected the market to get more volatile, just because it had become so overbought.

1% moves

In the past two weeks, the S&P 500 has had its first moves of more than 1%, both lower and higher, since early October. The Iowa caucuses Monday could also create more volatility, if progressive candidate Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders wins and then picks up momentum in other states. Sanders is leading in the polls in Iowa, and is also ahead in New Hampshire, which holds its primary next week. “The impeachment and the election have not been factors in the market so far. That could begin to change tonight,” said Art Cashin, head of floor operations at UBS. “If the market begins to feel [Sanders] is going to make headway in the first three states, things could begin to change.” It’s too soon to say whether Sanders will get the Democratic nomination, but analysts say he would be a negative force for markets, based on his tax, health care and other policies. Analysts said it’s likely President Donald Trump would beat Sanders, who is seen as far more negative for the market than more moderate, former Vice President Joseph Biden, who had previously been in the lead in Iowa. “Our presumption is if the moderates do better than expected versus the progressives that should be market positive,” said Emanuel. “We are not so presumptions to know how the market is going to respond right now because you have this exogenous factor—the coronavirus.” The Center for Disease Control reported an 11th confirmed U.S. case in California Monday, and there were news reports that it was preparing for “pandemic.” That headline and an earlier report that Carnival confirmed one of its passengers tested positive in Hong Kong for coronavirus, rattled stocks.

Goldman Sachs economists Monday said they expect coronavirus outbreak to reduce Chinese GDP growth in the first quarter of 2020 by 1.6 percentage points, and global growth could be impacted by 1 percentage point. Then growth is expected to rebound, and global growth would be hit by 0.1 or 0.2 percentage points for the year. “Nobody is going to be immune from a sharp drop in the Chinese economy,” said Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group. It “is infecting the economy… at a time when things were fragile to begin with.” Boockvar said the morning’s rally was too strong a bounce back reaction, after Friday’s sell-off. But Emanuel expects that type of see-saw market, with whippy action. “With all this incoming news, when the market becomes more volatile, as we believe it will become, you could get a day’s worth of price action in 30 minutes, several times a day,” said Emanuel.

Just 5%?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, percentage, huge, trading, street, market, volatility, emanuel, volatile, target, sanders, points, ahead, coronavirus, wall, growth, braces


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As ETFs continue to take over investing, this is what everyone is talking about

69% of US investors surveyed said they plan to increase allocations to ESG ETFs in 2020. 3) Active ETFs are gaining traction. The BBH report notes that US investors ranked active as the number one strategy (tied with low volatility ETFs) they would like to see more of in the market. 5) Disruptive technology is a major theme for ETF investors: high level of interest in ETFs investing in internet, robotics, environment/sustainability, cryptocurrency. 6) Low volatility ETFs find an audience.


69% of US investors surveyed said they plan to increase allocations to ESG ETFs in 2020.
3) Active ETFs are gaining traction.
The BBH report notes that US investors ranked active as the number one strategy (tied with low volatility ETFs) they would like to see more of in the market.
5) Disruptive technology is a major theme for ETF investors: high level of interest in ETFs investing in internet, robotics, environment/sustainability, cryptocurrency.
6) Low volatility ETFs find an audience.
As ETFs continue to take over investing, this is what everyone is talking about Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: bob pisani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, active, talking, managed, increase, etf, investing, esg, volatility, etfs, ranked, continue, investors, plan


As ETFs continue to take over investing, this is what everyone is talking about

Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., January 10, 2020.

The Inside ETF conference is underway in Hollywood, Florida. 2,000 investment professionals have gathered to talk what’s hot, and what’s not, in investing in 2020.

At a dinner last night with ETF leaders, several topics dominated the discussion: ESG (Environmental Social and Governance), actively managed ETFs, fixed income, and a continuing fascination with disruptive technologies as a major theme for future investing.

Those themes were echoed in a report out this morning from Brown Brothers Harriman in partnership with etf.com, which released its 7th Annual ETF survey of 300 institutional investors, financial advisers, and fund managers from around the world.

Highlights from the survey:

1) ETF adoption still going strong. One-third of the investors already allocate 25% to 50% of their portfolio to ETFs. 72% of US respondents plan to increase portfolio allocations to ETFs in 2020.

2) ESG: not a passing fad. 2019 was the year Environmental Social and Governance (ESG) finally attracted assets. The numbers are still small, but that may be about to change. 69% of US investors surveyed said they plan to increase allocations to ESG ETFs in 2020.

3) Active ETFs are gaining traction. Actively managed mutual funds that have been seeing outflows for years have a new plan: convert to an ETF. The SEC recently approved a number of new types of active ETF structures that do not require daily disclosures of the fund holdings — that will likely attract more money into ETFs and out of mutual funds. The BBH report notes that US investors ranked active as the number one strategy (tied with low volatility ETFs) they would like to see more of in the market. 62% of US investors plan to increase their exposure to actively-managed ETFs.

4) Fixed income continues to attract assets, mostly as a defensive play. The prospect of volatile global markets in 2020 has generated outsized interest in fixed income ETFs. For the second year in a row, investors ranked the group as their go-to product type in periods of heightened volatility.

5) Disruptive technology is a major theme for ETF investors: high level of interest in ETFs investing in internet, robotics, environment/sustainability, cryptocurrency.

6) Low volatility ETFs find an audience. Investors in the U.S and Greater China both ranked managed risk/low volatility as the top ETF strategy (tied with active in the US) they would like to see more of in the market.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: bob pisani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, active, talking, managed, increase, etf, investing, esg, volatility, etfs, ranked, continue, investors, plan


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Here’s one way to help figure out how much of a cash cushion you need

Now, a new online tool may help you figure out exactly how much you need. It also shows how many households in those income and age groups are falling short and by how much. “The average family doesn’t have enough of a buffer,” said Fiona Greig, director of consumer research at the JPMorgan Chase Institute, which developed the tool. “Across the board, pretty much everyone has a gap between what they should have and what they do have.” And if those two things happen at the same time, a cash cushi


Now, a new online tool may help you figure out exactly how much you need.
It also shows how many households in those income and age groups are falling short and by how much.
“The average family doesn’t have enough of a buffer,” said Fiona Greig, director of consumer research at the JPMorgan Chase Institute, which developed the tool.
“Across the board, pretty much everyone has a gap between what they should have and what they do have.”
And if those two things happen at the same time, a cash cushi
Here’s one way to help figure out how much of a cash cushion you need Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, figure, cash, research, jpmorgan, age, volatility, set, income, things, heres, shows, help, tool, cushion, spending, need, way


Here's one way to help figure out how much of a cash cushion you need

You probably know you’re supposed to have money set aside for the unexpected.

Now, a new online tool may help you figure out exactly how much you need.

Created by the JPMorgan Chase Institute and based on its recent research about income volatility among U.S. households, the tool lets you sort by income and age to see how much cash should be set aside to weather a simultaneous income dip and spike in spending. It also shows how many households in those income and age groups are falling short and by how much.

“The average family doesn’t have enough of a buffer,” said Fiona Greig, director of consumer research at the JPMorgan Chase Institute, which developed the tool. “Across the board, pretty much everyone has a gap between what they should have and what they do have.”

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Even financially savvy savers are getting this wrong

The institute’s research, based on anonymized data from 6 million primary checking accounts at JPMorgan, shows that many families have dips in income and spikes in spending throughout the year. And if those two things happen at the same time, a cash cushion — which differs across income and age groups — would help them get through it rather than fall into financial trouble.

“We always think about savings as saving for something like an emergency but, in fact, people need savings just to manage their cash-flow picture,” Greig said.

“Maybe you worked fewer hours one month and had to buy a flight home for Thanksgiving,” she said. “What if those things happen at the same time?

“It’s not necessarily an emergency,” Grieg added. “I’d characterize it as volatility in both income and expenditures.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, figure, cash, research, jpmorgan, age, volatility, set, income, things, heres, shows, help, tool, cushion, spending, need, way


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We may not see $100 oil ‘for a long time,’ says Chevron CEO

Chevron CEO Michael Wirth told CNBC on Thursday that oil prices may not reach $100 for a “long time” thanks to the boom in U.S. shale production. “Oil markets have really changed over the last decade or so,” Wirth said on “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. This was on display following the September attacks on Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais, which took an estimated 5.7 million barrels of oil offline. Oil prices initially spiked 15% before retur


Chevron CEO Michael Wirth told CNBC on Thursday that oil prices may not reach $100 for a “long time” thanks to the boom in U.S. shale production.
“Oil markets have really changed over the last decade or so,” Wirth said on “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
This was on display following the September attacks on Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais, which took an estimated 5.7 million barrels of oil offline.
Oil prices initially spiked 15% before retur
We may not see $100 oil ‘for a long time,’ says Chevron CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, world, wirth, weve, weekswirth, chevron, prices, 100, took, ceo, long, volatility, oil, run, discipline


We may not see $100 oil 'for a long time,' says Chevron CEO

Chevron CEO Michael Wirth told CNBC on Thursday that oil prices may not reach $100 for a “long time” thanks to the boom in U.S. shale production.

“Oil markets have really changed over the last decade or so,” Wirth said on “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “We’ve moved from a period of time where there was a belief we were approaching peak oil, and now we’re in an era of abundance.”

He said that he doesn’t believe the world will ever run out of oil, which means that prices are now less prone to bouts of volatility. This was on display following the September attacks on Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais, which took an estimated 5.7 million barrels of oil offline. Oil prices initially spiked 15% before returning to their pre-attack levels within weeks.

Wirth said that “efficiency” is the “age old story” of the oil industry, and that companies cannot rely on high oil prices for profits.

“You have to run your company — it’s a commodity business — with capital discipline, with cost discipline, and a real focus on maintaining that through the cycle,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, world, wirth, weve, weekswirth, chevron, prices, 100, took, ceo, long, volatility, oil, run, discipline


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