Trump says it might be better to wait until after 2020 election for a China trade deal

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that it might be better to wait until after the 2020 election to strike a trade deal with China. “In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal, but they want to make a deal now and we will see whether or not the deal is going to be right,” Trump told reporters in London. When asked if he had a deadline for the deal, he added: “I have no deadline, no … In some ways I think it is better to wait until after the election,


President Donald Trump said Tuesday that it might be better to wait until after the 2020 election to strike a trade deal with China.
“In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal, but they want to make a deal now and we will see whether or not the deal is going to be right,” Trump told reporters in London.
When asked if he had a deadline for the deal, he added: “I have no deadline, no …
In some ways I think it is better to wait until after the election,
Trump says it might be better to wait until after 2020 election for a China trade deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, waiting, trump, deadline, truthwashington, ways, china, better, wait, worth, trade, election, deal, 2020


Trump says it might be better to wait until after 2020 election for a China trade deal

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that it might be better to wait until after the 2020 election to strike a trade deal with China.

“In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal, but they want to make a deal now and we will see whether or not the deal is going to be right,” Trump told reporters in London. The U.S. general election is set to take place in November 2020.

When asked if he had a deadline for the deal, he added: “I have no deadline, no … In some ways I think it is better to wait until after the election, if you want to know the truth.”

Washington and Beijing have imposed tariffs on billions of dollars’ worth of one another’s goods since the start of 2018, battering financial markets and souring business and consumer sentiment. The next tariff deadline is Dec. 15. If the two sides cannot pen down a deal by then, additional U.S. levies on Chinese exports will go into effect.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, waiting, trump, deadline, truthwashington, ways, china, better, wait, worth, trade, election, deal, 2020


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Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t


If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders.
Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray.
Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.
It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t
Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there's something they don't want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. The downside? There are few geological secrets anymore. What was once a tribe’s, then a town’s, and eventually a country’s pride and joy is now subject to the whims of the international traveling world — all 1.4 billion of us. Take Norway’s now-famous Trolltunga. Jutting 2,300 feet above the north side of Ringedalsvatnet lake, the natural rock formation resulted from receding glaciers that broke off large, angular blocks from area mountains. It’s easy to see why photos at the site are an instant hit.

Two visitors gaze off Norway’s Trolltunga. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

The serenity. The solitude.

Trolltunga in Hardangerfjord, Norway. Morten Rustad | 500px Prime | Getty Images

The stillness of the remote surroundings. But widen the frame a bit, and that’s not the story.

Tourism explosion at Trolltunga

A decade ago, fewer than 800 people a year traveled to Trolltunga. Next year, that figure’s expected to hit 100,000. Trolltunga was formed roughly 10,000 years before the advent of the internet, but social media has played a major role in its massive influx. A photo there seems to combine everything we’ve come to expect from online travel photos: distant lands, a touch of daredevilism, breath-taking scenery and a soul-searchingly authentic experience.

Trolltunga, from a different angle. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

“Instagram has elevated the interest in the site that really no conventional marketing campaign can do,” said Bo Vibe, head of digital marketing at Fjord Tours. “Getting the ‘selfie’ on the top becomes the end-all for many visitors.” “Facebook has probably had just as much influence as Instagram,” said Jostein Soldal, CEO of Trolltunga Active, citing effective local and national marketing campaigns, word of mouth and the sheer beauty of the area as other factors. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. But that solemn mood conveyed on social media doesn’t match what’s happening just beyond the selfie-frame.

Tourists wait in line to be photographed on Trolltunga. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

As tourist numbers have increased, so have the lines. Visitors who arrive in the summer months have been known to wait longer than three hours to get a photograph on the tongue’s tip. The longest waits often result when good weather follows a long period of rain — and when the average number of visitors increases from 800 to 2,000 per day. Travelers who arrive from June to September should mentally prepare for an average wait of 60 to 90 minutes for a photo opp. “If you are prepared that there will be a line and spend the time just enjoying all the impressive poses many of the tourists are doing, the waiting is not a big issue,” said Soldal. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.

Trolltunga’s saving grace – it’s hard to get there

Consistently ranked one of the best hikes in Norway, the journey to reach Trolltunga isn’t an easy one. From Skjeggedal, it’s a 10- to 12-hour hike that covers 28 kilometers and an 800-meter ascent. Hikers need to be fit and equipped with food, water, headlights, hiking boots and other gear. Efforts to inform tourists of this have helped reduce rescue operations from an all-time high of 40 in 2016 to just 12 in 2018. Built in the early 1900s, a funicular called Mågelibanen once made the journey to Trolltunga considerably easier, but it closed in 2012. To date, the only way to reach it is by foot, a fact that suits the local population just fine, says Soldal. “We don’t want more visitors,” he said with a laugh. “Plus, if it’s a five-minute walk, the Trolltunga will lose some of its ‘I did it’ factor.” There is a steep, private road that takes travelers 400 meters up the mountain, but it’s still eight hours of hiking from there. Only 30 cars are allowed to park at a time, and the hairpin turns on the drive aren’t for the faint of heart.

Trolltunga isn’t alone

Trolltunga isn’t Norway’s only site to achieve Insta-fame. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like this:

Norway’s Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

But with 300,000 visitors a year — roughly three times as many visitors as Trolltunga — it’s better to assume it will look more like this in person.

Hiikers at Preikestolen. Xichao Yu | 500px | Getty Images

The journey to Pulpit Rock is a less-arduous, eight-kilometer hike that can be completed in three to four hours, making it a popular stop on the tourist bus and cruise ship circuit. Instagram is also rife with photos of Kjeragbolten, another picture-perfect geological wonder in Norway.

Woman atop Kjeragbolten. kotangens | iStock | Getty Images

But behind-the-scenes photos show that the line at Kjeragbolten is decidedly less zen.

Hikers wait in line to take a photo at Kjeragbolten. Courtesy of Ali Ronca at amsterdamandbeyond.com

How to avoid the crowds

For a less-congested experience, one option is to book an off-season tour. Winter tours reward visitors with open trails, little to no waits and beautiful snow-covered views, though the hike is more difficult and conditions can be too slick to step out onto the troll’s tongue. Off-season hikes — from October to May — can be dangerous for novices and should not be attempted without a guide. Early morning starts in high season are also possible, though it adds the extra challenge of hiking in darkness.

It’s an area where all logic says is not a place to settle down. And we have managed it for 8,000 years. Jostein Soldal CEO, Trolltunga Active


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


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Sales are already kicking off this Thanksgiving — here are some of the top brands offering discounts

More than 85% of Americans are expected to make purchases over the Thanksgiving weekend, either online or in their local mall, according to a recent poll. To capture their attention, even the most coveted and popular brands are offering deals. Some are kicking off their promotions early, hoping to lure shoppers who are starting to peruse the web for cosmetics or a new mattress on Turkey day. Here are a few popular brands to consider if you’re in the market for a deal. And for those who are plann


More than 85% of Americans are expected to make purchases over the Thanksgiving weekend, either online or in their local mall, according to a recent poll.
To capture their attention, even the most coveted and popular brands are offering deals.
Some are kicking off their promotions early, hoping to lure shoppers who are starting to peruse the web for cosmetics or a new mattress on Turkey day.
Here are a few popular brands to consider if you’re in the market for a deal.
And for those who are plann
Sales are already kicking off this Thanksgiving — here are some of the top brands offering discounts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weve, popular, thanksgiving, wait, turkey, starting, brands, sales, kicking, web, youre, weekend, offering, discounts


Sales are already kicking off this Thanksgiving — here are some of the top brands offering discounts

More than 85% of Americans are expected to make purchases over the Thanksgiving weekend, either online or in their local mall, according to a recent poll. To capture their attention, even the most coveted and popular brands are offering deals.

Some are kicking off their promotions early, hoping to lure shoppers who are starting to peruse the web for cosmetics or a new mattress on Turkey day.

Here are a few popular brands to consider if you’re in the market for a deal. And for those who are planning to wait, we’ve laid out some of the best offerings for the Thanksgiving weekend.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weve, popular, thanksgiving, wait, turkey, starting, brands, sales, kicking, web, youre, weekend, offering, discounts


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Flying this Thanksgiving? Here’s how long you’ll wait at immigration and security

That’s according to a new study on anticipated Thanksgiving weekend wait times at the nation’s top 25 airports for international arrivals from Airside Mobile, developer of the Mobile Passport smartphone app. The projected wait times apply to U.S. citizens only. “On the reverse, Orlando is a relatively low volume airport where the wait times are very painful,” said Merfert. Users of Mobile Passport or programs like Global Entry wait one-fifth as long as the hoi polloi on arrival, according to Air


That’s according to a new study on anticipated Thanksgiving weekend wait times at the nation’s top 25 airports for international arrivals from Airside Mobile, developer of the Mobile Passport smartphone app.
The projected wait times apply to U.S. citizens only.
“On the reverse, Orlando is a relatively low volume airport where the wait times are very painful,” said Merfert.
Users of Mobile Passport or programs like Global Entry wait one-fifth as long as the hoi polloi on arrival, according to Air
Flying this Thanksgiving? Here’s how long you’ll wait at immigration and security Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youll, minutes, merfert, passport, airports, average, long, flying, immigration, thanksgiving, heres, wait, times, mobile, security, international


Flying this Thanksgiving? Here's how long you'll wait at immigration and security

If you’re traveling abroad this Thanksgiving weekend, you might want to think about waiting until the very last minute to fly home. That’s because you’ll find some of the shortest lines at airport customs and immigration on Sunday, Dec. 1 from 10 p.m. to 11 p.m., and then from 1 a.m. to 2 a.m. in the morning Monday.

That’s according to a new study on anticipated Thanksgiving weekend wait times at the nation’s top 25 airports for international arrivals from Airside Mobile, developer of the Mobile Passport smartphone app. Launched in 2014 by Arlington, Virginia-based Airside, the free app allows U.S. citizens and Canadian visitors to clear immigration and customs by electronically submitting passport and customs information before arrival at checkpoints.

“We’re seeing a small trend during the Thanksgiving window, with a lot of folks taking advantage of the long weekend to go abroad,” said Patrick Merfert, Airside’s vice president of marketing. “We wanted to see what it was going to look like when they arrived back home.” The projected wait times apply to U.S. citizens only.

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The firm found that, in general, the best days to arrive back in the U.S. (based on average maximum wait times) are both the Saturday and Sunday after Thanksgiving, with predicted maximum wait times nationwide of 29.7 and 29.4 minutes, respectively. The lowest maximum waits on any day are, as noted, from 1 a.m. to 2 a.m. and then 10 p.m. and 11 p.m. The worst time to arrive from abroad? Between 4 a.m. and 6 a.m. daily.

How much time you’ll spend in line trying to get home after a Turkey Day abroad — whether you were visiting family in Canada or sunning yourself in Cancun — also depends on where home is.

“You tend to see a lot of smaller airports performing quite well, which is partially due to lower traffic, but you also see some larger airports punching above their weight,” said Merfert. “Washington Dulles is ranking quite well despite having moderately high traffic and Dallas-Fort Worth and Chicago O’Hare, as well.”

The airports with the speediest processing times for international arrivals are Phoenix; San Jose; Baltimore; Charlotte, North Carolina; and Philadelphia.

“On the reverse, Orlando is a relatively low volume airport where the wait times are very painful,” said Merfert. There, arriving international passengers have to wait 36 minutes, on average. New Jersey residents might want to consider flying into nearby Philly, because Newark Liberty International ranks among the five worst airports on the list, with an average 35-minute wait. Joining Jersey’s “Gateway City” and Orlando in the bottom five, in order of increasing delays, are Miami (39 minutes), George Bush Intercontinental in Houston (43 minutes) and San Francisco (44 minutes.)

Want to cut down on time spent tapping your toes — and wristwatch? Users of Mobile Passport or programs like Global Entry wait one-fifth as long as the hoi polloi on arrival, according to Airside. “Mobile Passport is at more than 20 of these 25 airports,” said Merfert. “It’s possible that folks using Global Entry and Mobile Passport are bringing down average wait times at those airports.”

For the full study from Airside Mobile with results for all 25 airports analyzed, click here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youll, minutes, merfert, passport, airports, average, long, flying, immigration, thanksgiving, heres, wait, times, mobile, security, international


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Fed’s Lael Brainard says she wants to wait and see how economy is doing before moving rates again

Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard said Wednesday she wants to see how the U.S. economy is performing before making changes to the central bank’s current stance on monetary policy. The adjustment Brainard refers to is the three rate cuts by the U.S. central bank this year. Those rate cuts followed four rate hikes in 2018, the last of which contributed to a massive sell-off in U.S. stocks. Back then, Chairman Jerome Powell raised the bar for further rate cuts but noted the Fed remains a long


Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard said Wednesday she wants to see how the U.S. economy is performing before making changes to the central bank’s current stance on monetary policy.
The adjustment Brainard refers to is the three rate cuts by the U.S. central bank this year.
Those rate cuts followed four rate hikes in 2018, the last of which contributed to a massive sell-off in U.S. stocks.
Back then, Chairman Jerome Powell raised the bar for further rate cuts but noted the Fed remains a long
Fed’s Lael Brainard says she wants to wait and see how economy is doing before moving rates again Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brainard, cuts, moving, economy, central, trade, rate, wants, lael, doing, wait, feds, sitting, rates, uncertainty


Fed's Lael Brainard says she wants to wait and see how economy is doing before moving rates again

Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard said Wednesday she wants to see how the U.S. economy is performing before making changes to the central bank’s current stance on monetary policy.

“The committee has a pretty substantial adjustment in the path of rates over the past few meetings,” Brainard told CNBC’s Steve Liesman on “Squawk on the Street.” “It will take some time to see that work through the economy, so I certainly want to monitor and assess how the economy is reacting to those cuts.”

The adjustment Brainard refers to is the three rate cuts by the U.S. central bank this year. Those rate cuts followed four rate hikes in 2018, the last of which contributed to a massive sell-off in U.S. stocks.

The Fed’s most-recent rate cut came in October. Back then, Chairman Jerome Powell raised the bar for further rate cuts but noted the Fed remains a long way from hiking rates any time soon.

Brainard noted residential investments have improved since the Fed started easing again, but reiterated she wants to “wait for a little bit” before the central bank makes changes as she assesses how “the outlook is adjusting.”

One of the factors Brainard is accounting for in her outlook is the status of U.S.-China trade relations, she said. Both countries have been engaged in a trade war for nearly two years. Back in October, President Donald Trump said a so-called phase one deal would be signed this month. However, there are reports saying the negotiations could hit an impasse.

“We’ve taken out some insurance against that, but we still hear from our business contacts that they’re sitting on the sideline waiting for some of this uncertainty to be resolved,” said Brainard. “I don’t think the expectation is for a major deal, but even a truce would be a significant reduction in uncertainty for a lot of businesses around the country that are sitting on the sidelines in terms of investment.”

Brainard’s comments came ahead of the release of the minutes from the Fed’s October meeting. The minutes are scheduled for release at 2 p.m. ET.

WATCH: CNBC’s full interview with the Fed’s Lael Brainard


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brainard, cuts, moving, economy, central, trade, rate, wants, lael, doing, wait, feds, sitting, rates, uncertainty


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Boeing’s bad week in Washington: US lawmakers push CEO to resign, but investors wait for 737 Max approval

Sarah Silbiger | ReutersIn two combative hearings on Capitol Hill last week, lawmakers pressed Boeing’s CEO Dennis Muilenburg on why he hasn’t given up his pay after two fatal crashes of its 737 Max planes that killed 346 people. Replacing Muilenburg would fall to Boeing’s board, which stripped him of his chairmanship on Oct. 11 but expressed “full confidence” in him as CEO. But a challenge to replacing Boeing’s Muilenburg amid the 737 Max crisis is finding someone who can both do the job and wh


Sarah Silbiger | ReutersIn two combative hearings on Capitol Hill last week, lawmakers pressed Boeing’s CEO Dennis Muilenburg on why he hasn’t given up his pay after two fatal crashes of its 737 Max planes that killed 346 people.
Replacing Muilenburg would fall to Boeing’s board, which stripped him of his chairmanship on Oct. 11 but expressed “full confidence” in him as CEO.
But a challenge to replacing Boeing’s Muilenburg amid the 737 Max crisis is finding someone who can both do the job and wh
Boeing’s bad week in Washington: US lawmakers push CEO to resign, but investors wait for 737 Max approval Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-03  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wait, boeing, investors, flight, ceo, resign, washington, 737, planes, system, push, week, boeings, board, muilenburg, lawmakers, max


Boeing's bad week in Washington: US lawmakers push CEO to resign, but investors wait for 737 Max approval

Boeing Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg testifies before a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing on “aviation safety” and the grounded 737 MAX after two deadly 737 MAX crashes killed 346 people, on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 29, 2019. Sarah Silbiger | Reuters

In two combative hearings on Capitol Hill last week, lawmakers pressed Boeing’s CEO Dennis Muilenburg on why he hasn’t given up his pay after two fatal crashes of its 737 Max planes that killed 346 people. The embattled executive, whose compensation topped $23 million in 2018, the year of the first crash, said that is up to the company’s board. Others lawmakers called for a more drastic measure. “Mr. Muilenburg, if you had an ounce of integrity, you would know that the right thing to do is to step down,” said Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, D-Fla., at the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing on Wednesday. “You are the captain of this ship. A culture of negligence, incompetence or corruption starts at the top and it starts with you” said Rep. Jesus Garcia, Democrat of Illinois, questioning Muilenburg on whether employees were pressured to cut corners to get the plane to market, accusations the executive denied. “I think it’s time that you submitted your resignation, don’t you?”

The buck stops

A day earlier, Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz was dismayed that Muilenburg only learned recently the details of an instant message exchange of a former Boeing pilot telling a colleague of trouble he was having in a 737 Max simulator. “You’re the CEO,” said Cruz. “The buck stops with you.” Replacing Muilenburg would fall to Boeing’s board, which stripped him of his chairmanship on Oct. 11 but expressed “full confidence” in him as CEO. He was replaced by board member and Blackstone Group executive David Calhoun, who also sits on the board of Caterpillar. The company later in the month ousted the head of Boeing’s important commercial airplane unit, which makes the Max. Some analysts and experts say replacing Muilenburg in the middle of this crisis could cause more uncertainty and drag out even more the all-important task of getting the 737 Max flying again. Boeing is facing a host of investigations about the plane’s development and certification by regulators, including a Justice Department probe.

‘The right person, right now’

The Max, Boeing’s best-selling plane accounting for about 40% of its profit, has been grounded by regulators around the world since March after the second of two crashes, a flight ban that has rippled through Boeing’s supply chain to its airline customers. “I think he’s the right person right now, given he’s worked through this process and the changes that need to be done to make the improvements necessary to get it ungrounded,” said Jeff Windau, a Boeing analyst at Edward Jones. “After that point, it depends on the view of the board.” Despite the two fiery hearings, Boeing shares ended the week up 1.6%, slightly more than the broader market. Shares have lagged the broader market so far this year but are still up 7% as of Friday’s close. “My take has been all along, the ultimate arbiter is the share price,” said Ron Epstein, Boeing analyst at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, who added that some investors have asked him whether Muilenburg will be replaced. “If you were to see the shares meaningfully under-perform for a while, that’s when the pitchforks come out.”

One more disruption

He said replacing him now “is one more disruption” and that “it doesn’t make it easier” to move forward. “Committee members were prepared with pointed but reasonable questions for BA, and some displayed clear anger with what they viewed as obfuscation of the culture behind decisions that undermined MCAS and the MAX,” wrote Credit Suisse in a note after the hearings. “That said, we found the exchange to be largely as expected: hardline questioning from members with a sympathetic but tactical responses from Boeing.” Recent executive departures under investor pressure have spanned Big Food, retail and technology. It is not unheard of for a CEO to resign or a board to replace its leadership if it’s “involved in a crisis of this magnitude, even if the CEO is found to be without any blame or responsibility,” said Jill E. Fisch, who teaches business law at University of Pennsylvania Law School. “Clean slate, new image.” But a challenge to replacing Boeing’s Muilenburg amid the 737 Max crisis is finding someone who can both do the job and who would want it, potentially from outside the company. “It’s not an attractive time to join a company,” said Fisch said. During a sales-practices scandal three years ago, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf stepped down and was replaced by the bank’s COO, Tim Sloan. Sloan then stepped down this past March after struggling to overhaul the bank at regulators’ demands in the wake of the scandal. The bank’s board then said it is seeking an external replacement, naming former Visa CEO Charlie Scharf to run the embattled bank last month.

‘We made mistakes’

Muilenburg was contrite during the hearings, victims’ family members sitting behind him — at times holding up photos of their loved ones who died in the crashes. Muilenburg admitted: “We made mistakes” and apologized to lawmakers and victims’ families several times. He withstood criticism that Boeing cut corners to rush the plane to market to take on rival Airbus and had too much control over the Federal Aviation Administration’s certification process. Lawmakers say they’re reviewing a decades-long program that outsources certification tasks to manufacturers. At the center of the controversy is a flight-control system that was implicated in the two crashes — a Lion Air flight that went down shortly after takeoff in Indonesia in October 2018, and another nearly-new Boeing 737 Max operated by Ethiopian Airlines in March. Boeing included the system on the Max jets to make them handle like older models. The 737 Max is a derivative of jet Boeing has sold since 1967. A clean sheet airplane would have taken longer to get to market. The system automatically pushes the nose of the planes downward to avoid a stall, but pilots were battling the system that was fed by inaccurate data from a faulty sensor. Boeing brought the planes to market with the system receiving information from just one sensor. He took heat in the hearings during the revelations of documents that showed an engineer was concerned about using only one sensor. Boeing said that and other messages showed it had an open culture where employees felt comfortable raising issues. Another message from a 737 manager who fretted employees were cutting corners under pressure to meet lofty production goals for the plane. Boeing touted to airline customers that they wouldn’t need to provide pilots with costly, time-consuming simulator training. It offered Southwest Airlines, its biggest Max customer in the U.S., a $1 million per-plane rebate if simulator training was needed, the House committee said as part of its investigation.

Different decisions

Lawmakers sharply questioned Boeing’s executives why the planes weren’t grounded after the first crash in October. “I think about that decision over and over again,” Muilenburg said in the Senate hearing on Wednesday. “If we knew everything back then that we know now we would have made a different decision.” But Muilenburg, who has been with Boeing since he was a college intern and became CEO in 2015, withstood calls to step down, saying instead he wants to see the crisis through, citing his upbringing on an Iowa farm.

A group of victims’ relatives said during the hearing that he “go back to to the farm, the mother of one of the crash victims told the Muilenburg after the questioning. “It has come to the point where you are not the person anymore to solve the situation,” the woman told Muilenburg. “You’re no longer an Iowa farm boy,” said Rep. Peter DeFazio, chairman of the House committee, on Thursday. “You are the CEO of the largest aircraft manufacturer in the world. You’re earning a heck of a lot of money, and so far the consequence to you has been, oh, you’re not chairman of the board anymore.” DeFazio blamed Boeing’s design and sales approach of the 737 Max on investor pressure. “This all starts on Wall Street,” he told reporters before the hearings.

Regaining trust

Boeing has designed a series of fixes for the beleaguered planes to make the flight control system less aggressive and with data from two sensors instead of one. Regulators still haven’t signed off on the changes, but Boeing expects them to before the end of the year. BofA analyst Epstein expects the planes to be cleared to go back into service late in the first quarter. Airlines don’t expect the jets to be back until January or February but have repeatedly delayed their projected return dates to avoid having to rebook travelers at high-priced last-minute fares and scramble to reassign crews. Muilenburg has said he wants to regain the public’s trust. More than a quarter of the world’s commercial aircraft fleet is a Boeing 737, according to Teal Group, and the latest iteration of that aircraft is key to Boeing’s future. Some surveys have shown passengers will be hesitant to fly on the planes and labor unions representing flight attendants at American and United, which both have the Max in their fleets, said more questions need to be answered about the plane’s safety. “After these two days of hearings it is clear there were serious breakdowns in the supervision of the 737 Max,” Lori Bassani, president of the Association of Professional Flight Attendants, which represents American’s 28,000 cabin crew members, wrote in a letter to Boeing’s CEO on Oct. 30. “We have fundamental questions about whether the FAA has the resources necessary for oversight moving forward.” Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants, which represents United’s flight attendants and those at 19 other airlines, said passengers are confused about the plane and often ask whether older 737 models are safe. “We will not work the 737 Max until and unless we have full assurance from regulators around the world, our colleagues in the flight deck, engineers, and our airlines that the 737 Max is safe,” Nelson said in a statement. “This week took a step backward in this process, not forward.” Because of the uncertainty and controversy around the plane, Boeing’s board should again come out to either express confidence in Muilenburg or let him go, said William Klepper who teaches executive leadership at Columbia Business School. “You can’t leave him flapping in the wind,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-03  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wait, boeing, investors, flight, ceo, resign, washington, 737, planes, system, push, week, boeings, board, muilenburg, lawmakers, max


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Cramer says Amazon ‘stock is a buy’ but wait until Friday’s selling is over

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on Friday that Amazon is not in trouble, despite missing on earnings and warning about holiday sales. “It’s a brilliant company,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” “This stock is a buy by next week, mid-week,” advising investors to wait until the selling clears out before getting in. Amazon spent more than $800 million in each of the last two quarters to expand free, one-day delivery to more products and more regions. “The people who are worried about Amazon are the s


CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on Friday that Amazon is not in trouble, despite missing on earnings and warning about holiday sales.
“It’s a brilliant company,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.”
“This stock is a buy by next week, mid-week,” advising investors to wait until the selling clears out before getting in.
Amazon spent more than $800 million in each of the last two quarters to expand free, one-day delivery to more products and more regions.
“The people who are worried about Amazon are the s
Cramer says Amazon ‘stock is a buy’ but wait until Friday’s selling is over Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, delivery, street, buy, wait, week, revenue, shipping, stock, selling, oneday, think, fridays, cramer, company


Cramer says Amazon 'stock is a buy' but wait until Friday's selling is over

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on Friday that Amazon is not in trouble, despite missing on earnings and warning about holiday sales.

“It’s a brilliant company,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” “This stock is a buy by next week, mid-week,” advising investors to wait until the selling clears out before getting in.

Shares of Amazon opened down 4.5% on Friday and trimmed some of those losses in early trading on Wall Street, after a much more dismal indication in premarket trading.

“I think that there’s a perception that they were down a beat,” the “Mad Money” host said. “I think that perception is wrong. They are quite confident that they have what people want.”

The e-commerce giant late Thursday reported third-quarter earnings that fell short of analyst expectations. The company also gave disappointing revenue guidance for the holiday shopping season.

However, revenue in the third quarter beat estimates and grew 24% to $70 billion, suggesting a heavy investment in free, one-day shipping was translating into more purchases.

Cramer said it’s clear that customers want one-day delivery — predicting that by the middle of next week investors will realize that Amazon made the right move in heavily financing its new delivery standard, which will make one-day shipping the default for Prime members.

Amazon spent more than $800 million in each of the last two quarters to expand free, one-day delivery to more products and more regions. The company expects to spend another $1.5 billion on the initiative during the fourth quarter to expand its warehouse footprint and product selection.

“The people who are worried about Amazon are the same people who turn on Amazon time and time again,” Cramer added. “Amazon is doing what the customer wants, then it tries to figure out how to do it more cheaply.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, delivery, street, buy, wait, week, revenue, shipping, stock, selling, oneday, think, fridays, cramer, company


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Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi

Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi3 Hours AgoShyam Devani of Citi says investors should wait for more clarity on Brexit before trading the British pound. For now, he is “absolutely neutral” on sterling, he says.


Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi3 Hours AgoShyam Devani of Citi says investors should wait for more clarity on Brexit before trading the British pound.
For now, he is “absolutely neutral” on sterling, he says.
Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pound, citi, wait, trading, investors, sterling, british, youre, neutral, long, profits


Take profits now if you're long on the British pound: Citi

Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi

3 Hours Ago

Shyam Devani of Citi says investors should wait for more clarity on Brexit before trading the British pound. For now, he is “absolutely neutral” on sterling, he says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pound, citi, wait, trading, investors, sterling, british, youre, neutral, long, profits


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Semis stocks are rallying, and technical analyst says charts point to more gains

Semis stocks are down Thursday but surging this week. The SMH semiconductor ETF has rallied 3% in the past five sessions, outpacing gains by the S&P 500. The top five stocks of the SOXX semiconductor ETF – Nvidia, Texas Instruments, Qualcomm, Broadcom and Intel – have had a mixed start to October. John Petrides, portfolio manager at Tocqueville Asset Management, also sees opportunity if the semis come under any pressure. Teradyne, Universal Display, KLA and Lam Research have led the ETF with gai


Semis stocks are down Thursday but surging this week.
The SMH semiconductor ETF has rallied 3% in the past five sessions, outpacing gains by the S&P 500.
The top five stocks of the SOXX semiconductor ETF – Nvidia, Texas Instruments, Qualcomm, Broadcom and Intel – have had a mixed start to October.
John Petrides, portfolio manager at Tocqueville Asset Management, also sees opportunity if the semis come under any pressure.
Teradyne, Universal Display, KLA and Lam Research have led the ETF with gai
Semis stocks are rallying, and technical analyst says charts point to more gains Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technical, stocks, semis, point, index, charts, analyst, think, semiconductor, wait, things, etf, rallying, gains, petrides


Semis stocks are rallying, and technical analyst says charts point to more gains

Semis stocks are down Thursday but surging this week.

The SMH semiconductor ETF has rallied 3% in the past five sessions, outpacing gains by the S&P 500.

“It definitely has been the leadership. It has also been the sign of the risk-on trade for the market. I think that even if you get a little short-term pullback in the semiconductor stocks here, I’d be a buyer of it,” Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray, said Wednesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.”

“When you look at this chart, the longer-term trend is still intact, you’re above a rising 50- and 200-day moving average, and when you start unpacking the index and looking at some of the best-performing names — the five largest names represent 40% of this index — and those are all charts that look like buys, so I would be buying any pullbacks in the semiconductor stocks,” Johnson said.

The top five stocks of the SOXX semiconductor ETF – Nvidia, Texas Instruments, Qualcomm, Broadcom and Intel – have had a mixed start to October. Nvidia has roared higher with 11% gains, Qualcomm and Broadcom are up more than 3%, and Texas Instruments and Intel have come in flat.

John Petrides, portfolio manager at Tocqueville Asset Management, also sees opportunity if the semis come under any pressure.

“I agree that you buy the dips for the semiconductors, I think there’s way too many crosscurrents right now, and I wouldn’t chase the rally that we saw last week. Let’s not forget the index is up about [52]% since December 2018. So, the group has performed quite strongly,” Petrides said during the same segment.

The SMH ETF is also up more than 40% for the year, its best since 2009. Teradyne, Universal Display, KLA and Lam Research have led the ETF with gains of more than 70%.

“The long-term thesis of the ‘internet of things’ is going to be a big driver for the semis, but I would wait for the pullback. Don’t forget semiconductors are commodities. They’re just shiny, flashy steel and oil stocks. When demand slows down these guys lose pricing and that does bad things to margins and this group sells off so I would be more opportunistic and wait for the sell-off,” Petrides said.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technical, stocks, semis, point, index, charts, analyst, think, semiconductor, wait, things, etf, rallying, gains, petrides


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‘Timing couldn’t have been worse’ for the Trump administration to issue bans on China, Jim Cramer says

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Tuesday said that “timing couldn’t have been worse” for the Trump administration to add dozens more Chinese companies to its blacklist. The U.S. Commerce Department announced that it placed an additional 28 firms on the so-called Entity List that American enterprises are banned from doing business with. With U.S.-China trade talks scheduled to resume later this week, the major stock market indexes all fell more than 1% during the trading session. The 28 companies aren’t that


CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Tuesday said that “timing couldn’t have been worse” for the Trump administration to add dozens more Chinese companies to its blacklist. The U.S. Commerce Department announced that it placed an additional 28 firms on the so-called Entity List that American enterprises are banned from doing business with. With U.S.-China trade talks scheduled to resume later this week, the major stock market indexes all fell more than 1% during the trading session. The 28 companies aren’t that
‘Timing couldn’t have been worse’ for the Trump administration to issue bans on China, Jim Cramer says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, china, trade, bans, timing, talks, couldnt, department, wait, companies, issue, trump, administration, commerce, jim, market, chinese, worse, host


'Timing couldn't have been worse' for the Trump administration to issue bans on China, Jim Cramer says

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Tuesday said that “timing couldn’t have been worse” for the Trump administration to add dozens more Chinese companies to its blacklist.

The U.S. Commerce Department announced that it placed an additional 28 firms on the so-called Entity List that American enterprises are banned from doing business with. With U.S.-China trade talks scheduled to resume later this week, the major stock market indexes all fell more than 1% during the trading session.

“I can’t fault the Commerce Department for cracking down on Chinese companies that enable some horrific human rights violations, but they did kind of pick a worst possible time to do it, right before the big trade talks,” the “Mad Money” host said. “So I think you need to be very careful as this market readjusts and recalibrates its expectations.”

The White House wants to limit communist China’s access to facial recognition technology. The 28 companies aren’t that well known, but the announcement shook up a number of semiconductor stocks in the American market, Cramer said.

The host pointed out that Nvidia and Intel both took a hit. The former fell about 3.9% and the latter slid 1.8%.

Cramer warned that the blacklist, along with the visa ban on some Chinese officials, could stall trade talks, which would ensure that the Oct. 15 tariff hike on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods that President Donald Trump has promised will go into effect. That would make it more challenging to invest in retail stocks.

Target, Walmart and Costco are among the few retailers that Cramer said are big enough to be able to offset the damage.

“Don’t do anything outrageous, don’t try anything fancy and wait. Wait for a better moment when it no longer feels like China’s in the balance,” the host said. “Or at least when next week’s upcoming tariff hikes have been baked into the averages. I don’t think we’re there yet.”

In response to a request for comment earlier Tuesday, the Commerce Department pointed CNBC to a press release announcing the addition of the Chinese companies to the Entity List.

Disclosure: Cramer’s charitable trust owns shares of Nvidia.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, china, trade, bans, timing, talks, couldnt, department, wait, companies, issue, trump, administration, commerce, jim, market, chinese, worse, host


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