As Trump demands major concessions, Beijing wants the world to think that the US will blink first

Trump on Monday threatened more tariffs on Chinese goods if Xi does not attend. Representatives from the Chinese side said Thursday they think it’s likely that Xi will go to the G-20 meeting. But in order to reach a trade deal, they emphasize, the U.S. must agree to certain conditions. Efforts to ensure that Beijing and the Trump administration will adhere to the terms of any trade deal have been a source of uncertainty on both sides. It’s hard to imagine a complete break of the United States fr


Trump on Monday threatened more tariffs on Chinese goods if Xi does not attend. Representatives from the Chinese side said Thursday they think it’s likely that Xi will go to the G-20 meeting. But in order to reach a trade deal, they emphasize, the U.S. must agree to certain conditions. Efforts to ensure that Beijing and the Trump administration will adhere to the terms of any trade deal have been a source of uncertainty on both sides. It’s hard to imagine a complete break of the United States fr
As Trump demands major concessions, Beijing wants the world to think that the US will blink first Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, concessions, blink, beijing, trade, liang, xi, deal, chinas, world, major, g20, china, think, wants, chinese, trump, demands


As Trump demands major concessions, Beijing wants the world to think that the US will blink first

U.S. and Chinese flags seen at the US Department of State May 23, 2018 in Washington, DC. Brendan Smialowsk | AFP | Getty Images

BEIJING – The Chinese government is trying to convince the world that the onus is on the U.S. to resolve trade tensions between the two countries. As negotiations remain at a standstill, Beijing has yet to confirm whether Chinese President Xi Jinping will meet U.S. President Donald Trump at the G-20 meeting in Japan at the end of this month. Trump on Monday threatened more tariffs on Chinese goods if Xi does not attend. Representatives from the Chinese side said Thursday they think it’s likely that Xi will go to the G-20 meeting. But in order to reach a trade deal, they emphasize, the U.S. must agree to certain conditions. These include the cancellation of all additional tariffs; following the direction of what was agreed at the G-20 meeting in Argentina last year; and abiding by terms which China considers equal. “China’s position has been very clear and explicit. It is the U.S. who initiated the trade friction,” said Liang Ming, director of the Institute of International Trade, a research unit under the Ministry of Commerce. He was speaking in Mandarin via an official translator at a press briefing on Thursday. “Now I think China has greater confidence than the U.S. At the G-20 we could have talks, but the precondition is that the U.S. shows good faith,” Liang said. “If it continues to go backtracking on its own commitments, then we’d rather not have the talks.”

China’s in no hurry

Negotiations between the U.S. and China took a turn for the worse last month. Trump increased tariffs on $200 billion worth of goods from China, and his administration put Chinese telecom giant Huawei on an “entity list” that effectively cuts the company off from its U.S. suppliers.

The view of Chinese academics, Liang said, is that China’s economy can withstand the pressure of prolonged trade tensions, which they see are at the behest of Trump’s presidential campaign efforts. “We know that starting from the (June) 18th, President Trump will start the new round of general election campaign, and so we think he is also eager to reach a deal, ” Liang said. “But if we look at the whole situation, China is in no hurry because time is on our side.”

US must show ‘sincerity’

Since then, the Ministry of Commerce’s official line has been this: For talks to continue, the U.S. must “adjust its wrong actions” with sincerity. Liang laid out three points in which the U.S. could show such “sincerity.” First, echoing China’s Vice Premier Liu He, who is also the country’s chief trade negotiator, Liang said the U.S. must agree to cancel all additional tariffs.

Second, Liang said Beijing would like the U.S. to “significantly ease export controls on high tech export products” in order to reach demands that China increase its imports of American goods by at least $1.2 trillion.

“The third point is about a balanced text that is about expressions and wordings,” Liang said. “We don’t think there should be a lot of strong, forceful words such as ‘must’, ‘should,’ etc.” Efforts to ensure that Beijing and the Trump administration will adhere to the terms of any trade deal have been a source of uncertainty on both sides. Each country claims the other backtracked on what appeared close to a deal just weeks before talks fell apart.

It’s hard to imagine a complete break of the United States from China or of China from the United States. Xi Jinping Chinese president

In early June, China’s powerful State Council published a white paper laying the blame on the U.S. for the trade tensions. Zhu Guangyao, former vice minister of finance and an advisor to the Chinese government on trade, affirmed Thursday that China is waiting for the U.S. to agree to Beijing’s terms. He said he expects Xi will attend the G-20 meeting given a previous agreement with Japan. But he emphasized the need for multiple levels of communication and full information for progress toward any kind of deal. “Since the negotiations are so (serious), both sides are beginning to put their red lines on the table — what we can negotiate, what not,” Zhu told CNBC’s Eunice Yoon in English. “So people’s interests, national sovereignty, national dignity, certainly is the red line. No one can go beyond that.”

Beijing’s ‘core interests’

In a commentary piece published in late May, state news agency Xinhua said that U.S. demands, including restricting the development of China’s state-owned enterprises, is an attempt to damage Beijing’s “core interests.” Foreign businesses have complained of an unequal playing field with Chinese companies due to government support. In addition, there’s poor protection of intellectual property rights and forced technology transfer to China in order to operate there, they say. Beijing has made some moves to address those issues in the last several months. But for an international community watching the country since it joined the World Trade Organization in 2001, China is still moving too slowly.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, concessions, blink, beijing, trade, liang, xi, deal, chinas, world, major, g20, china, think, wants, chinese, trump, demands


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The UK wants a US trade deal — but it’s not so sure about ‘chlorinated chicken’

And why does it matter to a potential U.S.-U.K. trade deal? Chlorinated chicken, or chlorine-washed chicken, refers to poultry that has been treated with antimicrobial rinses in order to remove harmful bacteria. Washing chicken in chlorine has been banned in the European Union (EU) since 1997 amid food safety concerns. The European Food Safety Authority has concluded chlorinated chicken does not pose a health risk to consumers. Earlier this year, U.S. ambassador to the U.K. Woody Johnson said fe


And why does it matter to a potential U.S.-U.K. trade deal? Chlorinated chicken, or chlorine-washed chicken, refers to poultry that has been treated with antimicrobial rinses in order to remove harmful bacteria. Washing chicken in chlorine has been banned in the European Union (EU) since 1997 amid food safety concerns. The European Food Safety Authority has concluded chlorinated chicken does not pose a health risk to consumers. Earlier this year, U.S. ambassador to the U.K. Woody Johnson said fe
The UK wants a US trade deal — but it’s not so sure about ‘chlorinated chicken’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, eu, chlorinated, sure, food, need, wants, union, chlorinewashed, european, uk, trade, chicken


The UK wants a US trade deal — but it's not so sure about 'chlorinated chicken'

An Australorp chicken setting eggs in the hen house of Chef Eric Skokan owner of two restaurants in Boulder, the Black Cat and Bramble & Hare, that are farm to table from the families Certified Organic Black Cat Farm in Longmont. May 8, 2017, Longmont, Colorado. Joe Amon | Denver Post | Getty Images

The prospect of a post-Brexit trade deal between the U.S. and U.K. could ultimately depend on the outcome of a controversial debate about whether it is acceptable to wash chicken in chlorine. In setting out its “negotiating objectives” earlier this year, the U.S. suggested Britain should not expect to enjoy softer treatment than any other ally when it comes to chlorinated chicken exported from America. The U.K. government has repeatedly denied it would accept lower food standards post-Brexit, but senior lawmakers in the ruling Conservative Party appear to be split on the issue. International Trade Secretary Liam Fox has hinted the U.K. could accept chlorine-washed chicken in a post-Brexit trade deal, while Environment Secretary Michael Gove — one of the leading candidates to become prime minister — has insisted it would be a “red line” in future trade talks with Washington. So, what is chlorinated chicken? Is it safe to eat? And why does it matter to a potential U.S.-U.K. trade deal? CNBC takes a look at all you need to know.

What is chlorinated chicken?

Chlorinated chicken, or chlorine-washed chicken, refers to poultry that has been treated with antimicrobial rinses in order to remove harmful bacteria. These rinses — often referred to as Pathogen Reduction Treatments (PRTs) in the industry — are designed to kill potentially harmful organisms such as E. coli, salmonella and campylobacter on the surface of the chicken. Washing chicken in chlorine has been banned in the European Union (EU) since 1997 amid food safety concerns. The ban has effectively prevented all imports of U.S. chicken meat generally treated by this process. Instead, the EU insists meat must not be washed with any substance other than water unless it has explicitly been approved by the European Commission.

The National Farmers Union (NFU) believes there are “justifiable fears,” both inside and outside the farming community that, after leaving the European Union, Britain could allow the import of food produced to lower standards. John Taggart | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Advocates of the EU’s so-called “farm to fork” or “plough to plate” approach argue that it leads to higher standards of hygiene and animal welfare. That’s because farmers must take care at every stage of the process rather than relying on a chemical bath to destroy harmful bacteria after chickens are slaughtered. “We’ve got concerns that if you focus on the end process, you’re more likely to be lax when it comes to observing any risks prior to that,” Gail Soutar, chief EU exit and international trade adviser of Britain’s National Farmers Union (NFU), told CNBC in a telephone interview.

Is the practice safe?

U.S. regulators say yes, chlorine-washed chicken is safe to eat. In fact, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has approved several antimicrobial rinses in poultry processing, including chlorine dioxide, acidified sodium chlorite, trisodium phosphate and peroxyacids. European regulators even agree with their U.S. counterparts. The European Food Safety Authority has concluded chlorinated chicken does not pose a health risk to consumers. But, the NFU believes there are “justifiable fears,” both inside and outside the farming community that, after leaving the European Union, Britain could allow the import of food produced to lower standards.

We don’t need to fall back on this end kind of process treatment… There is absolutely no need for compromise. Sue Davies Strategic policy partner at Which?

“It is entirely legitimate to require high standards of food safety, environmental protection and animal welfare but it must be recognized that these things come at a cost. A cost which is often not borne by overseas competitors, potentially putting U.K. farmers at an unfair disadvantage,” the NFU said.

Why does it matter?

A future transatlantic trade agreement is seen as vitally important to the U.K.’s economic future outside the EU. Chlorine-washed chickens are symbolic of wider concerns about food safety, animal welfare, and environmental standards that could become a critical negotiating tool in any post-Brexit deal. Agricultural issues were among the main barriers that prevented an agreement on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the U.S. and the EU in 2016. The U.S. has since cited the ban on the use of PRTs as one of the stumbling blocks to increased trade with the EU. Earlier this year, U.S. ambassador to the U.K. Woody Johnson said fears over chlorine-washed chicken and other stateside farming practices were “inflammatory and misleading.”

Packs of “Brexit Selection Freshly Chlorinated Chicken” sit on display at the ‘Costupper’ Brexit Minimart pop-up store, set up by the People’s Vote campaign group, in London, U.K., on Friday, Nov. 23, 2018. Simon Dawson | Bloomberg | Getty Images

In an article published by British newspaper The Telegraph in early March, Johnson urged the U.K. to accept U.S. farming methods after the U.S. published its objectives for a future U.S.-U.K. trade deal. In Europe, it is thought that if the U.K. were to accept treating meat with chlorine as the price of a free trade deal with the U.S., it could make it difficult to sell British meat to the EU. When asked if the prospect of chlorine-washed chicken being introduced into the U.K. post-Brexit raised concerns, Sue Davies, strategic policy partner at consumer group Which?, replied: “Definitely.” “We need to be very careful, particularly when it comes to food safety. We have come a long way from the dark days of salmonella scares and BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy).” “We don’t need to fall back on this end kind of process treatment… There is absolutely no need for compromise,” Davies said.

What happens next?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, eu, chlorinated, sure, food, need, wants, union, chlorinewashed, european, uk, trade, chicken


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Trump administration blames Iran for oil tanker attacks in Middle East

Fire and smoke billow from the Norwegian owned Front Altair tanker, which was said to have been attacked in the Gulf of Oman. “No economic sanctions entitle the Islamic Republic to attack innocent civilians, disrupt global oil markets and engage in nuclear blackmail.” “The international community condemns Iran’s assault on the freedom of navigation and the targeting of innocent civilians,” he said, adding that the U.S. will defend its forces, interests and partners. Oil prices rose as much as 4%


Fire and smoke billow from the Norwegian owned Front Altair tanker, which was said to have been attacked in the Gulf of Oman. “No economic sanctions entitle the Islamic Republic to attack innocent civilians, disrupt global oil markets and engage in nuclear blackmail.” “The international community condemns Iran’s assault on the freedom of navigation and the targeting of innocent civilians,” he said, adding that the U.S. will defend its forces, interests and partners. Oil prices rose as much as 4%
Trump administration blames Iran for oil tanker attacks in Middle East Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: amanda macias
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Trump administration blames Iran for oil tanker attacks in Middle East

Fire and smoke billow from the Norwegian owned Front Altair tanker, which was said to have been attacked in the Gulf of Oman.

WASHINGTON – Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday blamed Iran for attacks earlier in the day on oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman near Iran and the Strait of Hormuz, a vital shipping route through which much of the world’s oil passes.

“Iran is lashing out because the regime wants our successful maximum pressure campaign lifted,” Pompeo said without citing specific evidence as to why Tehran was responsible. “No economic sanctions entitle the Islamic Republic to attack innocent civilians, disrupt global oil markets and engage in nuclear blackmail.”

“The international community condemns Iran’s assault on the freedom of navigation and the targeting of innocent civilians,” he said, adding that the U.S. will defend its forces, interests and partners.

Oil prices rose as much as 4% on Thursday on renewed fears of conflict in the Middle East after a series of strikes last month. Crude futures briefly jumped back above 3% after Pompeo accused Tehran of being involved in the latest attacks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middle, iran, innocent, east, gulf, oil, worlds, tanker, pompeo, attacks, wants, civilians, trump, administration, tehran, blames


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General Electric wants to sell its stake in more than 100 start-ups

GE Ventures is looking for a buyer for its portfolio of more than 100 start-ups, according to people familiar with the matter, as parent company General Electric tries to orchestrate a turnaround and get its debt problem under control. GE Ventures hired investment bank Lazard to manage the process, said two of the people. GE Ventures has invested in a range of start-ups in areas like energy, technology and health care. GE Ventures was started by Sue Siegel, who is now GE’s chief innovation offic


GE Ventures is looking for a buyer for its portfolio of more than 100 start-ups, according to people familiar with the matter, as parent company General Electric tries to orchestrate a turnaround and get its debt problem under control. GE Ventures hired investment bank Lazard to manage the process, said two of the people. GE Ventures has invested in a range of start-ups in areas like energy, technology and health care. GE Ventures was started by Sue Siegel, who is now GE’s chief innovation offic
General Electric wants to sell its stake in more than 100 start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sell, months, 100, health, ventures, venture, stake, wants, partners, turnaround, ge, portfolio, according, company, startups, general, electric


General Electric wants to sell its stake in more than 100 start-ups

GE Ventures is looking for a buyer for its portfolio of more than 100 start-ups, according to people familiar with the matter, as parent company General Electric tries to orchestrate a turnaround and get its debt problem under control.

The venture arm, which started in 2013, has been shopping itself for several months and is in discussions with other venture firms as well as groups of limited partners who invest in those funds, said the people, who asked not to be named because the discussions are confidential. GE Ventures hired investment bank Lazard to manage the process, said two of the people.

GE is in a difficult financial position, with $110 billion in debt as of March 31, according to FactSet, and it continues to burn cash as CEO Larry Culp works through what he’s calling a multiyear turnaround. The stock is down 23% over the past 12 months even after rallying 43% so far this year. GE Capital reduced its liabilities in the first quarter, completing $1.1 billion in asset reductions in the period. GE is also under investigation for its accounting practices.

GE Ventures has invested in a range of start-ups in areas like energy, technology and health care. Its portfolio includes Evidation Health, which focuses on clinical studies, Verana Health, a patient-focused life sciences company, and augmented reality software developer Upskill.

Selling a venture portfolio is particularly challenging because the buyer has to assume ownership of not only the companies that have market traction but also those that are struggling, and in start-up land there tend to be far more failures than successes. GE has made clear to potential buyers that it does not want to sell off its investments on a piecemeal basis, but would prefer to offload the entire basket and ideally find a home for its remaining partners, people familiar with the matter said.

“During this time of transformation for GE, we are evaluating strategic options for GE Ventures to continue delivering returns for our shareholders and partners,” said Megan Newhouse, a GE spokesperson, in a statement. “While we can’t comment specifically on that process, we remain committed to supporting our portfolio companies, business units and partnering with the entrepreneurial ecosystem.”

Lazard declined to comment.

GE Ventures was started by Sue Siegel, who is now GE’s chief innovation officer and remains CEO of the ventures arm, according to her company bio. Many of the group’s top partners have left the firm in recent months, including Lisa Suennen, Noah Lewis and Jessica Zeaske.

In January, MedCityNews reported that GE Ventures would look to spin out from its parent company. The company has since shifted its strategy to focus instead on a search for a buyer.

Correction: The Key Points of this article have been updated with the correct percentage GE’s stock has fallen over the last 12 months.

WATCH: GE could rally another 80% from here, says pro


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sell, months, 100, health, ventures, venture, stake, wants, partners, turnaround, ge, portfolio, according, company, startups, general, electric


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White House acting budget chief seeks to delay Huawei restrictions: WSJ

The White House acting budget chief wants to delay the implementation of restrictions imposed by the U.S. on China’s Huawei, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday. Russell Vought, acting director of the Office of Management and Budget, made the request in a letter to Vice President Mike Pence and members of Congress, according to the Journal. President Donald Trump declared national emergency last month over threats to U.S. technology and Huawei was added to a blacklist by the Commerce Depa


The White House acting budget chief wants to delay the implementation of restrictions imposed by the U.S. on China’s Huawei, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday. Russell Vought, acting director of the Office of Management and Budget, made the request in a letter to Vice President Mike Pence and members of Congress, according to the Journal. President Donald Trump declared national emergency last month over threats to U.S. technology and Huawei was added to a blacklist by the Commerce Depa
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-09  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, budget, white, restrictions, wants, delay, vought, chief, acting, house, vice, huawei, wall, trump, seeks, wsj, threats


White House acting budget chief seeks to delay Huawei restrictions: WSJ

The White House acting budget chief wants to delay the implementation of restrictions imposed by the U.S. on China’s Huawei, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

Russell Vought, acting director of the Office of Management and Budget, made the request in a letter to Vice President Mike Pence and members of Congress, according to the Journal.

President Donald Trump declared national emergency last month over threats to U.S. technology and Huawei was added to a blacklist by the Commerce Department, which makes it difficult for the Chinese tech giant to do business with American companies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-09  Authors: spencer kimball
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China wants to pressure the US economy, but the finance sector is probably safe from Beijing

Technology, rare earth minerals and the education sector have been dragged into the scuffle between China and the U.S., but as Beijing considers more countermeasures, experts said America’s financial sector is unlikely to be a target. Speaking at the Institute of International Finance meeting in Tokyo, he said that any move to target financial services would be “unusual,” because the Chinese “need access to global financial markets.” Peterson said that the Chinese yuan, or the renminbi (RMB), wo


Technology, rare earth minerals and the education sector have been dragged into the scuffle between China and the U.S., but as Beijing considers more countermeasures, experts said America’s financial sector is unlikely to be a target. Speaking at the Institute of International Finance meeting in Tokyo, he said that any move to target financial services would be “unusual,” because the Chinese “need access to global financial markets.” Peterson said that the Chinese yuan, or the renminbi (RMB), wo
China wants to pressure the US economy, but the finance sector is probably safe from Beijing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, chinas, sector, trade, china, economy, global, safe, finance, wants, beijing, probably, chinese, markets, market, pressure, told


China wants to pressure the US economy, but the finance sector is probably safe from Beijing

Technology, rare earth minerals and the education sector have been dragged into the scuffle between China and the U.S., but as Beijing considers more countermeasures, experts said America’s financial sector is unlikely to be a target.

There’s just too much at stake for China in that area, they told CNBC this week, pointing to an ongoing drive in the country to open up the Chinese financial sector to global investors.

“We believe that the financial regulators (in China) … are looking at ways to really reform, make it more liquid, bring more transparency. We haven’t seen any shift in that attitude yet,” Douglas Peterson, president and chief executive at financial services and ratings giant S&P Global, told CNBC on Friday.

Speaking at the Institute of International Finance meeting in Tokyo, he said that any move to target financial services would be “unusual,” because the Chinese “need access to global financial markets.”

On Thursday, Tim Adams, who is president and chief executive of the IIF, a trade association, also expressed that sentiment.

“The Chinese government wants U.S. and European financial institutions — they are opening up the market. What I heard from Chinese authorities is … ‘we want the financial community to be here,'” he told CNBC.

Peterson said that the Chinese yuan, or the renminbi (RMB), would likely be a casualty of any move to clamp down on the financial sector.

“Clearly, one of their long term goals is to make their currency a larger, more dominant position in trade. They would like to have things like oil or certain types of commodities or goods priced in RMB,” he said. “In order to do that, they have to have a more active financial market, (to be) more engaged in the global financial market.”

Increasing overseas participation in yuan-denominated assets would help Beijing toward its goal of boosting international acceptance and use of the Chinese currency.

Increasingly, China’s markets have been opened up to global investors. Last year, Chinese A-shares — yuan-denominated stocks traded on the mainland — were included in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index.

This year, Chinese bonds were included in the widely followed Bloomberg Barclays index.

Those inclusions also bring billions of dollars into China’s markets. Analysts estimate that the full inclusion in the Bloomberg Barclays index will attract around $150 billion of foreign inflows into China’s roughly $13 trillion bond market, while the MSCI inclusion will also attract billions worth of inflows.

“There’s also very high demand from foreign investors for Chinese assets,” Peterson said. “So shutting down access to financial markets — I really don’t think it’s one of the measures they’re probably looking at very seriously.”

So far, other sectors have been implicated in trade skirmishes between the world’s two largest economies.

The U.S. put Chinese tech giant Huawei on a list that essentially prevents it from conducting business with American companies, while Chinese media warned that Beijing could cut off industrially significant rare earth minerals as a retaliatory measure in the escalating economic battle.

On Tuesday, China issued a warning to its citizens about working, studying and traveling in America, noting that the U.S. has recently placed certain restrictions on some Chinese student visas.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: weizhen tan
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Amazon will be ‘left alone’ by regulators while other big tech companies suffer, Stifel says

Trump wants NASA to go to Mars, not the moon like he declared…”NASA should NOT be talking about going to the Moon,” Trump tweeted. “We did that 50 years ago. They should be focused on the much bigger things we are doing, including Mars… Politicsread more


Trump wants NASA to go to Mars, not the moon like he declared…”NASA should NOT be talking about going to the Moon,” Trump tweeted. “We did that 50 years ago. They should be focused on the much bigger things we are doing, including Mars… Politicsread more
Amazon will be ‘left alone’ by regulators while other big tech companies suffer, Stifel says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
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Amazon will be 'left alone' by regulators while other big tech companies suffer, Stifel says

Trump wants NASA to go to Mars, not the moon like he declared…

“NASA should NOT be talking about going to the Moon,” Trump tweeted. “We did that 50 years ago. They should be focused on the much bigger things we are doing, including Mars…

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
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Procter and Gamble wants to redefine the word ‘black’

Procter & Gamble’s “My Black is Beautiful” campaign is asking dictionaries to rethink their definitions of the word “black.” In the section for “black” on Merriam-Webster’s website, for instance, an example of word usage that reads “his face was black with rage” is placed higher on the definition page than any mention of “black” as it pertains to identity or skin color. It can lead to unconscious associations between this word of identity and a negative term. That’s one point Coffey said the org


Procter & Gamble’s “My Black is Beautiful” campaign is asking dictionaries to rethink their definitions of the word “black.” In the section for “black” on Merriam-Webster’s website, for instance, an example of word usage that reads “his face was black with rage” is placed higher on the definition page than any mention of “black” as it pertains to identity or skin color. It can lead to unconscious associations between this word of identity and a negative term. That’s one point Coffey said the org
Procter and Gamble wants to redefine the word ‘black’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: megan graham
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Procter and Gamble wants to redefine the word 'black'

Procter & Gamble’s “My Black is Beautiful” campaign is asking dictionaries to rethink their definitions of the word “black.”

“My Black is Beautiful,” a campaign for black women the consumer goods giant formed over a decade ago, says dictionaries too often prioritize terms such as “evil” or “dirty” over those that describe the word as it relates to identity and skin color. The push is called #RedefineBlack and has a petition on DoSomething.org.

P&G’s latest effort joins other recent campaigns in which brands are taking stands on cultural and political issues. Last year, Nike ran a campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick that stirred controversy, and P&G has run campaigns of its own that have sparked conversation, including a Gillette ad that weighed in on the #MeToo movement. And this might be why: Nearly two in three people say they choose, switch, avoid or boycott a brand based on its stand on social issues, according to a 2018 Edelman Earned Brand report.

Lela Coffey, brand director of multicultural beauty at P&G, said “My Black is Beautiful” has always been focused on promoting a more positive perception of blackness and spotlighting bias. When the group started to think about the dictionary definitions, she said they discussed how associating darkness with badness can lead to racial prejudice.

“We talked with some professors about the issue and the effect that words have on people,” Coffey said. “We started to wonder if this was something we could change.”

In the section for “black” on Merriam-Webster’s website, for instance, an example of word usage that reads “his face was black with rage” is placed higher on the definition page than any mention of “black” as it pertains to identity or skin color.

Dictionary.com is already planning to update its definition because of the campaign. The website posted a blog Wednesday explaining that it would be making updates and revisions that will roll out on the website later this year.

“If you look on Dictionary.com today, the adjectival sense of ‘Black’ that refers to people is the third sense on the page, ” it says. “Currently this definition sits right above a definition that reads ‘soiled or stained with dirt.’ While there are no semantic links between these two senses, their proximity on the page can be harmful. It can lead to unconscious associations between this word of identity and a negative term. These are not associations we want anyone to get from Dictionary.com, and so we will be swapping our second and third senses on the page.”

Dictionary.com will also capitalize “Black” in the entry when it’s used in reference to people, which it says is considered a “mark of respect, recognition and pride.” That’s one point Coffey said the organization is asking dictionaries to make, along with updating the entries with references or usage of the word “black” to phrases black people actually use to identify themselves. She gave the example of “Black is beautiful” as one she hopes will be included.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, campaign, wants, definition, gamble, identity, beautiful, coffey, black, page, redefine, dictionaries, procter, website, word


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Crypto founder, who won Buffett lunch, wants to change the billionaire’s hatred of bitcoin

Justin Sun, the crypto entrepreneur who paid a record $4.57 million for lunch with Warren Buffett, told CNBC Tuesday he wants to change the billionaire investor’s mind on hating bitcoin. Sun, founder of cryptocurrency TRON and CEO of file-sharing company BitTorrent, had the highest bid in the 20 years of the charity auction. Winning the auction allows Sun to invite seven guests, and he said he’s going to bring other cryptocurrency industry leaders to the lunch in New York. In the past, he’s call


Justin Sun, the crypto entrepreneur who paid a record $4.57 million for lunch with Warren Buffett, told CNBC Tuesday he wants to change the billionaire investor’s mind on hating bitcoin. Sun, founder of cryptocurrency TRON and CEO of file-sharing company BitTorrent, had the highest bid in the 20 years of the charity auction. Winning the auction allows Sun to invite seven guests, and he said he’s going to bring other cryptocurrency industry leaders to the lunch in New York. In the past, he’s call
Crypto founder, who won Buffett lunch, wants to change the billionaire’s hatred of bitcoin Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winners, founder, hatred, crypto, bitcoin, billionaires, hes, auction, won, past, mind, industry, cryptocurrency, buffett, wants, told, lunch, change


Crypto founder, who won Buffett lunch, wants to change the billionaire's hatred of bitcoin

Justin Sun, the crypto entrepreneur who paid a record $4.57 million for lunch with Warren Buffett, told CNBC Tuesday he wants to change the billionaire investor’s mind on hating bitcoin.

Sun, founder of cryptocurrency TRON and CEO of file-sharing company BitTorrent, had the highest bid in the 20 years of the charity auction. Proceeds go to the Glide Foundation to help the homeless in San Francisco, where BitTorrent is located.

Winning the auction allows Sun to invite seven guests, and he said he’s going to bring other cryptocurrency industry leaders to the lunch in New York. But He told CNBC he’s not sure who he’s going to be bring yet.

Sun said he’s a believer and a fan of Buffet and his “long-term value investing strategy,” adding he wanted to pay Buffett “back for his inspiration.”

However, the Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO is not a fan of bitcoin. In the past, he’s called it “rat poison squared.”

When asked for comment on the lunch, Buffett laughed and told CNBC’s Becky Quick that he was looking forward to it.

Sun admitted on “Squawk Box” he knows he won’t change Buffett’s mind in a three hour lunch, but he hopes to offer him a different opinion and show him “how much progress we’ve made” in the past 10 years in the cryptocurrency industry. “I want him to learn what the younger generations are doing,” Sun added.

While some past winners have chosen to stay anonymous, Ted Weschler — later hired as a Berkshire investment manager — and Greenlight Capital’s David Einhorn were winners of the auction in previous years.

— CNBC’s Kate Rooney contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winners, founder, hatred, crypto, bitcoin, billionaires, hes, auction, won, past, mind, industry, cryptocurrency, buffett, wants, told, lunch, change


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Cramer: Trump wants to crack down on Big Tech because he views them as political opponents

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Tuesday that he believes President Donald Trump is looking to crack down on Silicon Valley’s biggest tech companies because he views them as political opponents. Cramer feels there may be an antitrust case to be made against Big Tech’s dominance. But he thinks the Trump administration is going after these companies for political reasons. On “Squawk Box, ” Cramer said that Trump views Alphabet’s Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple as “Democratic companies.” “But these are co


CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Tuesday that he believes President Donald Trump is looking to crack down on Silicon Valley’s biggest tech companies because he views them as political opponents. Cramer feels there may be an antitrust case to be made against Big Tech’s dominance. But he thinks the Trump administration is going after these companies for political reasons. On “Squawk Box, ” Cramer said that Trump views Alphabet’s Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple as “Democratic companies.” “But these are co
Cramer: Trump wants to crack down on Big Tech because he views them as political opponents Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, companies, democratic, cramer, views, wants, president, big, political, opponents, valleys, uniquely, tech, thinks, crack


Cramer: Trump wants to crack down on Big Tech because he views them as political opponents

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Tuesday that he believes President Donald Trump is looking to crack down on Silicon Valley’s biggest tech companies because he views them as political opponents.

Cramer feels there may be an antitrust case to be made against Big Tech’s dominance. But he thinks the Trump administration is going after these companies for political reasons.

On “Squawk Box, ” Cramer said that Trump views Alphabet’s Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple as “Democratic companies.”

“I know this sounds odd,” Cramer said. “But these are companies that the president sees as uniquely Democratic. So therefore they are game, they are fodder.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, companies, democratic, cramer, views, wants, president, big, political, opponents, valleys, uniquely, tech, thinks, crack


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