Senate approves impeachment trial rules, rejecting witnesses

The U.S. Senate plunged into President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial with Republicans abruptly abandoning plans to cram opening arguments into two days but solidly rejecting Democratic demands for more witnesses to expose Trump’s “trifecta” of offenses. But it ended near 2 a.m. Wednesday with Republicans easily approving the new trial rules largely on their terms. After one particularly bitter exchange, Roberts intervened, taking the rare step of admonishing both the Democratic House managers


The U.S. Senate plunged into President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial with Republicans abruptly abandoning plans to cram opening arguments into two days but solidly rejecting Democratic demands for more witnesses to expose Trump’s “trifecta” of offenses.
But it ended near 2 a.m. Wednesday with Republicans easily approving the new trial rules largely on their terms.
After one particularly bitter exchange, Roberts intervened, taking the rare step of admonishing both the Democratic House managers
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Senate approves impeachment trial rules, rejecting witnesses

(L-R) House impeachment managers Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY), Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) and Rep. Jason Crow (D-CO) speaks to reporters during a brief media availability before the start of the impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on January 21, 2020 in Washington, DC.

The U.S. Senate plunged into President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial with Republicans abruptly abandoning plans to cram opening arguments into two days but solidly rejecting Democratic demands for more witnesses to expose Trump’s “trifecta” of offenses.

A marathon session of nearly 13 hours started Tuesday with a setback for Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell and the president’s legal team, exposing a crack in the GOP ranks and the growing political unease over the historic impeachment proceedings unfolding amid a watchful public in an election year. But it ended near 2 a.m. Wednesday with Republicans easily approving the new trial rules largely on their terms.

“It’s about time we bring this power trip in for a landing,” said White House counsel Pat Cipollone, the president’s lead lawyer, lashing out at the House Democrats prosecuting the case.

“It’s a farce,” he said about the impeachment proceeding, “and it should end.”

Chief Justice John Roberts gaveled open the session, with House prosecutors on one side, Trump’s team on the other, in the well of the Senate, as senators sat silently at their desks, under oath to do “impartial justice.” No cellphones or other electronics were allowed.

As the day stretched deep into the night, lawyerly arguments gave way to more pointedly political ones. Tempers flared and senators paced the chamber. Democrats pursued what may be their only chance to force senators to vote on hearing new testimony.

After one particularly bitter exchange, Roberts intervened, taking the rare step of admonishing both the Democratic House managers and the White House counsel to “remember where they are.”

“I think it is appropriate at this point for me to admonish both the House managers and the president’s counsel in equal terms to remember that they are addressing the world’s greatest deliberative body,” the usually reserved Roberts said. He told them that description of the Senate stemmed from a 1905 trial when a senator objected to the word “pettifogging,” because members should “avoid speaking in a manner and using language that is not conducive to civil discourse.”

Over and over, Republicans turned back Democratic amendments to subpoena documents from the White House, State Department, Defense Department and budget office.

By the same 53-47 party-line, they turned away witnesses with front-row seats to Trump’s actions including acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney and John Bolton, the former national security adviser critical of the Ukraine policy.

Only on one amendment, to ensure a vote later on additional witnesses, did a single Republican, Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, join Democrats. But it, too, was rejected 52-48.

As the hours mounted, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer brushed back an offer from McConnell to more quickly stack the votes.

“It’s not our job to make it easy for you,” Rep. Adam Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee leading the prosecution, told the Senate. “Our job is to make it hard to deprive the American people of a fair trial.”

As the visitors’ gallery filled with guests, actress-and-activist Alyssa Milano among them, and Trump’s most ardent House allies lining the back rows, the day quickly took on the cadence of a trial proceeding over whether the president’s actions toward Ukraine warranted removal from office.

Earlier, McConnell stunned senators and delayed the start of proceedings with his decision to back off some of his proposed rules. Republicans were said to be concerned over the political optics of “dark of night” sessions.

Instead, 24 hours of opening arguments for each side will be spread over three days, for a moment swelling Democrats’ momentum as they push to break the standoff over calling new witnesses.

Cipollone led the prosecution, scoffing that the House charges against Trump were “ridiculous,” insisting the president “has done absolutely nothing wrong.”

The White House legal team did not dispute Trump’s actions, when he called Ukraine and asked for a “favor,” which was to investigate Democrat Joe Biden as the U.S. was withholding military aid the ally desperately needed as it faced off with hostile Russia on its border. But the lawyers insisted the president did nothing wrong. “Absolutely no case,” Cipollone said.

Schiff, the California Democrat, opened for the prosecution saying America’s Founders added the remedy of impeachment in the Constitution with “precisely this type of conduct in mind — conduct that abuses the power of office for a personal benefit, that undermines our national security, and that invites foreign interference in the democratic process of an election.”

Said Schiff: “It is the trifecta of constitutional misconduct justifying impeachment.″

The other lead lawyer on Trump’s team, Jay Sekulow, retorted, “I’ll give you a trifecta,” outlining complaints over the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry process.

The impeachment trial, unfolding in an election year, is testing whether Trump’s actions toward Ukraine warrant removal at the same time that voters are forming their own verdict on his White House.

All four senators who are presidential candidates are off the campaign trail, seated as jurors. “My focus is going to be on impeachment,” Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, told reporters.

The day began as a debate over rules, and it was only when the clerk started reading the dry language of the resolution that the hand-written changes became apparent.

McConnell made the adjustment after encountering resistance from Republicans during a closed-door lunch meeting. Senators worried about the public reaction to cramming the 24 hours of opening arguments from each side into just two days.

Sen. Susan Collins of Maine and Sen. Lisa Murkowksi of Alaska, along with a substantial number of other Republicans, wanted to make the changes, according to people familiar with the situation. Some senators argued that the two-day limit would have helped Democrats cast Republicans as squeezing testimony through in the dead of night.

Collins and Murkowski, who often ally to buck GOP leadership, sat side by side in the Senate through the day’s proceedings.

The turnaround was a swift lesson as White House wishes run into the reality of the Senate. The White House wanted a session kept to a shorter period to both expedite the trial and shift more of the proceedings into late night, according to a person familiar with the matter but unauthorized to discuss it in public.

“READ THE TRANSCRIPTS!” the president tweeted from overseas, at a global leaders conference in Davos, Switzerland.

That’s the transcript of his phone call in which he asked new Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy for “a favor.” The Democrats cite that transcript as solid evidence against Trump, though he repeatedly describes it as “perfect.”

A whistleblower’s complaint led the House to impeach Trump last month on a charge of abuse of power for pushing Ukraine to investigate Democratic rival Biden and his son Hunter Biden as the White House was withholding military aid from Ukraine. Trump also was impeached on a second charge, of obstruction of Congress, in the House probe.

Schumer of New York said Republican senators “felt the heat” and it “shows that they can make other changes, and that we can get documents and witnesses.”

Schumer offered the first of several amendments to the rules — to issue a subpoena for to the White House for “all documents, communications and other records” relating to the Ukraine matter.

It was rejected on a party-line vote, as were the others.

Trump’s legal team, absent its TV-showcase attorneys, Alan Dershowitz and Kenneth Starr who were not in the chamber, argued that in seeking new evidence the House was bringing a half-baked case that would be thrown out in any other court of law.

But Rep. Zoe Lofgren of California, one of the House managers and the first woman to argue for the prosecution in a presidential impeachment trial, said the House wasn’t asking the Senate to do the job for them. “The House is asking the Senate to do its job, to have a trial,” she said. “Have you ever heard of a trial without evidence?″

The White House had instructed officials not to testify in the House inquiry, and refused to turn over witnesses or documents, citing what is says is precedence in defiance of congressional subpoenas.

The ambassadors and national security officials who did appear before the House delivered often striking testimony, highlights that were displayed on television screens during the Senate proceeding.

At one point, Democrat Schiff displayed video of Trump himself suggesting there should be more witnesses testifying.

One by one, the House managers made the case, drawing on their own life experiences.

Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., a former police chief, said she never saw anyone take “such extreme steps to hide evidence.″ Rep. Jason Crow, a former Army Ranger who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, seemed to capture senators’ attention when he told them near he knew the hour was late, but it was morning in Ukraine where soldiers were waking up to fight Russia, depending on U.S. aid.

Legal scholars have long insisted the framers of the Constitution provided impeachment as a remedy for “other high crimes and misdemeanors,” a particularly broad definition that doesn’t mean simply specific criminal acts.

Democrats point in particular to a General Accountability Office report that found the White House violated federal law by stalling money to Ukraine that had been approved by Congress.

No president has ever been removed from office by the Senate. With its 53-47 Republican majority, the Senate is not expected to mount the two-thirds vote needed for conviction.


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Senate Democrats will seek to subpoena White House records in Trump impeachment trial

“The first amendment I will offer will ask that the Senate subpoena White House documents related to the charges against the president,” Schumer said at a news conference. McConnell on Monday released an outline of the trial rules that largely resemble former President Bill Clinton’s 1998 impeachment trial. McConnell has said he wants a speedy acquittal for Trump, and has openly said his office is coordinating with the White House. The White House might also try to dismiss the trial outright in


“The first amendment I will offer will ask that the Senate subpoena White House documents related to the charges against the president,” Schumer said at a news conference.
McConnell on Monday released an outline of the trial rules that largely resemble former President Bill Clinton’s 1998 impeachment trial.
McConnell has said he wants a speedy acquittal for Trump, and has openly said his office is coordinating with the White House.
The White House might also try to dismiss the trial outright in
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Senate Democrats will seek to subpoena White House records in Trump impeachment trial

WASHINGTON — Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Tuesday that he will introduce a series of amendments to the proposed rules for President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, set to begin Tuesday afternoon.

“The first amendment I will offer will ask that the Senate subpoena White House documents related to the charges against the president,” Schumer said at a news conference. “Those documents include the records of meetings and calls between President Trump and the president of Ukraine, as well as those records created or received by … White House personnel about the decision to hold and release the military assistance to Ukraine.”

McConnell on Monday released an outline of the trial rules that largely resemble former President Bill Clinton’s 1998 impeachment trial. But the rules in Trump’s trial depart from Clinton’s in key sections — most notably in the tight time constraints placed on both sides to state their cases.

Democrats were quick to cry foul. “McConnell’s resolution is nothing short of a national disgrace,” Schumer said Tuesday, “and it will go down in history as one of the very dark days of the Senate.”

Ahead of Wednesday’s opening arguments, Democrats have an opportunity on Tuesday afternoon to introduce amendments to these rules, which the full Senate will then vote on.

McConnell has said he wants a speedy acquittal for Trump, and has openly said his office is coordinating with the White House. His final resolution allows just two days each for House managers, and then Trump’s defense team, to present their arguments, with 24 hours of total time allotted each side.

As with Clinton’s trial, McConnell’s resolution allows senators to vote on witness testimony during the trial itself. But it also requires a specific vote in the majority-Republican chamber to consider evidence gathered from the House impeachment process.

The White House might also try to dismiss the trial outright in a motion on the Senate floor. While only a simple 51-vote majority is required to pass that motion, a handful of the 53 Republicans in the chamber have suggested they would not vote to do so.

Still, it is highly unlikely that two-thirds of the Senate will vote to convict and remove a Republican president. Trump is just the third U.S. president ever to be impeached, and no Senate Republicans have said they will vote to convict.

The president has denied wrongdoing.

After Tuesday’s debate over the trial rules, opening arguments are set to begin at 1 p.m. on Wednesday.


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US-China phase one deal is a ‘disaster,’ former senior economist at the White House says

DAVOS, Switzerland – The U.S.-China phase one deal does not address structural problems in the bilateral trade relationship, a panel of trade experts at the World Economic Forum said Tuesday. “While this deal is great in the sense that it has calmed things, additional tariffs aren’t going on, aside from that the deal is essentially a disaster. Bown, who served as a senior economist for international trade in the White House, under Obama’s leadership, said he is “very worried” about what’s in the


DAVOS, Switzerland – The U.S.-China phase one deal does not address structural problems in the bilateral trade relationship, a panel of trade experts at the World Economic Forum said Tuesday.
“While this deal is great in the sense that it has calmed things, additional tariffs aren’t going on, aside from that the deal is essentially a disaster.
Bown, who served as a senior economist for international trade in the White House, under Obama’s leadership, said he is “very worried” about what’s in the
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US-China phase one deal is a 'disaster,' former senior economist at the White House says

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He shakes hands with US President Donald Trump during a signing ceremony for trade agreement between the US and China in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, January 15, 2020.

DAVOS, Switzerland – The U.S.-China phase one deal does not address structural problems in the bilateral trade relationship, a panel of trade experts at the World Economic Forum said Tuesday.

After about two years of a tit-for-tat tariffs dispute, the two largest world economies seemed to have calmed the debate last week with the signing of an initial agreement. The deal didn’t roll back all tariffs imposed between Washington D.C. and Beijing, but both parties agreed to discuss that during the next round of trade negotiations.

However, experts speaking at the WEF said the deal is a “disaster” and simply an “intermediate step” to allow tensions to calm down.

“While this deal is great in the sense that it has calmed things, additional tariffs aren’t going on, aside from that the deal is essentially a disaster. It doesn’t address any of the systemic issues,” Chad Bown, senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, said.

Bown, who served as a senior economist for international trade in the White House, under Obama’s leadership, said he is “very worried” about what’s in the agreement.

China agreed to buy an additional $200 billion in U.S. goods over the next two years, as part of the deal. President Donald Trump, who addressed the Davos forum earlier on Tuesday, said the number of purchases could end up closer to $300 billion.

“These are unrealistic numbers, which puts the whole viability of the deal into question,” Bown said, adding that the only way to reach these figures is by diverting trade away from other countries, such as soy beans away from Brazil and fish away from Canada.

Among the additional purchases of U.S. goods, China has committed to buy at least $40 billion worth of American farming products. However, a leading commodities expert at Goldman Sachs casted doubts over whether China will manage to do that. Speaking to CNBC earlier this month Jeff Currie said “there is still a lot of uncertainty about how you would achieve $40 (billion) or potentially even $50 billion of agricultural purchases.”

However, most trade experts argue that the most difficult trade negotiations between the U.S. and China have yet to begin.

“When we think about the phase one deal it is the easier part of this, you can have Chinese people buying more U.S. goods and somehow the Chinese consumers will have to absorb the 2.4 billion dollars of American nuts and say goodbye to the New Zealand, Australians suppliers… but that’s the easy part,” Jin Keyu, associate professor at the London School of Economics (LSE) said at the WEF panel.

“The difficult part is really much about the model that China has, the political economy model that uses strong state capacity,” she added.

One of the main arguments used by President Trump in his dispute with China is the trade deficit between both economies. Data released earlier this month showed that the U.S. trade deficit with China fell to $43.09 billion for the month — the lowest level since October 2016.

However, Keyu warned the numbers could change.

“The grand irony is that if China actually did everything that the U.S. demanded it to do the result was going to be a much more successful Chinese economy and a much larger trade deficit in the U.S,” she said.

Nonetheless, speaking at the same Davos panel, the head of the World Trade Organization, Roberto Azevedo said: “The political impact of (the phase one deal) cannot be underestimated.”

Graciela Márquez Colín, the Mexican economy minister, also sitting at the panel explained that the deal is an “intermediate step” to calm down ongoing tensions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: silvia amaro
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White House top economic advisor Larry Kudlow says economic growth will beat 3% this year

President Donald Trump’s top economic advisor, Larry Kudlow, told CNBC on Tuesday that GDP growth in the U.S. should hit at least 3% in 2020. “This is a long cycle, and what you’ve got here in the Trump years is essentially a mini upcycle,” said Kudlow, National Economic Council director. Economic growth slumped to 2% in the second quarter and 2.1% in the third quarter, according to government data. That would make it extremely tough for the U.S. economy to hike its growth for the year above 3%.


President Donald Trump’s top economic advisor, Larry Kudlow, told CNBC on Tuesday that GDP growth in the U.S. should hit at least 3% in 2020.
“This is a long cycle, and what you’ve got here in the Trump years is essentially a mini upcycle,” said Kudlow, National Economic Council director.
Economic growth slumped to 2% in the second quarter and 2.1% in the third quarter, according to government data.
That would make it extremely tough for the U.S. economy to hike its growth for the year above 3%.
White House top economic advisor Larry Kudlow says economic growth will beat 3% this year Cached Page below :
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White House top economic advisor Larry Kudlow says economic growth will beat 3% this year

President Donald Trump’s top economic advisor, Larry Kudlow, told CNBC on Tuesday that GDP growth in the U.S. should hit at least 3% in 2020.

“This is a long cycle, and what you’ve got here in the Trump years is essentially a mini upcycle,” said Kudlow, National Economic Council director. “You’ve gone from 1.5% to 2% growth. We had it going at almost 4%, then the Fed tightened.”

“We’re now down to 2.5% to 3%. I’m looking for faster growth: I think we’re going to get 3% this year,” he added. “The trade deals will help, the Fed changed policy — that was very, very important.”

Some investors worried in 2019 that pressure from the U.S.-China tariffs, a decelerating global economy and low inflation levels would cut short a year that started off with a 3.1% GDP gain. But with two new major trade deals and new predictions for a global recovery in 2020, sentiment appears to be improving.

Stronger manufacturing and trade data released earlier this month suggested the U.S. economy ended 2019 on a healthy note, with expectations that the economy will grow more than 2% in the fourth quarter. While that would represent a slowdown from the 2.9% increase in 2018, 2% growth would still suggest the decade-old expansion is set to continue into 2020.

Globally, the most recent indication for better growth came from the International Monetary Fund, which earlier this week said it sees growth running at 3.3% in 2020, up from 2.9% in 2019.

But Kudlow’s June prediction that U.S. growth would maintain its 3% rate in 2019 will likely fall short when the Commerce Department releases its fourth-quarter numbers later this year.

Economic growth slumped to 2% in the second quarter and 2.1% in the third quarter, according to government data. That would make it extremely tough for the U.S. economy to hike its growth for the year above 3%.

Earlier this year, the president’s economic advisor told CNBC that “That 3% number is not contingent on a China deal that might be satisfactory for American economic interests.”

“What has changed,” he said in June, “is lower tax rates, massive deregulation, opening up the energy sector and various trade reforms.”


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Gary Cohn says Trump’s tariffs ‘totally hurt the United States’ and ‘collided’ with the tax cut

Former White House chief economic advisor Gary Cohn said Sunday that President Donald Trump’s tariffs hurt the U.S. economy and undermined the stimulative impact of the administration’s massive tax cut passed in 2017. Cohn, in an interview with CBS’ Face The Nation, said Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs “collided” with his tax policy by undermining a provision that allowed companies to write off their capital expenditures. “I think it’s totally hurt the United States,” Cohn said, referencing t


Former White House chief economic advisor Gary Cohn said Sunday that President Donald Trump’s tariffs hurt the U.S. economy and undermined the stimulative impact of the administration’s massive tax cut passed in 2017.
Cohn, in an interview with CBS’ Face The Nation, said Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs “collided” with his tax policy by undermining a provision that allowed companies to write off their capital expenditures.
“I think it’s totally hurt the United States,” Cohn said, referencing t
Gary Cohn says Trump’s tariffs ‘totally hurt the United States’ and ‘collided’ with the tax cut Cached Page below :
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Gary Cohn says Trump's tariffs 'totally hurt the United States' and 'collided' with the tax cut

Former White House chief economic advisor Gary Cohn said Sunday that President Donald Trump’s tariffs hurt the U.S. economy and undermined the stimulative impact of the administration’s massive tax cut passed in 2017.

Cohn, in an interview with CBS’ Face The Nation, said Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs “collided” with his tax policy by undermining a provision that allowed companies to write off their capital expenditures.

“I think it’s totally hurt the United States,” Cohn said, referencing the tariffs. “[…]We’re missing a big component. We’re missing the capital expenditures from companies in the United States.”

Companies buy steel and aluminum to build factories and equipment, but the metal tariffs increased input costs and diminished the benefits of writing off these capital expenditures under the tax law, Cohn said.

“So all of the sudden, the advantages that we were trying to give companies to help stimulate the economy, to build facilities, to go out and hire people, to drive wages, we took away that advantage by taxing the input that they needed to build,” Cohn told CBS.

The former Goldman Sachs president played an instrumental role in formulating Trump’s tax policy, but he clashed with protectionists in the administration on the issue of tariffs. He also criticized the White House over Trump’s response to a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in which a civil rights activist was killed in 2017.

Cohn resigned from the administration in March of 2018.


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Trump’s Fed pick Judy Shelton faces obstacles to confirmation

Judy Shelton, U.S. executive director for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., May 29, 2019. The second, though, is a sticky legal question and centers around a provision in the Federal Reserve Act that prohibits two governors from the same district. ‘A perfect fit’ who faces headwindsOne strategy that could be employed is if Shelton had a residence elsewhere. A White House release Wednesday stated that she is from Virginia, though


Judy Shelton, U.S. executive director for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., May 29, 2019.
The second, though, is a sticky legal question and centers around a provision in the Federal Reserve Act that prohibits two governors from the same district.
‘A perfect fit’ who faces headwindsOne strategy that could be employed is if Shelton had a residence elsewhere.
A White House release Wednesday stated that she is from Virginia, though
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Trump's Fed pick Judy Shelton faces obstacles to confirmation

Judy Shelton, U.S. executive director for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., May 29, 2019. Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s intention to nominate economist Judy Shelton to the Federal Reserve comes with two pressing questions — whether she could be a future chair at the central bank, and if she even will be able to serve if confirmed. The first is largely a political question and would only come into play if Trump continues to be dissatisfied with Chairman Jerome Powell and chooses not to renominate him when his term expires in 2022. The second, though, is a sticky legal question and centers around a provision in the Federal Reserve Act that prohibits two governors from the same district. Governor Lael Brainard hails from the same Richmond region, though it’s not clear that there wouldn’t be a way around the rule. In an announcement Wednesday, the White House said Trump plans on sending Shelton’s name to the Senate, along with that of fellow economist Christopher Waller of Missouri, whose nomination is expected to face few obstacles.

“Legally, it’s absolutely correct that there is a stipulation that calls for the appointment of representatives from each of the districts and not having any two from the same district. So far, that looks like it poses a great constraint,” said George Selgin, director of the Cato Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, a libertarian think tank. “But in practice, for all kinds of reasons it hasn’t been a binding constraint.” Selgin pointed specifically to former governors Elizabeth Duke (2008-12) and Sarah Raskin (2010-14), both of whom also were from the Richmond district, which encompasses Washington, D.C. A Fed spokesman referred the issue to the White House, which declined comment. Shelton did not respond to a request for comment. The Federal Reserve Act states that “In selecting the members of the Board, not more than one of whom shall be selected from any one Federal Reserve district, the President shall have due regard to a fair representation of the financial, agricultural, industrial, and commercial interests, and geographical divisions of the country.”

‘A perfect fit’ who faces headwinds

One strategy that could be employed is if Shelton had a residence elsewhere. A White House release Wednesday stated that she is from Virginia, though she could be named to represent another district. On the political issue, speculation has been growing that Shelton would be a strong contender for the chair position should Trump not renominate Powell. The president has been a fierce critic of Powell for the chairman’s lead in raising interest rates four times in 2018 and for rolling back the trillions of dollars in asset purchases instituted by his predecessors. Shelton’s record on interest rates is somewhat complicated — she has criticized both the near-zero rates instituted during and for several years after the financial crisis, and the more recent moves to raise rates. Trump has pushed the Fed to cut rates and even urged the central bank to look at the negative rates pervasive in parts of Europe. Shelton also has spoken in favor of returning to the gold standard that backs the issuance of U.S. dollars, and opposes the practice of paying interest on reserves that banks store at the Fed.


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Watch: Trump hosts Louisiana State University football team as impeachment trial looms

President Donald Trump on Friday hosts the Louisiana State University football team at the White House as his impeachment trial gears up in the Senate. It’s a tradition for championship teams to visit the White House, however, some pro athletes have declined post-victory invitations from Trump. The Golden State Warriors, for example, did not visit the White House in 2017. Louisiana’s visit comes a day after the Senate formally began Trump’s impeachment trial. On Friday, Trump announced his legal


President Donald Trump on Friday hosts the Louisiana State University football team at the White House as his impeachment trial gears up in the Senate.
It’s a tradition for championship teams to visit the White House, however, some pro athletes have declined post-victory invitations from Trump.
The Golden State Warriors, for example, did not visit the White House in 2017.
Louisiana’s visit comes a day after the Senate formally began Trump’s impeachment trial.
On Friday, Trump announced his legal
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Watch: Trump hosts Louisiana State University football team as impeachment trial looms

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President Donald Trump on Friday hosts the Louisiana State University football team at the White House as his impeachment trial gears up in the Senate.

On Monday, the team won the college playoff final, which Trump attended in New Orleans.

It’s a tradition for championship teams to visit the White House, however, some pro athletes have declined post-victory invitations from Trump. The Golden State Warriors, for example, did not visit the White House in 2017.

Louisiana’s visit comes a day after the Senate formally began Trump’s impeachment trial.

On Friday, Trump announced his legal team for the trial, which is expected to get started on Tuesday. His defense team will include Ken Starr, the independent counsel whose report led to President Bill Clinton’s impeachment, and Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz, whose clients have included notorious pedophile Jeffrey Epstein and O.J. Simpson.

The impeachment inquiry was triggered by Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy. While withholding congressionally approved military aid, Trump in the call pressed his newly elected counterpart to announce an investigation into Democrat Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch, state, president, trump, louisiana, team, impeachment, looms, visit, house, trumps, hosts, white, trial, university


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Trump economic advisor Larry Kudlow says White House is ‘looking at’ changes to global anti-bribery law

Larry Kudlow, director of the U.S. National Economic Council, speaks to members of the media outside the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is “looking at” making changes to a decades-old global anti-bribery law, White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow told reporters on Friday. “We are looking at it, and we have heard some complaints from our companies,” Kudlow said, responding to a question about the Foreign Corrupt Practices


Larry Kudlow, director of the U.S. National Economic Council, speaks to members of the media outside the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019.
WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is “looking at” making changes to a decades-old global anti-bribery law, White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow told reporters on Friday.
“We are looking at it, and we have heard some complaints from our companies,” Kudlow said, responding to a question about the Foreign Corrupt Practices
Trump economic advisor Larry Kudlow says White House is ‘looking at’ changes to global anti-bribery law Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: christina wilkie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, looking, house, economic, law, trump, white, larry, global, changes, washington, told, kudlow, companies


Trump economic advisor Larry Kudlow says White House is 'looking at' changes to global anti-bribery law

Larry Kudlow, director of the U.S. National Economic Council, speaks to members of the media outside the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019.

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is “looking at” making changes to a decades-old global anti-bribery law, White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow told reporters on Friday.

“We are looking at it, and we have heard some complaints from our companies,” Kudlow said, responding to a question about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The law generally prohibits American companies from paying bribes to secure contracts overseas.

“I don’t want to say anything definitive policy-wise, but we are looking at it,” Kudlow added.

Pressed about the specific changes the White House might try to make to the FCPA, Kudlow declined to offer details but signaled that the administration was working on a “package” of reforms.

“Let me wait until we get a better package,” before addressing specifics, Kudlow said at the White House. A White House spokesman did not respond to follow-up questions from CNBC about what was being considered.

The questions about possible changes to the FCPA were sparked by revelations in a soon-to-be-released book about Trump, which describes an episode in which Trump bitterly complained about the law, which he sees as a hindrance to U.S. businesses competing overseas.

According to Washington Post reporters Phillip Rucker and Carol Leonnig, in 2017 Trump told his then-Secretary of State Rex Tillerson that it was “just so unfair that American companies aren’t allowed to pay bribes to get business overseas.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: christina wilkie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, looking, house, economic, law, trump, white, larry, global, changes, washington, told, kudlow, companies


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The 2020 Oscar nominations show the Academy Awards is still a white man’s game

Oscar Statue at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on February 23, 2019 in Beverly Hills, California. Four years after it introduced major changes to its voting and recruitment rules, the organization behind the Academy Awards still has a diversity problem. While the group has made significant strides, this year’s list of Oscar nods shows that issues of representation persist — a point that actress Issa Rae underscored while announcing the nominees for best director, commenting, “Co


Oscar Statue at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on February 23, 2019 in Beverly Hills, California.
Four years after it introduced major changes to its voting and recruitment rules, the organization behind the Academy Awards still has a diversity problem.
While the group has made significant strides, this year’s list of Oscar nods shows that issues of representation persist — a point that actress Issa Rae underscored while announcing the nominees for best director, commenting, “Co
The 2020 Oscar nominations show the Academy Awards is still a white man’s game Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nominated, nods, number, game, oscar, nominations, white, 2020, mans, academy, films, female, picture, directors, awards, women


The 2020 Oscar nominations show the Academy Awards is still a white man's game

Oscar Statue at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on February 23, 2019 in Beverly Hills, California.

Four years after it introduced major changes to its voting and recruitment rules, the organization behind the Academy Awards still has a diversity problem.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 2016 set a goal of doubling the number of diverse members by 2020 following outrage over a lack of Oscar nominees who were female or people of color.

While the group has made significant strides, this year’s list of Oscar nods shows that issues of representation persist — a point that actress Issa Rae underscored while announcing the nominees for best director, commenting, “Congratulations to those men.”

Only two of the 20 actors and actresses nominated were people of color and no female director was nominated this year. Of the nine films nominated for best picture, only the South Korean movie “Parasite” featured a predominantly nonwhite cast and only one, “Little Women,” was centered around numerous female characters.

Notable snubs for the 2020 ceremony, which will take place on Feb. 9, include Greta Gerwig in the directing category, Jennifer Lopez and Awkwafina in the acting categories, as well as films such as “Dolemite is my Name,” “The Farewell,” “Us,” “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” and “Queen and Slim,” which were absent from the ballot altogether.

In a year that had an impressive number of diverse creators and actors, many in the industry pointed out that it’s puzzling that so few received nods for their work.

Hollywood has made progress, although it’s not quite as fast as industry watchers such as Stacy Smith, professor at USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, would like.

“There are signs of remarkable progress behind the camera,” she said. “But, I think the [Academy Award] nominations really represent major steps backward when the rest of the industry is working diligently to move in the direction that reflects the audience.”

As women such as Patty Jenkins (“Wonder Woman”), Anna Boden (co-director of “Captain Marvel”), Kathryn Bigelow (“The Hurt Locker”), Ava DuVernay (“A Wrinkle In Time”), Jennifer Lee (co-directed “Frozen”) and Elizabeth Banks (“Pitch Perfect 2″) prove that female directors can make good films that garner big bucks at the box office, more women are getting a chance to shine in top roles.

Currently, five of the top 10 most anticipated films of the year, including “Wonder Woman 1984” and a remake of Disney’s “Mulan,” are directed by women and star women.

Meanwhile, celebrities including J.J. Abrams (“Star Wars: The Force Awakens”), Tessa Thompson (“Creed II”), Bryce Dallas Howard (“Jurassic Park: The Lost World”), Reese Witherspoon (“Big Little Lies”) and Jordan Peele (“Get Out”) have pledged their commitment to working with more female directors on feature films.

Despite this growth in representation, female directors are still getting left off the Oscar ballot even when they direct Academy-worthy films. A number of female directors could have snagged a nomination this year: Gerwig, whose “Little Women” received six nods, was a top contender heading into the nominations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nominated, nods, number, game, oscar, nominations, white, 2020, mans, academy, films, female, picture, directors, awards, women


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Beijing cracking down on IP theft could boost investment in China, former US negotiator says

He explained that the trade agreement’s provisions to protect intellectual property would make a difference for many of the companies doing business in China. They’re going to have due process for the judicial proceedings. It calls for China to submit an “Action Plan to strengthen intellectual property protection” within 30 days of the agreement taking effect. I’ll also make the point, this is going for China,” Willems said. Ultimately, “better intellectual property protection means more investm


He explained that the trade agreement’s provisions to protect intellectual property would make a difference for many of the companies doing business in China.
They’re going to have due process for the judicial proceedings.
It calls for China to submit an “Action Plan to strengthen intellectual property protection” within 30 days of the agreement taking effect.
I’ll also make the point, this is going for China,” Willems said.
Ultimately, “better intellectual property protection means more investm
Beijing cracking down on IP theft could boost investment in China, former US negotiator says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, property, trade, willems, boost, theyre, theft, white, negotiator, intellectual, going, beijing, china, cracking, agreement


Beijing cracking down on IP theft could boost investment in China, former US negotiator says

President Donald Trump, with (L-R) Vice President Mike Pence, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, speaks during a press conference with Chinas Vice Premier Liu He(not shown), the countrys top trade negotiator, before they sign a trade agreement between the US and China during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC on January 15, 2020.

If Beijing cracks down hard on intellectual property thefts, it would not only boost the U.S. economy but it would also be good for China, according to a former top White House trade official.

Taking steps to protect trade secrets of foreign businesses operating in the world’s second-largest economy was part of the “phase one” trade deal that U.S. President Donald Trump signed with China on Wednesday.

“To me, the most significant part of this (deal) was what the U.S. was able to achieve on intellectual property,” Clete Willems, a partner at law firm Akin Gump, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday. “Trade secrets theft has been a long-time concern for U.S. businesses, and businesses around the world.”

Willems was previously the deputy director of the National Economic Council and served as the lead trade negotiator for the United States at multilateral summits like the G-7 and G-20.

He explained that the trade agreement’s provisions to protect intellectual property would make a difference for many of the companies doing business in China. “They’re going to have criminal penalties. They’re going to have due process for the judicial proceedings. They’re going to apply those penalties broader than they did in the past,” Willems said, adding there are provisions about pharmaceutical patents and counterfeit goods in the trade pact.

Wednesday’s agreement takes steps to root out several practices by Beijing that has irked the White House and members of Congress from both parties, including intellectual property theft and forced technology transfers from U.S. firms in exchange for Chinese market access.

It calls for China to submit an “Action Plan to strengthen intellectual property protection” within 30 days of the agreement taking effect. The proposal would include “measures that China will take to implement its obligations” and “the date by which each measure will go into effect.” (Read the full agreement here)

Part of the deal also details a $200 billion increase in Beijing’s purchases of U.S. goods over two years as well as commitment from Beijing to allow companies to operate without “any force or pressure” to hand over their technology — that, along with the trade secrets protection provisions, are likely to have ramifications for the U.S. tech sector, where firms want market access in China but are also suspicious over how government officials can access private data stored there.

“If you put it all together, it is going to be a big boost for the U.S. economy. I’ll also make the point, this is going for China,” Willems said. “This really empowers those in China that want to reform their system, want to make it more market-oriented and help them move down that path.”

Ultimately, “better intellectual property protection means more investment in China,” he added.

Still, some experts have expressed concerns about how the U.S. would ensure China keeps up with its commitments. Willems said the promise of further reduction in U.S. tariffs in the second phase of the trade agreement would likely be an incentive for Beijing to “faithfully implement this agreement.”

Another option for Washington would be to convince allies to work with the U.S. to enforce the agreement in a multilateral system to make it more sustainable and prevent Beijing from backsliding from its commitments, according to Willems.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, property, trade, willems, boost, theyre, theft, white, negotiator, intellectual, going, beijing, china, cracking, agreement


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