5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments


An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments
5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


5G rollout will 'make things better' for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019.

The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon.

“I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.

“I think there is a lot of research and development that we’ve done and I know others have done as well to make sure that 5G doesn’t just bring speed and reliability, but also that it’s done in a secure manner and addresses any of those kinds of concerns,” Novak said.

Novak’s comments come amid increasing scrutiny on companies seeking to win contracts to develop 5G capabilities for national networks. Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is chief among the firms under the spotlight as the U.S. seeks to dissuade America’s allies from purchasing its equipment, with claims that the firm is “too close to the government. ”

Recent moves by the U.S. have reportedly resulted in major tech companies limiting their employees’ access to Huawei. On May 16, the U.S. Department of Commerce put Huawei on a blacklist, barring it from doing business with American companies without government approval, then a few days later it authorized firms to interact with Huawei in standards bodies through August “as necessary for the development of 5G standards.”

For its part, U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration appears to have a conflicting stance on Huawei.

Trump told CNBC on Monday that Huawei could be part of the U.S. trade negotiation with China, contradicting remarks by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told CNBC on Sunday that Washington’s concerns surrounding the telecommunications behemoth are “national security” issues separate from trade.

On the subject of whether banning perceived bad actors from developing 5G networks would reduce the likelihood of data breaches, Novak said: “To be honest, it’s not even just the espionage element. In reality, the bigger percentage of that pie is actually financially motivated breaches.”

“If you actually roll back and look at the last decade, we’ve got almost about a half million security incidents that we’ve looked at over the course of that research,” he said. “While espionage plays a role in things and I think that’s kind of fired up a lot of the conversation here, I think ultimately there’s a lot of other facets to what we see happening in the cybersecurity and data breach landscape.”

— Reuters and CNBC’s Kate Fazzini contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


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My wife and I have been married 50 years, and we’ve never had a single fight about money—here’s our secret

My wife and I got married in 1968, and in the 50-plus years we’ve been together, we’ve never had a single fight about money. But the way I see it, differences over money should never come as a surprise when you’re married. As anyone who’s been married for several decades can tell you, financial compatibility is an essential element to any successful marriage. I’m 75 and my wife is 79, and we’ve maintained a peaceful marriage — thanks in large part to our shared views on saving and spending. If t


My wife and I got married in 1968, and in the 50-plus years we’ve been together, we’ve never had a single fight about money. But the way I see it, differences over money should never come as a surprise when you’re married. As anyone who’s been married for several decades can tell you, financial compatibility is an essential element to any successful marriage. I’m 75 and my wife is 79, and we’ve maintained a peaceful marriage — thanks in large part to our shared views on saving and spending. If t
My wife and I have been married 50 years, and we’ve never had a single fight about money—here’s our secret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-25  Authors: dick quinn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secret, wife, benefits, married, fight, money, financial, 50, marriage, weve, way, relationship, pay, moneyheres, single


My wife and I have been married 50 years, and we've never had a single fight about money—here's our secret

My wife and I got married in 1968, and in the 50-plus years we’ve been together, we’ve never had a single fight about money. There were deliberations, but never any fights. I get asked all the time: “How do you do it?” The secret, I tell them, can be summed up in three words: It’s our money.

I realize this isn’t the case for most couples. But having spent my entire career in employee benefits, finance and retirement counseling, I’ve witnessed a handful of misguided ideas about marriage and money.

In the early 60s, less than 25% of married women were employed, which led men to believe that any overtime pay they earned belonged solely to them. It was rare for couples to discuss their conflicting attitudes toward money — and if they did, they often found themselves caught in an antagonistic gridlock.

That sort of attitude led to a lot of tension in marriages — and it’s still prevalent today. In fact, arguments about money are still one of the top predictors for divorce. But the way I see it, differences over money should never come as a surprise when you’re married.

As anyone who’s been married for several decades can tell you, financial compatibility is an essential element to any successful marriage. One miser and one spendthrift will have a tough time agreeing. That doesn’t necessarily mean the relationship is doomed, it just means a serious conversation about financial goals and values must take place immediately. Having financial peace in a relationship is a matter of mutual respect and responsibility. The objective is to work on having a similar money mindset moving forward.

I’m 75 and my wife is 79, and we’ve maintained a peaceful marriage — thanks in large part to our shared views on saving and spending. She knows as well as I do where we stand financially. Any money that comes in is considered as our money, regardless of who brought it in, and we manage it together.

I retired in 2010 as vice president of compensation and benefits for a Fortune 500 company. My wife (also retired) and I live off my pension and our Social Security benefits, but our money philosophy has remained the same. We have several joint checking and savings accounts. Once money goes into an account, it’s apportioned among many others. For example, we have an account designated for travel, and another for fixed monthly bills, which includes utilities, taxes and HOA fees. Our checking accounts are mainly used to pay credit card bills.

This compartmentalized approach is our way of budgeting. But here’s the thing, we also know that neither of us is going to spend more we can afford. If there’s something significant that we need or want, we’ll wait until we’ve saved enough to pay in cash.

Many financial experts will advise against joint accounts. Call me old-fashioned, but I wholeheartedly disagree. In my opinion, insisting on a strict division between the money that each party earns is a sign of not being fully committed to the union.

If both parties are constantly questioning each other’s financial decisions, it’s unlikely that the relationship will last. I can understand a working person wanting a sense of ownership to some degree, but a marriage should be built on complete trust. Insisting on “your money” and “my money” violates that commitment. (Besides, there will be plenty of time for divisions in the divorce process.)

My wife and I don’t consider ourselves wealthy. We’re financially secure because we made sure our goals and values aligned before entering the dominion of marital bliss. That said, it does take a lot of hard work. We have four children who all went to private colleges. They worked campus and summer jobs to pay off their loans. My wife and I remortgaged our house (twice) and even started a part-time business to cover the remaining costs. That meant working 16 hours a day between two jobs.

My point is, if you sort out your differences early on and agree to say “it’s our money,” you’ll live happily ever after or hold hands in bankruptcy court. Either way, you’ll be in it together. But if your money differences are extreme, proceed at your own peril. Based on what I’ve seen, major changes by either party are unlikely.

Keep in mind that this advice is coming from someone who’s been married for more than 50 years, so unless your relationship is intended to be permanent, the “mine is mine” approach may be better.

Dick Quinn is a financial blogger and MarketWatch contributor. Before retiring in 2010, Dick was a compensation and benefits executive at an S&P 500 Company. His previous blogs include Healthy Change, Saving Ourselves and Required Irritation. Follow him on Twitter .

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-25  Authors: dick quinn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secret, wife, benefits, married, fight, money, financial, 50, marriage, weve, way, relationship, pay, moneyheres, single


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Here’s what you get if you buy a $1,000 mint julep at the Kentucky Derby

The mint julep is a Kentucky Derby staple. Each year, nearly 120,000 of them are served during the two-day event at the Churchill Downs Racetrack. “Then, whatever cups are left — and there always seems to be a few — we will have for sale to walk-in traffic at the track at the Woodford Reserve $1,000 mint julep bar,” says Morris. Woodford Reserve also offered 20 gold-plated cups for $2,500, which sold out in “a handful of days,” says Morris. The mint julep is the traditional beverage of Churchill


The mint julep is a Kentucky Derby staple. Each year, nearly 120,000 of them are served during the two-day event at the Churchill Downs Racetrack. “Then, whatever cups are left — and there always seems to be a few — we will have for sale to walk-in traffic at the track at the Woodford Reserve $1,000 mint julep bar,” says Morris. Woodford Reserve also offered 20 gold-plated cups for $2,500, which sold out in “a handful of days,” says Morris. The mint julep is the traditional beverage of Churchill
Here’s what you get if you buy a $1,000 mint julep at the Kentucky Derby Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mint, derby, weve, julep, reserve, woodford, heres, downs, buy, 1000, churchill, kentucky, cups


Here's what you get if you buy a $1,000 mint julep at the Kentucky Derby

The mint julep is a Kentucky Derby staple. Each year, nearly 120,000 of them are served during the two-day event at the Churchill Downs Racetrack. The beverages will go for about $10 a pop at the track but, for the 14th year in a row, Kentucky bourbon distillery Woodford Reserve is offering a limited number of $1,000 mint juleps for those who are looking to splurge. The recipe uses ingredients that can only be sourced in Kentucky. Here’s exactly what goes into the four-figure cocktail: 2 oz. Woodford Reserve Kentucky straight bourbon

2 bar spoons of honey sweetener

2 leaves of Kentucky colonel mint

Garnish: shaved honeycomb and a sprig of mint

The 2019 Woodford Reserve $1,000 and $2,500 mint julep cups Woodford Reserve

While the ingredient list is simple, the cups the drinks are served in are not: Each one is handcrafted by a Louisville-based jeweler and feature elaborate designs of Kentucky scenes like the Twin Spires of Churchill Downs. And they come in a wooden box lined with the same silk used to make the jerseys worn by the jockeys. “You get the most beautiful julep cup you’ve ever seen in your life,” Woodford Reserve master distiller Chris Morris tells CNBC Make It, adding: “Each year, the cup has been unique. We’ve had silver cups, gold-plated cups, both at the same time, as we do this year. We’ve had cups that have had diamonds in them and emeralds and rubies.” The cups, which went on sale in early April, will be available to purchase online until Friday, May 3, at noon. “Then, whatever cups are left — and there always seems to be a few — we will have for sale to walk-in traffic at the track at the Woodford Reserve $1,000 mint julep bar,” says Morris. There are about 33 left, he tells Make It. Woodford Reserve also offered 20 gold-plated cups for $2,500, which sold out in “a handful of days,” says Morris.

The mint julep is the traditional beverage of Churchill Downs and the Kentucky Derby Courtesy of Woodford Reserve


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mint, derby, weve, julep, reserve, woodford, heres, downs, buy, 1000, churchill, kentucky, cups


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Market bull skips high-flying FAANG names in favor of consumer plays

One of Wall Street’s biggest bulls is shunning new big tech investments in favor of consumer plays. According to Crossmark Global Investments’ Victoria Fernandez, consumer stocks should help drive the market rally’s next leg up. “The consumer has been so strong,” the firm’s chief market strategist said Wednesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation ” segment. “There was a lot of concern at the end of last year on what the consumer was going to do. The SPDR S&P Retail ETF, which tracks cyclical consumer nam


One of Wall Street’s biggest bulls is shunning new big tech investments in favor of consumer plays. According to Crossmark Global Investments’ Victoria Fernandez, consumer stocks should help drive the market rally’s next leg up. “The consumer has been so strong,” the firm’s chief market strategist said Wednesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation ” segment. “There was a lot of concern at the end of last year on what the consumer was going to do. The SPDR S&P Retail ETF, which tracks cyclical consumer nam
Market bull skips high-flying FAANG names in favor of consumer plays Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weve, big, favor, faang, names, skips, market, spdr, investments, bull, tech, consumer, highflying, couple, plays, fernandez


Market bull skips high-flying FAANG names in favor of consumer plays

One of Wall Street’s biggest bulls is shunning new big tech investments in favor of consumer plays.

According to Crossmark Global Investments’ Victoria Fernandez, consumer stocks should help drive the market rally’s next leg up.

“The consumer has been so strong,” the firm’s chief market strategist said Wednesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation ” segment. “There was a lot of concern at the end of last year on what the consumer was going to do. But look, we’ve had good retail sales. Spending numbers are good. Average hourly earnings are good.”

Fernandez, who is responsible for $5 billion in assets under management, believes big tech, along with FAANG names Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google parent Alphabet have run too far, too fast since the December low.

“We are invested in that tech sector, and we have a couple of the FAANG names. But we’ve started to look at other areas of the market,” said Fernandez.

The Technology Select Sector SPDR fund has rallied more than 36% since the December low. The SPDR S&P Retail ETF, which tracks cyclical consumer names, has lagged big tech. It’s up 17% in that same period.

“A couple of the names that we’ve done recently: McDonald’s and Estee Lauder, ” said Fernandez. “It’s a consumer play on one side, and also a value play as well. Both of those names have reported this week and had better than expected earnings.”

Fernandez expects the bullish picture to become clearer in a couple of weeks — when the nation’s biggest retailers begin reporting quarterly results.

“The consumer has some strength. Seventy-three percent of the economy is services. I think they’re going to do well,” Fernandez said.

Disclosure: In addition to McDonald’s and Estee Lauder, Crossmark Global Investments owns shares of Facebook, Alphabet and Apple. Hernandez personally owns shares of Netflix and Amazon.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weve, big, favor, faang, names, skips, market, spdr, investments, bull, tech, consumer, highflying, couple, plays, fernandez


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Cramer: ‘We’ve had a terrific run’ — it’s time to trim some positions

The major U.S. indexes all declined during the session as investors revealed worries that the stock market has been too strong for its own good, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Wednesday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed about 163 points, while the S&P 500 and the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite fell 0.75% and 0.57%, respectively. “We’ve had a terrific run, so I am blessing you to do some selling tomorrow,” the “Mad Money” host said. The current year doesn’t quite look like ’87 or ’99, but discipline is


The major U.S. indexes all declined during the session as investors revealed worries that the stock market has been too strong for its own good, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Wednesday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed about 163 points, while the S&P 500 and the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite fell 0.75% and 0.57%, respectively. “We’ve had a terrific run, so I am blessing you to do some selling tomorrow,” the “Mad Money” host said. The current year doesn’t quite look like ’87 or ’99, but discipline is
Cramer: ‘We’ve had a terrific run’ — it’s time to trim some positions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, 1987, veteran, stock, stocks, dow, dotcom, weve, run, terrific, trim, positions, nasdaq, money, market


Cramer: 'We've had a terrific run' — it's time to trim some positions

The major U.S. indexes all declined during the session as investors revealed worries that the stock market has been too strong for its own good, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Wednesday.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed about 163 points, while the S&P 500 and the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite fell 0.75% and 0.57%, respectively.

“We’ve had a terrific run, so I am blessing you to do some selling tomorrow,” the “Mad Money” host said. “But other than that, I think we’re in fine shape — somewhat overheated, most definitely — but I still think it makes sense to stay the course.”

The Dow had its best four-month rally to start the year since 1987. The Nasdaq had its best showing in the same period since its big rally in 1999. No one wants 2019 to look like those two years, Cramer said.

“Nothing scares the daylights out of professional traders more than those two years,” he said. “If you’re a grizzled veteran like I am, you know those two years had a horrific pattern: They gave you rapid-fire rallies, which ultimately led to a pair of ignominious crashes.”

Cramer said he is always on the lookout for history to repeat itself. He said he had cash on hand when the stock market crashed in 1987, and he shorted tech stocks during the dotcom bubble burst in 2000, which followed the 1999 rally.

The current year doesn’t quite look like ’87 or ’99, but discipline is key, said Cramer, who trimmed positions in his ActionAlertsPlus.com charitable trust. Still, the Dow is up 13% this year, the S&P 500 is up 17% and the Nasdaq is up 21%, he noted.

“Any time you have a remarkable run, it never hurts to take something off the table. Nobody ever got hurt ringing the register,” Cramer said. “Bulls make money, bears make money, but hogs — they get slaughtered. In other words, please don’t be greedy.”

But it’s not time to sell everything like the veteran stock trader did in 1987, or to short stocks as he did in 2000. The strategy behind short selling is to borrow stocks that have potential to decline in hopes of making a profit when the share price falls.

Yet, the “tsunami of IPOs” coming to market is reminiscent of the dotcom era, Carmer said. There are seven deals this week, and many in the technology space. Uber is on its way to public markets next week.

“When you get too many IPOs in one sector, it’s incredibly toxic to the rest of the group because all of this new supply tends to overwhelm the demand,” he said. “Like any other market, when supply exceeds demand, prices … they go down. So the current deluge of deals is unnerving to anyone who traded during the dotcom bubble.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, 1987, veteran, stock, stocks, dow, dotcom, weve, run, terrific, trim, positions, nasdaq, money, market


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This is the biggest money mistake people make, according to NFL player Brandon Copeland

This year, he is teaching a class at his alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League school, on financial literacy. “We’ve practiced our multiplication tables. We’ve practiced cursive at some point in time. We’ve never practiced budgeting,” said Copeland, a member of the CNBC Invest in You Financial Wellness Council. Check out 4 Money Lessons Everyone Should Know by Age 25 via Grow with Acorns+CNBC.


This year, he is teaching a class at his alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League school, on financial literacy. “We’ve practiced our multiplication tables. We’ve practiced cursive at some point in time. We’ve never practiced budgeting,” said Copeland, a member of the CNBC Invest in You Financial Wellness Council. Check out 4 Money Lessons Everyone Should Know by Age 25 via Grow with Acorns+CNBC.
This is the biggest money mistake people make, according to NFL player Brandon Copeland Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: michelle fox, michael reaves, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, practiced, copeland, know, invest, according, school, weve, nfl, brandon, mistake, biggest, making, understand, investors, money, player


This is the biggest money mistake people make, according to NFL player Brandon Copeland

He’s now making it his mission to educate people on how to manage their money. This year, he is teaching a class at his alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League school, on financial literacy.

It’s something he thinks is severely lacking in today’s educational system. According to a 2018 survey by the Council for Economic Education, only 17 states require high school students to take a personal finance class.

“We’ve practiced our multiplication tables. We’ve practiced cursive at some point in time. We’ve never practiced budgeting,” said Copeland, a member of the CNBC Invest in You Financial Wellness Council.

“Yet, when you come out of college you are expected to know it right off the bat,” he added. “A lot of this stuff kids don’t know, don’t understand because no one has ever sat down and talked to them about it.”

More from Invest In You:

Tony Robbins says these are the 3 biggest reasons investors fail

Here are America’s biggest money regrets, as told to CNBC

Former MLB All-Star Mark Teixeira wants you to be smart about your money

Copeland practices what he preaches. He saves about 90 percent of his income.

For others, he suggests aiming to save at least half of their salaries. But even that may not be feasible — which is understandable, he said.

“Some people, they can’t live if they are saving 50% of their money,” he said.

What they should do, however, is take stock of their financial situation. They can start off by calculating all of their expenses — from rent to cellphones to their Netflix account — and see where they can cut back.

They should also understand what they value and why in order to avoid making unnecessary purchases, and find strong mentors, he advises.

— CNBC’s Stefanie Kratter contributed to this report.

Check out 4 Money Lessons Everyone Should Know by Age 25 via Grow with Acorns+CNBC.

Disclosure: NBCUniversal and Comcast Ventures are investors in Acorns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: michelle fox, michael reaves, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, practiced, copeland, know, invest, according, school, weve, nfl, brandon, mistake, biggest, making, understand, investors, money, player


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NY county exec says ban on unvaccinated minors is working — ‘We’ve gotten their attention’

A New York county’s ban on unvaccinated minors in public is working, an official told CNBC on Friday. Rockland County Executive Ed Day said more than 500 immunizations have been administered since he announced the ban on Tuesday. “We’ve gotten their attention,” he said in an interview with “The Exchange.” “We’re not enforcing it by having people check people and things of that nature. There have been 157 reported cases in Rockland County since October 2018.


A New York county’s ban on unvaccinated minors in public is working, an official told CNBC on Friday. Rockland County Executive Ed Day said more than 500 immunizations have been administered since he announced the ban on Tuesday. “We’ve gotten their attention,” he said in an interview with “The Exchange.” “We’re not enforcing it by having people check people and things of that nature. There have been 157 reported cases in Rockland County since October 2018.
NY county exec says ban on unvaccinated minors is working — ‘We’ve gotten their attention’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: michelle fox, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tuesdayweve, unvaccinated, attention, york, gotten, ban, things, working, minors, suburbs, ny, weve, exec, understand, told, county


NY county exec says ban on unvaccinated minors is working — 'We've gotten their attention'

A New York county’s ban on unvaccinated minors in public is working, an official told CNBC on Friday.

Rockland County Executive Ed Day said more than 500 immunizations have been administered since he announced the ban on Tuesday.

“We’ve gotten their attention,” he said in an interview with “The Exchange.”

And that was the point. “We’re not enforcing it by having people check people and things of that nature. But basically people simply understand now that we are serious about this,” said Day.

The county, located in the northern suburbs of New York City, is one of six locations in the U.S. experiencing a measles outbreak, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There have been 157 reported cases in Rockland County since October 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: michelle fox, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tuesdayweve, unvaccinated, attention, york, gotten, ban, things, working, minors, suburbs, ny, weve, exec, understand, told, county


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European rather than UK stocks would suffer more in a no-deal Brexit, fund manager says

The shares of European firms outside of Britain would suffer more in the event of a poorly executed Brexit, a strategist told CNBC Tuesday. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe,” Ralph Jainz, a fund manager at Centricus Asset Management, said a negative Brexit outcome had “for sure” been underpriced by investors. “European markets are back to where they were in September and October,” he said. “We’ve seen a dramatic deterioration of the macro data since, and Europe as the (U.K.’s) largest tradi


The shares of European firms outside of Britain would suffer more in the event of a poorly executed Brexit, a strategist told CNBC Tuesday. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe,” Ralph Jainz, a fund manager at Centricus Asset Management, said a negative Brexit outcome had “for sure” been underpriced by investors. “European markets are back to where they were in September and October,” he said. “We’ve seen a dramatic deterioration of the macro data since, and Europe as the (U.K.’s) largest tradi
European rather than UK stocks would suffer more in a no-deal Brexit, fund manager says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: chloe taylor, alex kraus, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uks, underpriced, uk, sure, markets, undoubtedly, trading, stocks, europe, brexit, manager, european, nodeal, tuesdayspeaking, weve, fund, suffer


European rather than UK stocks would suffer more in a no-deal Brexit, fund manager says

The shares of European firms outside of Britain would suffer more in the event of a poorly executed Brexit, a strategist told CNBC Tuesday.

Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe,” Ralph Jainz, a fund manager at Centricus Asset Management, said a negative Brexit outcome had “for sure” been underpriced by investors.

“European markets are back to where they were in September and October,” he said. “We’ve seen a dramatic deterioration of the macro data since, and Europe as the (U.K.’s) largest trading partner will undoubtedly be negatively impacted (by a bad Brexit) — and after what has been a sensational start to the year for equity markets everywhere, for sure that risk is underpriced.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: chloe taylor, alex kraus, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uks, underpriced, uk, sure, markets, undoubtedly, trading, stocks, europe, brexit, manager, european, nodeal, tuesdayspeaking, weve, fund, suffer


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Read the memo Disney CEO Bob Iger sent to employees after closing the $71 billion Fox deal

Disney CEO Bob Iger is already gearing up for the next phase of the company on the heels of its acquisition of 21st Century Fox, which closed Wednesday. In a note to employees shared with CNBC, Iger thanked members of both organizations on their “patience and perseverance” leading up to the acquisition. Some of those growing pains are likely to include layoffs, which are expected to be in the thousands, as Disney and Fox pare down duplicate staff. Fox and Disney have overlap in their film produc


Disney CEO Bob Iger is already gearing up for the next phase of the company on the heels of its acquisition of 21st Century Fox, which closed Wednesday. In a note to employees shared with CNBC, Iger thanked members of both organizations on their “patience and perseverance” leading up to the acquisition. Some of those growing pains are likely to include layoffs, which are expected to be in the thousands, as Disney and Fox pare down duplicate staff. Fox and Disney have overlap in their film produc
Read the memo Disney CEO Bob Iger sent to employees after closing the $71 billion Fox deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20  Authors: julia boorstin, lauren feiner, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, acquisition, weve, understand, memo, employees, ceo, entertainment, iger, closing, read, fox, sent, company, businesses, disney


Read the memo Disney CEO Bob Iger sent to employees after closing the $71 billion Fox deal

Disney CEO Bob Iger is already gearing up for the next phase of the company on the heels of its acquisition of 21st Century Fox, which closed Wednesday.

The $71 billion acquisition adds a number of beloved entertainment assets to Disney’s collection as it prepares to launch its streaming service among a crowded field of competitors. Disney can count shows from Fox Channels like “Modern Family” and “This Is Us” as well as properties like Marvel’s “X-Men” to its library on Disney+, which is expected to launch later this year.

In a note to employees shared with CNBC, Iger thanked members of both organizations on their “patience and perseverance” leading up to the acquisition. He quickly turned to the road ahead, which he says will hold “the challenging work of uniting our businesses to create a dynamic, global entertainment company with the content, the platforms, and the reach to deliver industry-defining experiences that will engage consumers around the world for generations to come.”

Some of those growing pains are likely to include layoffs, which are expected to be in the thousands, as Disney and Fox pare down duplicate staff. Iger said the integration “will be an evolution, with some businesses impacted more than others.” Fox and Disney have overlap in their film production staffs.

The Disney-Fox deal follows another high profile media merger. AT&T acquired Time Warner last year for $81 billion and has plans to launch a new streaming service later this year that will include HBO. With Disney’s acquisition, it hopes to build a compelling content library to compete with tech companies that are also keen on streaming, including Netflix, Amazon and Apple.

Here’s the full message from Iger to employees following the deal’s close:

Subject: A Historic Day for Our Company I’m proud to announce the acquisition is complete and 21st Century Fox is now part of The Walt Disney Company. I’d like to welcome our new colleagues, and thank employees on both sides of the deal for your patience and perseverance as we worked through the lengthy acquisition and regulatory process. As you know, Disney has never been short on ambition. We’ve never been satisfied with the status quo, and our vision for this transformative era is our boldest yet. We are rapidly transforming our company to take full advantage of evolving consumer trends and emerging technology in order to thrive in this new and exciting time. Our acquisition of 21st Century Fox was driven by our strong belief that the addition of these great businesses, brands, franchises and talent will allow us to move faster, reach farther and aim higher – especially when it comes to building direct connections with consumers. I wish I could tell you that the hardest part is behind us; that closing the deal was the finish line, rather than just the next milestone. What lies ahead is the challenging work of uniting our businesses to create a dynamic, global entertainment company with the content, the platforms, and the reach to deliver industry-defining experiences that will engage consumers around the world for generations to come. We’ve spent the last year exploring the new opportunities and synergies generated by bringing our two legendary companies together. Leaders across both organizations have worked closely together to understand how to best unlock this potential and unleash innovation and creativity to generate long-term growth. We’re confident in our integration strategy and in our ability to execute it effectively; and we’re inspired and energized by the new possibilities. Our integration process will be an evolution, with some businesses impacted more than others. We’ve made many critical decisions already, but some areas still require further evaluation. We may not have answers to all of your questions at this moment, but we understand how vital information is, and we’re committed to moving as quickly as possible to provide clarity regarding how your role may be impacted. Having been on both sides of numerous acquisitions during my career, I have a deep appreciation for how this one impacts everyone involved, on both a personal and professional level. I understand the challenges, and I ask for your continued patience in the days to come as we combine this collection of great assets to create the world’s premier entertainment company. Bob

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Watch: Jim Cramer: The Disney/Fox deal could boost Disney stock


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20  Authors: julia boorstin, lauren feiner, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, acquisition, weve, understand, memo, employees, ceo, entertainment, iger, closing, read, fox, sent, company, businesses, disney


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Warren Buffett says there’s ‘enormous resistance to change’ healthcare

Complacency will make fixing the nation’s health-care system a daunting task, according to Warren Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway recently joined with J.P. Morgan Chase and Amazon to develop a new model for their 1 million employees. Buffett along with Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and J.P. Morgan’s Jamie Dimon recently formed the health-care joint venture Haven to figure out how to deliver better health care at a lower cost. One of the problems with the current system, Buffett said in an interview for


Complacency will make fixing the nation’s health-care system a daunting task, according to Warren Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway recently joined with J.P. Morgan Chase and Amazon to develop a new model for their 1 million employees. Buffett along with Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and J.P. Morgan’s Jamie Dimon recently formed the health-care joint venture Haven to figure out how to deliver better health care at a lower cost. One of the problems with the current system, Buffett said in an interview for
Warren Buffett says there’s ‘enormous resistance to change’ healthcare Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: liz moyer, david a grogan, cnbc, jaden urbi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buffett, change, healthcare, resistance, system, current, recently, warren, jp, weve, model, theres, worse, enormous


Warren Buffett says there's 'enormous resistance to change' healthcare

Complacency will make fixing the nation’s health-care system a daunting task, according to Warren Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway recently joined with J.P. Morgan Chase and Amazon to develop a new model for their 1 million employees.

Buffett along with Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and J.P. Morgan’s Jamie Dimon recently formed the health-care joint venture Haven to figure out how to deliver better health care at a lower cost. One of the problems with the current system, Buffett said in an interview for Yahoo Finance, is that health-care providers and others entrenched in the current model don’t have any incentive to change things.

“We have a $3.4 trillion industry, which is as much as the federal government raises every year, that basically feels pretty good about the system,” Buffett said. “There’s enormous resistance to change while a similar acknowledgement that change will be needed. And of course if the private sector doesn’t supply that over a period of time, people will say ‘we give up, we’ve got to turn this over to the government,’ which will probably be even worse.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: liz moyer, david a grogan, cnbc, jaden urbi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buffett, change, healthcare, resistance, system, current, recently, warren, jp, weve, model, theres, worse, enormous


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