Oil surges as US ends Iran sanction waivers—four experts forecast what’s next

Crude prices surged after the announcement, with the U.S. benchmark, West Texas Intermediate crude, gaining nearly 3 percent. So I think that’s one potential silver lining of higher oil. And so my guess is that economic activity stays where it is [and] oil prices will remain relatively constant. That’s going to couple with what we’ve been seeing in Venezuela, this likely forcing the oil price up [like] we’ve seen this morning. RBC Capital Markets’ head of U.S. equity strategy, Lori Calvasina, wa


Crude prices surged after the announcement, with the U.S. benchmark, West Texas Intermediate crude, gaining nearly 3 percent. So I think that’s one potential silver lining of higher oil. And so my guess is that economic activity stays where it is [and] oil prices will remain relatively constant. That’s going to couple with what we’ve been seeing in Venezuela, this likely forcing the oil price up [like] we’ve seen this morning. RBC Capital Markets’ head of U.S. equity strategy, Lori Calvasina, wa
Oil surges as US ends Iran sanction waivers—four experts forecast what’s next Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: lizzy gurdus, eddie seal, bloomberg, getty images, johannes eisele, afp, anna moneymaker, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, experts, market, forecast, thats, sanction, think, prices, whats, higher, energy, surges, oil, going, ends, iran, crude, waiversfour


Oil surges as US ends Iran sanction waivers—four experts forecast what's next

Things are heating up in the energy market.

The Trump administration announced Monday that it would end exemptions to its sanctions on Iran, a move meant to significantly curb Iran’s oil output. Crude prices surged after the announcement, with the U.S. benchmark, West Texas Intermediate crude, gaining nearly 3 percent.

Here’s what experts say higher oil prices could mean for the broader market:

Savita Subramanian, head of U.S. equity and quantitative strategy at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, said a significant uptick in the price of crude would likely be a double-edged sword:

“[Higher] oil is actually good for corporate profits because the S&P [500] is levered to oil, so I think this could be a source of positive earnings surprise[s] for the year where analysts are penciling in super low expectations. So I think that’s one potential silver lining of higher oil. And then … consumers are making more money, so we might not feel that energy pinch until we get to higher levels. But $5 a gallon in California is not a good environment to be in, so we’re getting to a point where this could turn ugly.”

Aperture Investors CEO Peter Kraus didn’t anticipate major changes to the status quo:

“I think the oil prices are going to continue to reflect this sort of restriction in supply. And we’re not going to see a lot of new drilling based on these prices. We’re not going to see more holes being punched into the world to create more oil at these current prices. And so my guess is that economic activity stays where it is [and] oil prices will remain relatively constant. […] People predicted oil was going to go to $100, $120 a barrel, which I don’t see happening.”

Alex Dryden, global market strategist at J.P. Morgan, said macroeconomic global risks could catch up to the oil market itself:

“I think what you’re looking at is incoming restrictions on supply. That’s going to couple with what we’ve been seeing in Venezuela, this likely forcing the oil price up [like] we’ve seen this morning. Now, again, it’s about how sustainable that oil price is. You look at … the futures market. Go three years out — you typically go out that far when you want to take out political risk and look at how much geopolitical risk premium [is] priced into oil. Right now, it’s some of the highest levels since the Arab Spring. That’s not exactly a great backdrop for energy companies to really be able to continue to put that oil number in in a reliable way going forward. So, certainly some question marks over it.”

RBC Capital Markets’ head of U.S. equity strategy, Lori Calvasina, was fairly bullish on the prospect of higher oil prices for the broader market:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: lizzy gurdus, eddie seal, bloomberg, getty images, johannes eisele, afp, anna moneymaker, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, experts, market, forecast, thats, sanction, think, prices, whats, higher, energy, surges, oil, going, ends, iran, crude, waiversfour


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Mueller report expected Thursday. Here’s what to watch and what’s next

Less than two days after receiving the lengthy report, Barr summarized what he said were its main conclusions in a four-page letter to congressional Judiciary Committee leaders. Barr shared two main conclusions from Mueller’s probe, both of which were celebrated by Trump. On the question obstruction, Barr quoted Mueller saying the report “does not conclude that the President committed a crime, [but] it also does not exonerate him.” “No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION,”


Less than two days after receiving the lengthy report, Barr summarized what he said were its main conclusions in a four-page letter to congressional Judiciary Committee leaders. Barr shared two main conclusions from Mueller’s probe, both of which were celebrated by Trump. On the question obstruction, Barr quoted Mueller saying the report “does not conclude that the President committed a crime, [but] it also does not exonerate him.” “No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION,”
Mueller report expected Thursday. Here’s what to watch and what’s next Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: kevin breuninger, cliff owen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, obstruction, york, trump, barr, conclusions, probe, muellers, whats, heres, information, expected, mueller, watch


Mueller report expected Thursday. Here's what to watch and what's next

Democrats and Republicans alike have clamored to see the final conclusions from the highly guarded investigation.

But like the probe itself, the process of preparing the report for its public rollout has been the subject of intense scrutiny and controversy on Capitol Hill.

Less than two days after receiving the lengthy report, Barr summarized what he said were its main conclusions in a four-page letter to congressional Judiciary Committee leaders.

Barr shared two main conclusions from Mueller’s probe, both of which were celebrated by Trump.

The special counsel did not establish conspiracy or coordination between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin, Barr wrote, quoting an excerpt from the report itself.

On the question obstruction, Barr quoted Mueller saying the report “does not conclude that the President committed a crime, [but] it also does not exonerate him.”

Mueller’s lack of a definitive stance on obstruction left the final decision to Barr and Rosenstein. They concluded: “The evidence developed during the special counsel’s investigation is not sufficient to establish that the president committed an obstruction of justice offense.”

Both sides of the political aisle were quick to respond that evening.

“No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION,” Trump tweeted, even though he was not exonerated by Mueller.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., immediately went after Barr’s credibility, saying in a statement that the attorney general “is not a neutral observer and is not in a position to make objective determinations about the report.”

Some Democrats had voiced concerns that Barr may have pre-judged the Mueller probe in light of an unsolicited memo he sent to the Justice Department last June criticizing the Mueller probe’s obstruction inquiry as “fatally misconceived.”

In addition, reports from The New York Times and Washington Post citing several members of Mueller’s team poured gasoline on the firestorm of controversy following Barr’s summary. The team members, speaking on the condition of anonymity, reportedly said that the evidence that Trump tried to obstruct the probe is stronger than Barr has publicly suggested.

Barr holds the ultimate authority on the report’s release. He gained oversight responsibilities from Rosenstein, who himself adopted those duties after former DOJ head Jeff Sessions recused himself from any investigations into Russian election meddling.

While Barr has vowed to be as transparent as possible in the handling and release of the report, he has made clear that both Congress and the public will see a version of the report that contains redactions in four areas. The attorney general said the redactions will be color-coded, so that readers can better understand why certain information was hidden.

That material includes information about intelligence sources and methods, details of ongoing investigations and other information that would “unduly infringe on the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties.”

But the most controversial redaction category involves the DOJ’s insistence that information related to Mueller’s grand jury cannot be released under federal law. Democratic lawmakers, led by House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler of New York, have pushed back on that argument, claiming Barr could share that information with Congress if he wanted to.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: kevin breuninger, cliff owen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, obstruction, york, trump, barr, conclusions, probe, muellers, whats, heres, information, expected, mueller, watch


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Two analysts make the case for their hold and buy ratings on Facebook

Two analysts make the case for their hold and buy ratings on Facebook16 Hours AgoLaura Martin of Needham and Youssef Squali of SunTrust join ‘Squawk Alley’ to discuss what’s changed at Facebook since CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s testified a year ago. They make the case for their hold and buy ratings on the stock.


Two analysts make the case for their hold and buy ratings on Facebook16 Hours AgoLaura Martin of Needham and Youssef Squali of SunTrust join ‘Squawk Alley’ to discuss what’s changed at Facebook since CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s testified a year ago. They make the case for their hold and buy ratings on the stock.
Two analysts make the case for their hold and buy ratings on Facebook Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buy, whats, stock, case, analysts, suntrust, zuckerbergs, ratings, youssef, testified, facebook, hold


Two analysts make the case for their hold and buy ratings on Facebook

Two analysts make the case for their hold and buy ratings on Facebook

16 Hours Ago

Laura Martin of Needham and Youssef Squali of SunTrust join ‘Squawk Alley’ to discuss what’s changed at Facebook since CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s testified a year ago. They make the case for their hold and buy ratings on the stock.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buy, whats, stock, case, analysts, suntrust, zuckerbergs, ratings, youssef, testified, facebook, hold


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Cramer: Investors should take analyst downgrades of GE, Boeing seriously

Investors should take note of the downgrades analysts made on a collection of stocks, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Monday. Analysts made their calls on General Electric, Boeing, and Clorox, among others, which could signal what’s to come, he said. The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed nearly 84 points on the day, while the S&P 500 rose 0.1% to extend a seven-day winning streak and the Nasdaq moved up 0.2%. Because the market has had an “incredible” run, many of these downgrades seem to be warranted an


Investors should take note of the downgrades analysts made on a collection of stocks, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Monday. Analysts made their calls on General Electric, Boeing, and Clorox, among others, which could signal what’s to come, he said. The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed nearly 84 points on the day, while the S&P 500 rose 0.1% to extend a seven-day winning streak and the Nasdaq moved up 0.2%. Because the market has had an “incredible” run, many of these downgrades seem to be warranted an
Cramer: Investors should take analyst downgrades of GE, Boeing seriously Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trouble, streak, cramer, money, whats, warranted, winning, boeing, investors, downgrades, analyst, calls, stocks, ge, seriously


Cramer: Investors should take analyst downgrades of GE, Boeing seriously

Investors should take note of the downgrades analysts made on a collection of stocks, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Monday.

Analysts made their calls on General Electric, Boeing, and Clorox, among others, which could signal what’s to come, he said. The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed nearly 84 points on the day, while the S&P 500 rose 0.1% to extend a seven-day winning streak and the Nasdaq moved up 0.2%.

Because the market has had an “incredible” run, many of these downgrades seem to be warranted and action oriented, Cramer said.

“You know my mantra: bulls make money, bears make money, but hogs … they get slaughtered,” the “Mad Money” host said. “I don’t want to be too greedy and that rule has never gotten me in trouble, so we need to take these calls seriously. We always should focus on downgrades. They can be very meaningful.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trouble, streak, cramer, money, whats, warranted, winning, boeing, investors, downgrades, analyst, calls, stocks, ge, seriously


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘There’s no way’ we’re headed for recession—five experts on the bond market’s warning sign

On Friday, the spread between 3-month and 10-year Treasury notes dipped below 10 basis points for the first time since 2007, indicating an inverted yield curve — when short-term yields rise above longer-term yields. To many, an inverted yield curve signals an oncoming recession. We also think that the problems in Europe … [are] indicative of what’s happening in the bunds market. So I think the yield curve is signaling slowdown, no inflation, and that risk asset prices are vulnerable. This is sig


On Friday, the spread between 3-month and 10-year Treasury notes dipped below 10 basis points for the first time since 2007, indicating an inverted yield curve — when short-term yields rise above longer-term yields. To many, an inverted yield curve signals an oncoming recession. We also think that the problems in Europe … [are] indicative of what’s happening in the bunds market. So I think the yield curve is signaling slowdown, no inflation, and that risk asset prices are vulnerable. This is sig
‘There’s no way’ we’re headed for recession—five experts on the bond market’s warning sign Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: lizzy gurdus, scott olson, getty images, stephanie keith, adam jeffery, frederic j brown, afp, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warning, recessionfive, whats, look, sign, markets, headed, bond, happening, way, experts, think, economy, inverted, market, yield, theres, recession, curve


'There's no way' we're headed for recession—five experts on the bond market's warning sign

U.S. stocks are holding steady despite what many see as a reliable recession indicator, and Wall Street experts are similarly unfazed — at least for now.

On Friday, the spread between 3-month and 10-year Treasury notes dipped below 10 basis points for the first time since 2007, indicating an inverted yield curve — when short-term yields rise above longer-term yields.

To many, an inverted yield curve signals an oncoming recession. But analysts and economists are largely split — and mostly underwhelmed — by the latest test of the market’s resilience.

Bespoke Investment Group co-founder Paul Hickey, for one, said the significance of the inversion will depend on how long it lasts:

“The importance of the yield curve is how long are we going to be inverted for? […] The longer you have this situation, the higher the risk goes. I think if we can go a few days inverted and then start to steepen again, I don’t think the concerns are as worrisome. … Our big area of focus is the semiconductors, and they’ve been a great leadership [group] for the market overall over the last six years. Every major sell-off in the stock market has been preceded by underperformance.”

James Camp, Eagle Asset Management’s managing director of strategic income, was more bearish:

“The issue for the equity market is the bond market telling you that global growth has really rolled over in a material sense, and we think that’s likely. We also think that the problems in Europe … [are] indicative of what’s happening in the bunds market. We now have negative yields back in Germany, so their 10-year now is back to that negative territory that had us all spooked just a couple of years ago. So I think the yield curve is signaling slowdown, no inflation, and that risk asset prices are vulnerable. […] I think the bond market’s basically telling you, ‘Look, the next move is lower, not higher, on short-term rates.'”

Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic advisor at Allianz, was not convinced that a recession is in store:

“When something happens for the first time since 2007, people pay attention, and that’s what happened on Friday when you got the inversion. However, when you look at the economy … and also when you look at the determinants of the yield curve shape and move, this is not signaling recession. This is signaling some very peculiar technicals in the market that have to do with what’s happening in Europe, that have to do with what’s happening in the Fed, rather than what’s happening in the economy. This economy, unless it gets disrupted by a major policy mistake, is on its way to 2.5 to 3 percent growth for this year. […] This is a strong labor market. We continue to have average monthly job creation well above what you would expect at this time of the cycle. You’re having real wage growth, and people are coming back into the labor market. Business investment is picking up; that’s good news for this year and next year. And, yes, the effects of the tax cuts are eroding, but against that, government spending is increasing. So, put it all together: this still has momentum. This economy still has momentum for this year. There’s no way you’re going to get a recession.”

Bank of America-Merrill Lynch Global Research’s head of U.S. equity and quantitative strategy, Savita Subramanian, noted that the market typically sees 12 months of gains following an inversion, and that creates opportunity:

“The Fed’s tone has shifted so aggressively to a dovish stance that I think the real opportunity today is in consumer discretionary stocks. In fact, we just upgraded the sector from underweight to overweight, … and what’s interesting is that consumer discretionary has been left for dead. And what I mean is the average mutual fund has a lower weight exposure in consumer discretionary stocks than they have since the financial crisis. […] Normally, this late in the cycle, the U.S. consumer would look very different, but this time around, consumers haven’t taken on as much leverage. Again, if you look at all of the balance sheet measures for consumers, they look really unusually healthy at this point relative to where they ought to be given how much the government has tried to encourage us to take on more and more debt.”

Tom Lee, head of research at Fundstrat Global Advisors, made an even bolder call:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: lizzy gurdus, scott olson, getty images, stephanie keith, adam jeffery, frederic j brown, afp, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warning, recessionfive, whats, look, sign, markets, headed, bond, happening, way, experts, think, economy, inverted, market, yield, theres, recession, curve


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘This Is Us’ star Chrissy Metz shares what’s inside in her wallet

‘This Is Us’ star Chrissy Metz shares what’s inside in her wallet7 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. She hardly carries cash, but has a variety of cards stashed.


‘This Is Us’ star Chrissy Metz shares what’s inside in her wallet7 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. She hardly carries cash, but has a variety of cards stashed.
‘This Is Us’ star Chrissy Metz shares what’s inside in her wallet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metz, chrissy, variety, try, view, whats, enabled, star, wallet, flash, inside, browser, shares, wallet7, stashed


'This Is Us' star Chrissy Metz shares what's inside in her wallet

‘This Is Us’ star Chrissy Metz shares what’s inside in her wallet

7 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

She hardly carries cash, but has a variety of cards stashed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metz, chrissy, variety, try, view, whats, enabled, star, wallet, flash, inside, browser, shares, wallet7, stashed


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘This Is Us’ star Chrissy Metz carries a $44 wallet from Nordstrom Rack—here’s what’s inside

Growing up, Chrissy Metz didn’t have a lot of money. And when she landed her breakout role on NBC’s “This Is Us,” she only had 81 cents in her bank account. Still, that doesn’t mean she’s flush with cash, at least not in her wallet. “I hardly ever carry cash,” Metz tells CNBC Make It. She uses a $44 wallet she bought nearly four years ago at Nordstrom Rack, which she loves.


Growing up, Chrissy Metz didn’t have a lot of money. And when she landed her breakout role on NBC’s “This Is Us,” she only had 81 cents in her bank account. Still, that doesn’t mean she’s flush with cash, at least not in her wallet. “I hardly ever carry cash,” Metz tells CNBC Make It. She uses a $44 wallet she bought nearly four years ago at Nordstrom Rack, which she loves.
‘This Is Us’ star Chrissy Metz carries a $44 wallet from Nordstrom Rack—here’s what’s inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: leah ginsberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metz, chrissy, uses, rackheres, theres, whats, tells, star, nordstrom, wallet, walleti, inside, cash, shes, upcoming, carries, zipper, 44


'This Is Us' star Chrissy Metz carries a $44 wallet from Nordstrom Rack—here's what's inside

Growing up, Chrissy Metz didn’t have a lot of money. And when she landed her breakout role on NBC’s “This Is Us,” she only had 81 cents in her bank account.

Today however, Metz, 38, has achieved amazing success — she has been nominated for both an Emmy and two Golden Globes; she has a bestselling book, “This Is Me” and she’s starring in the upcoming movie “Breakthrough.”

Still, that doesn’t mean she’s flush with cash, at least not in her wallet.

“I hardly ever carry cash,” Metz tells CNBC Make It.

She uses a $44 wallet she bought nearly four years ago at Nordstrom Rack, which she loves. “It’s really good inside, because there’s multiple places, also a zipper and also a secret [pocket] – like if you want to put some bills that you don’t want anyone to know about,” she says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: leah ginsberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metz, chrissy, uses, rackheres, theres, whats, tells, star, nordstrom, wallet, walleti, inside, cash, shes, upcoming, carries, zipper, 44


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Only 18 percent of Americans could answer this straightforward tax question

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act made some sweeping tax law changes when it passed in December 2017. But many Americans are unclear on how those changes could affect them. One study found that 28 percent don’t understand exactly what the law changed and 48 percent say they don’t know what tax bracket they’re now in. “Most Americans are in need of a refresher prior to filing their taxes,” the report concludes. Less than a quarter of respondents could correctly answer this key question about the standard


The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act made some sweeping tax law changes when it passed in December 2017. But many Americans are unclear on how those changes could affect them. One study found that 28 percent don’t understand exactly what the law changed and 48 percent say they don’t know what tax bracket they’re now in. “Most Americans are in need of a refresher prior to filing their taxes,” the report concludes. Less than a quarter of respondents could correctly answer this key question about the standard
Only 18 percent of Americans could answer this straightforward tax question Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, law, whats, answer, 18, key, americans, understand, question, tax, straightforward, respondents, changes, website, dont


Only 18 percent of Americans could answer this straightforward tax question

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act made some sweeping tax law changes when it passed in December 2017. But many Americans are unclear on how those changes could affect them.

One study found that 28 percent don’t understand exactly what the law changed and 48 percent say they don’t know what tax bracket they’re now in.

To take a deeper look into what’s confusing Americans, financial website GOBankingRates created a four-question quiz that covers key parts of the law — and 77 percent of the 501 respondents who took it failed, which means they got fewer than half of the questions correct.

“Most Americans are in need of a refresher prior to filing their taxes,” the report concludes. “These results appear to indicate that many taxpayers are poorly informed.”

Less than a quarter of respondents could correctly answer this key question about the standard deduction.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, law, whats, answer, 18, key, americans, understand, question, tax, straightforward, respondents, changes, website, dont


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Even most Americans with $10,000 to invest couldn’t answer these 3 money questions

There’s a lot of confusion about how retirement savings accounts work, even among those who are more well-prepared for retirement. That’s what TD Ameritrade concluded after a 2019 survey that The Harris Poll conducted for them asked U.S. adults with at least $10,000 in investable assets to answer questions about 401(k) plans and individual retirement accounts (IRAs). These three questions were particularly tricky and stumped at least half of all respondents:1. What’s the contribution limit for e


There’s a lot of confusion about how retirement savings accounts work, even among those who are more well-prepared for retirement. That’s what TD Ameritrade concluded after a 2019 survey that The Harris Poll conducted for them asked U.S. adults with at least $10,000 in investable assets to answer questions about 401(k) plans and individual retirement accounts (IRAs). These three questions were particularly tricky and stumped at least half of all respondents:1. What’s the contribution limit for e
Even most Americans with $10,000 to invest couldn’t answer these 3 money questions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, answer, retirement, 10000, whats, wellprepared, tricky, 2019, 401k, americans, invest, accounts, work, money, couldnt, questions


Even most Americans with $10,000 to invest couldn't answer these 3 money questions

There’s a lot of confusion about how retirement savings accounts work, even among those who are more well-prepared for retirement.

That’s what TD Ameritrade concluded after a 2019 survey that The Harris Poll conducted for them asked U.S. adults with at least $10,000 in investable assets to answer questions about 401(k) plans and individual retirement accounts (IRAs).

These three questions were particularly tricky and stumped at least half of all respondents:

1. What’s the contribution limit for employees who participate in a 401(k) in 2019 (excluding catch-up contributions)?

Just 19 percent of respondents selected the correct answer: $19,000.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, answer, retirement, 10000, whats, wellprepared, tricky, 2019, 401k, americans, invest, accounts, work, money, couldnt, questions


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This is the simple trick Bill Gates uses to remember what he reads

Bill Gates reads all the time — about 50 books a year — and is an advocate for its many benefits. So how does the billionaire book lover remember what he reads? “If you read enough, there’s a similarity between things that make it easy, because this thing is like this other thing. If you have a broad framework, then you have a place to put everything,” Gates says in the Quartz video, “How Bill Gates remembers what he reads.” “So you have the timeline, or you have the map or you have the branches


Bill Gates reads all the time — about 50 books a year — and is an advocate for its many benefits. So how does the billionaire book lover remember what he reads? “If you read enough, there’s a similarity between things that make it easy, because this thing is like this other thing. If you have a broad framework, then you have a place to put everything,” Gates says in the Quartz video, “How Bill Gates remembers what he reads.” “So you have the timeline, or you have the map or you have the branches
This is the simple trick Bill Gates uses to remember what he reads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: catherine clifford, the gates notes llc
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, simple, trick, bill, reads, reading, known, science, uses, framework, gates, whats, thing, quartz, remember


This is the simple trick Bill Gates uses to remember what he reads

Bill Gates reads all the time — about 50 books a year — and is an advocate for its many benefits.

So how does the billionaire book lover remember what he reads? The trick, he says, is context.

“If you read enough, there’s a similarity between things that make it easy, because this thing is like this other thing. If you have a broad framework, then you have a place to put everything,” Gates says in the Quartz video, “How Bill Gates remembers what he reads.”

When you come to a topic with a base layer of understanding, then fitting in new tidbits of information makes them easier to remember.

“So, incremental knowledge is so much easier to maintain in a rich way,” Gates says. “At first it is very daunting but then as you get the kind of scope, then all these pieces fit in.”

If you want to learn about science, for example, Gates says reading the history of scientists and reading about the progress they made can give you the context or framework to help you remember the details.

“So you have the timeline, or you have the map or you have the branches of science and what’s known and what’s not known,” Gates says in the Quartz interview.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: catherine clifford, the gates notes llc
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, simple, trick, bill, reads, reading, known, science, uses, framework, gates, whats, thing, quartz, remember


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post