UK leadership contest steps up a gear ahead of first round of voting

Boris Johnson during the launch of his campaign to become leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party and Prime Minister at the Royal Academy of Engineering in central London. If all candidates receive at least 17 votes, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated. When there are only two candidates left after this process of elimination, the wider Conservative Party membership in a run-off vote to elect one candidate as party leader and prime minister. As such, a lot of attention has be


Boris Johnson during the launch of his campaign to become leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party and Prime Minister at the Royal Academy of Engineering in central London. If all candidates receive at least 17 votes, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated. When there are only two candidates left after this process of elimination, the wider Conservative Party membership in a run-off vote to elect one candidate as party leader and prime minister. As such, a lot of attention has be
UK leadership contest steps up a gear ahead of first round of voting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, minister, contest, race, leadership, gear, votes, round, nodeal, ahead, leader, parliament, voting, vote, steps, uk, party


UK leadership contest steps up a gear ahead of first round of voting

Boris Johnson during the launch of his campaign to become leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party and Prime Minister at the Royal Academy of Engineering in central London.

The race to succeed Theresa May as leader of the ruling Conservative Party and prime minister enters a new phase on Thursday with Tory members of parliament (MPs) set to have their first vote for their preferred candidate.

There are 10 candidates in the leadership contest and any of them that fails to get at least 17 votes when MPs vote in secret ballots, the first of which is Thursday with more rounds to follow, will be eliminated from the race. If all candidates receive at least 17 votes, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated.

When there are only two candidates left after this process of elimination, the wider Conservative Party membership in a run-off vote to elect one candidate as party leader and prime minister. The winner is expected to be announced on July 22.

Brexit, and how the various leadership hopefuls would progress the thorny departure from the EU, has dominated the debate in the run up to the first vote.

Party members, and the wider public, are keen to know how the next prime minister will fare any better than Theresa May did at uniting a divided Parliament behind a Brexit deal that it has already rejected three times. The EU too has already said it will not re-negotiate the deal.

The U.K. is meant to leave the EU on October 31 and with no deal agreed by Parliament, the prospect of a potential “no-deal” departure has returned to the fore.

As such, a lot of attention has been put on the favorite to win the leadership race Boris Johnson, the former foreign secretary and mayor of London. Launching his leadership campaign on Wednesday, he said he was “not aiming for a no-deal outcome” but said it was responsible to “prepare vigorously” for such an outcome. He said any more delay to Brexit would mean “defeat.”

On Wednesday, the opposition Labour Party led an attempt to make sure the future prime minister could not push through a “no-deal” Brexit but failed to gain enough votes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, minister, contest, race, leadership, gear, votes, round, nodeal, ahead, leader, parliament, voting, vote, steps, uk, party


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Millionaires say they are more likely to vote for Joe Biden over Donald Trump in 2020 elections

Former U.S. vice president and current presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks during a campaign stop at the IBEW Local 490 in Concord, NH on June 4, 2019. American millionaires would elect Joe Biden over President Donald Trump if the former vice president becomes the Democratic nominee, according to a new survey. The CNBC Millionaire survey asked millionaires who they would choose for president if Trump runs against various opponents in 2020. Fully 53% of millionaire respondents said they would


Former U.S. vice president and current presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks during a campaign stop at the IBEW Local 490 in Concord, NH on June 4, 2019. American millionaires would elect Joe Biden over President Donald Trump if the former vice president becomes the Democratic nominee, according to a new survey. The CNBC Millionaire survey asked millionaires who they would choose for president if Trump runs against various opponents in 2020. Fully 53% of millionaire respondents said they would
Millionaires say they are more likely to vote for Joe Biden over Donald Trump in 2020 elections Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: robert frank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vote, sen, wins, likely, millionaire, trump, president, joe, donald, elections, biden, say, vice, 2020, survey, millionaires, democratic


Millionaires say they are more likely to vote for Joe Biden over Donald Trump in 2020 elections

Former U.S. vice president and current presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks during a campaign stop at the IBEW Local 490 in Concord, NH on June 4, 2019.

American millionaires would elect Joe Biden over President Donald Trump if the former vice president becomes the Democratic nominee, according to a new survey.

The CNBC Millionaire survey asked millionaires who they would choose for president if Trump runs against various opponents in 2020. Biden and Pete Buttigieg are the only Democratic nominees who beat Trump among the top Democratic candidates in a head-to-head race.

Fully 53% of millionaire respondents said they would vote for Biden, compared with 39% for Trump, while 9% would be undecided. In a race between Trump and Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, wins 43% to Trump’s 42%.

Against Sen. Bernie Sanders, Trump wins 46% to 40%. Trump beats Sen. Kamala Harris among millionaires 45% to 42%, while he beats Sen. Elizabeth Warren 47% to 40%.

Of course, millionaire voters aren’t reliable predictors of election results. Millionaires backed former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton by a comfortable margin over Trump before the 2016 election, 44% to 31%, according to the CNBC Millionaire Survey.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: robert frank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vote, sen, wins, likely, millionaire, trump, president, joe, donald, elections, biden, say, vice, 2020, survey, millionaires, democratic


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

House passes $19 billion disaster relief bill after delays, sending it to Trump

Oliver Kelly, 1 year old, cries as he is carried off the sheriff’s airboat during his rescue from rising flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Leland, North Carolina, September 16, 2018. The House passed a long awaited $19 billion disaster aid package Monday that, pending President Donald Trump’s signature, would send relief to areas of the U.S. battered by storms. The chamber approved the measure by a 354-58 vote after Republicans blocked three previous attempts to pass it unan


Oliver Kelly, 1 year old, cries as he is carried off the sheriff’s airboat during his rescue from rising flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Leland, North Carolina, September 16, 2018. The House passed a long awaited $19 billion disaster aid package Monday that, pending President Donald Trump’s signature, would send relief to areas of the U.S. battered by storms. The chamber approved the measure by a 354-58 vote after Republicans blocked three previous attempts to pass it unan
House passes $19 billion disaster relief bill after delays, sending it to Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sending, disaster, delays, bill, stormsthe, senate, send, trump, vote, signature, waters, relief, sheriffs, passes, voted, 19, unanimously, billion, house, trumps


House passes $19 billion disaster relief bill after delays, sending it to Trump

Oliver Kelly, 1 year old, cries as he is carried off the sheriff’s airboat during his rescue from rising flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Leland, North Carolina, September 16, 2018.

The House passed a long awaited $19 billion disaster aid package Monday that, pending President Donald Trump’s signature, would send relief to areas of the U.S. battered by storms.

The chamber approved the measure by a 354-58 vote after Republicans blocked three previous attempts to pass it unanimously. Only GOP members voted against it Monday. As the Senate has already cleared the bill, it will head to Trump’s desk for his approval.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sending, disaster, delays, bill, stormsthe, senate, send, trump, vote, signature, waters, relief, sheriffs, passes, voted, 19, unanimously, billion, house, trumps


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

South Africa election: Everything you need to know ahead of the vote

The ANC, which spearheaded the struggle for freedom in South Africa, has accrued serious reputational damage by successive corruption scandals in recent years. Alongside concern over violent crime, income inequality and unemployment, many people in South Africa still lack access to electricity and sanitation. Waldo Swiegers | Bloomberg via Getty ImagesThe gap between the so-called “haves” and “have-nots” in South Africa is massive. Ramaphosa “may not be the last chance for South Africa, but mayb


The ANC, which spearheaded the struggle for freedom in South Africa, has accrued serious reputational damage by successive corruption scandals in recent years. Alongside concern over violent crime, income inequality and unemployment, many people in South Africa still lack access to electricity and sanitation. Waldo Swiegers | Bloomberg via Getty ImagesThe gap between the so-called “haves” and “have-nots” in South Africa is massive. Ramaphosa “may not be the last chance for South Africa, but mayb
South Africa election: Everything you need to know ahead of the vote Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, south, zuma, anc, need, election, party, know, ahead, africa, vote, ramaphosa, leader, president, thaker


South Africa election: Everything you need to know ahead of the vote

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa addresses the crowd gathered at the Miki Yili Stadium, ahead of the celebrations for the 25th anniversary of Freedom Day, in Makhanda, Eastern Cape Province on April 27, 2019. MICHELE SPATARI | AFP | Getty Images

South Africans are preparing to vote for a new national parliament, 25 years after landmark elections ended white-minority rule. The African National Congress (ANC) has won every parliamentary vote since 1994, and opinion polls suggest the ruling party will secure another majority on Wednesday. But, President Cyril Ramaphosa is under intensifying pressure to prevent a further erosion of his party’s waning popularity. The ANC has seen its share of the parliamentary vote fall from a high of more than 69% in 2004 to 62% in 2014. The biggest rivals to the ANC are the Democratic Alliance (DA) — the country’s main opposition party — and the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF), a radical leftist group. The ballot comes at a time when voters in Africa’s most industrialized economy are deeply concerned about several issues impacting their daily lives, with roughly half of the adult population currently living below the poverty line.

What’s going to happen?

Almost 50 parties will compete for the support of nearly 27 million eligible voters, with the ANC tipped to secure somewhere between 54% and 61% of the vote. The DA, a center-right party which holds the Western Cape, is reportedly expected to win as much as 22% of the vote, while the EFF is set to receive around 10%. “The ANC will win with a slightly reduced majority, but it is the provincial breakdown which could have grand implications over whether Ramaphosa is able to implement economic reform,” Indigo Ellis, Africa analyst at Verisk Maplecroft, told CNBC via telephone. “It could even bring into question the entirety of Ramaphosa’s position as president,” Ellis said. The ANC, which spearheaded the struggle for freedom in South Africa, has accrued serious reputational damage by successive corruption scandals in recent years. Under its previous leader, former President Jacob Zuma who was ousted last year, the ruling party was caught up in a series of scandals involving corruption and gross maladministration. Zuma denies any wrongdoing.

This election is not about black and white, it is about the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots.’ Pat Thaker editorial director for the Middle East and Africa at the Economist Intelligence Unit

Ramaphosa, a charismatic former trade union leader who succeeded Zuma as ANC leader, has been trying to make amends by cracking down on corruption and stimulating economic growth. Analysts told CNBC that if the ANC were to win enough votes next week, the success of Ramaphosa’s reform agenda would most likely depend on the size of the party’s parliamentary majority.

Who is Ramaphosa?

Once seen as potential heir to Nelson Mandela, Ramaphosa lost out to internal battles within the ANC in the 1990s before going on to make a fortune in business. The 66-year-old lawyer returned to frontline politics as one of the country’s wealthiest politicians in 2014, with a reported net worth of about $450 million. He was elected as ANC leader in 2017, before replacing Zuma as president in February last year. “In many ways, Ramaphosa is rekindling the optimism of the 1990s but — and it is a big but — the economic, political and social problems are far greater now,” Pat Thaker, editorial director for the Middle East and Africa at the Economist Intelligence Unit, told CNBC via telephone. Alongside concern over violent crime, income inequality and unemployment, many people in South Africa still lack access to electricity and sanitation. Housing is also a hot button issue in the country, with richer households thought to be nearly 10 times wealthier than poor households. “This election is not about black and white, it is about the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’,” Thaker said.

Commercial buildings and office property stand on the city skyline as night falls, as seen from the 50th floor of the Carlton Centre, in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Tuesday, July 17, 2018. Waldo Swiegers | Bloomberg via Getty Images

The gap between the so-called “haves” and “have-nots” in South Africa is massive. High-walled mansions and skyscrapers are a constant reminder of the wealth enjoyed by some, while there are millions of others living in townships and squatter camps. Ramaphosa “may not be the last chance for South Africa, but maybe he is for the ruling party. I think the next election in 2024 could have a completely new party,” Thaker said.

Why does the election matter for global investors?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, south, zuma, anc, need, election, party, know, ahead, africa, vote, ramaphosa, leader, president, thaker


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘The center of the political universe’ — Iowa is even more important than usual in the 2020 election

The president won Iowa by about 10 percentage points in 2016 after President Barack Obama carried the state twice. Iowa Soybean Association President Lindsay Greiner Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean AssociationLindsay Greiner, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, said “there’s really bean a lack of any good news.” The majority House Democrats are in no hurry to bring the deal to a vote in the chamber. With the issues facing Iowa, Democrats have looked for ways to gain an edge in 2020. “We d


The president won Iowa by about 10 percentage points in 2016 after President Barack Obama carried the state twice. Iowa Soybean Association President Lindsay Greiner Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean AssociationLindsay Greiner, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, said “there’s really bean a lack of any good news.” The majority House Democrats are in no hurry to bring the deal to a vote in the chamber. With the issues facing Iowa, Democrats have looked for ways to gain an edge in 2020. “We d
‘The center of the political universe’ — Iowa is even more important than usual in the 2020 election Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, democratic, democrats, state, trade, iowa, vote, important, universe, trump, usual, political, 2020, election, president, center, states


'The center of the political universe' — Iowa is even more important than usual in the 2020 election

Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during a rally at the Fairfield Arts and Convention Center on April 06, 2019 in Fairfield, Iowa. Scott Olson | Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidates swarm. A nine-term U.S. House incumbent faces a primary challenge. Farmers watch to see whether President Donald Trump can end his trade conflicts — and ease their financial pain. That’s only the start of the intrigue in Iowa ahead of the 2020 elections. Even for a presidential campaign staging ground and White House swing state, the Hawkeye State will play a massive role next year. “Iowa is always important, but it really will be the center of the political universe for much of 2020,” said Alex Conant, a Republican strategist who worked on first-term Sen. Joni Ernst’s 2014 campaign victory. All four of the state’s House districts have a chance to change hands as Democrats try to hold a majority they won last year in part through a strong showing in Iowa. Meanwhile, Republicans may need Ernst to hold her seat to keep their Senate majority. Trump looms above it all. The president won Iowa by about 10 percentage points in 2016 after President Barack Obama carried the state twice. But frustrations have started to boil in a state heavily reliant on exports to Canada and Mexico. The president’s tariff policy and struggle to ratify updates to the North American Free Trade Agreement have created uncertainty for farms and other businesses. Of course, most of the focus on Iowa relates to its February caucuses, the first nominating contest in the Democratic presidential primary. The more than 20 candidates in the primary field have descended on the state in recent months, standing on counters, eating ice cream and serving beer as they court the state’s voters. A strong showing there can help Democrats establish an early foothold in the race to challenge Trump for the White House.

There’s more than a presidential race in Iowa

But much more will happen in Iowa to shape the battle for control of the White House and Congress in 2020. Along with states such as Pennsylvania and Michigan, Iowa voted for Trump after backing Obama twice. All of those states swung toward Democrats in last year’s midterms: in Iowa, Reps. Abby Finkenauer and Cindy Axne flipped GOP-held seats, while Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds won reelection by only about 2.5 percentage points. Iowa will play a major role in House elections again next year. Republicans have their eyes on taking back both Finkenauer’s 1st District and Axne’s 3rd District. The GOP will also target the state’s 2nd District, which despite its blue tilt has entered the 2020 battlefield due to Democratic Rep. Dave Loebsack’s retirement. Meanwhile, Republican Rep. Steve King in Iowa’s 4th District will have to fight off primary and general election challenges next year after surviving a close call in 2018. King, who has served for more than 15 years, lost party support and was stripped of committee assignments because of racist comments. His leading GOP rival for the seat is state Sen. Randy Feenstra, who easily raised more money than King in the first quarter. King’s district is “so heavily Republican that it really hasn’t been competitive for quite a while,” said Tim Hagle, an associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa. He said it has a better chance of flipping to Democratic control if King wins the nomination over one of his Republican challengers. Combined with Loebsack’s retirement and the freshman Democrats’ defense of their seats, the state has more congressional ballot intrigue than it has in years. At the statewide level, Ernst has an early advantage in the race to keep her seat. She won by nearly 10 percentage points in 2014. Democrats have struggled to find a top-tier challenger to take her on — both former Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack and Axne declined to run for Senate. Still, the factors that could make Trump’s reelection close in Iowa will also affect Ernst. Iowa sits at the center of two national issues that will test voters’ patience not only for the president but also other incumbents. Farmers damaged by lower prices caused in part by Trump’s trade war with China want to see the conflict end and hope Congress will approve the new United States Mexico Canada Agreement.

Iowa Soybean Association President Lindsay Greiner Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean Association

Lindsay Greiner, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, said “there’s really bean a lack of any good news.” The organization advocates for soybean farmers in Iowa, the largest U.S. producer of the crop. Prices have plunged since the U.S. started a tit-for-tat tariff battle with China. The Trump administration has pushed Beijing to purchase more soybeans as part of any agreement. “Politicians are dragging their feet on approving USMCA. Progress has been made on a deal with China but it’s been slow,” Greiner said, referring to the updated NAFTA, which Trump has dubbed the United States Mexico Canada Agreement. He added that politicians appear “more concerned about whether Russia meddled in an election when there’s real economic hardship going on in farm country.” Greiner grows about 800 acres of corn and 700 acres of soybeans near Keota, Iowa. He said he has looked for ways to cut costs as the revenue for his farm has dropped by about $80,000 in the last year. The prospects look grim for USMCA approval soon. The majority House Democrats are in no hurry to bring the deal to a vote in the chamber. Republicans, led by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley-R-Iowa, and Ernst, have pushed Trump to drop tariffs and steel and aluminum imports from Canada and Mexico before moving forward with the agreement. Iowa relies on America’s northern and southern neighbors. It sent $4.2 billion in goods, or about 30 percent of its exports, to Canada in 2018, according to the U.S. Trade Representative. It exported $2.3 billion in goods to Mexico. With about 18 months until the election and a Democratic nominee to be determined, it will take a while before we know whether the trade conflicts hurt Trump’s reelection. Greiner has voted for candidates from both major parties and supported both Trump and Loebsack in 2016. He said it is “too soon to tell” whether he will vote for a second term for the president. Trade has implications for Iowa’s House races, too. All four of Iowa’s congressional districts are among the 36 that have soybean plantings of more than half a million acres. Both Finkenauer and Axne criticized Trump’s tariffs on China on the way to winning their seats. While King acknowledged the damage the trade war caused to Iowa farmers, he, along with Trump, has stressed patience.

The disaster relief problem

Ryan Lincoln maneuvers his boat through flood water at the intersection of Pershing Ave and E 2nd St. Thursday, May 2, 2019. Kevin E. Schmidt | Quad City Times via AP

Farmers in western Iowa already ravaged by trade conflict took another devastating blow earlier this year. The worst flooding in years hit the state, along with Nebraska and Missouri. It put a focus not only on climate change but also the integrity of U.S. infrastructure. With the issues facing Iowa, Democrats have looked for ways to gain an edge in 2020. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., proposed appointing “trustbusters” to review and reverse “anti-competitive mergers” in the agriculture industry. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat used to campaigning in farm country, has put an emphasis on overhauling infrastructure and connecting rural Americans to the internet. Multiple Democratic candidates have toured the flooded areas of Iowa. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee — who has run primarily on a pledge to combat climate change — used the moment to accuse Trump of making natural disasters worse by failing to address a warming planet. In only the last few days, the eastern part of Iowa took a hit. Flood waters swept into Davenport, Iowa, on Tuesday temporary structures holding back a swollen Mississippi River gave way. Warren cited Davenport on Thursday in saying “climate change is here, and it’s up to us to act.” But Iowa carries its pitfalls for Democrats. The Senate has failed to pass a bill to send natural disaster relief funds to states such as Iowa, Florida, Texas and California. Democrats have pushed for a package to include more aid for hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico — spending Trump does not support. All six senators running for president as Democrats either voted not to advance, or missed the vote on, a GOP-backed bill that they said lacked enough relief money for the island commonwealth. When the vote took place last month, Grassley warned his colleagues about political backlash in Iowa. “To my colleagues across the aisle who have been spending a lot of time in Iowa lately as presidential candidates, if you vote against moving forward with the [relief money for Midwestern states], how are you going to look Iowans in the eye and justify a vote against moving this disaster relief bill ahead?” he asked at the time. Trade poses another issue for parts of the Democratic field in Iowa. Leading candidates whose trade views overlap with Trump’s — such as Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Warren — will have to defend their opposition to trade deals such as NAFTA that have shaped the Iowa economy.

“We do want to have an end in sight”

Soybean harvesting in Iowa Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean Association


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, democratic, democrats, state, trade, iowa, vote, important, universe, trump, usual, political, 2020, election, president, center, states


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Apple, AMD, Mondelez and more

Stephen Moore’s Fed nomination could be doomed as GOP senators…Sen. Joni Ernst, the Iowa Republican, said she likely will not vote for Moore and also said she does not believe he currently has the votes to win approval in the Senate. Politicsread more


Stephen Moore’s Fed nomination could be doomed as GOP senators…Sen. Joni Ernst, the Iowa Republican, said she likely will not vote for Moore and also said she does not believe he currently has the votes to win approval in the Senate. Politicsread more
Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Apple, AMD, Mondelez and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, votes, stephen, mondelez, biggest, senatepoliticsread, hours, apple, vote, moves, nomination, moore, senatorssen, moores, republican, win, stocks, making, amd


Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Apple, AMD, Mondelez and more

Stephen Moore’s Fed nomination could be doomed as GOP senators…

Sen. Joni Ernst, the Iowa Republican, said she likely will not vote for Moore and also said she does not believe he currently has the votes to win approval in the Senate.

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, votes, stephen, mondelez, biggest, senatepoliticsread, hours, apple, vote, moves, nomination, moore, senatorssen, moores, republican, win, stocks, making, amd


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump pick Stephen Moore’s Fed nomination could be doomed as GOP senators criticize his past statements

Ernst also said she has told the White House about her concerns with Moore. Ernst’s chilly view of Moore came shortly after fellow GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina told reporters that Moore being named to the Fed will be “a very problematic nomination.” Moore, who has echoed Trump’s criticism of the Fed for hiking interest rates last year, cannot afford to lose four Republican senators’ support if he hopes to survive the nomination process. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.,


Ernst also said she has told the White House about her concerns with Moore. Ernst’s chilly view of Moore came shortly after fellow GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina told reporters that Moore being named to the Fed will be “a very problematic nomination.” Moore, who has echoed Trump’s criticism of the Fed for hiking interest rates last year, cannot afford to lose four Republican senators’ support if he hopes to survive the nomination process. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.,
Trump pick Stephen Moore’s Fed nomination could be doomed as GOP senators criticize his past statements Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stephen, nominated, pick, vote, moore, nomination, past, writings, moores, trump, fed, republican, senators, win, women, statements, ernst, gop


Trump pick Stephen Moore's Fed nomination could be doomed as GOP senators criticize his past statements

“Oh, Stephen Moore?” Ernst said when NBC News asked about his nomination. “I am going to make a comment there: Very unlikely that I would support that person.” Ernst also said she has told the White House about her concerns with Moore.

Sen. Joni Ernst, an Iowa Republican, said she likely will not vote for Moore and also said she does not believe he currently has the votes to win approval in the Senate.

President Donald Trump’s plan to name conservative pundit Stephen Moore to the Federal Reserve Board could be doomed to failure, as a number of Republican senators were cool to his bid Tuesday because of his past sarcastic writings about women and other issues.

Ernst’s chilly view of Moore came shortly after fellow GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina told reporters that Moore being named to the Fed will be “a very problematic nomination.”

Moore, who has echoed Trump’s criticism of the Fed for hiking interest rates last year, cannot afford to lose four Republican senators’ support if he hopes to survive the nomination process. Republicans hold a 53-47 edge in the chamber.

Trump’s other recent Fed pick, businessman and former presidential candidate Herman Cain, recently dropped out from contention after it became clear he lacked enough Republican support in the Senate to win approval.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., gave a tepid response when reporters asked him about Moore, whose nomination has yet to be formally submitted to the Senate.

“Well, we’re happy to receive nominations when we get them, there are a lot of people who are being considered for all kinds of positions that are not yet nominated,” McConnell said. “And if he is nominated we’ll cross that bridge when we get there.”

The choice of Moore for the central bank has been controversial from the start because of concerns he would be too apt to do what Trump wanted on the Fed board, and because of his track record on economic predictions. On Tuesday, Moore told CNBC’s “Squawk Box ” that declining earnings among men is the biggest challenge facing the economy.

His bid has come under more fire in recent weeks with disclosures of his having had a $75,000 income tax lien, being found in contempt of court for shorting his ex-wife on more than $300,000 in a divorce settlement, and writing humor columns about women.

In one column, Moore said women should not be allowed to referee men’s basketball games in the NCAA tournament, and in another said that if women earned more than their husbands if could “be disruptive to family stability.”

Sen Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., said, “I think his statements definitely” are of concern.

“”So we’ll have to see — if he gets nominated and then what he says before the committee,” Capito said.

“It’s hard to look past some of those” writings, she said.

Ernst also had mentioned Moore’s writings on Tuesday.

“I’m not enthused about what he has said in various articles,” Ernst said, according to the Bloomberg news service. “I think it’s ridiculous.”

“It looks like drip by drip,” Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., said of the stories about Moore, Bloomberg reported. Shelby also said he thinks Moore’s nomination has “some problems.”

Sen Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn, said, “If he is nominated then I will visit with him.””

“Of course his comments are something that are not good and you can guarantee, big guarantee, absolutely without fail, if I visit him that would be a topic of discussion,” Blackburn said.The GOP has a three-seat majority in the Senate, but every Democrat and independent are likely to vote against Moore.

Moore could win confirmation if only three Republicans voted against him — given Vice President Mike Pence’s power to break a tie, 50-50 vote — but his bid for a Fed seat could be doomed if four GOP members come out against him.

WATCH: CNBC’s full interview with Stephen Moore


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stephen, nominated, pick, vote, moore, nomination, past, writings, moores, trump, fed, republican, senators, win, women, statements, ernst, gop


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Scotland will prepare for an independence referendum before May 2021

Scotland should hold an independence referendum before the current Scottish parliamentary term ends in May 2021 and will prepare legislation for this to happen, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said on Wednesday. “A choice between Brexit and a future for Scotland as an independent European nation should be offered in the lifetime of this parliament,” Sturgeon told Holyrood, Scotland’s devolved parliament. Sturgeon is under pressure from her nationalist movement to provide a clear way forward in th


Scotland should hold an independence referendum before the current Scottish parliamentary term ends in May 2021 and will prepare legislation for this to happen, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said on Wednesday. “A choice between Brexit and a future for Scotland as an independent European nation should be offered in the lifetime of this parliament,” Sturgeon told Holyrood, Scotland’s devolved parliament. Sturgeon is under pressure from her nationalist movement to provide a clear way forward in th
Scotland will prepare for an independence referendum before May 2021 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: jeff j mitchell, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sturgeon, vote, united, britain, stage, referendum, brexit, 2021, prepare, scotland, parliament, kingdom, independence


Scotland will prepare for an independence referendum before May 2021

Scotland should hold an independence referendum before the current Scottish parliamentary term ends in May 2021 and will prepare legislation for this to happen, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said on Wednesday.

“A choice between Brexit and a future for Scotland as an independent European nation should be offered in the lifetime of this parliament,” Sturgeon told Holyrood, Scotland’s devolved parliament.

She said a devolved parliament bill would be drawn up before the end of 2019.

The permission of Britain’s sovereign parliament at this stage was not needed, she said, but would be eventually be necessary “to put beyond doubt or challenge our ability to apply the bill to an independence referendum.”

Sturgeon is under pressure from her nationalist movement to provide a clear way forward in the quest for an independent Scotland.

But Britain is mired in political chaos due to Brexit and it is still unclear whether, when or even if Britain will leave the European Union.

Scotland, part of the United Kingdom for more than 300 years, rejected independence by 10 percentage points in a 2014 referendum.

Differences over Brexit have strained the United Kingdom. Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to stay in the EU in a 2016 referendum, while Wales and England vote to leave.

Those who want to maintain the United Kingdom argue that Brexit has made no difference to how Scots feel, and the secession vote should not be repeated.

But Sturgeon argued that leaving the world’s largest trading bloc endangers Britain and Scotland’s economic well-being.

“We face being forced to the margins, sidelined within a UK that is itself increasingly sidelined on the international stage. Independence by contrast would allow us to protect our place in Europe,” she said.

“We need a more solid foundation on which to build our future as a country.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: jeff j mitchell, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sturgeon, vote, united, britain, stage, referendum, brexit, 2021, prepare, scotland, parliament, kingdom, independence


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Egypt voters allow El-Sissi to remain president until 2030

Voters in Egypt approved constitutional amendments allowing President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi to remain in power until 2030, election officials said Tuesday, a move that critics fear will cement his authoritarian rule eight years after a pro-democracy uprising. Freedoms won in 2011, when mass protests ended President Hosni Mubarak’s nearly three-decade rule, have been rolled back. In his first public comments on the amendments, el-Sissi thanked the Egyptian people for voting. El-Sissi was elected


Voters in Egypt approved constitutional amendments allowing President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi to remain in power until 2030, election officials said Tuesday, a move that critics fear will cement his authoritarian rule eight years after a pro-democracy uprising. Freedoms won in 2011, when mass protests ended President Hosni Mubarak’s nearly three-decade rule, have been rolled back. In his first public comments on the amendments, el-Sissi thanked the Egyptian people for voting. El-Sissi was elected
Egypt voters allow El-Sissi to remain president until 2030 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: islam safwat, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elsissi, remain, amendments, progovernment, president, posters, vote, allow, rule, 2030, egyptian, referendum, egypt, voters


Egypt voters allow El-Sissi to remain president until 2030

Voters in Egypt approved constitutional amendments allowing President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi to remain in power until 2030, election officials said Tuesday, a move that critics fear will cement his authoritarian rule eight years after a pro-democracy uprising.

El-Sissi led the military overthrow of an elected but divisive Islamist president amid mass protests against his rule in 2013 and has since presided over an unprecedented crackdown on dissent. Thousands of people, including many pro-democracy activists, have been arrested by authorities. Freedoms won in 2011, when mass protests ended President Hosni Mubarak’s nearly three-decade rule, have been rolled back.

Lasheen Ibrahim, the head of Egypt’s National Election Authority, told a news conference the amendments to the 2014 constitution were approved with 88.83% voting in favor, with a turnout of 44.33%. The nationwide referendum took place over three days, from Saturday through Monday to maximize turnout. Egypt has some 61 million eligible voters.

In his first public comments on the amendments, el-Sissi thanked the Egyptian people for voting.

“Wonderful scene done by Egyptians who took part in the referendum… will be written down in our nation’s historical record,” he tweeted minutes after Ibrahim announced the results.

Pro-government media, business people and lawmakers had pushed for a “Yes” vote and a high turnout, with many offering free rides and food handouts to voters, while authorities threatened to fine anyone boycotting the three-day referendum.

Opposition parties had urged a “no” vote, but they have little power in parliament, which is packed with el-Sissi supporters and overwhelmingly approved the amendments earlier this month. The local media is also dominated by pro-government commentators, and the authorities have blocked hundreds of websites, including many operated by independent media and rights groups.

Two international advocacy groups — Human Rights Watch and the International Commission of Jurists — had urged the Egyptian government to withdraw the amendments, saying they placed the country on a path to more autocratic rule.

Hassan Nafaa, a political science professor at Cairo University, said the results were expected. “There will be dangerous repercussion from the ruling regime as we will see more repression and restrictive policies,” he said.

Generally, the amendments extend a president’s term in office from four to six years and allow for a maximum of two terms. But they also include a special article specific to el-Sissi that extends his current second four-year term to six years and allows him to run for another six-year term in 2024 — potentially extending his rule until 2030.

The changes also allow the president to appoint top judges and include language declaring the military the “guardian and protector” of the Egyptian state, democracy and the constitution, while granting military courts wider jurisdiction in trying civilians.

El-Sissi was elected president in 2014 and re-elected last year after all potentially serious challengers were jailed or pressured to exit the race.

Parliament overwhelmingly approved the amendments last week, with only 22 no votes and one abstention from 554 lawmakers in attendance. The national electoral commission announced the following day that voting would begin Saturday.

Since early April, the Egyptian capital had been awash with large posters and banners encouraging people to vote in favor of the changes. Most of the posters were apparently funded by pro-government parties, businessmen and lawmakers.

In Cairo’s central Tahrir Square, where mass protests became the symbol of the 2011 anti-Mubarak uprising and of hopes for democratic change in Egypt, the posters urged people to vote in the referendum.

“Take part, say … ‘yes’ for the constitutional amendments,” said one banner near the offices of the pro-government Nation’s Future Party. Most of the posters were apparently funded by pro-government parties, businessmen and lawmakers.

During the referendum, business people and lawmakers loyal to el-Sissi offered incentives to voters. They provided buses to transport people free of charge to a polling center. Also some voters were being handed bags of food staples — like oil, rice and sugar — after they cast their ballots.

Trucks with loudspeakers drove around central Cairo through the three-day referendum, playing patriotic songs and urging people to vote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: islam safwat, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elsissi, remain, amendments, progovernment, president, posters, vote, allow, rule, 2030, egyptian, referendum, egypt, voters


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Spain’s about to hold a general election: Here’s what you need to know

The party has been overseeing a minority government with just 84 seats in the 350-member Congress of Deputies, Spain’s lower house of parliament. In this election, it could gain as many as 54 seats — but that would still fall short of the 176 seats a party needs to gain a majority. Opinion polls have consistently showed that the PSOE leads by a wide margin and is seen with between 28 to 31% of the votes. The Vox party is seen getting around 9-11% of the vote. “People are really scared of the ris


The party has been overseeing a minority government with just 84 seats in the 350-member Congress of Deputies, Spain’s lower house of parliament. In this election, it could gain as many as 54 seats — but that would still fall short of the 176 seats a party needs to gain a majority. Opinion polls have consistently showed that the PSOE leads by a wide margin and is seen with between 28 to 31% of the votes. The Vox party is seen getting around 9-11% of the vote. “People are really scared of the ris
Spain’s about to hold a general election: Here’s what you need to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: holly ellyatt, jose jordan, afp, getty images, david ramos, getty images news
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hold, election, party, gain, vote, consistently, polls, socialists, psoe, seen, heres, seats, need, general, know, spains, voters


Spain's about to hold a general election: Here's what you need to know

Opinion polls in recent weeks have consistently signaled that Sanchez’s socialists could win the largest share of the vote — but not enough for the party to govern alone.

The party has been overseeing a minority government with just 84 seats in the 350-member Congress of Deputies, Spain’s lower house of parliament. In this election, it could gain as many as 54 seats — but that would still fall short of the 176 seats a party needs to gain a majority.

Opinion polls have consistently showed that the PSOE leads by a wide margin and is seen with between 28 to 31% of the votes. The PP is trailing with around 20-24% of the vote. Ciudadanos is seen with around 15% and Podemos with around 12-13%. The Vox party is seen getting around 9-11% of the vote.

A large number of voters (25-30%) remain undecided as to who to vote for, and this could have a significant impact on the final result.

Speculation is already mounting over what alliances PSOE could seek to enable it to form a government. Anna Rosenberg, partner and head of Europe and U.K. at Signum Global Advisors, told CNBC that the socialists were benefiting from the fragmentation on the right.

“People are really scared of the rise of the right-wing parties and that will mobilize voters that might not have been expected to vote before. Sanchez has also actually done quite well and doesn’t represent the status quo,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: holly ellyatt, jose jordan, afp, getty images, david ramos, getty images news
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hold, election, party, gain, vote, consistently, polls, socialists, psoe, seen, heres, seats, need, general, know, spains, voters


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post