Big bank earnings are about to kick off—here are 3 ways to play the deluge

“This persistent low-rate environment is going to favor the bigger banks,” said Chris Hempstead, top ETF consultant and former head of ETF sales at Deutsche Bank. “The bigger banks have a much deeper capital market structure that they can leverage for revenue that the regional banks don’t have.” The XLF has outperformed the SPDR S&P Regional Banking ETF, an equal-weighted fund that trades under the ticker KRE, by about 5% year to date. “IAT — if you want to play PNC and US [Bancorp], that’s the


“This persistent low-rate environment is going to favor the bigger banks,” said Chris Hempstead, top ETF consultant and former head of ETF sales at Deutsche Bank. “The bigger banks have a much deeper capital market structure that they can leverage for revenue that the regional banks don’t have.” The XLF has outperformed the SPDR S&P Regional Banking ETF, an equal-weighted fund that trades under the ticker KRE, by about 5% year to date. “IAT — if you want to play PNC and US [Bancorp], that’s the
Big bank earnings are about to kick off—here are 3 ways to play the deluge Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, banks, big, kre, regional, going, iat, ways, kick, play, xlf, earnings, bank, offhere, deluge, fund, etf, rosenbluth


Big bank earnings are about to kick off—here are 3 ways to play the deluge

Can you bank on the banks?

It’s a fair question, considering the uncertainty surrounding financial stocks — as global slowdown concerns and expectations for more interest rate cuts grip the market — but experts haven’t lost hope just yet.

With big banks Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan, Wells Fargo and others marking the unofficial start of earnings season Tuesday with their reports, there are still buying opportunities in the exchange-traded fund space that investors can use to capitalize on the moves, two market watchers said Monday on CNBC’s “ETF Edge.”

“This persistent low-rate environment is going to favor the bigger banks,” said Chris Hempstead, top ETF consultant and former head of ETF sales at Deutsche Bank. “The bigger banks have a much deeper capital market structure that they can leverage for revenue that the regional banks don’t have.”

That means an ETF such as the Financial Select Sector SPDR Fund, ticker XLF, could be in a prime position to push higher this week, Todd Rosenbluth, senior director of ETF and mutual fund research at CFRA, said in the same interview.

The XLF has outperformed the SPDR S&P Regional Banking ETF, an equal-weighted fund that trades under the ticker KRE, by about 5% year to date.

“[With] the larger companies, which tend to be in more of the market-cap-weighted products like XLF … or the iShares Regional Bank ETF [ticker IAT], you’re going to have more diversification of the revenue stream,” Rosenbluth said.

“It’s not as dependent upon loans and loan growth, but broader areas of revenue that you’re going to have: asset management, wealth management, trading and capital markets,” he said. “That diversification is going to help in a lower-for-longer interest rate environment.”

That leaves questions around the fate of the regional banks, but as members of that subgroup grow in size — with five bank stocks now accounting for roughly half of IAT’s market-cap-weighted portfolio — investors’ choices are expanding as well.

“It highlights how important it is to look inside the portfolio,” Rosenbluth said, noting that if investors compare IAT with KRE, they’ll find a “big difference in the number of holdings, big difference in the size of those holdings and [in] the position — so, roughly 2 or 3% of the assets in those larger regional banks [in KRE] as opposed to 8 or 9%.”

In short, “You’ve really got to look under the hood with ETFs,” Rosenbluth said.

Hempstead agreed.

“We’re always saying, ‘Do your homework, do your research,'” Hempstead said. “IAT — if you want to play PNC and US [Bancorp], that’s the better ETF for you. Most people gravitate to KRE. There’s nothing wrong with KRE, it’s equal-weighted, but people look at it because it has higher volume. But tradability? IAT is right there with it.”

XLF closed slightly higher on Monday. IAT and KRE each sank by less than a tenth of 1%.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, banks, big, kre, regional, going, iat, ways, kick, play, xlf, earnings, bank, offhere, deluge, fund, etf, rosenbluth


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3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th


If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th
3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: alizah salario, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, allowance, golden, save, child, financial, ways, parents, help, money, kids


3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. Consider getting them a savings jar or even opening them a bank account. Two in three parents give their child an allowance. They dole out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and in many cases the money is linked to the completion of household chores. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” Nearly all, or 92%, of parents say it’s important for their child to learn how to manage money, and helping your kids become savers early on is a great way to make that happen. By saving a third of a $30 weekly allowance, your child would be able to sock away over $500 every year. “It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money,” says Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education. “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. They’re the front line of defense.”

Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster Money

Here are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make the most of it over time.

1. Set kids up to be savers

Encouraging your kid to save even part of their allowance can help them establish healthy financial habits. Start by conditioning your kids to automatically save a certain amount each month because “then they don’t miss it,” says Golden. With younger children, Golden suggests using a savings jar so they can see the money building up. Then, once your child starts asking about how banks work, consider opening a savings account. Pay attention to their cues and take advantage of their interest, he says. “Once you’ve started with the habit of saving when you’re young, you start seeing what saving [money] actually does for you,” Clark D. Randall, a certified financial planner and the founder of Financial Enlightenment in Dallas, Texas, told Grow earlier this year. Parents are usually the No. 1 money influence on their kids. In a recent survey of “supersavers,” or people who put an impressive share of their income away for retirement, 80% gave credit to their parents for positively influencing their savings habits.

It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money. Paul Golden Managing director, National Endowment for Financial Education

2. Teach them to budget

Instead of saving, kids, like many adults, put money toward the things they want in the moment. In the AICPA’s survey, parents reported that kids spend most of their allowance money on outings with friends (47%) followed by digital devices and downloads (37%) and toys (33%). Learning to budget, though, will allow your child to think about all what they want to prioritize in the coming week, month, or year. If there’s something expensive your child really wants, you can drive home the connection between spending and earning by explaining how budgeting can help them meet their goals. Let’s say they want a $200 tablet but they end up blowing their allowance each week going out with friends. By setting aside, say, $20 of their $30 allowance, they can count on getting what they want in only 10 weeks. If they want it sooner, they can sock away the full $30 each week. And if they continue to splurge instead of save, don’t get mad. “It’s OK to make mistakes,” says Golden. “That starts to condition us as adults. There’s not some fairy that will come down and get you through till the next paycheck” when you’re an adult, either. So the best time for kids to trip up is when parents are there to guide and counsel them, and help them figure out what to do better going forward.

3. Help them differentiate between wants and needs

By helping them learn to budget for short- and long-term goals at a young age, you’re setting your kids up to tell the difference between wants and needs, explains Golden. Older kids may have to cover bills for the first time. “Once you have teens, they have to start prioritizing things they’ve never done [before], like putting gas in the car or paying for auto insurance,” he says. Condition kids to put money aside by encouraging them to save and budget starting at a young age, and they’ll be prepared to put their needs first. That, in turn, can help them avoid certain pitfalls of overspending, like winding up without money for gas.

Bonus advice: How much to give and how to set an example


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: alizah salario, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, allowance, golden, save, child, financial, ways, parents, help, money, kids


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62% of Americans say they’re behind on saving for retirement—here are 4 ways to catch up

If you’re feeling behind when it comes to saving for retirement, you’re not alone: Most Americans, 62%, say they need to catch up. When asked why they’ve fallen behind on their retirement savings, the responses varied by generation: The No. No matter where you’re starting, there are ways to increase your savings without without feeling cash strapped or making any drastic lifestyle changes. Take advantage of your company matchIf your company offers a 401(k) plan, they may also offer a 401(k) matc


If you’re feeling behind when it comes to saving for retirement, you’re not alone: Most Americans, 62%, say they need to catch up. When asked why they’ve fallen behind on their retirement savings, the responses varied by generation: The No. No matter where you’re starting, there are ways to increase your savings without without feeling cash strapped or making any drastic lifestyle changes. Take advantage of your company matchIf your company offers a 401(k) plan, they may also offer a 401(k) matc
62% of Americans say they’re behind on saving for retirement—here are 4 ways to catch up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, theyre, saving, savings, catch, 401k, money, retirementhere, work, ways, youll, start, retirement, increase, company, americans, say


62% of Americans say they're behind on saving for retirement—here are 4 ways to catch up

If you’re feeling behind when it comes to saving for retirement, you’re not alone: Most Americans, 62%, say they need to catch up. That’s according to a 2019 TD Ameritrade report, which surveyed 1,015 U.S. adults ages 23 and older with at least $10,000 in investable assets. When asked why they’ve fallen behind on their retirement savings, the responses varied by generation: The No. 1 response for millennials (ages 23-38) was housing costs (37% cited it), while the top response for Gen X (ages 39-54) was inadequate income (31% cited it).

No matter where you’re starting, there are ways to increase your savings without without feeling cash strapped or making any drastic lifestyle changes. Here are four effective strategies.

1. Put your money to work today

The sooner you start saving and investing, the less you’ll have to save each month to reach your goals, thanks to the power of compound interest. If you start at 23, for instance, you only have to save about $14 a day, or $420 a month, to be a millionaire by 67. That’s assuming a 6% average annual investment return. If you start at 35, on the other hand, you’d have to set aside $30 a day, or $900 a month, to reach seven figures by 67. One of the simplest ways to get started is to fund your employer-sponsored 401(k) plan. If your company doesn’t offer one, or you’re self-employed, consider other options, like contributing to a traditional or Roth IRA.

2. Automate your contributions

If you automate your retirement savings — meaning, you have a portion of your paycheck sent directly to a retirement account, such as a 401(k), Roth IRA or traditional IRA — you’ll never even see the money you’re setting aside and will learn to live without it. Ideally, you’ll want to work your way up to saving at least 10% of your pretax income, but if you’re only comfortable with putting away 1%, start there and gradually increase your contributions. Once you’ve set up automatic transfers, check to see if you can also set up “auto-increase,” which allows you to choose the percentage you want to increase your contributions by and how often. This way, you won’t forget to up your savings or talk yourself out of setting aside a larger chunk when the time comes. If you can’t find the feature online, call your retirement plan provider to find out if it’s possible.

3. Take advantage of your company match

If your company offers a 401(k) plan, they may also offer a 401(k) match, which is essentially “free” money. But it’s up to you to take advantage of it. These programs are pretty straightforward. Typically, your employer will match whatever contribution you put toward your 401(k) up to a certain amount. If you choose to put 5% of your salary directly into your account and your employer matches dollar-for-dollar, then it will put that same amount in as well, in effect doubling your contribution. And whatever money your company contributes doesn’t count towards the IRS contribution limit. The median matching level is 4% among Vanguard 401(k) plans. Note that depending on where you work, the match sometimes comes with stipulations. You may have to work at the company for a certain amount of time before it goes into effect, for instance.

4. Increase your income


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, theyre, saving, savings, catch, 401k, money, retirementhere, work, ways, youll, start, retirement, increase, company, americans, say


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4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up

“Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. How to save money on housingHere are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. You can use your negotiation skills to save


“Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. How to save money on housingHere are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. You can use your negotiation skills to save
4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, costs, negotiate, youre, utility, going, rent, upgrades, ways, consider, money, save, shouldnt


4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up

Housing can be the single biggest monthly expense in your budget. Your rent or mortgage payment can eat up a significant portion of your income, and it can be particularly difficult to figure out how to spend less on where you live. In some places, especially cities with high rents and astronomical home prices, keeping housing costs manageable is incredibly difficult. Ideally, experts say you should be spending only around a quarter of your income on housing-related costs. “Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. “That’s superhard, especially for young people in an expensive real estate market,” Winston says.

How to save money on housing

Here are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. 1. Consider refinancing The current economic environment is friendly to homeowners looking to refinance, so it may be a good idea to consider your options. Mortgage rates are falling, which opens up an opportunity for homeowners to refinance and potentially lower your payments. Rates are 1.25 percentage points lower than they were in October 2018, which could save those with a $300,000 mortgage as much as $2,700 per year.

2. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. Salvador Nobre Veiga, a 32-year-old living in Pennsylvania, told Grow earlier this year that he was able to reduce his annual utility costs by 66% by making upgrades to his house. For Nobre Veiga, investing in additional insulation, energy-efficient light bulbs, and a smart thermostat saved him hundreds of dollars per year. These are upgrades you can consider, too, whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Utility bills cost the average household in the U.S. around $2,000 per year, so a few small upgrades can potentially save you hundreds of dollars annually. 3. Negotiate You can negotiate the price of almost anything. The trouble is, many people find it uncomfortable, so they just accept the terms they’re offered. But you shouldn’t be afraid to ask for a better deal. You can use your negotiation skills to save money in other areas, too. Homeowners can negotiate with their insurance companies or contractors to save money on certain bills. Renters may be able to negotiate reductions in rent in exchange for making upgrades or repairs to properties, or in exchange for signing longer leases. It never hurts to ask — just remember to be nice.

4. Consider moving If you run out of options and can’t find a way for your current living situation to make financial sense, it may be in your best interest to move. For renters, this will be easier — though you still may have to pay a fee if you break your lease. But even that might save you money if you can find a significantly less expensive place to rent or share. Selling a house is a much bigger project, and it can take both an emotional and a financial toll. You can always look at other options, such as selling equity in your home to help you get by, before deciding to put your home on the market. Even if you’re open to moving, make sure you shift to a place you can better afford so you won’t end up finding yourself in a worse, or equally difficult, situation. And you probably shouldn’t hold out hope that your rent or home prices will decrease in the near future.

Housing costs keep going up


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, costs, negotiate, youre, utility, going, rent, upgrades, ways, consider, money, save, shouldnt


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Worried about a recession? Here are 4 ways to protect your finances

But Tiffany Aliche, personal finance expert and founder of The Budgetnista says there are several simple steps you can take to protect your finances. “We’ve all heard the whispers: recession, recession, recession,” Aliche tells CNBC Make It. Here are four steps Aliche recommends taking today so that if a recession hits, you won’t be scrambling. “You should be having at least three months,” Aliche says. She was a schoolteacher at a non-profit school when the last recession hit, making about $50,0


But Tiffany Aliche, personal finance expert and founder of The Budgetnista says there are several simple steps you can take to protect your finances. “We’ve all heard the whispers: recession, recession, recession,” Aliche tells CNBC Make It. Here are four steps Aliche recommends taking today so that if a recession hits, you won’t be scrambling. “You should be having at least three months,” Aliche says. She was a schoolteacher at a non-profit school when the last recession hit, making about $50,0
Worried about a recession? Here are 4 ways to protect your finances Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finances, aliche, need, financial, youre, months, worried, ways, resume, steps, savings, job, recession, protect


Worried about a recession? Here are 4 ways to protect your finances

It seems like every time you turn on the TV or open a newspaper these days, financial experts are talking about the possibility of a recession. But Tiffany Aliche, personal finance expert and founder of The Budgetnista says there are several simple steps you can take to protect your finances. “We’ve all heard the whispers: recession, recession, recession,” Aliche tells CNBC Make It. But it’s important to keep in mind that even if a recession comes, it’s not going to be like the last, “super terrible” recession that Americans experienced starting in 2008, she says. That’s because the 2018 financial crisis was linked to the housing market. Thousands of Americans, including Aliche, lost their homes because the housing bubble burst. “So it wasn’t just a financial downturn. People were literally losing their homes. That’s what made it extra terrible,” Aliche says. It’s also important to keep in mind that fluctuations in the market are normal. Market “ebbs and flows are natural,” Aliche says. But that also means you should always be prepared, she adds. Here are four steps Aliche recommends taking today so that if a recession hits, you won’t be scrambling.

1. Build up your savings

One way to prepare for any financial setback is to have an emergency savings account. “You should be having at least three months,” Aliche says. However, saving up only three months of living expenses is for someone who knows they can get a job quickly, she adds. For example, a nurse. Nurses are in high demand and it’s a job that you can find pretty much everywhere. But if you have a specialized job, such as an aerospace engineer or a psychobiologist, it may be more difficult and take longer to find another position if you’re laid off. In that case, you should aim to put away more than three months’ worth of emergency savings, likely closer to a year or more.

2. Live frugally

Not only should you have robust emergency savings, but you should live below your means. “You should not be living at capacity because you want to be able to pivot,” Aliche says. She was a schoolteacher at a non-profit school when the last recession hit, making about $50,000 a year. But when she lost her job and had to take a pay cut, she didn’t have to dramatically cut back her expenses. Because she was only spending about $30,000 a year, it was easier for her to find a collection of jobs that covered her living expenses. To get your finances in good shape before a downturn hits, Aliche recommends putting together a monthly budget so you can identify where you’re spending money and where it may be possible to trim. That might mean packing your lunch more often or opting for a cheaper cable package — or it may require some bigger changes, such as finding a cheaper apartment. More from Invest in You:

How to invest and pay off your student loans, according to the Broke Millennial

Here’s what to do if you’re ‘bad with money,’ says author of ‘I Will Teach You to be Rich’

Wealth manager to millennials: These 3 steps will help you get rich

3. Polish your resume

If a recession does occur, you may need to worry about unemployment. When economic growth slows, companies typically generate less revenue and may need to lay off employees. That could mean you need to look for a job with little to no notice, so it pays to have your resume up to date, Aliche says. That may also include putting together a portfolio and updating your social media accounts. Does your LinkedIn photo and profile look professional? If not, fix it now so you don’t have to delay if you need to start job hunting. “You want to make sure that when someone finds you online that they’re already impressed with you,” Aliche says. “I always say this: Social media is your resume before the resume. Are you presenting yourself in a positive light?”

4. Don’t stress


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finances, aliche, need, financial, youre, months, worried, ways, resume, steps, savings, job, recession, protect


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Slack, Spotify and Michael Lewis will join nearly every big investor in Silicon Valley to talk about direct listings vs IPOs

One of the main ways bankers currently make money is through the so-called greenshoe, which allows them to buy shares at the IPO price after the initial pop. Sequoia Capital’s Mike Moritz is participating in a session with Spotify CFO Barry McCarthy. Sequoia is a large investor in Airbnb, one of the largest remaining tech companies that has not gone public. It’s expected to pursue a direct listing next year, according to Bloomberg. From the buy side — the investors who buy public stocks — the ev


One of the main ways bankers currently make money is through the so-called greenshoe, which allows them to buy shares at the IPO price after the initial pop. Sequoia Capital’s Mike Moritz is participating in a session with Spotify CFO Barry McCarthy. Sequoia is a large investor in Airbnb, one of the largest remaining tech companies that has not gone public. It’s expected to pursue a direct listing next year, according to Bloomberg. From the buy side — the investors who buy public stocks — the ev
Slack, Spotify and Michael Lewis will join nearly every big investor in Silicon Valley to talk about direct listings vs IPOs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: ari levy scott wapner, ari levy, scott wapner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spotify, talk, companies, ways, nearly, venture, valley, listings, slack, lewis, event, according, michael, ipo, listing, public, silicon, direct, buy


Slack, Spotify and Michael Lewis will join nearly every big investor in Silicon Valley to talk about direct listings vs IPOs

Bill Gurley, the venture capitalist from Benchmark and former Uber board member, is leading a meeting in San Francisco on Tuesday to explore alternatives to the traditional IPO process, which the investor said recently has put Silicon Valley “on the bad end of a bad joke for about four decades now.”

The invitation-only event — Direct Listings: A Simpler and Superior Alternative to the IPO — is being held at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco and will include presentations from public CEOs and CFOs who have gone through IPOs in recent years, as well top executives from Slack and Spotify, which bypassed underwriters in favor of the direct listing path, according to the agenda obtained by CNBC.

The direct listing approach will be a primary topic of discussion, as companies look for ways to allow employees and early investors to sell shares without waiting for the six-month lock-up period to expire and to avoid paying such hefty fees to underwriters. One of the main ways bankers currently make money is through the so-called greenshoe, which allows them to buy shares at the IPO price after the initial pop.

Sequoia Capital’s Mike Moritz is participating in a session with Spotify CFO Barry McCarthy. Sequoia is a large investor in Airbnb, one of the largest remaining tech companies that has not gone public. It’s expected to pursue a direct listing next year, according to Bloomberg.

CEOs speaking include Zillow’s Rich Barton, who co-founded the real estate site in 2004 and just took the helm this year, Stitch Fix’s Katrina Lake and MuleSoft’s Greg Schott, whose company was bought by Salesforce last year.

From the buy side — the investors who buy public stocks — the event will feature a discussion between money managers at Wellington, Holocene and Altimeter.

About 100 private companies are expected to attend, along with partners from venture firms Andreessen Horowitz, Menlo Ventures, Bessemer Venture Partners, GGV and others, according to people familiar with the event who asked not to be named because the guest list is private. Stacey Cunningham, president of NYSE Euronext will be interviewed on stage, and Jay Ritter, an IPO expert and business professor at the University of Florida, will present four decades worth of data.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: ari levy scott wapner, ari levy, scott wapner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spotify, talk, companies, ways, nearly, venture, valley, listings, slack, lewis, event, according, michael, ipo, listing, public, silicon, direct, buy


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Billionaire Ray Dalio says this outlook will help you achieve your dreams

But hedge-fund billionaire Ray Dalio believes that you need both qualities to be successful. In fact, Dalio says all dreamers need a healthy dose of realism to help them achieve their dreams. “Being hyperrealistic will help you choose your dreams wisely and then achieve them,” Dalio wrote in a Facebook post on Thursday. “Understanding, accepting and working with reality is both practical and beautiful,” Dalio writes on Facebook. “Don’t get me wrong: I believe in making dreams happen,” the billio


But hedge-fund billionaire Ray Dalio believes that you need both qualities to be successful. In fact, Dalio says all dreamers need a healthy dose of realism to help them achieve their dreams. “Being hyperrealistic will help you choose your dreams wisely and then achieve them,” Dalio wrote in a Facebook post on Thursday. “Understanding, accepting and working with reality is both practical and beautiful,” Dalio writes on Facebook. “Don’t get me wrong: I believe in making dreams happen,” the billio
Billionaire Ray Dalio says this outlook will help you achieve your dreams Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, outlook, dreams, ray, dreamers, help, achieve, writes, ways, billionaire, impractical, facebook, dalio, successful, working


Billionaire Ray Dalio says this outlook will help you achieve your dreams

It’s often argued that some people are dreamers while others are realists. But hedge-fund billionaire Ray Dalio believes that you need both qualities to be successful. In fact, Dalio says all dreamers need a healthy dose of realism to help them achieve their dreams. “Being hyperrealistic will help you choose your dreams wisely and then achieve them,” Dalio wrote in a Facebook post on Thursday. Dalio is the founder of the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, which manages roughly $160 billion in assets. In that social-media post, Dalio touts the importance of balancing realism and idealism by pursuing your dreams while also being as realistic as possible about the best ways to achieve them. “Understanding, accepting and working with reality is both practical and beautiful,” Dalio writes on Facebook. “I have become so much of a hyperrealist that I’ve learned to appreciate the beauty of all realities, even harsh ones, and have come to despise impractical idealism.”

By “impractical idealism,” Dalio is referring to the way of thinking that’s mostly associated with dreamers who either never follow through and pursue their lofty ideals, or who do so in impractical, or unrealistic, ways. (For instance, an impractical idealist could be more likely to spend more time daydreaming about success than actually working to achieve their goals.) But Dalio isn’t against dreaming at all, he asserts. “Don’t get me wrong: I believe in making dreams happen,” the billionaire writes on Facebook. “To me, there’s nothing better in life than doing that. The pursuit of dreams is what gives life its flavor. “My point is that people who create great things aren’t idle dreamers: They are totally grounded in reality,” he says. A 2018 Psychology Today article notes that dreaming about success is more effective when a person also imagines the realistic obstacles they’ll face on the path to their dreams. “Successful goal pursuits require figuring out which wishes are desirable and feasible and which ones to let go,” Shahram Heshmat, an associate professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Springfield, writes in the article.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, outlook, dreams, ray, dreamers, help, achieve, writes, ways, billionaire, impractical, facebook, dalio, successful, working


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3 simple ways to maintain good credit

Sometimes, the best strategies for maintaining good credit are the most straightforward ones. If used responsibly, a credit card can help you build up your credit history and finance larger purchases over time. Be careful about opening new cardsHaving multiple credit cards open in order to increase your available credit might seem like a good idea, but maintaining lots of lines of credit comes with risks. Graphic preview FICO breakdown Factors that impact your credit score Social chart title kie


Sometimes, the best strategies for maintaining good credit are the most straightforward ones. If used responsibly, a credit card can help you build up your credit history and finance larger purchases over time. Be careful about opening new cardsHaving multiple credit cards open in order to increase your available credit might seem like a good idea, but maintaining lots of lines of credit comes with risks. Graphic preview FICO breakdown Factors that impact your credit score Social chart title kie
3 simple ways to maintain good credit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: ivana pino, aditi shrikant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, card, rewards, good, score, cashback, multiple, credit, ways, spending, purchases, simple, maintain, cards


3 simple ways to maintain good credit

Sometimes, the best strategies for maintaining good credit are the most straightforward ones. Over 70% of cardholders prefer a simple credit card strategy, meaning they use the same one to two cards as much as possible, according to a 2019 CreditCards.com report that surveyed 2,569 adults, including 1,657 credit card holders. “People like simplicity, and often in the form of cash back,” says Ted Rossman, industry analyst for Creditcards.com. “You hear about these gamers who exploit every loophole and score first class tickets to the Maldives. That’s great, but the fact is, it takes a lot of work, time, and effort.” And gaming may not be good for your bottom line. Opening too many new cards to get rewards and bonus points can damage your credit score and also lead to overspending. If used responsibly, a credit card can help you build up your credit history and finance larger purchases over time. The less complicated your credit strategy is, the easier it is to manage your credit. Here are three ways you can keep it simple and keep your credit strong.

1. Be careful about opening new cards

Having multiple credit cards open in order to increase your available credit might seem like a good idea, but maintaining lots of lines of credit comes with risks. You don’t want to open up too many credit cards and then end up having to cancel them because you’re stuck with multiple annual fees and high interest rates. Canceling cards can drag down your credit score and, ultimately, cost you money.

Graphic preview FICO breakdown Factors that impact your credit score Social chart title kiersten schmidt/grow FICO

That’s not all: Having multiple credit cards can put you at risk of overspending. One of the best ways to maintain good credit is to pay off your balance on time and in full each month. If you have multiple cards, that becomes harder to do. Plus you may have to contend with several different annual fees. Read more: Don’t make this mistake with your old credit cards

2. Look for cash-back cards that reward everyday purchases

If you do decide you want to open a new card, take advantage of cashback incentives and rewards you’ll actually use. Rather than trying to game the system and apply for every card that offers enticing incentives, be selective about the one card you choose. A straightforward cash-back card is a great way to rack up rewards for your everyday purchases. Making sure your cash-back card rewards match up with your spending habits is a surefire way to maximize those returns, says Rossman. Some of the simplest cash-back card programs offer a flat 1% to 2% cash-back rate on all spending. And tiered cash-back cards can boost rewards on select purchases: One may offer 6% cash-back on all purchases at gas stations and supermarkets, for example.

“Simplicity and rewards can actually go together,” says Rossman. Consider “cards like the Citi Double Cash that give 2% back on everything, or even Apple Cards that have a simple rewards structure.” By sticking with a single card that maximizes your rewards, you can more easily manage your spending and payments. That, in turn, will help keep your credit in good standing. Read more: Why it’s time to pick a new credit card

3. Keep your utilization rate low


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: ivana pino, aditi shrikant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, card, rewards, good, score, cashback, multiple, credit, ways, spending, purchases, simple, maintain, cards


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5 smart habits that ‘supersavers’ use to supercharge their retirement savings

A new study has teased out some of the ways “supersavers” put away an impressive share of their income for retirement. Here are some of the main ways that “supersavers” cut costs so that they can supercharge their retirement savings.1. They drive older carsMany of Principal’s supersavers forgo buying new cars, and instead drive older vehicles. Supersavers find ways to cut their housing costs, often, according to the Principal study, by “owning a modest home.” They travel frugallyMany supersaver


A new study has teased out some of the ways “supersavers” put away an impressive share of their income for retirement. Here are some of the main ways that “supersavers” cut costs so that they can supercharge their retirement savings.1. They drive older carsMany of Principal’s supersavers forgo buying new cars, and instead drive older vehicles. Supersavers find ways to cut their housing costs, often, according to the Principal study, by “owning a modest home.” They travel frugallyMany supersaver
5 smart habits that ‘supersavers’ use to supercharge their retirement savings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: sam becker, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, principal, principals, smart, supersavers, supercharge, housing, youre, ways, savings, hard, habits, study, retirement, save


5 smart habits that 'supersavers' use to supercharge their retirement savings

A new study has teased out some of the ways “supersavers” put away an impressive share of their income for retirement. The study, from retirement account provider Principal, highlights the saving methods of “supersavers,” which Principal defines as millennials, Gen Xers, or members of Gen Z with Principal 401(k) retirement plans who saved more than 90% ($17,100) of the annual $19,000 limit during 2018, or deferred more than 15% of their salary. Principal’s team says that 48% of supersavers earned less than $100,000 last year. “We spend a lot of time in our industry talking about what people aren’t doing. And what we love about this research is that we’re finding people who are making good choices and good decisions,” says Jerry Patterson, Principal’s senior vice president of retirement. The secret for many supersavers is spending less on big-ticket items like cars and housing. “These people are not miserable,” says Patterson. “The key part, the hard part, is that they’re making hard decisions and sacrifices to balance what’s best for their future selves.” Here are some of the main ways that “supersavers” cut costs so that they can supercharge their retirement savings.

1. They drive older cars

Many of Principal’s supersavers forgo buying new cars, and instead drive older vehicles. Cars can be incredibly expensive to own and maintain: The average person spends about $770 per month. Experts say the single best way to reduce those costs is to buy and drive a used car. And savings can be significant — you could save an average of $4,443 buying a three-year-old used model over its new counterpart, according to Edmunds.

2. They live in ‘modest’ homes

Typically, the single biggest monthly expense a household contends with on a monthly basis is housing, including rent or mortgage payments. Supersavers find ways to cut their housing costs, often, according to the Principal study, by “owning a modest home.” Depending on where you live, owning a home may not be an option: Real estate prices have skyrocketed in recent years. But whether you’re buying or renting, you may be able to find a cheaper place to live if you’re willing to make some trade-offs. Here are a few other things to try, too, if you’re looking to cut housing costs.

3. They travel frugally

Many supersavers opt for cheaper or shorter vacations in order to save more, according to Principal’s study. If you still want to travel, there are ways to cut costs. You can travel to certain destinations during the off-season, for example, or plan well in advance and stick to a budget to keep your spending in line. All told, if you’re savvy about it, you can save hundreds, and maybe thousands, while still getting away.

The key part, the hard part, is that they’re making hard decisions and sacrifices to balance what’s best for their future selves. Jerry Patterson Senior VP of retirement at Principal

4. They commit to DIY

Many supersavers are willing to roll up their sleeves, and it pays off. You can do your own yard work, for example, or install your own housing fixtures. Even choosing to pick up your takeout order can save you a couple of bucks on delivery fees. Or, if you take on a bigger project like painting a small bedroom, you could save up to $455 by doing the work yourself rather than hiring a pro.

5. They clean up after themselves


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: sam becker, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, principal, principals, smart, supersavers, supercharge, housing, youre, ways, savings, hard, habits, study, retirement, save


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