Jim Cramer: Microsoft’s attempt to fight climate change matters

Jim Cramer: Microsoft’s attempt to fight climate change matters”Whether or not Microsoft can save the environment, what matters is that they’re making the attempt and the stock wasn’t punished for it,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer says.


Jim Cramer: Microsoft’s attempt to fight climate change matters”Whether or not Microsoft can save the environment, what matters is that they’re making the attempt and the stock wasn’t punished for it,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer says.
Jim Cramer: Microsoft’s attempt to fight climate change matters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, stock, jim, microsoft, fight, theyre, save, microsofts, wasnt, matters, punished, attempt, change, climate


Jim Cramer: Microsoft's attempt to fight climate change matters

Jim Cramer: Microsoft’s attempt to fight climate change matters

“Whether or not Microsoft can save the environment, what matters is that they’re making the attempt and the stock wasn’t punished for it,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, stock, jim, microsoft, fight, theyre, save, microsofts, wasnt, matters, punished, attempt, change, climate


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Elizabeth Warren ‘felt like a failure’ because she wasn’t ‘cut out’ to be a stay-at-home mom

Warren, who grew up with three older brothers in Oklahoma in the 1950s and ’60s, was taught that women stayed home to tend to family. I understood that many women did, and for a long time I felt like a failure,” she told Vogue. But after she got married at age 19, Warren quit school followed her husband, Jim Warren, to Texas. “With each one of those steps, I built a more independent life,” Warren told Vogue. I wanted family.


Warren, who grew up with three older brothers in Oklahoma in the 1950s and ’60s, was taught that women stayed home to tend to family.
I understood that many women did, and for a long time I felt like a failure,” she told Vogue.
But after she got married at age 19, Warren quit school followed her husband, Jim Warren, to Texas.
“With each one of those steps, I built a more independent life,” Warren told Vogue.
I wanted family.
Elizabeth Warren ‘felt like a failure’ because she wasn’t ‘cut out’ to be a stay-at-home mom Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, women, young, wasnt, felt, taught, mom, told, school, stayathome, warren, cut, university, wanted, husband, failure, elizabeth, family


Elizabeth Warren 'felt like a failure' because she wasn't 'cut out' to be a stay-at-home mom

As a Senator and Democratic presidential candidate, Elizabeth Warren is outspoken about women’s rights, from the pay gap for women of color to protecting abortion rights.

But when Warren was young, she struggled with what the world expected of women. And it made her feel like a “failure,” she told Vogue in a story published Tuesday.

Warren, who grew up with three older brothers in Oklahoma in the 1950s and ’60s, was taught that women stayed home to tend to family. But Warren was different; she was born “contrary,” to the rest, her mother told her.

“As a young woman I wanted what I’d been taught to want, and I tried really hard to succeed at that,” she says. “I just wasn’t cut out to stay home and build my life around my husband. I understood that many women did, and for a long time I felt like a failure,” she told Vogue.

In 1966 Warren graduated (a year early) from Northwest Classen High School — where she was on the pep squad and the debate team — and won a debate scholarship to George Washington University in Washington, D.C. But after she got married at age 19, Warren quit school followed her husband, Jim Warren, to Texas. There, she became the first person in her family to graduate college, completing her degree at University of Houston in 1970.

The couple moved to New Jersey when Warren’s husband got a job there and she got her first teaching job. But Warren said she was not asked to return the following year because she was visibly pregnant with her daughter, Amelia, who was born in 1971. (That account has been challenged, though Warren sticks by it.)

The transition to stay-at-home mom wasn’t perfect for Warren. “I had a baby and stayed home for a couple years, and I was really casting about thinking, ‘What am I gonna do?'” she said in a 2007 interview at University of California, Berkeley.

Warren says her husband’s “view of it was, ‘Stay home. We’ll have more children. You’ll love this.'”

However, “I was very restless about it,” she said.

Warren enrolled at Rutgers Law School, had a second child in 1976, Alexander, and after graduating that year, taught classes there and later at the University of Houston.

Warren divorced Jim in 1979 and remarried in 1980. But her marriage to Bruce Mann was less traditional: She popped the question and they had a long-distance relationship while Warren taught at various schools, including University of Texas, University of Michigan and University of Pennsylvania, and he taught American legal history at University of Connecticut. In 1995 both Warren and Mann got teaching jobs at Harvard.

“With each one of those steps, I built a more independent life,” Warren told Vogue. “Not purposefully to take me away from the vision of marriage I’d grown up with, but because I needed to do more.”

In 2008, Warren entered politics when she was appointed as an expert to a congressional oversight panel, and two years later, former president Barack Obama appointed Warren to serve as special adviser to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. In 2012, Warren became the first woman elected to the Senate from Massachusetts.

“Did I think I was going to be one of those ‘women’s libbers’? Heavens no,” she said at UC Berkeley. “I wanted children. I wanted family. And somehow, I thought those were either-or choices. And yet I wanted to do things.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, women, young, wasnt, felt, taught, mom, told, school, stayathome, warren, cut, university, wanted, husband, failure, elizabeth, family


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The slowest fire season in years taught this wildland firefighter to create a financial backup plan

The 25-year-old Montanan was preparing for his second season as a wildland firefighter when Grow talked to him this past summer. Read more: What it’s really like to make a living as a wildland firefighter in Montana This season proved more challenging, prompting Linear to pick up other lines of work to supplement his income and create a plan for financial security. By mid-September, it had become clear: “There just wasn’t any work for us, even outside of the fires.” Donovan “Donny” Linear Wildla


The 25-year-old Montanan was preparing for his second season as a wildland firefighter when Grow talked to him this past summer.
Read more: What it’s really like to make a living as a wildland firefighter in Montana This season proved more challenging, prompting Linear to pick up other lines of work to supplement his income and create a plan for financial security.
By mid-September, it had become clear: “There just wasn’t any work for us, even outside of the fires.”
Donovan “Donny” Linear Wildla
The slowest fire season in years taught this wildland firefighter to create a financial backup plan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-01  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, season, 2019, fires, create, 2018, slowest, plan, job, taught, wasnt, linears, wildland, backup, firefighter, linear, financial


The slowest fire season in years taught this wildland firefighter to create a financial backup plan

Much of the Western part of the U.S. got a reprieve this year from a milder than average fire season — and no one knows this as well as Donovan “Donny” Linear. The 25-year-old Montanan was preparing for his second season as a wildland firefighter when Grow talked to him this past summer. In 2018, his first year in this seasonal line of work, Linear had fought wildfires in six U.S. states and made more money in the stretch from June to November than he’d ever earned in a full year of work. Read more: What it’s really like to make a living as a wildland firefighter in Montana This season proved more challenging, prompting Linear to pick up other lines of work to supplement his income and create a plan for financial security. Here’s how Linear navigated a year of uncertainty, and his plans for the future.

‘There just wasn’t any work for us’

Firefighters must be comfortable with uncertainty. The nature of the work is that they don’t know where the next fire will take them or how long it will take to fight it. But this year, another unpredictable factor tested Linear: How much fire activity there will be in a season — or how little, as was the case in 2019. Linear’s crew was first called out for a fire in July, more than a month later than their first call in 2018. Their second call of 2019 was in early September. More than 49,000 reported fires burned 4.6 million acres in the U.S. through late-December, compared to a 10-year average of 64,000 fires and 6.9 million acres, according to data from the National Interagency Fire Center. The acreage that burned in 2019 was the least since 2014, and about half the amount in 2017 and 2018. Linear and the other 19 members of a Missoula, Montana-based initial attack handcrew are employed by a private contractor. While these crews work alongside those employed by government agencies, since they contract with federal and state agencies for work, they may not be the first crews to be called. By mid-September, it had become clear: “There just wasn’t any work for us, even outside of the fires.” “Here I am sitting around waiting for a fire call and that kind of set me behind with bills and stuff like that, so I ended up having to get a regular job in order to get by,” he says. Instead of fighting fires, which requires hiking several miles a day with a 60-pound pack on his back, Linear’s new job was working as a cashier at a local grocery store.

There just wasn’t any work for us, even outside of the fires. Donovan “Donny” Linear Wildland firefighter

‘Short and bitter’ fire season

While Linear’s rookie season as a wildland firefighter kept him on the job for weeks at a stretch, 2019 was the complete opposite experience. When he turned in his firefighting gear sometime in October, he’d only worked a total of 21 days. “It was short and bitter,” Linear says of this season. Fire is vital to forest regrowth because it can clear out underbrush and dead trees. “A lot of people just aren’t really knowledgeable in the sense that Mother Nature also needs fire, it’s part of the natural ecosystem.” Linear is grateful that there were fewer destructive fires in 2019, burning homes or killing people. “I heard plenty of people saying they were thankful there wasn’t smoke,” he says. But the mild fire season was tough for people like Linear who depend on it for their livelihood. Linear says if he were to compare his 2019 earnings with what he made in 2018, “it’s like night and day.”

Courtesy Donovan Linear

Linear’s crew was called out for a third fire, which turned out to be a 16-day job in Colorado. But by that time he already was working elsewhere, so he had to turn down the opportunity. All that downtime proved inspirational for Linear, however. He completed online training through the International Sports Sciences Association to become a certified fitness trainer, and began working as a personal trainer.

A financial plan for 2020 and beyond

The slower-than-average fire activity this year didn’t affect Linear’s love for fighting wildland fires, but he will take a different approach with this seasonal job in the future. “I’m definitely planning on coming back, but I know now that if the year’s starting to look like it was this past year, what I can do differently,” he says. “Once those months are rolling around where the fires really start to get to popping, if it looks like it’s not going to be a good season, I’ll probably just work a regular job or invest more time into my personal training business.” This spring, the 2020 fire season will begin anew. Linear will need to attend a refresher training course and pass a physical fitness test again: walking three miles within 45 minutes while wearing a 45-pound vest. And he still has dreams of becoming a hotshot, the most elite group of wildland firefighters who generally work closest to the blaze, and joining a government crew in the future. Doing so would provide more security, by earning him a salary even during slow fire seasons and receiving benefits like health insurance, Linear says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-01  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, season, 2019, fires, create, 2018, slowest, plan, job, taught, wasnt, linears, wildland, backup, firefighter, linear, financial


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Bloomberg firm Hawkfish falsely told potential hires it would be the ‘primary’ tech platform for the DNC

The firm, Hawkfish LLC, is the main digital agency and technology service for the former New York mayor’s campaign for president, as CNBC first reported. It was corrected starting Dec. 2, said Michael Frazier, a Bloomberg campaign spokesman. Several potential hires received notices through LinkedIn in which they were informed that Hawkfish was working for both the Bloomberg campaign and the DNC. The Bloomberg campaign previously declined to specify which campaigns the firm worked on in those sta


The firm, Hawkfish LLC, is the main digital agency and technology service for the former New York mayor’s campaign for president, as CNBC first reported.
It was corrected starting Dec. 2, said Michael Frazier, a Bloomberg campaign spokesman.
Several potential hires received notices through LinkedIn in which they were informed that Hawkfish was working for both the Bloomberg campaign and the DNC.
The Bloomberg campaign previously declined to specify which campaigns the firm worked on in those sta
Bloomberg firm Hawkfish falsely told potential hires it would be the ‘primary’ tech platform for the DNC Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, potential, dnc, firm, falsely, tech, recruiting, person, platform, hawkfish, hires, told, bloomberg, campaign, wasnt, primary, president


Bloomberg firm Hawkfish falsely told potential hires it would be the 'primary' tech platform for the DNC

During the week Mike Bloomberg announced his run for president in November, a technology company he founded was reaching out to potential recruits through an outside firm, saying it would be the “primary platform” for the Democratic National Committee.

But the claim wasn’t true.

The firm, Hawkfish LLC, is the main digital agency and technology service for the former New York mayor’s campaign for president, as CNBC first reported. Yet it has no current or planned role with the DNC in the 2020 election cycle, according to a Bloomberg aide and a DNC official.

On Nov. 27, three days after Bloomberg officially launched his bid for the White House, the DNC told Hawkfish that the pitches were misleading, according to the DNC official, spokesman Daniel Wessel.

“We had previously alerted Hawkfish that the recruiting emails were incorrect and misleading,” Wessel told CNBC. Hawkfish then conceded to the DNC that the script sent to potential recruits wasn’t accurate, according to Wessel. It was corrected starting Dec. 2, said Michael Frazier, a Bloomberg campaign spokesman.

Bloomberg, who has a net worth of just over $54 billion, incorporated Hawkfish in spring 2019, with the goal of helping Democrats overpower the formidable data operation assembled by the Republican National Committee and President Donald Trump’s campaign. Yet much about the company wasn’t known until CNBC reported on its existence and efforts last week.

The Bloomberg campaign said that the company Hawkfish hired to recruit talent, Andiamo Partners, mistakenly believed the data startup also had a contract with the DNC. Andiamo’s CEO, Patrick McAdams, did not respond to a request for comment.

Several potential hires received notices through LinkedIn in which they were informed that Hawkfish was working for both the Bloomberg campaign and the DNC. It wasn’t immediately clear how many recruiting targets received the erroneous pitch.

“The recruiting company mistook support for Democratic causes as Hawkfish working under contract with the DNC, which isn’t the case,” said Frazier, the Bloomberg aide.

Hawkfish had done work for Democratic groups in state races within Virginia and Kentucky earlier this year. The Bloomberg campaign previously declined to specify which campaigns the firm worked on in those states. In November, Democrats won control of the Virginia statehouse for the first time in over two decades, while Democrat Andy Beshear narrowly defeated GOP Gov. Matt Bevin.

CNBC first learned of Hawkfish’s recruiting efforts after receiving a copy of a LinkedIn message from a person who had experience working with data analytics for President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton’s campaigns for president.

This person, who declined to be named in this story due to worries about his career being affected, pushed back on the recruiter.

“I told them that they were tarnishing their brand among potential recruits by misrepresenting their relationship with the DNC,” this person said. This person did not end up moving forward with a job interview.

The Andiamo Partners representative who sent out these messages was taken off the account. Hawkfish, which is largely operating out of the Bloomberg campaign headquarters in New York, is still using the firm to help with recruitment. Hawkfish’s leadership ranks include longtime Facebook Chief Marketing Officer Gary Briggs and Jeff Glueck, the former CEO of location tracking firm Foursquare.

The discovery of Hawkfish’s issues with a third-party recruiting vendor comes after Bloomberg’s campaign ended its relationship with an outside firm that used prison labor to make calls on behalf of the candidate.

Bloomberg is in fifth place in the Democratic primary, behind former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, according to a Real Clear Politics average of national polls.

Bloomberg has spent more than $100 million on TV ads across the country, along with more than $20 million on digital spots on Facebook and Google.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, potential, dnc, firm, falsely, tech, recruiting, person, platform, hawkfish, hires, told, bloomberg, campaign, wasnt, primary, president


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How Okta’s CEO convinced his wife in 2008 that he should leave Salesforce to start a company

As the 2010s come to a close, Okta co-founder Todd McKinnon leads a $14.6 billion company at the center of the rapidly expanding cloud economy. In late 2008, as the economy suffered through its worst recession since the Great Depression, McKinnon became convinced that he should leave his senior executive role at Salesforce. So he put together a Google Slides presentation for his wife that he titled, “Proposal to move to a new job starting a company (Why I’m not crazy).” McKinnon had also just be


As the 2010s come to a close, Okta co-founder Todd McKinnon leads a $14.6 billion company at the center of the rapidly expanding cloud economy.
In late 2008, as the economy suffered through its worst recession since the Great Depression, McKinnon became convinced that he should leave his senior executive role at Salesforce.
So he put together a Google Slides presentation for his wife that he titled, “Proposal to move to a new job starting a company (Why I’m not crazy).”
McKinnon had also just be
How Okta’s CEO convinced his wife in 2008 that he should leave Salesforce to start a company Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26  Authors: ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salesforce, leave, wife, company, mckinnon, wasnt, ceo, work, convinced, economy, oktas, 2008, worst, million, presentation, start


How Okta's CEO convinced his wife in 2008 that he should leave Salesforce to start a company

As the 2010s come to a close, Okta co-founder Todd McKinnon leads a $14.6 billion company at the center of the rapidly expanding cloud economy. His personal stock is worth about $640 million.

It almost never happened.

In late 2008, as the economy suffered through its worst recession since the Great Depression, McKinnon became convinced that he should leave his senior executive role at Salesforce. So he put together a Google Slides presentation for his wife that he titled, “Proposal to move to a new job starting a company (Why I’m not crazy).”

McKinnon was in his mid-30s with a six-month-old daughter at home. His wife, Roxanne, whom he’d met in high school, wasn’t sure if she wanted to go back to work and was concerned about McKinnon’s job security given the state of the economy. McKinnon had also just been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, meaning good health-care coverage was vital.

In the 13-page presentation, which he recently shared with CNBC, McKinnon told his wife that he was bored at Salesforce, wasn’t learning things at a rapid clip, was unlikely to gain more responsibility in the near future and wanted to start a company because the software industry is “going through the biggest shift I’ll see in my career.”

“Microsoft and Oracle were both started in poor economic times,” wrote McKinnon.

McKinnon’s proposal for a network monitoring company called Saasure included four possible scenarios for outcomes, ranging from worst — he fails to raise money and returns to work, possibly at Salesforce — to best, where he would operate the company for five to 10 years and take it public at a valuation of $50 million to $100 million. The middle scenarios involved running the company for a couple years and making enough to live during that time, or selling for $10 million to $20 million within five years.

It wasn’t the most polished presentation. McKinnon said he’d already gotten commitments from two angel investors, Mike Dodd of Austin Ventures and David Schellhase, who was then general counsel at Salesforce. But he spelled both their names wrong, writing Dobb instead of Dodd, and dropping one of the ls from Schellhase, who’s now general counsel at Slack.

(He blacked out some sensitive financial information from the original document.)


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26  Authors: ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salesforce, leave, wife, company, mckinnon, wasnt, ceo, work, convinced, economy, oktas, 2008, worst, million, presentation, start


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Company founder didn’t take a salary for 9 years: ‘Every time I get a paycheck, it feels like I’ve won the lottery’

Within six years, her company Tatcha was named the No. For most of this time of growth, Tsai never took a paycheck, and instead reinvested any earnings back into the company. Part of this, the Harvard Business School grad says, is because there wasn’t a precedent for the type of company she wanted to build. “When we first started out, direct-to-consumer beauty wasn’t a thing, Asian beauty wasn’t a thing, clean formulas were not a thing,” Tsai says. “Every time I get a paycheck, it feels like I’v


Within six years, her company Tatcha was named the No.
For most of this time of growth, Tsai never took a paycheck, and instead reinvested any earnings back into the company.
Part of this, the Harvard Business School grad says, is because there wasn’t a precedent for the type of company she wanted to build.
“When we first started out, direct-to-consumer beauty wasn’t a thing, Asian beauty wasn’t a thing, clean formulas were not a thing,” Tsai says.
“Every time I get a paycheck, it feels like I’v
Company founder didn’t take a salary for 9 years: ‘Every time I get a paycheck, it feels like I’ve won the lottery’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-23  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, wasnt, thing, wanted, paycheck, tatchas, didnt, tatcha, won, lottery, ive, founder, feels, money, tsai, company, beauty, started


Company founder didn't take a salary for 9 years: 'Every time I get a paycheck, it feels like I've won the lottery'

In 2009, Vicky Tsai had quit her job on Wall Street, sold her engagement ring, moved back home with her mom and started a beauty company out of her San Francisco garage.

Within six years, her company Tatcha was named the No. 2 fastest-growing, woman-led company on the Inc. 5000 list. The luxury skin care brand with fans in Kim Kardashian and Meghan Markle would go on to make $70 million in sales in 2018, according to Bloomberg, and was acquired by Unilever during the summer of 2019.

For most of this time of growth, Tsai never took a paycheck, and instead reinvested any earnings back into the company. She says this decision was fundamental to Tatcha’s start.

“Even if I wanted to, I couldn’t raise money in a meaningful institutional way,” Tsai tells CNBC Make It.

Part of this, the Harvard Business School grad says, is because there wasn’t a precedent for the type of company she wanted to build.

Tatcha products draw from generations-old beauty rituals of Japanese geishas and focus on a less-is-more approach. Tsai, who was on a flight layover in Japan and was at the time suffering from acute dermatitis, was drawn to the simple ingredients of the Japanese skin care ritual and wanted to create similar products free of parabens, synthetic fragrances, mineral oil and other potentially irritating ingredients.

“When we first started out, direct-to-consumer beauty wasn’t a thing, Asian beauty wasn’t a thing, clean formulas were not a thing,” Tsai says.

Plus, her experience was a common one among women-led businesses: Women founders face greater barriers funding their businesses.

A recent study from Crunchbase found that in 2019, for every $100 invested by venture capital firms, just $3 went to companies founded by women.

That’s where self-funding became essential to Tatcha’s start. At most, Tsai estimates she accumulated up to $1 million in debt across remaining student loans from undergraduate and business school, as well as credit cards used to float the company.

For a time, Tsai worked four jobs on the side, including cleaning and showing apartments, while her husband, Eric, became the single-income earner for their family. Most of their earnings went back into launching and growing Tatcha.

However, “at one point it wasn’t about necessity anymore,” Tsai says of self-funding. “It was about maintaining control.”

Not having to rely on investor dollars meant Tsai could prioritize research and development (Tatcha has a Tokyo-based R&D center), customer service and incorporating a giving model into her business. For every purchase made, Tatcha funds a day of girls’ education in partnership with the non-profit Room to Read.

Now, after Tatcha’s commercial success, Tsai has only recently started taking a salary.

“Every time I get a paycheck, it feels like I’ve won the lottery,” she says. “It’s amazing.”

However, even after bouts of barely being able to afford groceries, Tsai says her favorite way to spend her money isn’t on things.

“The first thing I did when I started taking a salary and moved out of my mom’s house is I gave everything away — like, [I was] down to seven pairs of underwear,” Tsai says. “I find ‘stuff’ to be a huge burden, so I don’t buy stuff.”

She finds spending on experiences for herself difficult because of her work schedule but tries to invest in ones to help her daughter, Alea, see the world.

“I take her to Room to Read markets with me,” Tsai says, explaining that Alea will accompany her on trips to visit the schools around the world that receive education funding from the organization.

“We matched the money she raised and she built her own library in Cambodia last year,” Tsai continues, “so we made a family trip out of it visit her library and keep in touch with the person who made it happen. So that’s philanthropy and experiences all in one.”

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Don’t miss: Nearly half of workers have made a dramatic career switch, and this is the average age they do it


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-23  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, wasnt, thing, wanted, paycheck, tatchas, didnt, tatcha, won, lottery, ive, founder, feels, money, tsai, company, beauty, started


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Paramount Pictures releases trailer with revamped ‘Sonic the Hedgehog,’ fans cheer new look

Paramount Pictures released a new trailer for its “Sonic the Hedgehog” movie that shows off its major redesign of the character, and it looks like fans are pleased. The first official trailer for the movie, based off the “Sonic the Hedgehog” video games, was released in late April, and immediately was met with backlash. Disgruntled fans felt the depiction of the iconic speedy blue hedgehog wasn’t up to par. The decision delayed the release of the “Sonic the Hedgehog” movie, which was originally


Paramount Pictures released a new trailer for its “Sonic the Hedgehog” movie that shows off its major redesign of the character, and it looks like fans are pleased.
The first official trailer for the movie, based off the “Sonic the Hedgehog” video games, was released in late April, and immediately was met with backlash.
Disgruntled fans felt the depiction of the iconic speedy blue hedgehog wasn’t up to par.
The decision delayed the release of the “Sonic the Hedgehog” movie, which was originally
Paramount Pictures releases trailer with revamped ‘Sonic the Hedgehog,’ fans cheer new look Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: elly cosgrove
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, released, wasnt, body, pictures, sonic, trailer, revamped, paramount, fans, movie, character, version, hedgehog, cheer, look, releases


Paramount Pictures releases trailer with revamped 'Sonic the Hedgehog,' fans cheer new look

Paramount Pictures released a new trailer for its “Sonic the Hedgehog” movie that shows off its major redesign of the character, and it looks like fans are pleased.

The first official trailer for the movie, based off the “Sonic the Hedgehog” video games, was released in late April, and immediately was met with backlash. Disgruntled fans felt the depiction of the iconic speedy blue hedgehog wasn’t up to par.

In response, director Jeff Fowler announced the film would go back and make changes to fix how the character was depicted. The decision delayed the release of the “Sonic the Hedgehog” movie, which was originally set to be released this November.

Paramount tweeted out the new trailer on Tuesday and said it is expected to be in theaters on Feb. 14.

In the original version, fans thought that Sonic’s body proportions and facial features were inconsistent with the Sonic many grew up with in the 90’s. In the new version, the character has bigger eyes and fewer human-like teeth. The face and body also have different coloring and texture.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: elly cosgrove
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, released, wasnt, body, pictures, sonic, trailer, revamped, paramount, fans, movie, character, version, hedgehog, cheer, look, releases


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Bill Gates: ‘I didn’t even want to meet Warren Buffett’ —but their first dinner conversation changed everything

There seems to be no shortage of people eager to meet Warren Buffett. And yet, fellow billionaire Bill Gates says he wasn’t even sure he wanted to meet Buffett at all before the two iconic businessmen finally crossed paths in the early 1990s. In an interview at The New York Times/DealBook conference on Wednesday, the Microsoft co-founder explained why he was initially reluctant to meet with Buffett. That was my view before I met him … he wasn’t going to tell me about inventing something,” Gates


There seems to be no shortage of people eager to meet Warren Buffett.
And yet, fellow billionaire Bill Gates says he wasn’t even sure he wanted to meet Buffett at all before the two iconic businessmen finally crossed paths in the early 1990s.
In an interview at The New York Times/DealBook conference on Wednesday, the Microsoft co-founder explained why he was initially reluctant to meet with Buffett.
That was my view before I met him … he wasn’t going to tell me about inventing something,” Gates
Bill Gates: ‘I didn’t even want to meet Warren Buffett’ —but their first dinner conversation changed everything Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conversation, bill, didnt, buffett, investors, microsoft, dinner, meeting, wasnt, gates, warren, meet, thats, value, changed


Bill Gates: 'I didn't even want to meet Warren Buffett' —but their first dinner conversation changed everything

There seems to be no shortage of people eager to meet Warren Buffett.

Every year, investors flock to the annual meeting of Berkshire Hathaway, the billionaire investor’s holding company, to catch a glimpse of Buffett and possibly ask him a question. And the annual charity auction for a lunch with Buffett now regularly fields multi-million dollar bids (this year’s winner paid nearly $4.6 million, even if he did postpone at the last minute).

And yet, fellow billionaire Bill Gates says he wasn’t even sure he wanted to meet Buffett at all before the two iconic businessmen finally crossed paths in the early 1990s. In an interview at The New York Times/DealBook conference on Wednesday, the Microsoft co-founder explained why he was initially reluctant to meet with Buffett.

“I didn’t even want to meet Warren because I thought, ‘Hey this guy buys and sells things, and so he found imperfections in terms of markets, that’s not value added to society, that’s a zero-sum game that is almost parasitic.’ That was my view before I met him … he wasn’t going to tell me about inventing something,” Gates said at the conference.

Gates simply felt that he and Buffett operated too differently in the world of business for there to be any value in them meeting and sharing insights — Buffett is an investor looking to create value for himself and his shareholders, while Gates, especially at that point in Microsoft’s history, was more focused on building software that would change the way people and businesses use computers in their daily lives. (His company released its first Microsoft Office suite and Windows 3.0 in 1990, a year before Gates and Buffett actually did meet).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conversation, bill, didnt, buffett, investors, microsoft, dinner, meeting, wasnt, gates, warren, meet, thats, value, changed


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27-year-old tech CEO had to convince banks he wasn’t ‘just a kid’ — now his clients include Capital One

In 2016, less than a year into founding his financial services consulting company, Kishan Patel, then 24, was close to landing his first half-million-dollar contract. Even though Patel’s company, Kunai, had already passed through several phases of vetting, the potential client had one final request: a site visit. Kishan Patel CEO, KunaiHis first six months in business, Patel says he constantly thought about giving up. Rather than focusing on what would make money, bringing in clients, Patel says


In 2016, less than a year into founding his financial services consulting company, Kishan Patel, then 24, was close to landing his first half-million-dollar contract.
Even though Patel’s company, Kunai, had already passed through several phases of vetting, the potential client had one final request: a site visit.
Kishan Patel CEO, KunaiHis first six months in business, Patel says he constantly thought about giving up.
Rather than focusing on what would make money, bringing in clients, Patel says
27-year-old tech CEO had to convince banks he wasn’t ‘just a kid’ — now his clients include Capital One Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, youre, convince, kunai, companies, clients, ceo, capital, patel, wasnt, hard, include, work, didnt, kishan, 27yearold, kid, banks, tech


27-year-old tech CEO had to convince banks he wasn't 'just a kid' — now his clients include Capital One

In 2016, less than a year into founding his financial services consulting company, Kishan Patel, then 24, was close to landing his first half-million-dollar contract. Even though Patel’s company, Kunai, had already passed through several phases of vetting, the potential client had one final request: a site visit. At the time, Kunai had 10 employees, most of whom worked remotely — and the “office” was basically a school desk and school chairs. “It looked like a dump,” he recalls. The CEO had to improvise, and fast. He spruced up the office and called in a big favor from dozens of former coworkers: He asked them to work from his office for the day. “The client walked around and saw that we were a small, but bustling team,” Patel says. And his company landed the contract. Patel, now 27, has founded a total of three companies and learned a lot about how to be taken seriously as an entrepreneur even when you’re young. Here are some of his key takeaways.

Push past your fears

By the time Patel founded Kunai in 2015, he had two prior ventures under his belt. In high school, he launched a website to promote independent music. (“It failed miserably.”) And along with one of his professors at the University of Southern California, he started an e-greeting card company incorporating video clips. (“It didn’t work out, either.”) As Patel was winding down that second company in 2014, he met with Monsoon, an app-development agency focused on start-ups and other companies in the San Francisco Bay area. But six months after he joined the agency as a partner, Monsoon was acquired by Capital One. This meant that Patel was out of work — but not out of ideas. He saw an opportunity to fill a void. He realized that banks and other financial services companies have come to rely on technology to serve their customers. Because that’s not their specialty, they need help. “These large companies often struggle to be as nimble and fast-moving as their fintech counterparts,” Patel says. That’s where he envisioned Kunai, named for a weapon ninjas use, coming into play. While Patel had been building websites since he was 15 and felt comfortable navigating tough technical topics, he didn’t know what was needed to start the business he envisioned. He says he spent “inordinate amounts of time” doing research and Googling questions like, “How do you set up a tech consulting company?”

When you’re sitting alone in your bedroom trying to figure out what’s going to happen next with the company, doubt starts to creep in and pretty consistently. Kishan Patel CEO, Kunai

His first six months in business, Patel says he constantly thought about giving up. He was running the company with one other partner who he didn’t see very often. “When you’re sitting alone in your bedroom trying to figure out what’s going to happen next with the company, doubt starts to creep in and pretty consistently.” Rather than focusing on what would make money, bringing in clients, Patel says he worried about everything else. “You lose all sense of rational thinking because you’ve taken what feels like the biggest leap in your life and there’s no safety net beneath you,” he says. “But you need to push past it by realizing it’s just a part of the journey. Self-doubt and feeling lost are not phases, they’re constant.”

Hustle to get traction

Patel came to realize that Kunai’s success depended on his hustle. There was always another call to make, another meeting to secure, and he had to “completely exhaust those options” before throwing in the towel: “If you don’t land, it’s back to where you were before, working at a company you don’t love.” So Patel became “very scrappy” about getting meetings with potential clients. Selling some of the world’s largest banks on a two-person start-up based in Oakland, California, with developers in Ukraine? That was unconventional, Patel says: “We had to convince people.” And there was an extra hurdle. Most of his potential clients were headquartered in New York, so Patel had to travel across the country to try to get new deals. On several occasions Patel mentioned he’d be in New York, even though he didn’t actually have a trip booked. The bet often paid off; if the other person suggested they meet, Patel would go ahead and book a last-minute flight.

Courtesy Kishan Patel

His commitment came at a cost, however. “Financially, things [got] really difficult, especially when [I was] hustling to get traction,” he says. While the company made about $30,000 after taxes in 2015, Patel put his salary on hold to keep the business afloat. He also turned to other extreme measures he doesn’t necessarily recommend. “I found myself scrambling to figure out how I could use loopholes in my personal credit cards, Venmo, and a bunch of moving money around to keep my landlord, my utilities, and my internet going,” Patel recalls. He watched as his once near-perfect credit score tanked to subprime levels and one of his credit card issuers sent him to collections: “It was rough.” He was also trying, mostly unsuccessfully, to scrape together extra money: Buying cheap watches and reselling them on eBay, crowdfunding an inflatable couch with friends, and trying to start a meme Instagram account. “Most of it was nothing more than a distraction,” he says.

Craft your image

As Patel began meeting with more potential clients in New York, he faced a conundrum. He wanted to distinguish himself from the big consulting companies that employ 100,000-plus people, but he didn’t want his age to become an issue. “In those early days, I was wearing the most ridiculous clothing,” Patel recounts, including “terrible” shirts with fish on them or Members Only jackets in “obscene” colors. On the other side of the table? People in suits. Patel’s attire was intentional, though. “If you speak their language but dress differently, there’s an inconsistency that clicks in their mind,” he says. “They think, ‘He’s saying the things I want to hear and need to hear, and he’s using my terminology, but he knows some other world that I don’t.'”

It’s hard telling large publicly traded companies that your little company can help them build cool technology. It’s especially hard if they think you’re just a kid. Kishan Patel CEO, Kunai

Since many of these meetings were with senior level people who were two or even three times his age, though, Patel needed creative ways to avoid small talk about his personal life that might reveal just how young he was. He’d made up stories previously, a decision he regretted because he didn’t want to lie or have to deflect questions about a wife or kids with jokes. So he went shopping. “I ordered a cheap ring off Amazon in the hopes that clients would notice it and wouldn’t go there,” Patel recalls. “It’s hard telling large publicly traded companies that your little company can help them build cool technology. It’s especially hard if they think you’re just a kid.”

Learn from your mistakes

While many of his peers are still working their way up the corporate ladder, Patel has been grappling with the responsibility of being a CEO for years. Three months after starting Kunai, Patel had to lay off a team of 30 — people he’d brought on board from his prior job — because “it just wasn’t working out,” he recalls. “It sucked. I felt like I let them and the team down,” even though he offered the workers two months’ notice and helped them land new jobs. Thanks in part to landing that $500,000 deal with the new client in 2016, Patel started paying himself a salary that year, and his credit score began bouncing back. Family members who’d previously asked, mostly in jest, if he needed to go look for a job started taking his venture more seriously, especially as he began working with companies they recognized. Building the business nearly five years in isn’t necessarily easier, but it’s “decisively less hard,” Patel says. “Once you have a few notches on your belt, it’s a lot easier to talk about the good work you’ve done and to focus on the results you’ve created for your clients.” Growing the company also brings other pressure: “It’s constantly on my mind that we’re responsible for 65 people and their source of income.”

Once you have a few notches on your belt, it’s a lot easier to talk about the good work you’ve done. Kishan Patel CEO, Kunai

What’s next


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, youre, convince, kunai, companies, clients, ceo, capital, patel, wasnt, hard, include, work, didnt, kishan, 27yearold, kid, banks, tech


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