US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying it

If you follow the markets, there’s been recent reason for optimism about a U.S.-China trade deal. The quarterly survey finds CFOs around the world increasingly are worried about U.S. trade policy as a business risk factor. If a trade deal remains elusive, even that stability may not last long. — CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 U.S. CFOs taking the survey did reveal significant concerns about the trade war in other responses. Impact of trade tensions new new U.S. tariffs—CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 The d


If you follow the markets, there’s been recent reason for optimism about a U.S.-China trade deal. The quarterly survey finds CFOs around the world increasingly are worried about U.S. trade policy as a business risk factor. If a trade deal remains elusive, even that stability may not last long. — CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 U.S. CFOs taking the survey did reveal significant concerns about the trade war in other responses. Impact of trade tensions new new U.S. tariffs—CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 The d
US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-13  Authors: eric rosenbaum, anthony volastro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buying, china, big, companies, deal, survey, business, optimism, president, risk, trade, policy, cfo, cfos, war, uschina


US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying it

If you follow the markets, there’s been recent reason for optimism about a U.S.-China trade deal. Some investors are buying it — literally — with recent gains in stocks attributed to positive signals from the U.S. and China after a volatile August. But there’s one group of market insiders not buying the talk: corporate executives. In other words, the people who run the companies whose publicly traded shares have been rebounding. Top executives in the U.S. and around the world are not placing bets that the U.S.-China trade war will be resolved anytime soon. In fact, corporations say they expect to feel the pain of trade tensions over the next six months, according to the third-quarter CNBC Global CFO Council survey. The quarterly survey finds CFOs around the world increasingly are worried about U.S. trade policy as a business risk factor. Chief financial officers also downgraded their view of the U.S. economy, from “improving” to “stable.” If a trade deal remains elusive, even that stability may not last long. “With this level of uncertainty between the U.S. and China, I would think ‘stable’ might actually be a win a couple of quarters from now,” said Jack McCullough, president and founder of the CFO Leadership Council, an executive networking group. “I cannot recall when CFOs were as jittery about a change in policy as they are today.” The CNBC Global CFO Council represents some of the largest public and private companies in the world, collectively managing more than $5 trillion in market value across a wide variety of sectors. The Q3 2019 survey was conducted between Aug. 21 and Sept. 3 among 62 global members of the council.

Trade is the biggest risk factor

Thirty-five percent of CFOs cited U.S. trade policy as the “biggest external risk factor,” which was more than double the second biggest risk highlighted: “consumer demand.” Fears about trade were up from 22% in the second quarter. There was an important split between U.S. CFOs and those based around the world. Thirty-five percent of U.S. CFOs cited consumer demand as the top external risk factor, which can be explained by the fact that the resilience of the U.S. economy, in spite of slowdowns in Europe and China, has been based on consumer strength. What is the biggest external risk factor currently facing your business? — CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 U.S. CFOs taking the survey did reveal significant concerns about the trade war in other responses. About sixty-five percent said trade policy will be a negative for their business over the next six months. In Q2 that had dropped to 40% — possibly due to a prevailing and false sense of security that a deal would be easier to achieve than has proven to be the case — but it is now back up to a level consistent with the Q3 2018 through Q1 2019 surveys. “The surprise may be that only about 65% of CFOs view that trade policy will be a negative for their organizations,” McCullough said. “While at a macro level it’s easy to understand the motivation behind the recent policy changes, I can’t find a single CFO who has told me it would be a positive for his or her business. … It is uniformly negative for their business, at least in the eyes of finance chiefs.”

While at a macro level it’s easy to understand the motivation behind the recent policy changes, I can’t find a single CFO who has told me it would be a positive for his or her business. Jack McCullough president and founder, CFO Leadership Council

McCullough noted that his networking group offers an online forum for more than 1,100 chief financial officers to discuss issues of importance to their business. He said there never has been a question that he can recall about government policy that has dominated discussion as much as the trade policy has recently. That discussion has included whether manufacturing is moving and strategies for dealing with tariffs. “It is top of mind, and they are not confident they will emerge from this unscathed,” he said. Nearly half of North American CFOs surveyed by CNBC said they are facing higher input costs, and more than one-quarter said they have increased prices to offset those costs. They were more likely than European or Asian counterparts to say they have experienced higher costs and passed on those costs to customers. And more likely to say they have moved operations to minimize the impact of tariffs, though that was less than 20% of CFO respondents. While U.S. CFOs indicated in the survey that they were not confident about increasing their capital spend, less than 10% said they had delayed or canceled projects because of trade policy. Impact of trade tensions new new U.S. tariffs—CNBC Global CFO Survey Q3 The daily headlines can be tougher to measure. On Thursday alone, news broke that the U.S. and China were considering an interim trade deal, but a few minutes later a senior White House official told CNBC no such deal was in the works. President Donald Trump did agree to delay increasing tariffs on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods from Oct. 1 to Oct. 15 as a “gesture of goodwill,” and that move was matched by China, which said it would restart purchase of some U.S. agricultural products. Then later in the day, President Trump told reporters he would be open to an interim trade deal with China but would prefer a lasting deal. “It’s something we would consider, I guess,” Trump said. The U.S. and China have agreed to meet again at the negotiating table in October, a plan that was reported after an early September phone call between Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. CFOs view of the trade war is not yet influencing their thinking about President Trump’s reelection chances. The survey found the majority of CFOs of the belief that Trump will be reelected in 2020 and the U.S. economy will not slip into a recession next year.

Trade weighing on business investment


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-13  Authors: eric rosenbaum, anthony volastro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buying, china, big, companies, deal, survey, business, optimism, president, risk, trade, policy, cfo, cfos, war, uschina


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

China adds US agricultural products to tariff exemptions ahead of trade talks

US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying itTop executives do not think the U.S.-China trade war will be resolved soon. Sixty-five percent of U.S. CFOs think U.S. trade policy will be negative for their businesses over…CNBC Global CFO Councilread more


US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying itTop executives do not think the U.S.-China trade war will be resolved soon. Sixty-five percent of U.S. CFOs think U.S. trade policy will be negative for their businesses over…CNBC Global CFO Councilread more
China adds US agricultural products to tariff exemptions ahead of trade talks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-13  Authors: yun li, eric rosenbaum
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, soon, ahead, resolved, think, tariff, agricultural, overcnbc, products, adds, talks, sixtyfive, optimism, trade, exemptions, policy, war, uschina


China adds US agricultural products to tariff exemptions ahead of trade talks

US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying it

Top executives do not think the U.S.-China trade war will be resolved soon. Sixty-five percent of U.S. CFOs think U.S. trade policy will be negative for their businesses over…

CNBC Global CFO Council

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-13  Authors: yun li, eric rosenbaum
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, soon, ahead, resolved, think, tariff, agricultural, overcnbc, products, adds, talks, sixtyfive, optimism, trade, exemptions, policy, war, uschina


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Dropcam founder Greg Duffy reportedly leaves Apple

US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying itTop executives do not think the U.S.-China trade war will be resolved soon. Sixty-five percent of U.S. CFOs think U.S. trade policy will be negative for their businesses over…CNBC Global CFO Councilread more


US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying itTop executives do not think the U.S.-China trade war will be resolved soon. Sixty-five percent of U.S. CFOs think U.S. trade policy will be negative for their businesses over…CNBC Global CFO Councilread more
Dropcam founder Greg Duffy reportedly leaves Apple Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, soon, leaves, resolved, dropcam, apple, think, founder, overcnbc, sixtyfive, optimism, reportedly, trade, duffy, policy, war, uschina, greg


Dropcam founder Greg Duffy reportedly leaves Apple

US–China trade war optimism? Big companies are not buying it

Top executives do not think the U.S.-China trade war will be resolved soon. Sixty-five percent of U.S. CFOs think U.S. trade policy will be negative for their businesses over…

CNBC Global CFO Council

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, soon, leaves, resolved, dropcam, apple, think, founder, overcnbc, sixtyfive, optimism, reportedly, trade, duffy, policy, war, uschina, greg


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

George Soros offers rare praise for Trump and how he’s handled Huawei in the trade war

Billionaire liberal financier George Soros offered some rare praise of Donald Trump’s policies in a Wall Street Journal op-ed Tuesday, but said he’s worried the president will undermine his own strategy. Soros called Trump’s policy on China, “coherent and genuinely bipartisan” as well as “the greatest — and perhaps only — foreign policy accomplishment of the Trump administration.” Specifically, Soros said the Trump administration was right to put Huawei on the Commerce Department’s “entity list”


Billionaire liberal financier George Soros offered some rare praise of Donald Trump’s policies in a Wall Street Journal op-ed Tuesday, but said he’s worried the president will undermine his own strategy. Soros called Trump’s policy on China, “coherent and genuinely bipartisan” as well as “the greatest — and perhaps only — foreign policy accomplishment of the Trump administration.” Specifically, Soros said the Trump administration was right to put Huawei on the Commerce Department’s “entity list”
George Soros offers rare praise for Trump and how he’s handled Huawei in the trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, huawei, policy, rare, list, trade, offers, oped, entity, china, hes, war, soros, handled, seriously, praise, trump


George Soros offers rare praise for Trump and how he's handled Huawei in the trade war

Billionaire liberal financier George Soros offered some rare praise of Donald Trump’s policies in a Wall Street Journal op-ed Tuesday, but said he’s worried the president will undermine his own strategy.

Soros called Trump’s policy on China, “coherent and genuinely bipartisan” as well as “the greatest — and perhaps only — foreign policy accomplishment of the Trump administration.”

Specifically, Soros said the Trump administration was right to put Huawei on the Commerce Department’s “entity list” as a national security threat, which prevents U.S. companies from engaging in business with the firm.

In the op-ed, Soros called China “a dangerous rival in artificial intelligence and machine learning” but said its ability to compete in the 5G market is seriously hampered by Huawei’s dependence on U.S. companies.

“As long as Huawei remains on the entity list, it will lack crucial technology and be seriously weakened,” Soros wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, huawei, policy, rare, list, trade, offers, oped, entity, china, hes, war, soros, handled, seriously, praise, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Johnny Depp says there was no ‘dishonorable’ intent after Dior perfume ad backlash

Movie star Johnny Depp defended his role in an ad campaign for Parfums Christian Dior’s “Sauvage” perfume after it was accused of cultural appropriation. Images and sneak preview videos released ahead of the main campaign showed footage of Native Americans performing a war dance in traditional dress and also featured Depp. There was never — and how could there be or how would there be — any dishonorable (intent).” The release also said the group had made Depp an honorary citizen of the Comanche


Movie star Johnny Depp defended his role in an ad campaign for Parfums Christian Dior’s “Sauvage” perfume after it was accused of cultural appropriation. Images and sneak preview videos released ahead of the main campaign showed footage of Native Americans performing a war dance in traditional dress and also featured Depp. There was never — and how could there be or how would there be — any dishonorable (intent).” The release also said the group had made Depp an honorary citizen of the Comanche
Johnny Depp says there was no ‘dishonorable’ intent after Dior perfume ad backlash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: lucy handley megan graham, lucy handley, megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, native, group, johnny, perfume, dior, release, respect, teaser, war, backlash, film, intent, dishonorable, depp


Johnny Depp says there was no 'dishonorable' intent after Dior perfume ad backlash

Movie star Johnny Depp defended his role in an ad campaign for Parfums Christian Dior’s “Sauvage” perfume after it was accused of cultural appropriation.

Images and sneak preview videos released ahead of the main campaign showed footage of Native Americans performing a war dance in traditional dress and also featured Depp.

But after a social media backlash, Depp has defended his role. Speaking at the Deauville Film Festival in France this week he stated: “A teaser obviously is a very concentrated version of images and there were objections to the teaser of the small film. The (full) film has never been seen. There was never — and how could there be or how would there be — any dishonorable (intent).”

“It was a film made out of great respect and with great respect and love for the Native American peoples to bring light to them. They haven’t had the greatest amount of help out of the United States government. The idea is as pure as it ever was.”

Depp said the creative team was working with those offended on a resolution.

The LVMH-owned brand started posting short “teaser” videos and photos on social media in August but was accused by some of racism and posts showing Native Americans performing a war dance appear to have been removed.

Images of Depp sitting by a fire in a desert remain on Dior Parfum’s Instagram account, stating: “Even wilder than before, Johnny Depp is at one with nature, reconnecting with a land where boundaries are made to be pushed.”

Asked for comment by CNBC after the initial backlash, Dior sent a press release from a nonprofit called the Americans for Indian Opportunity (AIO), which refers to itself as a group that advocates for the rights of indigenous peoples.

The group said it collaborated with Dior, as well as music video director Jean-Baptiste Mondino and Depp to provide advice on “authentic inclusion of Native American images in the film promoting Depp’s signature parfum.” The release also said the group had made Depp an honorary citizen of the Comanche Nation in 2012.

“There was need for authenticity and respect for the land and the nations that allowed us to shoot there. From the choice of location, wardrobe making, right down to casting and set design, AIO was involved,” Depp said in the release.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: lucy handley megan graham, lucy handley, megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, native, group, johnny, perfume, dior, release, respect, teaser, war, backlash, film, intent, dishonorable, depp


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

China will win the trade war and wean off American technology in 7 years, strategist says

China will win the trade war with the U.S., and eventually wean itself off its reliance on American technology, a strategist told CNBC on Monday. “China will never trust the United States again, and it will achieve its technology independence within seven years,” David Roche, Independent Strategy’s president and global strategist, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” In May, Chinese tech giant Huawei was placed on a U.S. blacklist, restricting the firm from purchasing American-made chips and software unles


China will win the trade war with the U.S., and eventually wean itself off its reliance on American technology, a strategist told CNBC on Monday. “China will never trust the United States again, and it will achieve its technology independence within seven years,” David Roche, Independent Strategy’s president and global strategist, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” In May, Chinese tech giant Huawei was placed on a U.S. blacklist, restricting the firm from purchasing American-made chips and software unles
China will win the trade war and wean off American technology in 7 years, strategist says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, war, china, huawei, software, chips, win, strategist, american, wean, technology, trade, told


China will win the trade war and wean off American technology in 7 years, strategist says

China will win the trade war with the U.S., and eventually wean itself off its reliance on American technology, a strategist told CNBC on Monday.

“China will never trust the United States again, and it will achieve its technology independence within seven years,” David Roche, Independent Strategy’s president and global strategist, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

China has traditionally been reliant on U.S. suppliers for key tech components such as chips and software, as well as modems and jet engines, but recent developments in the two countries’ protracted trade war have strained those ties and affected businesses from both sides.

In May, Chinese tech giant Huawei was placed on a U.S. blacklist, restricting the firm from purchasing American-made chips and software unless they got permission to do so. Some American mobile networks also use Huawei gear, while other U.S. companies have said their revenue will be affected by the blacklist.

Alphabet’s Google also halted all business activity with Huawei, a move that means future Huawei phones will no longer come installed with Google’s Android operating system.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, war, china, huawei, software, chips, win, strategist, american, wean, technology, trade, told


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Treasury yields rise, adding to September rebound on trade war optimism

U.S. government debt yields rose on Monday as gradual de-escalation of trade relations between the U.S. and China continued to ease investor angst. The latest report on the U.S.-China trade war came just weeks after President Donald Trump delayed some tariffs on Chinese imports ahead of the Christmas shopping season to Dec. 15. The White House has already imposed tariffs on $250 billion worth of imports from China. For its part, Beijing had already put retaliatory tariffs on $110 billion worth o


U.S. government debt yields rose on Monday as gradual de-escalation of trade relations between the U.S. and China continued to ease investor angst. The latest report on the U.S.-China trade war came just weeks after President Donald Trump delayed some tariffs on Chinese imports ahead of the Christmas shopping season to Dec. 15. The White House has already imposed tariffs on $250 billion worth of imports from China. For its part, Beijing had already put retaliatory tariffs on $110 billion worth o
Treasury yields rise, adding to September rebound on trade war optimism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worth, china, billion, tariffs, report, adding, trump, rebound, trade, jobs, rise, yields, chinese, treasury, yield, war, optimism


Treasury yields rise, adding to September rebound on trade war optimism

U.S. government debt yields rose on Monday as gradual de-escalation of trade relations between the U.S. and China continued to ease investor angst.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was 5 basis points higher at around 1.598%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at around 2.073%.

The latest turn away from Treasurys came after Politico reported on Friday that China made a peace proposal in a phone conversation with top trade officials last week to buy an unspecified quantity of U.S. agricultural goods.

The report, citing people familiar with the talk, said the offer could hinge on whether the U.S. eases export restrictions on Chinese telecom giant Huawei and postponing the Oct. 1 round of tariffs.

The latest report on the U.S.-China trade war came just weeks after President Donald Trump delayed some tariffs on Chinese imports ahead of the Christmas shopping season to Dec. 15. Trump had announced in early August that the administration would impose 10% tariffs on the remaining $300 billion worth of Chinese goods that at the time had not yet been subject to the duties.

The White House has already imposed tariffs on $250 billion worth of imports from China. For its part, Beijing had already put retaliatory tariffs on $110 billion worth of U.S. goods and responded to the most recent threat by suspending all purchases of U.S. agricultural products.

New data out of China showed that exports unexpectedly fell in August with a large contraction for shipments to the United States. The drop indicates further weakness in the world’s second largest economy and puts further pressure on Chinese lawmakers to announce new economic stimulus.

Market sentiment is also somewhat cautious on the back of a disappointing U.S. jobs report at the end of last week.

U.S. employers added a fewer-than-anticipated 130,000 jobs in August, the government said in its regular update situation on Friday. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the labor market to add 150,000 jobs following a gain of 164,000 in July. The unemployment rate held steady at 3.7%.

Average hourly earnings — a statistic often used by economists as a leading inflation indicator — rose more than expected between August and July, as a 0.4% gain topped expectations of a 0.3% increase. The print brings wages gains up to 3.2% over the year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worth, china, billion, tariffs, report, adding, trump, rebound, trade, jobs, rise, yields, chinese, treasury, yield, war, optimism


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Goldman has the perfect stocks to buy amid the recession and trade war fears gripping the market

Expecting the U.S. to narrowly avoid a recession, Goldman Sachs recommends one group of stocks with a good track record in this type of precarious environment: Aerospace and defense companies. As an added bonus, Goldman Sachs analyst David Kostin said aerospace and defense stocks come “with the lowest exposure to China.” The S&P 500 has historically gained 22% in the six months following an ISM contraction that doesn’t lead to a recession. “During the past 10 years, Aerospace & Defense has been


Expecting the U.S. to narrowly avoid a recession, Goldman Sachs recommends one group of stocks with a good track record in this type of precarious environment: Aerospace and defense companies. As an added bonus, Goldman Sachs analyst David Kostin said aerospace and defense stocks come “with the lowest exposure to China.” The S&P 500 has historically gained 22% in the six months following an ISM contraction that doesn’t lead to a recession. “During the past 10 years, Aerospace & Defense has been
Goldman has the perfect stocks to buy amid the recession and trade war fears gripping the market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goldman, war, perfect, gripping, trade, buy, stocks, recession, defense, 500, kostin, aerospace, fears, market, ism, economic


Goldman has the perfect stocks to buy amid the recession and trade war fears gripping the market

Marines from 4th Tank Battalion, Twentynine Palms, Calif., roll down a dirt road on their M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank during a day of training.

Whether or not a recession is just around the corner is a hotly debated topic among U.S. stock market investors, especially as the trade war with China drags on and some economic indicators flash warning signs.

Expecting the U.S. to narrowly avoid a recession, Goldman Sachs recommends one group of stocks with a good track record in this type of precarious environment: Aerospace and defense companies. As an added bonus, Goldman Sachs analyst David Kostin said aerospace and defense stocks come “with the lowest exposure to China.”

Kostin’s recommendation comes as a response to the decline in the ISM manufacturing index, which last week fell below 50 points for the first time in three years. A reading below 50 indicates a contraction. While some may raise concern about the drop, Kostin called the index “an inconsistent predictor of US recessions.” But Kostin noted that, when a recession didn’t occur following the ISM dropping below 50, aerospace and defense stocks outpaced the growth of the S&P 500 in the six months after.

So in other words, when economic conditions deteriorate but ultimately do not lead to a recession, the stock market typically does well in this period with defensive-type stocks outperforming. The S&P 500 has historically gained 22% in the six months following an ISM contraction that doesn’t lead to a recession. And Aerospace/defense stocks do even better, gaining an additional 2.5% during the same period, Goldman found.

“During the past 10 years, Aerospace & Defense has been least sensitive to US and global economic growth across Industrials subsectors,” Kostin said.

The firm pointed out that the three S&P 500 aerospace and defense companies “with the lowest reported sales to Asia Pacific” are TransDigm, Huntington Ingalls and Northrop Grumman.

Goldman is bullish on stocks for the next two years, expecting the S&P 500 will climb 4% to 3100 points by the end of this year and 14% to 3400 by the end of next year.

“Our economists expect that a US recession is unlikely during the next two years,” Kostin said.

– CNBC’s Michael Bloom contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goldman, war, perfect, gripping, trade, buy, stocks, recession, defense, 500, kostin, aerospace, fears, market, ism, economic


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Singapore stocks offer ‘good yield’ despite trade war jitters

Gantry cranes stand at the Port of Singapore in Singapore, on Friday, July 12, 2019. Even though Singapore’s economy is taking a big hit from the U.S.-China trade war, stocks in the city-state remain attractive compared to the rest of Asia, analysts told CNBC. “The trade war impacts (Singapore) quite a bit, but at the same time, I think Singapore has an advantage relative to other Asian markets,” said Vasu Menon, executive director of investment strategy at Singapore’s OCBC Bank. The dividend yi


Gantry cranes stand at the Port of Singapore in Singapore, on Friday, July 12, 2019. Even though Singapore’s economy is taking a big hit from the U.S.-China trade war, stocks in the city-state remain attractive compared to the rest of Asia, analysts told CNBC. “The trade war impacts (Singapore) quite a bit, but at the same time, I think Singapore has an advantage relative to other Asian markets,” said Vasu Menon, executive director of investment strategy at Singapore’s OCBC Bank. The dividend yi
Singapore stocks offer ‘good yield’ despite trade war jitters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, asia, good, yields, economy, offer, markets, jitters, despite, singapore, trade, told, stocks, asian, singapores, yield


Singapore stocks offer 'good yield' despite trade war jitters

Gantry cranes stand at the Port of Singapore in Singapore, on Friday, July 12, 2019.

Even though Singapore’s economy is taking a big hit from the U.S.-China trade war, stocks in the city-state remain attractive compared to the rest of Asia, analysts told CNBC.

“The trade war impacts (Singapore) quite a bit, but at the same time, I think Singapore has an advantage relative to other Asian markets,” said Vasu Menon, executive director of investment strategy at Singapore’s OCBC Bank.

“Singapore companies offer you pretty good yield. The dividend yields in Singapore are one of the highest you have in Asia,” Menon told CNBC in late August.

The real estate investment trust (REIT) sector in Singapore is “huge,” he added.

Menon’s views were echoed by REYL Singapore’s Head of Portfolio Management Daryl Liew.

“Singapore equities (have) got a reputation for being a safe-haven, dividend play, simply because of the REIT market,” Liew said. “Singapore was … one of the first few Asian markets to start to roll out the REITs. That’s why it’s attracted a lot of listings, not just Singapore players but also offshore.”

In the current risk-off environment where yields are low as interest rates come down, Singapore’s markets could “get some interest,” Liew said.

As of Friday’s market close, the Straits Times index saw an increase of more than 2.4% since the beginning of this year. In comparison, the broader MSCI Asia ex-Japan index has grown more than 6% in the same period.

Singapore’s export-reliant economy has suffered in the midst of a protracted trade war between the world’s two largest economies, that has dragged on for more than a year as both sides slap escalating tariffs on billions of dollars of worth of goods from each other.

The Southeast Asian nation’s economy contracted by 3.3% on quarter in the April-to-June period, with some analysts warning that a recession may be around the corner. Last month, Singapore’s government slashed its 2019 official growth forecast to between 0% and 1%, from between 1.5% and 2.5% previously.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, asia, good, yields, economy, offer, markets, jitters, despite, singapore, trade, told, stocks, asian, singapores, yield


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

BMW CFO wants politicians to offer ‘sensible solution’ on trade war

The chief financial officer of German auto giant BMW said that tension between China and the United States needs to improve in the coming weeks or his company’s profit margins will suffer. The U.S. has threatened a series of global tariffs which would have a negative effect on European carmakers. One concern for BMW is the U.S. threat to raise import tariffs on foreign cars, although President Donald Trump has delayed any decision on that until around late November. Data on Monday revealed that


The chief financial officer of German auto giant BMW said that tension between China and the United States needs to improve in the coming weeks or his company’s profit margins will suffer. The U.S. has threatened a series of global tariffs which would have a negative effect on European carmakers. One concern for BMW is the U.S. threat to raise import tariffs on foreign cars, although President Donald Trump has delayed any decision on that until around late November. Data on Monday revealed that
BMW CFO wants politicians to offer ‘sensible solution’ on trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cfo, threatened, profit, china, war, negative, bmw, global, solution, wants, politicians, tension, weisbach, tariffs, offer, companys, trade, sensible


BMW CFO wants politicians to offer 'sensible solution' on trade war

The chief financial officer of German auto giant BMW said that tension between China and the United States needs to improve in the coming weeks or his company’s profit margins will suffer.

The U.S. has threatened a series of global tariffs which would have a negative effect on European carmakers. One concern for BMW is the U.S. threat to raise import tariffs on foreign cars, although President Donald Trump has delayed any decision on that until around late November.

Nicolas Peter told CNBC’s Annette Weisbach at the Frankfurt Motor Show Monday that his firm was “best prepared” to cope with trade tariffs but further measures threatened by Washington would have an impact.

“If this tension between (the) U.S. and China would further escalate this would have an negative impact on our P+L (profit and loss) but we still have a couple of months time and I definitely hope the politicians would come to a sensible solution,” he said.

Data on Monday revealed that BMW Group’s global deliveries rose 4.4% in August when compared to the same month last year. The company’s total sales across 2019 to the end of August were 1,617,512 units — a 1.3% rise on 2018’s comparable time scale.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cfo, threatened, profit, china, war, negative, bmw, global, solution, wants, politicians, tension, weisbach, tariffs, offer, companys, trade, sensible


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post