I tested the new iPad Pro and it still can’t replace my laptop like Apple says it can

When Apple announced the new iPad Pro last month, it tried yet again to drive one point home: the iPad can replace your computer. The company even said that iPads are outselling laptops from all the top traditional computer makers. Does the new iPad Pro change that? I’ve been testing the iPad for the past several days, and while it’s a very nice tablet, it’s still not capable of replacing my regular laptop. In fact, most people should probably just buy a Mac, or Apple’s cheaper $329 regular iPad


When Apple announced the new iPad Pro last month, it tried yet again to drive one point home: the iPad can replace your computer. The company even said that iPads are outselling laptops from all the top traditional computer makers. Does the new iPad Pro change that? I’ve been testing the iPad for the past several days, and while it’s a very nice tablet, it’s still not capable of replacing my regular laptop. In fact, most people should probably just buy a Mac, or Apple’s cheaper $329 regular iPad
I tested the new iPad Pro and it still can’t replace my laptop like Apple says it can Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: todd haselton, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watching, tried, regular, work, replace, thats, ipad, apple, pro, theredoes, cant, laptop, traditional, tested, computer


I tested the new iPad Pro and it still can't replace my laptop like Apple says it can

When Apple announced the new iPad Pro last month, it tried yet again to drive one point home: the iPad can replace your computer. The company even said that iPads are outselling laptops from all the top traditional computer makers.

Here’s the problem: I’ve never seen the iPad as much more than a machine that’s good for watching movies on airplanes and getting light work done here and there.

Does the new iPad Pro change that? No, it doesn’t.

I’ve been testing the iPad for the past several days, and while it’s a very nice tablet, it’s still not capable of replacing my regular laptop. In fact, most people should probably just buy a Mac, or Apple’s cheaper $329 regular iPad.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: todd haselton, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watching, tried, regular, work, replace, thats, ipad, apple, pro, theredoes, cant, laptop, traditional, tested, computer


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General Electric gets crushed, again — here’s what three experts say may come next

Shares of General Electric just plunged to a fresh nine-year low, and one equity strategist says investors should take note of one particularly devilish level for the stock: $6.66. Shares of General Electric plunged on Monday to their lowest level since March 2009, extending the stock’s severe losses from the session prior. As GE briefly broke below $8 per share, experts told CNBC what investors might expect next. Here’s what four experts say investors should be watching. AboutTrading Nation is


Shares of General Electric just plunged to a fresh nine-year low, and one equity strategist says investors should take note of one particularly devilish level for the stock: $6.66. Shares of General Electric plunged on Monday to their lowest level since March 2009, extending the stock’s severe losses from the session prior. As GE briefly broke below $8 per share, experts told CNBC what investors might expect next. Here’s what four experts say investors should be watching. AboutTrading Nation is
General Electric gets crushed, again — here’s what three experts say may come next Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: rebecca ungarino, bryan r smith, afp, getty images, pictures ltd, corbis, michael nagle, bloomberg, simon dawson, kcna
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, traders, come, general, gets, stocks, plunged, heres, investors, level, say, nation, electric, crushed, experts, watching, session, market


General Electric gets crushed, again — here's what three experts say may come next

Shares of General Electric just plunged to a fresh nine-year low, and one equity strategist says investors should take note of one particularly devilish level for the stock: $6.66.

Shares of General Electric plunged on Monday to their lowest level since March 2009, extending the stock’s severe losses from the session prior. As GE briefly broke below $8 per share, experts told CNBC what investors might expect next.

Not the same as cheap “value” stocks, these are companies with less debt, stable businesses and some defensive characteristics in a tougher market or economy.

The market was down over 600 points at session lows. Here’s what four experts say investors should be watching. With Shannon Saccocia, CIO of Boston Private Wealth; Alex Dryden, J.P. Morgan; Shawn Matthews, Hondius Capital Management CEO; and Tobias Levkovich, Citi chief U.S. equity strategist.

Chad Morganlander of Washington Crossing Advisors is watching the dollar this week and expects it’ll begin to strengthen heading into the second half of the year.

About

Trading Nation is a multimedia financial news program that shows investors and traders how to use the news of the day to their advantage. This is where experts from across the financial world – including macro strategists, technical analysts, stock-pickers, and traders who specialize in options, currencies, and fixed income – come together to find the best ways to capitalize on recent developments in the market. Trading Nation: Where headlines become opportunities.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: rebecca ungarino, bryan r smith, afp, getty images, pictures ltd, corbis, michael nagle, bloomberg, simon dawson, kcna
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, traders, come, general, gets, stocks, plunged, heres, investors, level, say, nation, electric, crushed, experts, watching, session, market


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Trump doubles down on unsubstantiated claims of election ‘stealing’ in Florida

President Donald Trump on Saturday doubled down on his unsubstantiated claims that there was something nefarious going on in the Florida elections. His assertion came in response to the news on Saturday that the Florida Secretary of State ordered a machine recount of votes in the U.S. Senate race, as well as the governor’s race. Rick Scott and Democrat Bill Nelson are locked in a tight battle for Florida’s Senate seat. In the gubernatorial contest, Republican Ron DeSantis, a former congressman,


President Donald Trump on Saturday doubled down on his unsubstantiated claims that there was something nefarious going on in the Florida elections. His assertion came in response to the news on Saturday that the Florida Secretary of State ordered a machine recount of votes in the U.S. Senate race, as well as the governor’s race. Rick Scott and Democrat Bill Nelson are locked in a tight battle for Florida’s Senate seat. In the gubernatorial contest, Republican Ron DeSantis, a former congressman,
Trump doubles down on unsubstantiated claims of election ‘stealing’ in Florida Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-10  Authors: michelle fox, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubles, election, stealing, recount, unsubstantiated, votes, nelson, race, races, claims, florida, trump, tweeted, senate, watching


Trump doubles down on unsubstantiated claims of election 'stealing' in Florida

President Donald Trump on Saturday doubled down on his unsubstantiated claims that there was something nefarious going on in the Florida elections.

His assertion came in response to the news on Saturday that the Florida Secretary of State ordered a machine recount of votes in the U.S. Senate race, as well as the governor’s race. The results are due by 3 p.m. ET Thursday.

Trump tweeted, “Trying to STEAL two big elections. We are watching closely!”

Republican Gov. Rick Scott and Democrat Bill Nelson are locked in a tight battle for Florida’s Senate seat. Scott’s lead over Nelson narrowed to about 12,500 votes, or 0.15 percent, by Saturday afternoon.

In the gubernatorial contest, Republican Ron DeSantis, a former congressman, was last leading by 0.41 percentage points over Democratic Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum.

Earlier in the day, a motion was approved in Broward County to begin a recount in four Florida races, including the senate and governor races.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-10  Authors: michelle fox, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubles, election, stealing, recount, unsubstantiated, votes, nelson, race, races, claims, florida, trump, tweeted, senate, watching


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Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


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Red wave or blue wave? Here are the key election races Wall Street is watching as early indicators

Congressional races in Indiana, Kentucky, Florida and Virginia will be among the first Wall Street is watching to see whether the electorate’s response to President Donald Trump’s programs is strong enough to launch either a ‘red wave’ of support or a ‘blue wave’ backlash. Key early indicators of blue or red wave:Kentucky — polls start closing at 6 p.m. ETVirginia — polls close at 7 p.m. Polls in Kentucky close at 6 p.m. “Between Kentucky and the two or three Virginia races, if the Republicans a


Congressional races in Indiana, Kentucky, Florida and Virginia will be among the first Wall Street is watching to see whether the electorate’s response to President Donald Trump’s programs is strong enough to launch either a ‘red wave’ of support or a ‘blue wave’ backlash. Key early indicators of blue or red wave:Kentucky — polls start closing at 6 p.m. ETVirginia — polls close at 7 p.m. Polls in Kentucky close at 6 p.m. “Between Kentucky and the two or three Virginia races, if the Republicans a
Red wave or blue wave? Here are the key election races Wall Street is watching as early indicators Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: patti domm, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wave, early, seat, indicators, races, polls, key, house, democrats, rep, watching, kentucky, district, red, election, street, close, wall


Red wave or blue wave? Here are the key election races Wall Street is watching as early indicators

Congressional races in Indiana, Kentucky, Florida and Virginia will be among the first Wall Street is watching to see whether the electorate’s response to President Donald Trump’s programs is strong enough to launch either a ‘red wave’ of support or a ‘blue wave’ backlash.

The view of major firms like Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley is for a mixed outcome, with Democrats gaining control of the House and Republicans holding or even adding to their majority in the Senate. The market reaction to that scenario could be muted, but not so if there’s an upset, with either party staging a surprise victory and gaining total control of Congress.

Stocks could rally if there’s a GOP surge— or red wave — and some strategists see a sharp decline if Democrats over come the odds and take both the House and Senate.

Key early indicators of blue or red wave:

Kentucky — polls start closing at 6 p.m. ET

Indiana — polls start closing at 6 p.m. ET

Virginia — polls close at 7 p.m. ET

Florida — polls start closing at 7 p.m. ET

For that reason, investors are tuned in to the early races that can’t tell the whole story but could give clues to the broader outcome of the midterm elections. One of those races is being fought in the sixth district of Kentucky, where Amy McGrath, a retired Marine lieutenant colonel, is challenging GOP Rep. Andy Barr.

“It’s going to be one of the first races. Polls in Kentucky close at 6 p.m. If she wins, it’s very positive for Democrats. If he wins, it’s not hugely negative, but it’s not good for the Democrats. Kentucky is so Republican. This is in Lexington where the University of Kentucky is…There’s a liberal area of Lexington, but there’s the farm area outside. She was the first female marine fighter pilot,” said Tom Block, Fundstrat Washington policy strategist.

Block said he will also be focused on the Viriginia, where Rep. Scott Taylor is defending his seat in the second district against Elaine Luria, who like Taylor is a Navy veteran. In Virginia’s fifth district, Republican Denver Riggleman is running a close race against Democrat Leslie Cockburn for a seat vacated by Rep. Tom Garrett, who is retiring. A third Virginia House seat is up for grabs in the seventh district, where Rep. Dave Brat is running against former CIA operative Abigail Spanberger in a close race for a seat that has been in GOP hands for decades.

“Between Kentucky and the two or three Virginia races, if the Republicans are winning them all, it means they could hold the House,” said Block.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: patti domm, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wave, early, seat, indicators, races, polls, key, house, democrats, rep, watching, kentucky, district, red, election, street, close, wall


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California bus service shuttles seniors to dispensaries amid pot boom

That segment skyrocketed from 5 percent to 18 percent, as older Americans flocked to medical marijuana. Meanwhile, over 30 states and the District of Columbia have legalized pot for medical or recreational use. Sandy Sopher, a senior who uses cannabis for pain, told CNBC that social stigma is still a barrier to wider adoption. “The DEA has started to give approvals to Canadian companies to actually import their cannabis to academic institutions in United States for research,” Azer told CNBC. On


That segment skyrocketed from 5 percent to 18 percent, as older Americans flocked to medical marijuana. Meanwhile, over 30 states and the District of Columbia have legalized pot for medical or recreational use. Sandy Sopher, a senior who uses cannabis for pain, told CNBC that social stigma is still a barrier to wider adoption. “The DEA has started to give approvals to Canadian companies to actually import their cannabis to academic institutions in United States for research,” Azer told CNBC. On
California bus service shuttles seniors to dispensaries amid pot boom Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: erin barry, denis balibouse
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marijuana, watching, research, california, shuttles, bus, told, medical, boom, senior, cannabis, dispensaries, service, seniors, pot, uses, amid


California bus service shuttles seniors to dispensaries amid pot boom

And the popularity of marijuana among boomers and seniors is growing rapidly. According to recent research from Cowen and Company and the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, cannabis users age 55 and up nearly quadrupled in the last ten years. That segment skyrocketed from 5 percent to 18 percent, as older Americans flocked to medical marijuana.

Meanwhile, over 30 states and the District of Columbia have legalized pot for medical or recreational use.

Shari Horn, a former resident of the Laguna Woods Village who is now an advocate of medical marijuana and a member of the city council, uses topicals and tinctures derived from pot in order to ease arthritis pain.

“I’ve been using cannabis my whole life, you know, way back in the 60s,” Horn tells CNBC.

But for others who are less familiar with marijuana, the shuttle serves as an educational tool.

“The idea here really is to educate. These field trips are not just an opportunity to market to the senior community, but an opportunity to educate. And then they tell their friends, and it grows, it gets attention,” said Miller.

Still, not everyone is in favor of the idea. Sandy Sopher, a senior who uses cannabis for pain, told CNBC that social stigma is still a barrier to wider adoption.

“I had a neighbor and she doesn’t even want to talk to me anymore because she found out I smoke cannabis,” said Sopher.

Earlier this month, Canada legalized marijuana for recreational use, and analysts are closely watching the reaction to see how that could impact the United States.

Cowen Senior analyst Vivien Azer told CNBC that Canada’s experience could provide insight into how pot gets adopted by a society at large, and whether that erodes the stigma of its use.

As many people claim the medical benefits of the drug, there has been little scientific research done because of its legal status.

“The DEA has started to give approvals to Canadian companies to actually import their cannabis to academic institutions in United States for research,” Azer told CNBC.

While she doesn’t expect federal legalization anytime soon in the U.S., “we expect things to continue on a state by state basis in the near term.”

She added: “The midterms will be critical in terms of watching for that evolution.”

On the Money airs on CNBC Saturdays at 5:30 am ET, or check listings for air times in local markets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: erin barry, denis balibouse
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marijuana, watching, research, california, shuttles, bus, told, medical, boom, senior, cannabis, dispensaries, service, seniors, pot, uses, amid


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Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller: I don’t expect a sharp turn in the housing market

The housing market may be slowing down, but Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller told CNBC he isn’t fearful that a big downturn is ahead. Now, “you can call it a bubble” because home prices have been rising since 2012, “but it’s not the same. “I don’t expect a sharp turn in the housing market at this point,” added Shiller, the co-founder of the Case-Shiller Index, which tracks home prices around the nation. The impact of rising mortgage rates is already being felt on the housing market. The latest


The housing market may be slowing down, but Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller told CNBC he isn’t fearful that a big downturn is ahead. Now, “you can call it a bubble” because home prices have been rising since 2012, “but it’s not the same. “I don’t expect a sharp turn in the housing market at this point,” added Shiller, the co-founder of the Case-Shiller Index, which tracks home prices around the nation. The impact of rising mortgage rates is already being felt on the housing market. The latest
Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller: I don’t expect a sharp turn in the housing market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: michelle fox, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prize, robert, turn, shiller, slowing, point, housing, nobel, prices, winner, expect, rates, rate, sharp, price, market, rising, watching


Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller: I don't expect a sharp turn in the housing market

The housing market may be slowing down, but Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller told CNBC he isn’t fearful that a big downturn is ahead.

During the financial crisis, the fluctuation of home prices was the sharpest anyone had ever seen — and the word “housing bubble” entered the vocabulary, the Yale economist said.

Now, “you can call it a bubble” because home prices have been rising since 2012, “but it’s not the same. It’s more placid,” he said on “Power Lunch.”

“I don’t expect a sharp turn in the housing market at this point,” added Shiller, the co-founder of the Case-Shiller Index, which tracks home prices around the nation.

The impact of rising mortgage rates is already being felt on the housing market.

Rates started climbing in September and are now approximately a full percentage point higher than they were a year ago. The 30-year fixed mortgage rate is now around 5 percent.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Census reported that sales of newly built homes dropped 5.5 percent in September compared with August and were 13 percent lower compared with a year ago. The slowdown is worse than had been predicted, even with higher rates factored in.

The reading prompted Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group, to write in a note to clients: “Anyone watching home builder stocks or watching the data all year should not be surprised but it’s clear this important area of the US economy, highly sensitive to price and rates, has obviously slowed sharply.”

The latest S&P Corelogic Case-Shiller Home Price Indices, released last month, showed a slowing of the rate of price increases for July.

— CNBC’s Diana Olick contributed to this report.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: michelle fox, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prize, robert, turn, shiller, slowing, point, housing, nobel, prices, winner, expect, rates, rate, sharp, price, market, rising, watching


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Melissa McCarthy wakes up every morning at 4:30—here’s the first thing she does

Melissa McCarthy, like many other highly successful people, starts her day early. The Oscar-nominated actress tells The New York Times Magazine that she’s up at 4:30 every morning. Instead, she eases into the day by making coffee and watching reruns. “I treat myself right,” says McCarthy, who prefers old episodes of “Knight Rider” or “The Incredible Hulk” starring Lou Ferrigno. I take a bath every morning and use the time to decompress and relax.”


Melissa McCarthy, like many other highly successful people, starts her day early. The Oscar-nominated actress tells The New York Times Magazine that she’s up at 4:30 every morning. Instead, she eases into the day by making coffee and watching reruns. “I treat myself right,” says McCarthy, who prefers old episodes of “Knight Rider” or “The Incredible Hulk” starring Lou Ferrigno. I take a bath every morning and use the time to decompress and relax.”
Melissa McCarthy wakes up every morning at 4:30—here’s the first thing she does Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: kathleen elkins, gregg deguire, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, day, mccarthy, successful, 430heres, does, coffee, watching, bath, wakes, morning, york, thing, actress, melissa, hulk


Melissa McCarthy wakes up every morning at 4:30—here's the first thing she does

Melissa McCarthy, like many other highly successful people, starts her day early. The Oscar-nominated actress tells The New York Times Magazine that she’s up at 4:30 every morning.

But the actress and producer doesn’t immediately begin checking email, exercising or even reading the news. Instead, she eases into the day by making coffee and watching reruns.

“I treat myself right,” says McCarthy, who prefers old episodes of “Knight Rider” or “The Incredible Hulk” starring Lou Ferrigno. The Hulk is “great,” she adds. “The music. There’s. So. Much. Score.”

She’s not the only successful person to make time for herself in the morning: President of Ariel Investments Mellody Hobson, who rises at 4 a.m., says she can’t start her day without taking a bath: “My bath time is essential personal time. I take a bath every morning and use the time to decompress and relax.”

Amazon CEO and self-made billionaire Jeff Bezos also carves out time for himself. “I like to putter in the mornings,” he said at the Economic Club of Washington, D.C., in September 2018. “I like to read the newspaper, I like to have coffee, I like to have breakfast with my kids before they go to school. My puttering time is very important to me.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: kathleen elkins, gregg deguire, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, day, mccarthy, successful, 430heres, does, coffee, watching, bath, wakes, morning, york, thing, actress, melissa, hulk


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With 10-year yields above 3.1%, here’s the next level technician Louise Yamada is watching

The breakout in Treasury yields confirms a trend veteran technician Louise Yamada has seen in the cards for some time. “We have made a shift from the 36-year falling interest rate cycle into a new emerging rising interest rate cycle which may take us a decade or two to complete,” Yamada, managing director of Louise Yamada Technical Research Advisors, said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Futures Now.” “The move to 3 percent really completed the reversal from the falling rate cycle to the rising rate cycle. Bo


The breakout in Treasury yields confirms a trend veteran technician Louise Yamada has seen in the cards for some time. “We have made a shift from the 36-year falling interest rate cycle into a new emerging rising interest rate cycle which may take us a decade or two to complete,” Yamada, managing director of Louise Yamada Technical Research Advisors, said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Futures Now.” “The move to 3 percent really completed the reversal from the falling rate cycle to the rising rate cycle. Bo
With 10-year yields above 3.1%, here’s the next level technician Louise Yamada is watching Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-17  Authors: keris lahiff, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images, susana vera, drew angerer, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, 31, bond, technician, heres, treasury, 10year, interest, seen, watching, cycle, level, rates, yamada, yields, louise, rise


With 10-year yields above 3.1%, here's the next level technician Louise Yamada is watching

This is the next level to watch in bond markets: technician Louise Yamada 2 Hours Ago | 00:54

After a surge in yields last week, rates now sit comfortably at highs not seen in seven years.

The breakout in Treasury yields confirms a trend veteran technician Louise Yamada has seen in the cards for some time.

“We have made a shift from the 36-year falling interest rate cycle into a new emerging rising interest rate cycle which may take us a decade or two to complete,” Yamada, managing director of Louise Yamada Technical Research Advisors, said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Futures Now.” “We’ve made the turn.”

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note surged from around 1.8 percent to above 2 percent in November 2016 following the U.S. presidential election. The spike in yields broke through a 1981 downtrend that Yamada had been tracking.

“The move to 3 percent really completed the reversal from the falling rate cycle to the rising rate cycle. The 1981 downtrend has been penetrated and now you’ve gone through that 3 percent critical level,” she said.

Yields broke through 3 percent earlier in the year as tightening monetary conditions and Treasury oversupply gave rise to a bond sell-off and higher rates. Bond yields rise as prices fall.

Now, Yamada sees a grind higher in interest rates that could take it to levels not seen since April 2011.

“Rates will move slowly, whether or not we get a little bit of a consolidation here,” said Yamada. Bond yields could see “some vacillation here above and around 3 percent, possibly moving a little higher with the December interest rate rise. I don’t see a rush toward 3.5 percent but that’s our next target.”

While the bond market rout and yield spike triggered a sell-off last week, Yamada does not expect any real hit to the economy until much later.

“You don’t have an effect on the economic picture from rates themselves until it gets up near 5 percent and I can’t see that happening in the near future,” she said. “That’s not to say the market can’t have an interim pullback which I think we may still be in the middle of.”

Yields have not risen above 5 percent since July 2007.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-17  Authors: keris lahiff, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images, susana vera, drew angerer, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, 31, bond, technician, heres, treasury, 10year, interest, seen, watching, cycle, level, rates, yamada, yields, louise, rise


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China Treasury holdings at their lowest in 14 months

China trimmed its holdings of U.S. Treasurys in August by about $6 billion, to the lowest level since June 2017. China’s holdings of Treasury bills, notes and bonds fell to $1.165 trillion, from $1.171 trillion in July, according to U.S. Treasury data. It is the third month of decline, and well below the recent high of $1.2 trillion a year earlier. “The fact you’re seeing a slow downward drift is not surprising,” said Jon Hill, U.S. rates strategist at BMO. He said Chinese holdings are now the l


China trimmed its holdings of U.S. Treasurys in August by about $6 billion, to the lowest level since June 2017. China’s holdings of Treasury bills, notes and bonds fell to $1.165 trillion, from $1.171 trillion in July, according to U.S. Treasury data. It is the third month of decline, and well below the recent high of $1.2 trillion a year earlier. “The fact you’re seeing a slow downward drift is not surprising,” said Jon Hill, U.S. rates strategist at BMO. He said Chinese holdings are now the l
China Treasury holdings at their lowest in 14 months Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: patti domm, saul loeb, contributor, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 14, holdings, months, treasurys, trillion, youre, trimmed, treasury, volatility, china, lowest, watching


China Treasury holdings at their lowest in 14 months

China trimmed its holdings of U.S. Treasurys in August by about $6 billion, to the lowest level since June 2017.

China’s holdings of Treasury bills, notes and bonds fell to $1.165 trillion, from $1.171 trillion in July, according to U.S. Treasury data. It is the third month of decline, and well below the recent high of $1.2 trillion a year earlier.

Bond traders have been watching to see if China is intentionally reducing its holdings of U.S. Treasurys because of friction over the trade spat with the U.S., but market pros do not believe the reduction is meaningful. It also came at a time of currency volatility this past summer.

“The fact you’re seeing a slow downward drift is not surprising,” said Jon Hill, U.S. rates strategist at BMO. He said Chinese holdings are now the lowest since June 2017, when they were at $1.147 trillion. “


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: patti domm, saul loeb, contributor, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 14, holdings, months, treasurys, trillion, youre, trimmed, treasury, volatility, china, lowest, watching


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