Billionaire James Dyson reportedly buys $54 million penthouse in Singapore

The Wallich Residence is located within the Tanjong Pagar Centre (second from right), Singapore’s tallest building. British technology firm founder James Dyson and his wife have bought a luxury penthouse in Singapore for a record 73.8 million Singapore dollars ($54.2 million), according to The Business Times newspaper on Wednesday. The privately held company Dyson founded is known for selling $400 hair dryers and sleekly designed vacuum cleaners. The Business Times did not specify its sources, b


The Wallich Residence is located within the Tanjong Pagar Centre (second from right), Singapore’s tallest building. British technology firm founder James Dyson and his wife have bought a luxury penthouse in Singapore for a record 73.8 million Singapore dollars ($54.2 million), according to The Business Times newspaper on Wednesday. The privately held company Dyson founded is known for selling $400 hair dryers and sleekly designed vacuum cleaners. The Business Times did not specify its sources, b
Billionaire James Dyson reportedly buys $54 million penthouse in Singapore Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 54, james, wife, reportedly, million, singapore, dyson, wednesdaythe, buys, newspaper, business, penthouse, billionaire, records, times, wire


Billionaire James Dyson reportedly buys $54 million penthouse in Singapore

The Wallich Residence is located within the Tanjong Pagar Centre (second from right), Singapore’s tallest building.

British technology firm founder James Dyson and his wife have bought a luxury penthouse in Singapore for a record 73.8 million Singapore dollars ($54.2 million), according to The Business Times newspaper on Wednesday.

The privately held company Dyson founded is known for selling $400 hair dryers and sleekly designed vacuum cleaners.

The Business Times did not specify its sources, but local newspaper The Straits Times said it had reviewed documents revealing the purchase.

Official title records seen by Reuters show billionaire Dyson and his wife became tenants of the 99-year leasehold property on June 20. The records did not state the price paid, the wire said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 54, james, wife, reportedly, million, singapore, dyson, wednesdaythe, buys, newspaper, business, penthouse, billionaire, records, times, wire


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Huawei CEO says banks knew about the company’s allegedly criminal activities

Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei says the banks at the center of the U.S. case against his company were fully aware of the nature and activities of the business. In an exclusive interview with CNBC’s Deirdre Bosa on Wednesday, Ren said the banks “have full knowledge of all those business activities,” referring to the allegations of bank and wire fraud against Huawei and Ren’s daughter, Meng Wanzhou, who is also the company’s CFO. It’s the first time Ren has spoken publicly about the specific details in t


Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei says the banks at the center of the U.S. case against his company were fully aware of the nature and activities of the business. In an exclusive interview with CNBC’s Deirdre Bosa on Wednesday, Ren said the banks “have full knowledge of all those business activities,” referring to the allegations of bank and wire fraud against Huawei and Ren’s daughter, Meng Wanzhou, who is also the company’s CFO. It’s the first time Ren has spoken publicly about the specific details in t
Huawei CEO says banks knew about the company’s allegedly criminal activities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: laura batchelor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, daughter, case, ren, meng, ceo, iran, banks, allegedly, companys, wire, criminal, bank, activities, knew, fraud


Huawei CEO says banks knew about the company's allegedly criminal activities

Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei says the banks at the center of the U.S. case against his company were fully aware of the nature and activities of the business.

In an exclusive interview with CNBC’s Deirdre Bosa on Wednesday, Ren said the banks “have full knowledge of all those business activities,” referring to the allegations of bank and wire fraud against Huawei and Ren’s daughter, Meng Wanzhou, who is also the company’s CFO.

It’s the first time Ren has spoken publicly about the specific details in the case against Meng and Huawei.

Huawei and Meng are charged with bank and wire fraud and conspiracy to commit bank and wire fraud in relation to skirting American sanctions on Iran. Meng was arrested in Canada in December and is still there fighting extradition to the U.S.

The U.S. government alleges that Meng lied to HSBC and other banks about Huawei’s relationship with an unofficial subsidiary in Iran called Skycom in order to get banking services.

Huawei and Meng strongly deny wrongdoing. Ren added that one of the banks even met with Meng.

“My daughter was in a cafe and said something to the bank officials,” he said. “We have to talk to the person who had the coffee with Meng.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: laura batchelor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, daughter, case, ren, meng, ceo, iran, banks, allegedly, companys, wire, criminal, bank, activities, knew, fraud


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Michael Avenatti charged with ripping off porn star Stormy Daniels, trying to extort Nike in new indictments

Adult-film actress Stephanie Clifford, also known as Stormy Daniels speaks US Federal Court with her lawyer Michael Avenatti (R) on April 16, 2018, in Lower Manhattan, New York. While the Nike-related indictment was expected because it mirrors allegations in a criminal complaint executed against Avenatti in March, the claims related to Daniels were brand new. Prosecutors claim that Avenatti ripped off Daniels by taking payments for her book sales and paying her just half of what she was owed. “M


Adult-film actress Stephanie Clifford, also known as Stormy Daniels speaks US Federal Court with her lawyer Michael Avenatti (R) on April 16, 2018, in Lower Manhattan, New York. While the Nike-related indictment was expected because it mirrors allegations in a criminal complaint executed against Avenatti in March, the claims related to Daniels were brand new. Prosecutors claim that Avenatti ripped off Daniels by taking payments for her book sales and paying her just half of what she was owed. “M
Michael Avenatti charged with ripping off porn star Stormy Daniels, trying to extort Nike in new indictments Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ripping, star, wire, porn, indictments, client, lawyer, alleged, trying, nike, michael, theft, trump, avenatti, book, stormy, daniels, extort


Michael Avenatti charged with ripping off porn star Stormy Daniels, trying to extort Nike in new indictments

Adult-film actress Stephanie Clifford, also known as Stormy Daniels speaks US Federal Court with her lawyer Michael Avenatti (R) on April 16, 2018, in Lower Manhattan, New York.

Controversial lawyer Michael Avenatti was indicted Wednesday in separate cases charging him with stealing about $300,000 from his former porn star client Stormy Daniels, and with trying to extort athletic shoe giant Nike out of tens of millions of dollars by threatening to go public with claims the company was facilitating payments to the families of high school basketball stars.

While the Nike-related indictment was expected because it mirrors allegations in a criminal complaint executed against Avenatti in March, the claims related to Daniels were brand new.

Avenatti, who last year was mulling a run for the White House, is now charged in three separate federal indictments, including one pending in California related to alleged theft of client funds and other crimes, and faces the possibility of many years in prison if convicted.

According to one of the new indictments in New York, Avenatti allegedly forged Daniels’ signature on a document that gave wire fund transfer information to her literary agent, which helped direct the money paid out for the book sales to a bank account controlled by Avenatt.

The lawyer had become widely known and notorious last year for his representation of Daniels, who was paid $140,000 on the eve of the 2016 presidential election by President Donald Trump’s then-personal lawyer Michael Cohen to keep her quiet about her alleged sexual tryst with Trump a decade earlier. Trump denies having sex with her.

Prosecutors claim that Avenatti ripped off Daniels by taking payments for her book sales and paying her just half of what she was owed.

The indictment, which charges him with wire fraud and aggravated identity theft, accuses him of spending some of the money he allegedly swindled from Daniels on a lease payment for his Ferrari, travel expenses, dry cleaning and $56,000 in payroll at his law firm.

“Michael Avenatti abused and violated the core duty of an attorney – the duty to his client,” said Manhattan U.S. Attorney Geoffrey S. Berman.

“As alleged, he used his position of trust to steal an advance on the client’s book deal. As alleged, he blatantly lied to and stole from his client to maintain his extravagant lifestyle, including to pay for, among other things, a monthly car payment on a Ferrari. Far from zealously representing his client, Avenatti, as alleged, instead engaged in outright deception and theft, victimizing rather than advocating for his client.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ripping, star, wire, porn, indictments, client, lawyer, alleged, trying, nike, michael, theft, trump, avenatti, book, stormy, daniels, extort


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After Trump tweet, UK spy agency says claim it spied on Trump is utterly ridiculous

Britain’s main eavesdropping agency on Wednesday said allegations that it had been asked by the Obama administration to spy on Donald Trump after the 2016 presidential election were utterly ridiculous and should be ignored. Trump on Wednesday tweeted that a former CIA analyst, Larry Johnson, had accused Britain of spying on the Trump campaign. Trump said: “It is now just a question of time before the truth comes out, and when it does, it will be a beauty!” When asked about the tweet, a GCHQ spok


Britain’s main eavesdropping agency on Wednesday said allegations that it had been asked by the Obama administration to spy on Donald Trump after the 2016 presidential election were utterly ridiculous and should be ignored. Trump on Wednesday tweeted that a former CIA analyst, Larry Johnson, had accused Britain of spying on the Trump campaign. Trump said: “It is now just a question of time before the truth comes out, and when it does, it will be a beauty!” When asked about the tweet, a GCHQ spok
After Trump tweet, UK spy agency says claim it spied on Trump is utterly ridiculous Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, ridiculous, truth, tweeted, spy, utterly, spied, allegations, wire, tapping, agency, claim, asked, uk, gchq


After Trump tweet, UK spy agency says claim it spied on Trump is utterly ridiculous

Britain’s main eavesdropping agency on Wednesday said allegations that it had been asked by the Obama administration to spy on Donald Trump after the 2016 presidential election were utterly ridiculous and should be ignored.

Trump on Wednesday tweeted that a former CIA analyst, Larry Johnson, had accused Britain of spying on the Trump campaign. Trump said: “It is now just a question of time before the truth comes out, and when it does, it will be a beauty!”

When asked about the tweet, a GCHQ spokesman said: “The allegations that GCHQ was asked to conduct ‘wire tapping’ against the then President Elect are nonsense. They are utterly ridiculous and should be ignored.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, ridiculous, truth, tweeted, spy, utterly, spied, allegations, wire, tapping, agency, claim, asked, uk, gchq


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After Trump tweet, UK spy agency says claim it spied on Trump is utterly ridiculous

Britain’s main eavesdropping agency on Wednesday said allegations that it had been asked by the Obama administration to spy on Donald Trump after the 2016 presidential election were utterly ridiculous and should be ignored. Trump on Wednesday tweeted that a former CIA analyst, Larry Johnson, had accused Britain of spying on the Trump campaign. Trump said: “It is now just a question of time before the truth comes out, and when it does, it will be a beauty!” When asked about the tweet, a GCHQ spok


Britain’s main eavesdropping agency on Wednesday said allegations that it had been asked by the Obama administration to spy on Donald Trump after the 2016 presidential election were utterly ridiculous and should be ignored. Trump on Wednesday tweeted that a former CIA analyst, Larry Johnson, had accused Britain of spying on the Trump campaign. Trump said: “It is now just a question of time before the truth comes out, and when it does, it will be a beauty!” When asked about the tweet, a GCHQ spok
After Trump tweet, UK spy agency says claim it spied on Trump is utterly ridiculous Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, ridiculous, truth, tweeted, spy, utterly, spied, allegations, wire, tapping, agency, claim, asked, uk, gchq


After Trump tweet, UK spy agency says claim it spied on Trump is utterly ridiculous

Britain’s main eavesdropping agency on Wednesday said allegations that it had been asked by the Obama administration to spy on Donald Trump after the 2016 presidential election were utterly ridiculous and should be ignored.

Trump on Wednesday tweeted that a former CIA analyst, Larry Johnson, had accused Britain of spying on the Trump campaign. Trump said: “It is now just a question of time before the truth comes out, and when it does, it will be a beauty!”

When asked about the tweet, a GCHQ spokesman said: “The allegations that GCHQ was asked to conduct ‘wire tapping’ against the then President Elect are nonsense. They are utterly ridiculous and should be ignored.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, ridiculous, truth, tweeted, spy, utterly, spied, allegations, wire, tapping, agency, claim, asked, uk, gchq


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Tax extortion scams are skyrocketing, says FBI

The FBI received 51,146 complaints from people who reported losing $83 million to the scams, which have become highly automated and fast. D’Antuono says that he personally fielded five robocalls trying to scam him out of his tax and financial information on Monday. The scams typically start with an automated call to the victim’s cell phone, including a dire warning about taxes owed. We’ve heard a lot of reports of threats that they’re going to come to [victim’s] house, they’re going to arrest th


The FBI received 51,146 complaints from people who reported losing $83 million to the scams, which have become highly automated and fast. D’Antuono says that he personally fielded five robocalls trying to scam him out of his tax and financial information on Monday. The scams typically start with an automated call to the victim’s cell phone, including a dire warning about taxes owed. We’ve heard a lot of reports of threats that they’re going to come to [victim’s] house, they’re going to arrest th
Tax extortion scams are skyrocketing, says FBI Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: kate fazzini, sturti, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyre, extortion, skyrocketing, scams, tax, money, wire, irs, taxes, calls, phone, victims, scammers, fbi


Tax extortion scams are skyrocketing, says FBI

You’re not imagining it. Tax-related extortion schemes, many of which that start with robocalls and hinge on convincing you to pay taxes to scammers posing as the IRS, rose 242% year-over-year, according to the latest data from the FBI.

The FBI received 51,146 complaints from people who reported losing $83 million to the scams, which have become highly automated and fast. The data is collected and tracked by the bureau’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, known as IC3.

“We can’t arrest our way out of this situation because there are too many con men out there,” said Steven D’Antuono, section chief of the FBI’s D.C.-based financial crimes section.

D’Antuono says that he personally fielded five robocalls trying to scam him out of his tax and financial information on Monday.

The scams typically start with an automated call to the victim’s cell phone, including a dire warning about taxes owed. If the individual calls back, fraudsters then work to convince the taxpayer that he or she must immediately pay the sum.

Often, D’Antuono said, the scammers will provide the targeted person with a phone number that is supposed to be a local law enforcement or IRS office. In fact, it’s a fraudulent number leading to another criminal who reinforces the scheme. Victims send money in a variety of ways, including by wire or check. In some cases where victims were too scared to wire money, fraudsters have been able to convince them to buy gift cards and send the necessary information for the criminals to cash them out. He said some more recent versions of the scheme may also request victims make their payment in bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies.

A criminal can net a few thousand dollars in a single, successful theft, he said, and they have “gotten very, very aggressive of late. We’ve heard a lot of reports of threats that they’re going to come to [victim’s] house, they’re going to arrest them.”

D’Antuono said he expects many scammers will wait to ramp up the fraudulent calls until after April 15, when the majority of Americans will have filed their tax returns. That’s a natural time to tell people that they got something wrong on their returns and that the IRS is “following up.”

He emphasized that the IRS will never contact taxpayers by phone or email about any taxes owed, only by mail. Individuals should ignore the calls, he said, and report any unsolicited or questionable request for money to the FBI’s IC3 tip line.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: kate fazzini, sturti, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyre, extortion, skyrocketing, scams, tax, money, wire, irs, taxes, calls, phone, victims, scammers, fbi


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Tax extortion scams are skyrocketing, says FBI

The FBI received 51,146 complaints from people who reported losing $83 million to the scams, which have become highly automated and fast. D’Antuono says that he personally fielded five robocalls trying to scam him out of his tax and financial information on Monday. The scams typically start with an automated call to the victim’s cell phone, including a dire warning about taxes owed. We’ve heard a lot of reports of threats that they’re going to come to [victim’s] house, they’re going to arrest th


The FBI received 51,146 complaints from people who reported losing $83 million to the scams, which have become highly automated and fast. D’Antuono says that he personally fielded five robocalls trying to scam him out of his tax and financial information on Monday. The scams typically start with an automated call to the victim’s cell phone, including a dire warning about taxes owed. We’ve heard a lot of reports of threats that they’re going to come to [victim’s] house, they’re going to arrest th
Tax extortion scams are skyrocketing, says FBI Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: kate fazzini, sturti, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyre, extortion, skyrocketing, scams, tax, money, wire, irs, taxes, calls, phone, victims, scammers, fbi


Tax extortion scams are skyrocketing, says FBI

You’re not imagining it. Tax-related extortion schemes, many of which that start with robocalls and hinge on convincing you to pay taxes to scammers posing as the IRS, rose 242% year-over-year, according to the latest data from the FBI.

The FBI received 51,146 complaints from people who reported losing $83 million to the scams, which have become highly automated and fast. The data is collected and tracked by the bureau’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, known as IC3.

“We can’t arrest our way out of this situation because there are too many con men out there,” said Steven D’Antuono, section chief of the FBI’s D.C.-based financial crimes section.

D’Antuono says that he personally fielded five robocalls trying to scam him out of his tax and financial information on Monday.

The scams typically start with an automated call to the victim’s cell phone, including a dire warning about taxes owed. If the individual calls back, fraudsters then work to convince the taxpayer that he or she must immediately pay the sum.

Often, D’Antuono said, the scammers will provide the targeted person with a phone number that is supposed to be a local law enforcement or IRS office. In fact, it’s a fraudulent number leading to another criminal who reinforces the scheme. Victims send money in a variety of ways, including by wire or check. In some cases where victims were too scared to wire money, fraudsters have been able to convince them to buy gift cards and send the necessary information for the criminals to cash them out. He said some more recent versions of the scheme may also request victims make their payment in bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies.

A criminal can net a few thousand dollars in a single, successful theft, he said, and they have “gotten very, very aggressive of late. We’ve heard a lot of reports of threats that they’re going to come to [victim’s] house, they’re going to arrest them.”

D’Antuono said he expects many scammers will wait to ramp up the fraudulent calls until after April 15, when the majority of Americans will have filed their tax returns. That’s a natural time to tell people that they got something wrong on their returns and that the IRS is “following up.”

He emphasized that the IRS will never contact taxpayers by phone or email about any taxes owed, only by mail. Individuals should ignore the calls, he said, and report any unsolicited or questionable request for money to the FBI’s IC3 tip line.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: kate fazzini, sturti, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyre, extortion, skyrocketing, scams, tax, money, wire, irs, taxes, calls, phone, victims, scammers, fbi


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New wire fraud scam targets your direct deposit info paycheck

Around two or three times per month, KVC Health Systems, a mid-sized non-profit agency for child welfare based in Kansas City, receives phishing emails from criminals with the goal of re-routing an employee’s paycheck by direct deposit. The emails look legitimate at first, as though they come from the CEO, CFO or payroll director. “They might just say, ‘I need to update my direct deposit information,'” said Erik Nyberg, director of information technology at KVC. KVC has had a few near-misses, Ny


Around two or three times per month, KVC Health Systems, a mid-sized non-profit agency for child welfare based in Kansas City, receives phishing emails from criminals with the goal of re-routing an employee’s paycheck by direct deposit. The emails look legitimate at first, as though they come from the CEO, CFO or payroll director. “They might just say, ‘I need to update my direct deposit information,'” said Erik Nyberg, director of information technology at KVC. KVC has had a few near-misses, Ny
New wire fraud scam targets your direct deposit info paycheck Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fraud, deposit, paychecks, paycheck, phishing, version, targets, emails, wire, information, stolen, payroll, scam, direct, kvc, info


New wire fraud scam targets your direct deposit info paycheck

Around two or three times per month, KVC Health Systems, a mid-sized non-profit agency for child welfare based in Kansas City, receives phishing emails from criminals with the goal of re-routing an employee’s paycheck by direct deposit.

The emails look legitimate at first, as though they come from the CEO, CFO or payroll director.

“They might just say, ‘I need to update my direct deposit information,'” said Erik Nyberg, director of information technology at KVC. “Or they start with, ‘Hey, do you have a second?’ and if that target person responds, then they go from there.”

The fake emails defy many existing controls for malicious communications, he said. They are usually well-written, cordial and lack the misspellings, grammar mistakes and exclamation points that would trigger many popular email filters that search for spam or phishing attempts.

The scammer is trying to convince human resources personnel to change the bank account and routing information the employee uses to have paychecks direct-deposited. Once routed to the criminal’s account, the company is on the hook for replacing the stolen funds and the employee faces the inconvenience of a late paycheck. KVC has had a few near-misses, Nyberg said, but has not transferred any paychecks to scammers.

It’s a new version of wire fraud scams that have devastated businesses in recent years, and a more focused version of a series of payroll fraud crimes that the Internal Revenue Service warned late last year were on the rise. The fraud is growing, experts said, because it easily bypasses many existing technical controls, and the small sums stolen are inoffensive enough that they can be folded into the cost of doing business.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fraud, deposit, paychecks, paycheck, phishing, version, targets, emails, wire, information, stolen, payroll, scam, direct, kvc, info


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New wire fraud scam targets your direct deposit info paycheck

Around two or three times per month, KVC Health Systems, a midsize nonprofit agency for child welfare based in Kansas City, receives phishing emails from criminals with the goal of rerouting an employee’s paycheck by direct deposit. The emails look legitimate at first, as though they come from the CEO, CFO or payroll director. “They might just say, ‘I need to update my direct deposit information,'” said Erik Nyberg, director of information technology at KVC. KVC has had a few near misses, Nyberg


Around two or three times per month, KVC Health Systems, a midsize nonprofit agency for child welfare based in Kansas City, receives phishing emails from criminals with the goal of rerouting an employee’s paycheck by direct deposit. The emails look legitimate at first, as though they come from the CEO, CFO or payroll director. “They might just say, ‘I need to update my direct deposit information,'” said Erik Nyberg, director of information technology at KVC. KVC has had a few near misses, Nyberg
New wire fraud scam targets your direct deposit info paycheck Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wire, info, deposit, targets, version, phishing, paychecks, fraud, direct, kvc, stolen, emails, payroll, scam, information, paycheck


New wire fraud scam targets your direct deposit info paycheck

Around two or three times per month, KVC Health Systems, a midsize nonprofit agency for child welfare based in Kansas City, receives phishing emails from criminals with the goal of rerouting an employee’s paycheck by direct deposit.

The emails look legitimate at first, as though they come from the CEO, CFO or payroll director.

“They might just say, ‘I need to update my direct deposit information,'” said Erik Nyberg, director of information technology at KVC. “Or they start with, ‘Hey, do you have a second?’ and if that target person responds, then they go from there.”

The fake emails defy many existing controls for malicious communications, he said. They are usually well written, cordial and lack the misspellings, grammar mistakes and exclamation points that would trigger many popular email filters that search for spam or phishing attempts.

The scammer is trying to convince human resources personnel to change the bank account and routing information the employee uses to have paychecks direct-deposited. Once routed to the criminal’s account, the company is on the hook for replacing the stolen funds and the employee faces the inconvenience of a late paycheck. KVC has had a few near misses, Nyberg said, but has not transferred any paychecks to scammers.

It’s a new version of wire fraud scams that have devastated businesses in recent years, and a more focused version of a series of payroll fraud crimes that the IRS warned late last year were on the rise. The fraud is growing, experts said, because it easily bypasses many existing technical controls, and the small sums stolen are inoffensive enough that they can be folded into the cost of doing business.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wire, info, deposit, targets, version, phishing, paychecks, fraud, direct, kvc, stolen, emails, payroll, scam, information, paycheck


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Pope Francis on immigration: Political leaders ‘risk becoming prisoners of the walls they build’

Pope Francis said on Sunday that political leaders who want walls and other barriers to keep migrants out “will end up becoming prisoners of the walls they build.” “Builders of walls, be they made of razor wire or bricks, will end up becoming prisoners of the walls they build,” he said. “With fear, we will not move forward, with walls, we will remain closed within these walls,” he said on Sunday. On the plane, Francis repeated some of the key points of his views on migration. He said wealthy cou


Pope Francis said on Sunday that political leaders who want walls and other barriers to keep migrants out “will end up becoming prisoners of the walls they build.” “Builders of walls, be they made of razor wire or bricks, will end up becoming prisoners of the walls they build,” he said. “With fear, we will not move forward, with walls, we will remain closed within these walls,” he said on Sunday. On the plane, Francis repeated some of the key points of his views on migration. He said wealthy cou
Pope Francis on immigration: Political leaders ‘risk becoming prisoners of the walls they build’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-31  Authors: massimo valicchia, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prisoners, immigration, response, resolved, razor, francis, migration, plane, walls, risk, pope, political, build, leaders, wire


Pope Francis on immigration: Political leaders 'risk becoming prisoners of the walls they build'

Pope Francis said on Sunday that political leaders who want walls and other barriers to keep migrants out “will end up becoming prisoners of the walls they build.”

The pope made his comments to reporters aboard the plane returning from Morocco in response to a question about migration in general and about U.S. President Donald Trump’s threat to shut down the southern border with Mexico.

“Builders of walls, be they made of razor wire or bricks, will end up becoming prisoners of the walls they build,” he said.

Francis, who did not mention Trump in his response, has sparred with the U.S. president before over migration, which was a theme of several questions on the plane as well as during the trip to Morocco.

Trump has declared a national emergency to justify redirecting money earmarked for the military to pay for his promised U.S.-Mexico border wall.

“I realize that with this problem (of migration), a government has a hot potato in its hands, but it must be resolved differently, humanely, not with razor wire,” the Argentine-born pope said on the plane.

Addressing Moroccan leaders on Saturday, Francis said that problems of migration would never be resolved by physical barriers but instead required social justice and correcting the world’s economic imbalances.

“With fear, we will not move forward, with walls, we will remain closed within these walls,” he said on Sunday.

Besides the United States, migration has again risen to the fore of national political debates in a number of North African and European countries.

On the plane, Francis repeated some of the key points of his views on migration.

He said wealthy countries should help eliminate the root causes of migration such as poverty, war and political instability.

Migrants should be accepted, protected and integrated and if a country cannot handle the numbers, the migrants should be distributed among other countries, he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-31  Authors: massimo valicchia, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prisoners, immigration, response, resolved, razor, francis, migration, plane, walls, risk, pope, political, build, leaders, wire


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