Large fund firms’ support for combating climate change is all talk

Climate change questions don’t get more fundamental than this one: How much time is left to act before it is too late? Before he died, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle said one of the biggest issues the index fund would face in the future is its societal influence. BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, and Vanguard Group, the creator of the index fund, manage more than $11 trillion combined. And their market influence continues to grow: Vanguard has attracted roughly $1 trillion in the


Climate change questions don’t get more fundamental than this one: How much time is left to act before it is too late? Before he died, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle said one of the biggest issues the index fund would face in the future is its societal influence. BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, and Vanguard Group, the creator of the index fund, manage more than $11 trillion combined. And their market influence continues to grow: Vanguard has attracted roughly $1 trillion in the
Large fund firms’ support for combating climate change is all talk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: eric rosenbaum, getty images, pickstock, matthew davidson, eyeem, hero images, laflor, saul loeb, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firms, companies, change, fund, vanguard, talk, funds, large, index, combating, trillion, shareholder, climate, sustainability, support, vote, showing


Large fund firms' support for combating climate change is all talk

Climate change questions don’t get more fundamental than this one: How much time is left to act before it is too late?

Right now the difficulty of answering that question is showing up in a place where many individuals are heavily invested in getting the answer right: The index funds responsible for meeting millions of Americans personal financial goals, from saving for a house, to a child’s education, and a secure retirement.

Before he died, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle said one of the biggest issues the index fund would face in the future is its societal influence. Specifically, he meant the need to vote proxies on complex issues such as sustainability at annual meetings held by every publicly traded company and on behalf of so many individual fund shareholders.

BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, and Vanguard Group, the creator of the index fund, manage more than $11 trillion combined. Just in ETFs, they manage roughly $2.5 trillion. And their market influence continues to grow: Vanguard has attracted roughly $1 trillion in the past three years alone.

“Larger mutual funds companies, like Vanguard, Fidelity, BlackRock and State Street Global Advisors, can move the market,” said Mindy Lubber, CEO and president of Ceres, a nonprofit organization that works with big investors and companies on sustainability. “They can take a shareholder resolution from 10 percent to 40 percent.”

In 2017 both companies voted to require ExxonMobil to produce a report on climate change, a watershed moment showing what can occur when index funds punch their weight in proxy voting.

Yet shareholder advocates say there have not been nearly enough of those ExxonMobil vote moments.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: eric rosenbaum, getty images, pickstock, matthew davidson, eyeem, hero images, laflor, saul loeb, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firms, companies, change, fund, vanguard, talk, funds, large, index, combating, trillion, shareholder, climate, sustainability, support, vote, showing


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Speaker of UK House of Parliament warns Theresa May on third meaningful vote

The U.K. Parliament speaker John Bercow has warned Theresa May’s government that it should not bring a replica of its proposed Brexit “Withdrawal Deal” back to lawmakers for a third vote. In a statement to Parliament, the speaker of the House of Commons said the first two votes had substantial enough differences to merit lawmakers voting on both. It was expected that a third vote on the PM’s “Withdrawal Deal” would take place in the House of Commons on Tuesday or Wednesday this week. The two pre


The U.K. Parliament speaker John Bercow has warned Theresa May’s government that it should not bring a replica of its proposed Brexit “Withdrawal Deal” back to lawmakers for a third vote. In a statement to Parliament, the speaker of the House of Commons said the first two votes had substantial enough differences to merit lawmakers voting on both. It was expected that a third vote on the PM’s “Withdrawal Deal” would take place in the House of Commons on Tuesday or Wednesday this week. The two pre
Speaker of UK House of Parliament warns Theresa May on third meaningful vote Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theresa, statement, house, warns, parliament, uk, meaningful, withdrawal, mays, votes, lawmakers, deal, speaker, vote


Speaker of UK House of Parliament warns Theresa May on third meaningful vote

The U.K. Parliament speaker John Bercow has warned Theresa May’s government that it should not bring a replica of its proposed Brexit “Withdrawal Deal” back to lawmakers for a third vote.

In a statement to Parliament, the speaker of the House of Commons said the first two votes had substantial enough differences to merit lawmakers voting on both.

It was expected that a third vote on the PM’s “Withdrawal Deal” would take place in the House of Commons on Tuesday or Wednesday this week. The two previous votes saw May’s draft proposal defeated by a record margin of 230 at the first attempt and then 149 votes in the second.

Bercow said the government could not “legitimately resubmit” a third proposition that matched the first two.

The intervention will be seen as yet another obstacle to the U.K. government who are hoping to pass their deal by banking that lawmakers will change their vote, rather than risk any long delay to Britain’s departure.

Sterling dipped slightly following the statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theresa, statement, house, warns, parliament, uk, meaningful, withdrawal, mays, votes, lawmakers, deal, speaker, vote


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

European markets open slightly higher after UK lawmakers vote to delay Brexit

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He spoke via telephone with U.S. Trade Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Xinhua news agency reported Friday. Back in Europe, British Prime Minister Theresa May is preparing once more to try and win approval for her twice-rejected Brexit deal. U.K. lawmakers voted on Thursday to seek a delay in Britain’s exit from the EU. On Tuesday, Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal suffered a second humiliating defeat as it was voted down b


Chinese Vice Premier Liu He spoke via telephone with U.S. Trade Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Xinhua news agency reported Friday. Back in Europe, British Prime Minister Theresa May is preparing once more to try and win approval for her twice-rejected Brexit deal. U.K. lawmakers voted on Thursday to seek a delay in Britain’s exit from the EU. On Tuesday, Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal suffered a second humiliating defeat as it was voted down b
European markets open slightly higher after UK lawmakers vote to delay Brexit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawmakers, theresa, slightly, delay, uk, vote, data, open, prime, mnuchin, trade, european, brexit, higher, voted, end, minister, markets


European markets open slightly higher after UK lawmakers vote to delay Brexit

Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, as sentiment improved on a report that more progress has been made in talks between the world’s two largest economies.

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He spoke via telephone with U.S. Trade Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Xinhua news agency reported Friday.

It comes after Mnuchin said on Thursday that a summit to secure a comprehensive trade agreement between President Donald Trump and Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping would not happen at the end of March as previously discussed.

In Asia, MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares, excluding Japan, rose 0.5 percent.

Back in Europe, British Prime Minister Theresa May is preparing once more to try and win approval for her twice-rejected Brexit deal.

U.K. lawmakers voted on Thursday to seek a delay in Britain’s exit from the EU. It marked the end to a dramatic trilogy of events this week which have added yet more confusion into the whole Brexit process.

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal suffered a second humiliating defeat as it was voted down by a majority of 149 votes. Then on Wednesday, U.K. lawmakers rejected the idea of leaving the bloc without a withdrawal agreement in place.

On the data front, investors are likely to closely monitor a final reading of annualized euro zone inflation rate data for February at around 10:00 a.m. London time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawmakers, theresa, slightly, delay, uk, vote, data, open, prime, mnuchin, trade, european, brexit, higher, voted, end, minister, markets


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

In his first veto, Trump rejects bill that would block his border emergency

Those lawsuits in part cited comments Trump made when he declared the emergency last month. Democrats plan to vote to override Trump’s veto on March 26, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a written statement Friday. Trump declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border last month to divert already appropriated Defense Department money to build his proposed border wall. “There is no emergency; Congress has refused to fund his wall multiple times; Mexico won’t pay for it; and a bipartisan


Those lawsuits in part cited comments Trump made when he declared the emergency last month. Democrats plan to vote to override Trump’s veto on March 26, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a written statement Friday. Trump declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border last month to divert already appropriated Defense Department money to build his proposed border wall. “There is no emergency; Congress has refused to fund his wall multiple times; Mexico won’t pay for it; and a bipartisan
In his first veto, Trump rejects bill that would block his border emergency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: jacob pramuk, evan vucci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, block, border, bill, billion, veto, vote, emergency, president, wall, support, trump, congress, house, rejects


In his first veto, Trump rejects bill that would block his border emergency

Those lawsuits in part cited comments Trump made when he declared the emergency last month. The president said he “didn’t need to” take that step but wanted to expedite the construction of barriers.

Democrats plan to vote to override Trump’s veto on March 26, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a written statement Friday. When the House voted on it previously, 245 members supported it, well short of the 285 needed for two-thirds support. (The House currently only has 432 members due to three vacancies.)

“On March 26, the House will once again act to protect our Constitution and our democracy from the President’s emergency declaration by holding a vote to override his veto,” the California Democrat said. “House Republicans will have to choose between their partisan hypocrisy and their sacred oath to support and defend the Constitution.”

Rep. Joaquin Castro, a Texas Democrat who introduced the measure to block the declaration in the House, said Thursday that he will try to gather support for another vote even though it will be “very tough” to reach a two-thirds majority.

Trump declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border last month to divert already appropriated Defense Department money to build his proposed border wall. He demanded $5.7 billion for border barriers as part of a spending plan to fund the government through September, but Congress denied him. Lawmakers passed only $1.4 billion for structures on the border.

Democrats said Trump created a sham emergency in order to circumvent Congress’ appropriations power. Republicans also worried the president is setting a dangerous precedent that Democrats could use in the future to declare emergencies related to other topics such as climate change and gun violence.

“It is no surprise that the president holds the rule of law and our Constitution in minimal regard,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said in a statement following the veto. “There is no emergency; Congress has refused to fund his wall multiple times; Mexico won’t pay for it; and a bipartisan majority in both chambers just voted to terminate his fake emergency.”

Trump hopes to put $8 billion total toward the border wall, including the money allocated by Congress. Using emergency powers, he would divert $3.6 billion from military construction funds. With other executive actions, he hopes to pull the remainder from other Pentagon and Treasury Department funds.

The wall will not go away as a political issue. Trump set up another fight with Democrats when he asked for an additional $8.6 billion for border barriers in his recently released fiscal 2020 budget.

Democrats could also vote on whether to block the national emergency declaration every six months.

The Senate rebuked Trump twice this week. The chamber also voted to end U.S. support for a Saudi-led coalition’s military intervention in Yemen. Once the House passes the resolution, as expected, the president will likely have to issue his second veto.

Trump’s two predecessors, Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush, both issued 12 vetoes during their two terms in office.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: jacob pramuk, evan vucci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, block, border, bill, billion, veto, vote, emergency, president, wall, support, trump, congress, house, rejects


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Senate vote on Trump’s emergency plan shows the dividends Democrats are reaping from midterms

If it clears the Republican-led Senate on Thursday, Democrats lack the votes to override him. Congress shielded the president from oversight; House and Senate leaders shielded their members from casting politically perilous votes. The shift in White House accountability has attracted the most attention so far, for good reason. Pelosi can also force votes on popular issues that divide the GOP while uniting, at least rhetorically, Democrats and the White House. Even if none of those measures wins


If it clears the Republican-led Senate on Thursday, Democrats lack the votes to override him. Congress shielded the president from oversight; House and Senate leaders shielded their members from casting politically perilous votes. The shift in White House accountability has attracted the most attention so far, for good reason. Pelosi can also force votes on popular issues that divide the GOP while uniting, at least rhetorically, Democrats and the White House. Even if none of those measures wins
Senate vote on Trump’s emergency plan shows the dividends Democrats are reaping from midterms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: john harwood, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, trump, shift, plan, senate, votes, reaping, democrats, shows, white, midterms, trumps, dividends, house, emergency, gop, washington, vote


Senate vote on Trump's emergency plan shows the dividends Democrats are reaping from midterms

President Donald Trump can veto a resolution blocking his border emergency declaration. If it clears the Republican-led Senate on Thursday, Democrats lack the votes to override him.

But the episode shows again what the 2018 midterm elections brought the GOP: constant pressure.

Democratic control of the House won’t produce much legislation in a divided Washington, but it has already produced a fundamental shift in political leverage.

During the first half of Trump’s term, Republicans at both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue protected each other. Congress shielded the president from oversight; House and Senate leaders shielded their members from casting politically perilous votes.

The shift in White House accountability has attracted the most attention so far, for good reason. The House Intelligence, Financial Services, Oversight and Judiciary committees have piled overlapping probes of their own onto investigations by prosecutors for special counsel Robert Mueller, the Southern District of New York, the state of New York and the Manhattan district attorney.

Those House initiatives alone could effectively cripple the administration over the next two years. Through the impeachment process, they could even cut it short.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has signaled the House may ultimately eschew an impeachment battle as divisive and politically counterproductive. But she has the ability to regularly squeeze Trump and his fellow Republicans under any scenario.

Pelosi’s gavel lets her force votes on issues where Republican orthodoxy stands at odds with broader public opinion. That includes climate change, gun control measures and higher taxes on the rich.

Pelosi can also force votes on popular issues that divide the GOP while uniting, at least rhetorically, Democrats and the White House. Her legislative agenda includes two 2016 Trump campaign priorities – a costly infrastructure program and action to cut the prices pharmaceutical companies charge – that Republican leaders disdain.

Even if none of those measures wins so much as a Senate floor vote, they create a record for Democratic candidates in 2020 campaigns for Congress and the White House alike.

Power also creates burdens for Democrats. Far more than in 2017-18, the party will share responsibility with Trump and the GOP for events in Washington that so often repel rank-and-file voters.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: john harwood, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, trump, shift, plan, senate, votes, reaping, democrats, shows, white, midterms, trumps, dividends, house, emergency, gop, washington, vote


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

UK lawmakers to vote on Brexit delay as political crisis rumbles on

BNY’s Derrick: Every move in the pound for months has been tied directly to Brexit news 7 Hours Ago | 05:03The motion being put forward by the government states that if Parliament has approved a Brexit deal by March 20 then the government will seek to agree with the EU a short delay to Brexit ending on June 30. If Parliament has not approved a deal by March 20, then the U.K. would have to seek a longer delay, the government proposed. “It is highly likely that the European Council (head of EU nat


BNY’s Derrick: Every move in the pound for months has been tied directly to Brexit news 7 Hours Ago | 05:03The motion being put forward by the government states that if Parliament has approved a Brexit deal by March 20 then the government will seek to agree with the EU a short delay to Brexit ending on June 30. If Parliament has not approved a deal by March 20, then the U.K. would have to seek a longer delay, the government proposed. “It is highly likely that the European Council (head of EU nat
UK lawmakers to vote on Brexit delay as political crisis rumbles on Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: holly ellyatt, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, rumbles, motion, uk, deal, delay, seek, require, short, parliament, lawmakers, crisis, brexit, agree, vote


UK lawmakers to vote on Brexit delay as political crisis rumbles on

BNY’s Derrick: Every move in the pound for months has been tied directly to Brexit news 7 Hours Ago | 05:03

The motion being put forward by the government states that if Parliament has approved a Brexit deal by March 20 then the government will seek to agree with the EU a short delay to Brexit ending on June 30.

If Parliament has not approved a deal by March 20, then the U.K. would have to seek a longer delay, the government proposed.

“It is highly likely that the European Council (head of EU nations) at its meeting the following day (Thursday next week) would require a clear purpose for any extension, not least to determine its length, and that any extension beyond 30 June 2019 would require the United Kingdom to hold European Parliament elections in May 2019,” the motion to be debated Thursday afternoon states.

The length of any delay is the key question for the U.K. and EU.

On Wednesday evening, May said there were now two choices — agree a deal and try to secure a short delay to Brexit (her preference) or fail to agree anything and face a much longer delay.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: holly ellyatt, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, rumbles, motion, uk, deal, delay, seek, require, short, parliament, lawmakers, crisis, brexit, agree, vote


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Theresa May intends to bring her twice-rejected Brexit deal back to Parliament

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May hopes it will be a case of third time lucky next week, when the embattled Conservative Party leader brings her Brexit deal to Parliament yet again. May has already warned MPs (Members of Parliament) that if her deal fails to get enough parliamentary support, a lengthy delay to the Brexit process might be necessary. On Thursday, the House of Commons is due to vote on whether to ask the EU for permission to delay Brexit beyond 29 March. It comes after U.K. lawmakers


U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May hopes it will be a case of third time lucky next week, when the embattled Conservative Party leader brings her Brexit deal to Parliament yet again. May has already warned MPs (Members of Parliament) that if her deal fails to get enough parliamentary support, a lengthy delay to the Brexit process might be necessary. On Thursday, the House of Commons is due to vote on whether to ask the EU for permission to delay Brexit beyond 29 March. It comes after U.K. lawmakers
Theresa May intends to bring her twice-rejected Brexit deal back to Parliament Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: sam meredith, reuters tv via reuters
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, theresa, uk, twicerejected, place, 29, nodeal, parliament, intends, brexit, socalled, bring, rejected, vote, party


Theresa May intends to bring her twice-rejected Brexit deal back to Parliament

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May hopes it will be a case of third time lucky next week, when the embattled Conservative Party leader brings her Brexit deal to Parliament yet again.

May has already warned MPs (Members of Parliament) that if her deal fails to get enough parliamentary support, a lengthy delay to the Brexit process might be necessary.

No date has yet been scheduled for the third so-called “meaningful” vote. However, the government motion states it must take place before March 20.

On Thursday, the House of Commons is due to vote on whether to ask the EU for permission to delay Brexit beyond 29 March.

It comes after U.K. lawmakers rejected the idea of leaving the bloc without a Withdrawal Agreement in place on March 29. Westminster also narrowly backed an amendment that rejected a no-deal Brexit in any circumstance.

The approved motion to block a no-deal Brexit — which refers to the so-called “cliff-edge” scenario where Britain leaves abruptly on March 29 with no 21-month transition period and is forced to revert to WTO trading rules — was not legally binding.

But, given the amendment passed, thanks to a large rebellion by members of May’s own Conservative Party and cabinet, analysts at Citi said it “severely undermines” her authority and could potentially trigger another wave of ministerial resignations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: sam meredith, reuters tv via reuters
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, theresa, uk, twicerejected, place, 29, nodeal, parliament, intends, brexit, socalled, bring, rejected, vote, party


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘It’s terrible — the Brits were lied to’: Americans give their verdict on Brexit

Brexit might be changing the course of British and European history but that hasn’t stopped the Americans taking an interest — and having a say. Brexit faced a crucial week this week as May tried to get her Brexit deal approved by the U.K. Parliament. It failed to win enough support from British lawmakers for a second time but MPs also then voted to reject the option of leaving the EU without a deal. They are next going to vote on whether to delay Brexit altogether. WATCH: Niall Ferguson: Brexit


Brexit might be changing the course of British and European history but that hasn’t stopped the Americans taking an interest — and having a say. Brexit faced a crucial week this week as May tried to get her Brexit deal approved by the U.K. Parliament. It failed to win enough support from British lawmakers for a second time but MPs also then voted to reject the option of leaving the EU without a deal. They are next going to vote on whether to delay Brexit altogether. WATCH: Niall Ferguson: Brexit
‘It’s terrible — the Brits were lied to’: Americans give their verdict on Brexit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: holly ellyatt, jordan malter, james d morgan, getty images entertainment, getty images, wiktor szymanowicz, barcroft media, marlene awaad, bloomberg, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, union, week, uk, deal, british, americans, verdict, terrible, brits, leaving, win, voted, brexit, lied, vote


'It's terrible — the Brits were lied to': Americans give their verdict on Brexit

Brexit might be changing the course of British and European history but that hasn’t stopped the Americans taking an interest — and having a say.

President Donald Trump has been characteristically forthright, commenting on both the opportunity that leaving the 28-member union could bring to the U.K. and U.S.’ relationship, and also on how badly he thought British Prime Minister Theresa May had handled the negotiations.

Brexit faced a crucial week this week as May tried to get her Brexit deal approved by the U.K. Parliament. It failed to win enough support from British lawmakers for a second time but MPs also then voted to reject the option of leaving the EU without a deal. They are next going to vote on whether to delay Brexit altogether.

WATCH: Niall Ferguson: Brexit has turned into a student asking for a paper extension


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: holly ellyatt, jordan malter, james d morgan, getty images entertainment, getty images, wiktor szymanowicz, barcroft media, marlene awaad, bloomberg, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, union, week, uk, deal, british, americans, verdict, terrible, brits, leaving, win, voted, brexit, lied, vote


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump tweets ‘VETO!’ after Senate votes to block his border emergency declaration

The Senate voted Thursday to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration over the southern border, a sharp bipartisan rebuke of the president’s flex of executive power. Trump plans to reject the bill, which the Democratic-held House has already passed. Neither chamber appears to have enough support to overcome Trump’s opposition with a two-thirds majority vote. It is unclear now if House leaders will push for a vote to override the president’s veto. Trump publicly lobbied the G


The Senate voted Thursday to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration over the southern border, a sharp bipartisan rebuke of the president’s flex of executive power. Trump plans to reject the bill, which the Democratic-held House has already passed. Neither chamber appears to have enough support to overcome Trump’s opposition with a two-thirds majority vote. It is unclear now if House leaders will push for a vote to override the president’s veto. Trump publicly lobbied the G
Trump tweets ‘VETO!’ after Senate votes to block his border emergency declaration Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, votes, block, vote, house, veto, emergency, tweets, passed, resolution, senate, declaration, trump, voted, republicans, presidents, support, border


Trump tweets 'VETO!' after Senate votes to block his border emergency declaration

The Senate voted Thursday to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration over the southern border, a sharp bipartisan rebuke of the president’s flex of executive power.

The chamber comfortably passed the measure in a 59-41 vote. Twelve Republicans who worried about executive overreach supported it in an embarrassing blow to the president.

Trump plans to reject the bill, which the Democratic-held House has already passed. In one tweet after the vote, he simply said, “VETO!” In a subsequent message, he said he looks “forward to VETOING the just passed Democrat inspired Resolution,” thanking Republicans “who voted to support Border Security and our desperately needed WALL!”

The veto would be the first of his presidency. Neither chamber appears to have enough support to overcome Trump’s opposition with a two-thirds majority vote.

It is unclear now if House leaders will push for a vote to override the president’s veto. Rep. Joaquin Castro, a Texas Democrat who introduced the House resolution, told reporters Thursday that he will push for another vote even though it will be “very tough” to reach a veto-proof majority. He called it a “consequential constitutional vote.”

Trump publicly lobbied the GOP to support his declaration in recent days. Republican lawmakers who voted to terminate Trump’s action voiced concerns not only about presidents circumventing Congress’ appropriations power, but also the prospect of Democratic administrations declaring emergencies on other topics in the future.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, votes, block, vote, house, veto, emergency, tweets, passed, resolution, senate, declaration, trump, voted, republicans, presidents, support, border


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

UK lawmakers set to shape the future of Brexit with no-deal vote

Brexit will be ‘extremely bumpy’ but we’ll be fine in no deal scenario, economist says 5 Hours Ago | 03:43As if yesterday’s momentous rejection of the U.K.’s Brexit deal with the European Union was not enough to unsettle markets, British Members of Parliament (MPs) are voting again Wednesday evening on whether to block a “no-deal” departure from the EU. The majority of MPs (391, to be precise) voted against Prime Minister Theresa May’s agreement, including 75 from within her own Conservative Par


Brexit will be ‘extremely bumpy’ but we’ll be fine in no deal scenario, economist says 5 Hours Ago | 03:43As if yesterday’s momentous rejection of the U.K.’s Brexit deal with the European Union was not enough to unsettle markets, British Members of Parliament (MPs) are voting again Wednesday evening on whether to block a “no-deal” departure from the EU. The majority of MPs (391, to be precise) voted against Prime Minister Theresa May’s agreement, including 75 from within her own Conservative Par
UK lawmakers set to shape the future of Brexit with no-deal vote Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: holly ellyatt, daniel leal-olivas, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, departure, nodeal, brexit, deal, uk, voting, lawmakers, vote, shape, scenario, set, mean, majority, mps


UK lawmakers set to shape the future of Brexit with no-deal vote

Brexit will be ‘extremely bumpy’ but we’ll be fine in no deal scenario, economist says 5 Hours Ago | 03:43

As if yesterday’s momentous rejection of the U.K.’s Brexit deal with the European Union was not enough to unsettle markets, British Members of Parliament (MPs) are voting again Wednesday evening on whether to block a “no-deal” departure from the EU.

The majority of MPs (391, to be precise) voted against Prime Minister Theresa May’s agreement, including 75 from within her own Conservative Party. Voting against her deal doesn’t necessarily mean that MPs will vote this evening to support a “no-deal” departure, however.

In fact, for the majority of MPs, a no-deal departure — in which the U.K. leaves the EU on March 29 with no formal arrangements whatsoever — is seen by many as the worst possible scenario and is expected to cause widespread economic uncertainty.

Infamously known as a “cliff-edge” Brexit, a no-deal exit would mean the U.K. abruptly ceases to be a member of the EU overnight on March 29 with no 21-month transition period in place to gently prepare for life outside the economic and political bloc it has belonged to for 46 years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: holly ellyatt, daniel leal-olivas, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, departure, nodeal, brexit, deal, uk, voting, lawmakers, vote, shape, scenario, set, mean, majority, mps


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post